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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 7:24 am    Post subject: Trudeau blames the opposition for his own failures Reply with quote

( doesn't this seem like an entirely clueless and arrogant politician to come out which such a news conference and then to try and blame the opposition for his own failures , he owns the deficit and electoral reform was a liberal idea , he has no one to blame but himself )


PM Trudeau blames opposition for electoral reform failure, budget deficit




Laura Payton, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@laura_payton
.
Published Tuesday, June 27, 2017 12:32PM EDT
Last Updated Tuesday, June 27, 2017 5:29PM EDT

OTTAWA -- Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ended his second parliamentary sitting with a few parting shots at the Conservatives and NDP, blaming the opposition for stalling bills in the Senate, the federal deficit and his broken promise to reform the electoral system.

Trudeau held a press conference Tuesday to mark Parliament rising for the summer, taking questions on issues ranging from strong job numbers to whether he regrets naming independent senators.

Asked whether he still plans to get rid of the deficit by the 2019-2020 fiscal year, Trudeau didn't answer directly, instead speaking more broadly about the government's intention to strengthen the economy.



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a media availability at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Tuesday, June 27, 2017. (Justin Tang / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

"If you tally up the promises we made [in our election platform], it was about $10 billion worth of new spending. In our first year, our first budget as we put forward, we committed to about $10 billion in new spending," Trudeau said in Ottawa.

"We just went from a floor where the budget was balanced, because supposedly the Conservatives had balanced the budget, to what was the reality of our budget of being at about $18 billion in deficit the end of that first year. So we've been consistent in our plan and our approach," he said.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer, the federal watchdog charged with examining government finances, downgraded the country's fiscal outlook just after the Liberals won the 2015 election -- based on lower-than-expected growth. A separate PBO report cited the Liberals' decision to re-lower to 65 the age at which Canadians can claim Old Age Security.

Trudeau kicked off the press conference with an opening statement in which he thanked journalists for their work. He has repeatedly emphasized his "positive" approach to governing.

But it wasn't just on the federal deficit that Trudeau pointed blame at the Conservatives, who held power for 10 years before the Liberals won the 2015 federal election.

'A block of partisan Conservatives' in Senate

Asked whether he regretted kicking Liberal senators out of his caucus and appointing only independent senators, Trudeau said the Senate is taking steps toward the independence envisioned by Canada's founders 150 years ago.

But he singled out the Senate's Conservative caucus as a problem.

"This approach demonstrates less partisanship, more [independence] of thought. The fact that we are stymied a bit by a block of partisan Conservatives who vote against the government every chance they get, simply means there is more work to do to create a more independent and thoughtfully reflective Senate. But we are on the right track on having removed the knee-jerk partisanship from what is now the majority of the Senate," Trudeau said.

Last week, Senators slowed down the passage of the budget when they tried to amend it. Independent Sen. Andre Pratte initially tried to separate a controversial infrastructure bank proposal from the rest of the budget so it could be studied on its own, though the Senate later voted down the move.

The Senate national finance committee then changed the bill by eliminating a clause that will raise excise taxes on alcohol in line with inflation every year. The House rejected the change and the Senate sat on the bill -- at the behest of Sen. Peter Harder, the government's representative in the Senate -- for a night before voting to pass the bill as-is.

The Senate also rose for the summer without considering MPs' changes to bill S-3, a Senate bill that would remove some of the sexism in the Indian Act.

'The voice' of voters

Conservative Sen. Larry Smith disputed Trudeau's remarks. The opposition plays a critical role in holding government accountable and protecting Canadian democracy, he said in a statement.

"The Prime Minister's nomination process is no different than previous governments'. He simply added an online application and made public who would review candidates. All prime ministers make final recommendations to the Governor General," Smith said.

"In 2015, 5.6 million Canadians voted for the Conservative Party and we are the voice of those voters in the Senate."

It wasn't just the Conservatives who drew Trudeau's ire in his closing press conference. The prime minister blamed both opposition parties for his decision not to go ahead with electoral reform, a firm promise on which he'd campaigned and repeated following the election.

"I think there were ways to improve our electoral system in this country," Trudeau said, noting he preferred a ranked ballot so that any MP elected would have the support of at least 50 per cent of voters in a riding. Currently, the number of candidates running for major parties can mean an MP wins with less than 40 per cent support.

"We thought that was the right and concrete way forward. Nobody else agreed," Trudeau went on.

"The NDP were anchored in proportional representation as being the only way forward... The Conservatives wanted the status quo no matter what, and the only way to break that logjam would have been to do a national referendum on electoral reform, which I definitely don't think was in the best interest of Canadians."

"There was no openness to compromise in the other parties and I wasn't going to use my majority to bring in a system just to tick off a box on an election platform," he said.

