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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 8:54 am    Post subject: Merkel in trouble in new German polls Reply with quote

( although I don't really know if the SPD would be any better or not ? are they just another left of centre party ? I really don't know )


GOODBYE MERKEL? Polls show Schulz closing gap on troubled Chancellor as Germany rebels

ANGELA MERKEL supporters are turning their back on the Chancellor and leaning towards rival Martin Schulz, latest polls have shown.

By Zoie O'Brien

PUBLISHED: 09:50, Wed, Feb 8, 2017 | UPDATED: 11:29, Wed, Feb 8, 2017


Germany's Social Democrats (SPD) has seen a surge in support since nominating European Parliament president Mr Schulz to take on the current leader.

SPD polled 31 per cent in a survey on Wednesday, revealing a rise in those backing Mrs Merkel opponents.

With just seven months before federal elections the figures reveal a problem for Mrs Merkel.

The poll for Stern magazine and broadcaster RTL was the first by the Forsa institute to give the SPD above 30 percent since October 2012.


Mr Schulz, 61, resigned from his EU presidency last month after earning more than £1million from the taxpayer in five years.

The SPD, which holds a minority share in Mrs Merkel's 'grand coalition' is now being tipped for a dramatic take over after almost two years of migrant policy fall-out in Germany.

The party, Mrs Merkel's junior coalition partner, has been trailing the conservatives for years in opinion polls and last won an election under Gerhard Schroeder in 2002.

Right and left wing voters have marched against one another for over a year with migration to Germany from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan being a devise issue.

A poll by INSA for Bild newspaper put the SPD on 31 per cent, and the conservatives on 30 per cent.

Mrs Merkel's approval ratings have collapsed after The Federal Ministry of Finance revealed taxpayers will be spending £37billion (€43billion) for 2016 and 2017 migrant budget to “meet the challenges of the nation-state” last week.


Bundestag politicians have instigated an ‘Asylum Procedures Acceleration Act’ in a bid to speed up the process of deportation.

Mrs Merkel’s party even called for a burka ban but in the wake of terror attacks and sex assaults in Germany it is feared it is too little too late for the Chancellor.

On Monday a different poll showed the SPD would beat Merkel's conservatives had an election been held that day.

Forsa head Manfred Guellner said: “We're not yet seeing such a decisive mood for change as we did in 1998 when Gerhard Schroeder was able to score points due to widespread weariness after 16 years of Helmut Kohl.”


The migrant issue in Germany has been a divisive one with voters leaning away from Angela Merkel


Mr Schroeder was German chancellor from 1998 to 2005, replacing the CDU's Helmut Kohl, who was elected West German Chancellor in 1982 and remained leader of a reunified country until 1998.

The Forsa poll put the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) in third place on 10 per cent while the Greens and the left-wing Linke were on eight per cent each.

The federal election is due on September 24 and Merkel reiterated on Tuesday that it would be the "toughest that I have ever experienced".

http://www.express.co.uk/news/.....turbulence
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the course of two weeks polling has had Merkel's CDU polling with a double digit lead over the SPD to losing by one.

I am a little reluctant to buy into that buy who knows.

Lets not forget the CDU & SPD are governing as part of a "grand coalition" currently.

What I suspect may happen is the CDU ends up with the most seats, but this time the FDP who is historically a CDU ally co-govern or you continue with a grand coalition as you have now.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
In the course of two weeks polling has had Merkel's CDU polling with a double digit lead over the SPD to losing by one.

I am a little reluctant to buy into that buy who knows.

Lets not forget the CDU & SPD are governing as part of a "grand coalition" currently.

What I suspect may happen is the CDU ends up with the most seats, but this time the FDP who is historically a CDU ally co-govern or you continue with a grand coalition as you have now.



I don't know how accurate these polls are , I have seen others that showed the anti immigrant party doing much better than 10 %

but I think overall there consistent in the fact Merkel is doing much worse than the last election , none of them have her doing better

Germany also has a weird proportional representation system and that pretty much guarantees coalitions of various parties , so its unlikely her party would be removed from power entirely
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Former non-voters could swing German election in favor of SPD, poll shows

The center-left SPD has been surging in polls since Martin Schulz announced he's running for chancellor, while Merkel's conservatives are losing support. A new poll shows growing SPD support particularly among one group.

SPD Kanzlerkandidat Martin Schulz (picture-alliance/dpa/K. Nietfeld)


Whether previous non-voters go to the polls could be the decisive factor in the upcoming federal parliament elections in Germany, according to opinion poll results published by German newspaper "Bild" on Monday.

Every fifth person who is planning to support the center-left Social Democrats (SPD) in the upcoming election did not vote in 2013, according to "Bild." In contrast, only every 10th person planning to cast a ballot for the conservative Christian Democrats (CDU) or Bavarian sister party Christian Social Union (CSU) stayed away from polling stations in the last election.

This comes amid an overall surge for the SPD following the announcement that former EU President Martin Schulz would be their choice of candidate to run for chancellor. Schulz will face off against sitting chancellor Angela Merkel, who is running for the CDU/CSU bloc.

Merkel, once uncontested as Germany's most popular politician, has recently struggled against criticism over her refugee policy, including from her own party.

Best SPD results in years

Another poll published by "Bild" on Sunday predicted that the SPD would receive 32 percent in the September election, while the CDU/CSU would get 33 percent; the best ratings the Social Democrats have received against the conservatives in years.

Berlin Bundespräsidentenwahl Merkel Schulz (picture-alliance/dpa/G. Fischer)
Schulz has sent Merkel's conservatives into a poll tailspin

"Since Martin Schulz announced his candidacy for the chancellorship, the number of people who did not vote in 2013 and are now planning to vote for the SPD has risen by roughly 70 percent in the last 14 days," Bild wrote on Monday. The number of previous non-voters planning to support the CDU/CSU has fallen by 30 percent.

The nationalist Alternative for Germany (AfD) - which brought the most non-voters to the polls in several state elections last year - also lost support dramatically. Forty percent fewer former non-voters expressed their support for the party.

Coalition likely

Up to six parties are expected to make it into the German federal parliament in the September election. If no party receives an outright majority - an outcome widely seen as likely - two or more parties will have to form a coalition government.

As the two largest parties, the SPD and the CDU/CSU have both staked their claim to run the next German government. They are expected to campaign against each other, even though they are currently running the German federal administration together in a so-called "grand coalition."

Four other parties are currently polling above 5 percent, the threshold parties need to meet in order to make it into the parliament. According to "Bild," the AfD is expected to garner 10 percent of all votes, the Left party 8 percent, the Greens 7 percent, and the pro-business FDP 6 percent.

http://www.dw.com/en/former-no.....a-37527944
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Merkel in trouble in new German polls

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