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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daphne Bramham: Justin Trudeau joins Burnaby South byelection circus


Even without NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, this byelection race a swirling stew of division over race, patriotism, sexuality and the less sexy issues of pipelines, housing affordability and the Liberals’ record.

Daphne Bramham
Updated: February 11, 2019


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the audience, pumping for federal Liberal candidate Richard T. Lee (right) on Sunday in the Burnaby South byelection campaign. Voters go to the polls in that riding and two other vacant ridings on Feb. 25. DARRYL DYCK / THE CANADIAN PRESS


Usually a federal party leader running in a riding is enough to spark more than a frisson of interest.

It’s certainly attracted the attention of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Ignoring the sometime tradition of not running a candidate against another leader, Trudeau is actively campaigning in Burnaby South this week.

Yet, even if NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh weren’t running there, the Burnaby South byelection race is a crazy one.

It’s a swirling stew of division over race, patriotism, sexuality and the decidedly less sexy issues of pipelines, housing affordability and the Liberals’ record. (That record got a little bit murkier last week with reports that Trudeau and/or his officials pressured former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould to intervene in the prosecution of Quebec-based SNC-Lavalin.)

Burnaby South is one of the most diverse communities in Canada. In Burnaby, there’s a 73-per-cent chance that two randomly chosen people will be of different ethnicities.


Chinese are the largest ethnic group at 38.7 per cent, followed by Caucasians (29.8 per cent), Indo-Canadians (eight per cent), followed by Filipinos, Koreans, West Asians, Latin Americans, Japanese, Indigenous Canadians and others.

The community is facing tremendous development pressure and housing affordability is the top issue for most voters. It’s also, no doubt, why trolls on social media made the false accusation that Singh owns a $5-million mansion.

Older, low-rise apartments are being demolished at breakneck speed. Between 2007 and 2018, 875 purpose-built rentals were demolished, according to Metro Vancouver. That’s displaced a large number of lower income residents, including many new Canadians, immigrants and refugees.

Replacing them are condo owners as well as those who can afford much higher market rents. The economic disparity is evident in Metro Vancouver’s 2016 housing data book that showed median household income for renters was $45,839 compared to the $80,492 median income of homeowners.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh opens his campaign office following the announcement on Jan. 13, 2019 of the upcoming Burnaby South byelection slated for Feb. 25.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh opens his campaign office following the announcement on Jan. 13, 2019 of the upcoming Burnaby South byelection slated for Feb. 25. Nick Procaylo / PNG

While one might assume that Singh — the first non-white leader of a national party — is the lightning rod when it comes to race, it’s the Liberals’ candidates who have drawn the attention.

Karen Wong resigned after a tweet that referenced both her Chinese-ness and Singh’s Sikh religion. She was replaced by Richard T. Lee, a former four-term MLA.

But Lee is attracting lots of scrutiny on social media with questions raised about his ties to the Chinese Communist Party with dozens of photos tweeted and retweeted showing him alongside high-ranking Chinese officials both here and in China.

This, at a time, when Canadians are jailed in China and Canadian trade targeted by China in retaliation for Canada’s arrest and detention of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, who is waiting out the U.S. extradition proceedings in the comfort of her own home in Vancouver.

Then there’s Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson. She’s running for the People’s Party of Canada, which is so new it doesn’t have a full platform.

What its leader (failed Conservative party leadership candidate) Maxime Bernier does espouse is getting rid of supply management (a totally irrelevant issue to most in this urban/suburban riding) and severely limiting immigration (a totally relevant issue here).

Although Bernier is a social liberal, Thompson is an arch-conservative host of a Christian TV talk show. She’s anti-abortion, anti-transgender rights and an outspoken opponent of the current sex education curriculum known as SOGI.

In Burnaby’s October school district election, Thompson got 12,390 votes, finishing third last among the 13 candidates.


Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson, a right-wing Christian and outspoken critic of SOGI, is running in the Burnaby South by-election for Maxime Bernier’s new party called the People’s Party of Canada. Facebook / PNG

In September, she attracted attention outside the courthouse following the first appearance of Ibrahim Ali, a Syrian refugee charged with first-degree murder in the death of Burnaby school girl Marrisa Shen. Thompson had been debating other demonstrators over Canada’s refugee policies when she claims a woman wearing a hijab threw liquid over her.

