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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:51 pm    Post subject: Mulcair trips fuel rumours of retirement from politics Reply with quote

(well not really news that Mulcair isn't going to run again and will retire by 2019 . if he were to leave early and force a by election in Outremont that would create a difficult by election for the ndp to deal with )


Mulcair trips fuel rumours of impending retirement from politics



Open this photo in gallery: THE CANADIAN PRESS

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair stands during Question Period on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on September 19. Mr. Mulcair has participated in three foreign trips since his exit as NDP leader on Oct. 1, joining parliamentary delegations in Andorra, Russia and Bangladesh.

Sean Kilpatrick/THE CANADIAN PRESS



Daniel Leblanc

OTTAWA


2 days ago

November 5, 2017



Tom Mulcair has participated in three foreign trips since his exit as NDP leader on Oct. 1, joining parliamentary delegations in Andorra, Russia and Bangladesh in what could be the final weeks of his political career.

The three trips, in addition to his participation in an official visit to China in July, have fuelled speculation on Parliament Hill that Mr. Mulcair is taking the opportunity to travel the world ahead of his widely anticipated retirement as an MP.

"For the first time in a long time, I am doing what many other MPs have often done, that is to use my experience and my knowledge while taking part in various international parliamentary delegations," Mr. Mulcair said in a statement in response to questions about his recent travels.


Mr. Mulcair has clearly said he will not run again in the 2019 general election, and he has talked openly about having had job discussions with various universities and research institutions. Still, the date of his retirement remains unknown, even among some of his closest allies.

All MPs are eligible to participate in delegations organized by various parliamentary associations, which make dozens of trips every year largely at public expense.



The foreign trips are widely seen as perks controlled by each party's respective whip. Mr. Mulcair is the only MP who has participated in all three of his recent delegations.

NDP sources said Mr. Mulcair, who has expressed his desire to act as a kind of elder statesman for the party, is building up his contacts around the world after being mostly confined to domestic travels during his five years as leader.

By spending time abroad, Mr. Mulcair is also making sure that he is not stealing attention from his successor as NDP Leader, Jagmeet Singh.

According to his office, Mr. Mulcair joined the Canadian delegation for the parliamentary assembly of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe in Andorra from Oct. 1 to 6. The meeting featured debates on "cybersecurity, climate change and the importance of education as a guarantee of stability," according to the official agenda.

Mr. Mulcair then went to Russia from Oct. 11 to 19 with the Canadian group of the Inter-Parliamentary Union, which held its assembly in St. Petersburg this year.


He is currently in Bangladesh with the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, his office said.

While he was still NDP leader, Mr. Mulcair joined then-governor-general David Johnston on an official visit to China from July 10 to 14. In addition to two ministers on the delegation, there were three MPs, but Mr. Mulcair was the only party leader.

Mr. Mulcair first won a federal seat in a by-election in 2007, and he was elected leader of the NDP in 2012.

After a disappointing result in the 2015 general election, he suffered a stinging defeat in a confidence vote at the party's convention in Edmonton in 2016. However, he remained leader and continued to grill the Liberal government in the House until he was officially replaced by Mr. Singh.

Mr. Mulcair has been coy about his exact plans for the future, although he has speculated about the possibility of joining a university after retiring from the House. He has also explored the possibility of working with law firms.

Mr. Mulcair was environment minister in the cabinet of former Quebec premier Jean Charest before he jumped into federal politics a decade ago.


"I am going to keep my seat for now," Mr. Mulcair told The Globe and Mail in September. "I am in very advanced discussions with a number of universities and research institutions in Canada and I am keeping those options open."

Mr. Mulcair added that he would "never [run] again at any level," while expressing a desire to act as an elder statesman in New Democratic circles.

"I hope to be the [former Ontario NDP leader] Stephen Lewis character who gets invited up to the stage [at NDP campaign events] to give a rousing speech in years to come, because I so firmly believe that we should finally get a government that others have only talked about," Mr. Mulcair said.

https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/mulcairs-travels-fuel-rumours-of-impending-retirement-from-politics/article36840486/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not surprising.

The NDP turfed him after the second most successful election result in their history;
I was surprised he even bothered to stay on as interim leader.

The Outremont By-Election will mark the official end of the NDP's honeymoon with Quebec as the Liberals winning with anything less than 50% would be surprising.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He was the guy whose belligerent awfulness tipped the election to Justin, imho.

I think the climactic moment was when the two opposition politicians were compelled to "cost out" their promises.

Mulcair presented an outline of a budget that was made up of categories of expense like "helping people". It was a farce, described by reporters as something written on the back of an envelope. but even that revealed that the $100 million promised various separate activist groups was the same $100 million. He was promising the same money to all these different groups. He didn't even blush. He just maintained his indignation that he was not PM until the end.

The Liberals saw how bad he looked, and they conceded they would project a small deficit, but, they said, they'd get the G-8's leading economy really going again. Was that a lie or a fizzled prediction? Whatever, it wasn't as naked as the other guy's lies, and it may even be defensible, largely due to Donald Trump.

Looking back, it seems like the electorate had already rejected Harper, after that bogus show-trial and the coordinated press coverage ... oh, and let's not forget the pliant judge who was conscious that the real purpose of the trial was to create headlines and justify Mulcairs sneering innuendos. Truly contemptible. (TC tells of that convicting Michael Bryant for something -- even leaving the scene of 'the accident -- had no reasonhable expectation of success, but that convicting the PM of bribing Mike Duffy did?)

To me, this is a man of unbridled ambition who made sneering suspicions and lies his whole politics. He reshaped the NDP, causing it to lose a chunk of its base, and began frittering away the gains in Quebec. (Thet aren't gone, but they will be.)

He arrogantly presented himself as the heir apparent, the next PM, created sympathy for Justin by displaying open contempt, and violated about notion of elementary justice in framing an entirely fictional case against Harper. He didn't lead the NDP to its second most successful result -- he failed to take the party to the next stage, yet required it sell its soul to get there.

"Judge not, lest you be judged." Well, if there's someone who deserves "judgement" more than this failed prosecutor I don't know who it would be.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Not surprising.

The NDP turfed him after the second most successful election result in their history;
I was surprised he even bothered to stay on as interim leader.

The Outremont By-Election will mark the official end of the NDP's honeymoon with Quebec as the Liberals winning with anything less than 50% would be surprising.



I'm surprised Mulcair has even stayed this long after the way he was dumped at the ndp convention .

but there might be some options available to the ndp to avoid the embarrassment of losing his seat in a by election .

- if he stayed till within 6 months of the next election they legally don't have to call a vote and would simply elect a new mp during 2019 election

- if new leader Jagmeet Singh ran in his riding , under parliamentary tradition the government isn't suppose to run a candidate against a new opposition leader seeking a seat ( the liberals didn't run candidates when Joe Clark , Stockwell Day or Stephen Harper ran in the early 2000's ) and if there was no liberal its doubtful bloc or cpc would be able to beat the ndp leader
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why do people discuss this without reference to MP pensions, and all the other rich benefits that flow to our elected representatives? Why is Mulcair expected to float above such considerations?

He chose a path where he draws a better salary that he could earn elsewhere, and where he fattens his pension far more than he could otherwise. One shouldn't eliminate self-interest or greed from a politician's possible motivations. Just because he's led the NDP doesn't mean he's a saint.
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Mulcair trips fuel rumours of retirement from politics

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