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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 8:06 pm    Post subject: CBC posts opinion article attacking Canadian taxpayers fed Reply with quote

( if you though you've seen it all from the CBC , read this piece of nonsense attacking the Canadian taxpayers federation of all groups . I haven't seen such a piece of partisan BS in some time . of course the CBC doesn't like a group like the CTF , or want any accountability over how they spend our tax dollars )



Opinion
Canadian Taxpayers Federation has 5 members — why should we care what they think?


By Dougald Lamont, for CBC News Posted: Oct 16, 2016 4:00 AM CT| Last Updated: Oct 16, 2016 12:01 PM CT

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation has no obligation to disclose its donors and it doesn't, writes Dougald Lamont.


The Canadian Taxpayers' Federation has been around since the late 1980s, selling itself as a populist "citizens advocacy group" looking to cut waste and ensure accountability in government.


They get acres of free coverage in newspapers and on local and national newscasts; their spokespeople regularly get more coverage than elected officials.
■Canadian Taxpayers Federation spurns idea of pop tax
■Carbon tax will cost Alberta families $600 a year, taxpayer group claims

Perhaps the CTF gets the coverage it does because it is seen as less biased than politicians — it is seen as advocating for taxpayers against all politicians, on the right and left.

The CTF's media presence is truly remarkable when you consider it has a membership of five people. You read that correctly: five.

This might come as a surprise, but the CTF is not now, nor has it ever been, a grassroots, member-based organization where anyone can pay $10 to sign up (or sign up free) and have a say in how the organization is run.

Instead, it has supporters — about 90,000 of them, who, like followers on Facebook, can like, comment, answer surveys and make donations, but they have no actual say in how the organization is run.

Why does this matter?

While the CTF's mandate is to hold elected officials to account, who holds the CTF's five members to account? Each other. Who decides who else can become a member? They do. It should be no surprise that the CTF has, as a result, faced accusations of being an Astroturf organization — a fake grassroots organization.

This has clearly struck a nerve, and on Aug. 22, 2014 CTF spokesman Scott Hennig published Setting the record straight: how the CTF is governed.

"From time to time, some folks claim the CTF is not a grassroots organization because we have 'five members,'" he wrote.

"The truth is that we sometimes have four, sometimes six and currently we have five. According to our bylaws we can have as few as three and as many as 20."

Hennig says voting memberships aren't allowed because the CTF was "designed by its founders to prevent a takeover by hostile groups."

The resulting "lean" organization doesn't get "bogged down in meetings, procedures and elections," which he considers a waste of donors' money.

hi-taxform-ipad-hands-852-8col
Lamont says there is an important distinction between the terms citizen and taxpayer: all citizens are equal while taxpayers are not. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Imagine the reaction if the CTF's usual targets (political parties, unions, governments) announced they were going to scrap voting and elections because they slowed things down too much and were a waste of donors' money — while refusing to disclose who those donors were.

By the CTF's own argument, it appears that it is not a citizen's advocacy group, but a donors' advocacy group. Hennig boasts the CTF has more donors than political parties — but political parties have thousands of members and volunteers, and elections have millions of voting citizens.

No obligation to disclose donors

Almost every MP has more constituents than the CTF has supporters. The CTF also boasts that it receives no government funding. But as a non-profit, it pays no taxes on the $4.7 million in donations it received in 2014-15.

Political parties and politicians are required by law to disclose the names of donors over about $200. As a non-profit, the CTF has no obligation to disclose its donors — and it doesn't.

Where donors live matters too.

In the 1990s, the CTF shuttered its Manitoba office because it couldn't survive without transfer payments from Alberta, but despite a lack of support, created a "Prairies" office that still hectors Manitoba politicians.

If all of the CTF's donors are still in Saskatchewan and Alberta, it raises the question of what business they have in telling governments in other provinces how to tax and spend.

The CTF's focus on donors indicates a deeper problem.