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May says the Liberal MPs' dissenting report on a committee study of electoral reform never mentioned ranked ballots. She says it's Trudeau, not the Liberals, who wanted ranked ballots.

"I thought this prime minister wasn't about top-down dictatorship. On other issues, the prime minister defers to his cabinet members, but it's clear that on electoral reform, this was his personal preference without regard for the evidence," she said in a statement.

"There is evidence to show that the only system that distorts the intent of voters and 'misbehaves' more than [the current system of] First Past the Post is ranked ballots."

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3478395
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 7:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the sunglasses he's wearing in the picture just seem like a really odd thing to do , there's something untrustworthy about someone who feels they need to wear sunglasses when they don't have to )




'There was no path' to bring in electoral reform, Trudeau says about breaking his promise

Trudeau says he made the 'difficult but necessary' choice to break his promise because other parties refused to accommodate the Liberal preference for ranked ballots



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives at the National Press Theatre in Ottawa on Tuesday, June 27, 2017.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he made the “difficult but necessary” choice to break his promise on electoral reform because the other parties refused to compromise and accommodate the Liberal preference for ranked ballots, and that he’s always felt proportional representation would be bad for Canada.

At a news conference on Tuesday to wrap up the spring sitting of Parliament, Trudeau gave one of his bluntest answers yet on electoral reform. When asked if he felt bad about breaking his promise to end the first-past-the-post system by the next election, he paused for a few moments before answering.

“This was something that I felt, and continue to feel, personally, quite strongly about,” he said.

“Unfortunately it became very clear that we had a preference to give people a ranked ballot…We thought that was the right, concrete way forward. Nobody else agreed. The NDP were anchored in proportional representation as being the only way forward.”


I think creating fragmentation amongst political parties, as opposed to having larger political parties that include Canada's diversity within them, would weaken our country

- Trudeau


He said he’s been “consistent and crystal clear” throughout his political career that proportional representation would “be bad for our country.”


“I think creating fragmentation amongst political parties, as opposed to having larger political parties that include Canada’s diversity within them, would weaken our country,” Trudeau said.

And he said the Conservatives, for their part, were insistent on keeping the status quo.

“The only way to break that logjam would have been to do a national referendum, which I definitely don’t think was in the best interests of Canadians,” he said.

“So it was a very difficult decision for me to make the determination that even given my own hopes that we would be able to move forward on reforming the electoral system, there was no path to do that. There was no openness to compromise in the other parties, and I wasn’t going to use my majority to bring in a system just to tick off a box on an election platform.”

In the last election, Trudeau promised electoral reform without specifying a particular solution. An all-party committee of MPs then spent 2016 studying electoral reform, concluding last December that the government should hold a referendum to bring in some type of proportional representation system.
See Also Liberals call all-party electoral reform committee ‘radical’ and ‘hasty’ after it recommends referendum
Trudeau abandons electoral reform promise — no change to voting system in time for 2019 election

The government rejected it, with then-Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef calling it “hasty” and saying she was disappointed in the committee’s work. Shortly afterward, Trudeau dropped the electoral reform promise from the democratic institution minister’s mandate.

Trudeau spent a half hour answering wide-ranging questions from the media on Tuesday morning. Here are a few other notable quotes:

On the record-breaking sniper shot in Iraq, and whether Canadian forces are in combat there:

“The advise-and-assist mission that Canadian Forces are engaged in in northern Iraq has always had an element of defence, of obviously Canadian troops and of our coalition partners…What happened there is, first of all, something to be celebrated for the excellence of Canadian Forces and their training and their performance of their duties. But also something to be understood as being entirely consistent with what Canada is expected and Canadians expect our forces to be doing as part of the coalition against Daesh.”

On the Senate’s independence:

“The working of the Senate is actually beginning to be understood by Canadians, certainly by our government, as being significant steps in the right direction, consistent with what the actual founders and creators of our political institutions envisioned 150 years ago. This approach demonstrates less partisanship, more independence of thought. And the fact that we are, you know, stymied a bit by a bloc of partisan Conservatives who vote against the government every chance they can get simply means there is more work to do to create a more independent and thoughtfully reflective Senate.”

On the larger-than-promised budget deficits:

“Quite frankly, in our election platform, if you tally up the promises we made, it was about $10 billion worth of new spending. In our first year, in our first budget we put forward, we committed to about $10 billion in new spending. We just went from a floor where the budget was balanced, because supposedly the Conservatives had balanced the budget, to what was the reality of our budget of being at about $18 billion in deficit at the end of that first year. So we’ve been consistent with our plan and our approach.”

(Despite being asked, he did not answer about when he plans to eliminate the deficit.)

http://nationalpost.com/news/p.....5159102643
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

People seem to be noticing the emptiness of his responses to charges. His comments on his budget overruns are fantastic, but he gives no reason for them. Sort of observations on them. The way the supposedly practical wing of the Liberal Party would have it, the Wynne Liberals are running a balanced budget right now! They just pretend!