Since the 1980s, there has been a deliberate effort to reframe citizens as "taxpayers" and public spending as "taxpayers' money," as if taxpayers are shareholders.

Taxpayers vs. citizens

Journalists and politicians in every political party routinely use these terms without considering that this framing is anti-democratic. That is because politicians are elected by citizens, not just taxpayers.

The word "taxpayer" is not in the constitution; the word "citizen" is. All citizens are equal. Taxpayers are not.

It is self-evident that you can contribute to the economy and society without paying taxes.

Many citizens don't pay income taxes, notably children, the working poor and a few millionaires and billionaires.

Charities, churches and places of faith are all tax-exempt.
■Canadians aren't economically equal: We need to stop pretending they are
■NDP severances an insult to Manitoba taxpayers, federation says

Defining taxpayers as the only people who matter has real and serious consequences for policy.

It is not a politically neutral position: it is a fairly radical right-wing ideology that drives inequality by making the rich richer while neglecting the poor.

That is why the CTF's real membership of five people matters, as does its ideology. We don't have to care what they think, but we should be clear on just where they are coming from.


​Dougald Lamont is a lecturer in government and business relations at the University of Winnipeg and a long-time Liberal working in policy and communications.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3802441
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It reads like a shotgun blast at any independent organization which takes the point of view of taxpayers as its starting point.

It isn't well written or organized, but the editors let it fly. I wonder if we're starting a new 'narrative' ...
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The comment I found so odd from the article was:

"Political parties and politicians are required by law to disclose the names of donors over about $200. As a non-profit, the CTF has no obligation to disclose its donors — and it doesn't"

Do many non-profits in the political realm, or any any realm for that matter make it a habit of disclosing their donor lists to the masses?

The Broadbent Institute as an example protects "Any and all personal information you voluntarily provide is protected under the provisions of Canada’s federal privacy legislation"

http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/privacy

Its an interesting out although an apt one, but ultimately cause for them to seemingly not have a donor list online.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6295
Reputation: 229.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
It reads like a shotgun blast at any independent organization which takes the point of view of taxpayers as its starting point.

It isn't well written or organized, but the editors let it fly. I wonder if we're starting a new 'narrative' ...


its an odd piece , to note it was not published nationally but rather on CBC Manitoba , but word seemed to get out about it and it was seen by many other viewers

perhaps the CBC is feeling more empowered by trudeau's liberal majority and extra money that they have decided to go after some of their critics ? its unusual for a media outlet to just randomly go after an organization like this so viciously , there has to be more to the story that we haven't yet heard
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6295
Reputation: 229.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( according to the rebel the author of this post is an employee of a liberal mp from Winnipeg and a liberal policy advisor )



October 17, 2016

CBC hides partisan Liberal hit job against Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Brian Lilley
Rebel Co-Founder






The CBC wants to replicate the opinion pages of private newspapers and put them on the state broadcaster’s website but if what happened over the weekend in what amounted to a hit piece against the Canadian Taxpayers Federation is any indication, it won’t go well.



Watch as I explain the problematic aspects of the piece including their failure to tell you who wrote that piece.

The fact is, the CTF raised more than $4M from donors last year to help pay for their operations to fulfil their mandate of keeping an eye on how taxpayer money is spent by politicians. Clearly, the Canadian public supports them.

Unlike the CBC, the CTF is scrupulous about being non-partisan and not wasting donor money.


http://www.therebel.media/cbc_.....federation
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4157
Reputation: 239
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder if the Taxpayer's Federation is really 'in' politics?

It isn't connected with any party. I wonder how they look at Harper's record, which, after all, ran deficits most of his term.

It's more an adjudicator that throws light on some of the tax consequences of policy, and other questions involving taxes. They do the research (probably) because our media won't. And they have the expertise than our everyday journalists so conspicuously lack.

But otherwise, why are they doing anything more than the journalism the CBC wants to suppress? Why is it anything more than Government News throwing its weight around?
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