And the Federal Liberals are, behind the Trudeau faceplate, a lot of the McGuinty team.

How much can they hide behind the glittering smile and elegant smugness of Justin? Particularly when things are getting tough? Will people accept the web-spinning of Justin's Senate musings when jobs are disappearing and prices rising?

In a sense, their PR strength is that they have no plan, but they have tentative answers all over the place ... which they pull out something new no matter what happens. But the follow-through is something else. Plans are good because they allow effective management. And that's where they fall short.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As the CPC has been producing a document from the auditor general all day on nearly form of social media establishing they left a surplus its interesting the Liberals have opted for this direction.

Its the usual "hope no one check our facts" approach to failure.

In terms of Electoral Reform;
The Liberals gave up their majority on the committee for this moment.

By walking away from their majority on the committee assured there would be no consensus.

The NDP and Greens wanted PR, the CPC wanted no change and wanted a referendum on any change, and the LPC wanted ranked ballots. We knew all of this from the start.

They have a majority;
If they want to pass electoral reform they have the means.

They fact that they are not is squarely on them.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2017 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Facebook is full of anti-Wynne and anti-Trudeau stuff, much of it fact-based. There is more information about Hydro than you'll get in the Globe & Mail, often bullet points. They compared an Ontario hydro bill with that in Manitoba and Quebec, and the Ontario bill was $150 a month higher. This is only one example, a Facebook page for an organization.

https://www.facebook.com/NoLibs/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED.

There's more. The way social media works, stuff gets passed around a lot if it's got popular sentiment behind it. The numbers on that would be revealing, but they appear on my page because somebody has 'shared' them.

The interesting thing is, you almost never see a politician in these ads except as a target. The point of view is from Mr Everyman's point of view, confronting their governors with their incompetence and lies.

Trump is a real player in this field. It is said he can reach over 100 million people with his tweets! That's why he can call his media enemies 'fake news' -- and now CNN was caught creating 'fake news'. Trump has actually started a fight with the media -- something no normal politician would do -- and is starting to win!
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 29, 2017 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Justin Sinclair Trudeau's most recent press conference left a bad taste in Andrew's mouth. I expect this feeling is more broadly spread than they reveal amongst those pundits who take themselves seriously. How is a journalist to make sense out of his answers?

There will come a time when the reporters can't help themselves -- they will mock the PM. What they won't say is what is becoming evident -- this government is not going to deliver on giving us a more dynamic economy. They are running big deficits into the future when times are good. What will happen if times turn bad?

Everyone is starting to realize that these guys are failing.

Quote:
Andrew Coyne: Trudeau's petulant, tone-deaf performance a remarkable milestone
Until this week I don’t think any of us quite fathomed just how cynical Justin Trudeau could be

Until this week I don’t think any of us quite fathomed just how cynical Justin Trudeau could be. That he had broken several important election promises was well known; that his government was every bit as controlling, and as programmed, as its predecessor was every week becoming more apparent.

But Tuesday’s petulant, tone-deaf performance was still a remarkable milestone. As an exercise in executive blame-shifting, it may be without parallel. In the course of a single press conference, the prime minister managed to blame the opposition for his own decisions: to run deficits three times as large as promised for ten times as many years; to launch the Senate on its present collision course with the Commons; and to renege altogether on electoral reform.

The deficit, first. The prime minister may have promised to run deficits of no more than $10 billion for no more than two years, and to return to a balanced budget by the fourth. He may have instead delivered deficits of nearly $30 billion, with no end in sight. He may command a majority government, in a growing economy. But that should not be taken to mean he is somehow responsible for any of what has happened on his fiscal watch. Rather, it is all the Conservatives’ doing.

“If you tally up the promises we made [in the Liberal election platform], it was about $10 billion worth of new spending,” the putative prime minister explained. But — alas! — once elected they found they had been hoodwinked. “We just went from a floor where the budget was balanced, because supposedly the Conservatives had balanced the budget, to what was the reality of our budget of being at about $18 billion in deficit the end of that first year,” he added.

This is admittedly a familiar Liberal refrain, but it doesn’t get any truer with the retelling. That the Conservatives did indeed leave them a balanced budget for 2015-16 is not disputed by any serious analyst. The Liberals were only able to drag the final number into the red by some truly heroic back-dating of their own spending: a surplus of $7.5 billion through the first 11 months of the year became a deficit of — wait for it — $0.9 billion after the twelfth.

It is true that revenues came in less in the following fiscal year than the Tories had projected. But to blame the resulting $23-billion deficit — or the $29-billion deficit in the current fiscal year, or the $27-billion deficit in the next — on this is a stretch, to say the least. Compare: Budget 2015, the Conservatives’ last budget, forecast revenues for fiscal 2017 at $302-billion. Actual figure: $292-billion, a shortfall of $10-billion. Spending, meanwhile, came in at $291-billion, almost $17-billion over the original projection. So let us be clear on what, or who, was responsible for the deficit ballooning as it has.

On the Senate, whose transformation (in its own eyes at least) from a partisan patronage house to one filled with “independent, merit-based” appointees has coincided with a marked increase in belligerence, one that on several occasions has brought it perilously close to vetoing the elected House of Commons, the prime minister again accepted no responsibility. It may have been his decision to kick all of the Liberal senators out of caucus, or to experiment with a new, allegedly non-partisan appointment process. But the fault for whatever followed lay exclusively with the Conservatives.

“The fact that we are stymied a bit by a block of partisan Conservatives who vote against the government every chance they get,” he explained, “simply means there is more work to do to create a more independent and thoughtfully reflective Senate.” You understand, when the Conservative senators vote against the government — 70.5 per cent of the time, according to tabulations by the CBC’s Eric Grenier — they are merely being partisan. But when the prime minister’s own appointees vote with the government 94.5 per cent of the time, why, that just shows how independent and thoughtfully reflective they are.

But the most scandalous part of Trudeau’s performance was his response on why he had broken his promise on electoral reform. To refresh your memory: the Liberals promised the 2015 election would be “the last federal election conducted under the first-past-the-post voting system.” They did not specify what system they would replace it with. Rather, they would “convene an all-party Parliamentary committee to review a wide variety of reforms,” including ranked ballots and proportional representation. [....]
http://nationalpost.com/opinio.....9d62cb38a2
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
They are running big deficits into the future when times are good. What will happen if times turn bad?


Certainly a point worthy of discussion;
The situation with the current Prime Minister is largely a re-run of his Fathers time in office.

Economy is good, money is cheap, lets spend it.
For the 15 budgets that PET tabled he had 14 deficits (One was balanced with a minimum surplus);

Which wouldn't have been as much of an issue except that interest went from 4.75% (72/73) to peaks of 21.03% (Aug 81) and became a massive component of our budget.

Politically spending money wins you points;
The problem becomes eventually you have to pay for it and depending on interest it becomes a matter of how many times over will you pay for it?

Politically the Prime Minister has been effective;
The waters seem muddy enough that some voters are somehow convinced the budget wasn't balanced when he took office and fantasy tends to become reality during many political campaigns regardless of stripe;

However someone sooner or later is going to need to address this
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 05, 2017 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The thing is -- they promised a more dynamic economy would be the result of increased public spending on infrastructure. We aren't seeing that, even while the spending is already winding out of control.

This comes from the heart. The present Liberal party is controlled by or heavily influenced by the old McGuinty insiders. This is the bunch that didn't mind wasting $1 billion+ to win an election. They are zealots on the energy issue and they have left Ontario with the most expensive electricity in North America! The province will lose jobs and be saddled with debt into the future. Nobody really knows how bad Ontario will be in when the smoke clears. Right now, they are pretending to balance the budget.

So I expect the worst. This isn't a special antipathy to the Liberal Party, it's an antipathy to a bunch of talented opportunists who have grabbed control of the Treasury of Canada and for whom the Liberal Party is a mere vehicle.

Justin's bubble is popping. You can see it in the attitude of the journalists. They are growing bored with the empty answers, full of buzzwords and crafted to replace an honest fact-based response with an insight into his emotional concern, largely feigned.

If there are harder times coming, they will quickly lose patience.

That may not be such a big 'if' if you think we've been in a recovery for 8 or 9 years, and read the signs -- declining retail sales, backlogs of autos, stock market going to unprecedented highs, etc -- there's reason to think that some kind of slow-down is the most likely outcome, over the next twenty-eight months. But, with Trump rampaging around, it could be worse, even much worse.

All politicians have the same problem -- they pretend the emerging issue isn't of concern, while they feverishly try to figure out what to do about it. Trudeau's problem is his lightness of being. If the jobs start disappearing, he will sound trivial rather than reassuring. He is not good with serious questions about policy. He's the furthest thing from a 'wonk'. The longer the slow-down goes on, the worse it will get. His government will start shovelling money into showy but inefficient public works -- perhaps a high-speed railway between Windsor and Quebec City? People will start making 'Justin jokes ...'as the debt grows. All of a sudden, we're back where we started, threatened with a lowered status by the bond-rating agencies.!

That doesn't mean he will lose.

Honestly, to me, the Conservative Party has two obligations right now. First, they have to head off this train wreck and second, to innoculate Canadians from making this kind of electoral mistake ever again. We gave up G-7 leading management for a pretty face ... and got spiralling debt and lower performance out of it.

Based on the McGuinty pattern, if they get a second term, it'll be crazy. That's what I fear is unfolding.
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Trudeau blames the opposition for his own failures

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