Independent Valentine Wu was once spokesperson for the Shen family. A former B.C. Green party candidate, the IT consultant told Burnaby Now that he has no platform and that his political opinions don’t matter. He wants to be a conduit for constituents.

And there’s Terry Grimwood, a 66-year-old political gadfly whose plans to form a new national party called Canada Fresh didn’t pan out in time for him to run as its leader.

He claims that he collected enough votes to run the Montreal riding of Outremont and that he failed to get enough signatures to appear on the byelection ballot in the Ontario riding of Leeds–Grenville–Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes.

Grimwood, who lives in Sechelt, told the local paper that he doesn’t think the byelection should focus on Burnaby issues.

The Conservatives have a credible candidate, but Jay Shin hasn’t attracted as much attention as some of the others, which may be a very good thing for a novice politician in a field like this one.

Shin immigrated with his family, who ran a grocery store in Burnaby. He has two undergraduate degrees, an MBA and a law degree. He practises business law and has taught at two Korean universities as well as in the University of British Columbia’s law faculty.

As for Singh, there’s been lots of talk about knives being sharpened within the NDP in case he fails to win. But how and what is Singh doing in the race itself? More about that in another column.


https://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/daphne-bramham-justin-trudeau-joins-burnaby-south-byelection-circus
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jagmeet Singh only party candidate eligible to vote in Burnaby South byelection


Other party candidates live outside the riding; Independent Valentine Wu lives in Burnaby South


Kelvin Gawley / Burnaby Now
February 11, 2019 01:30 PM


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh moved to Burnaby in November 2018, in anticipation of the upcoming byelection.

Photograph By Jennifer Gauthier


Only two of the six candidates in the upcoming Burnaby South byelection will have the opportunity to vote for themselves.

That’s because most of them don’t actually live in the riding.


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and independent Valentine Wu do, however, reside in south Burnaby and will be able to cast a ballot on election day, Feb. 25, or on one of four advance voting days: Feb. 15, 16, 17 and 18.

Conservative Jay Shin lives in Vancouver; Liberal Richard Lee lives in North Burnaby; Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson of the People’s Party lives in New Westminster and independent Terry Grimwood lives in Sechelt.

Singh moved to the riding from Ontario in November. He has said he’s renting a two-bedroom home near Gilley Avenue and Imperial Street with his wife.

To be eligible to vote in a byelection, Elections Canada says someone must "live in the electoral district where the by-election is taking place (from the start of revision – which normally begins on the fourth day after the by-election is called – until election day)."

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the Burnaby South byelection on Jan. 9.

At the time, Singh told the NOW he was “very excited” to make Burnaby his home. He has since said he and his wife have enjoyed settling in the community and getting to know their neighbours.

In a statement responding to a NOW inquiry, Lee said he has lived in Burnaby for 32 years, including 16 as the BC Liberal MLA for North Burnaby.

“As a community leader and MLA I've worked to make a real difference for the people in Burnaby, and as the Member of Parliament for Burnaby South, I would be a strong local voice for families in our community,” Lee said.

Shin has previously told the NOW he has roots in Burnaby South, despite not currently living there. He said he lived in Burnaby until 2004 and his parents still live there.


https://www.burnabynow.com/news/jagmeet-singh-only-party-candidate-eligible-to-vote-in-burnaby-south-byelection-1.23630493
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

York-Simcoe byelection candidates debate in Bradford tonight


Residents have a chance to ask questions of at least four of the seven candidates in the Feb. 25 federal byelection

about 2 hours ago by: Jenni Dunning



It is almost time for Bradford West Gwillimbury residents to head to the polls again to help elect a new MP for York-Simcoe, and there is a chance to meet the candidates tonight.

There are seven candidates in the Feb. 25 federal byelection, and at least four of them are expected to participate in a debate Wednesday.


The event will take place in the second-floor auditorium at the Bradford and District Memorial Community Centre, 125 Simcoe Rd., at 7 p.m.

Anyone wishing to submit a question to the candidates can do so on the Bradford Board of Trade website.

Former York-Simcoe MP Peter Van Loan retired from politics last fall, sparking a byelection.

The candidates are:
•Scot Davidson, Progressive Conservatives
•Shaun Tanaka, Liberal
•Jessa McLean, NDP
•Matt Lund, Green Party
•Robert Geurts, People’s Party of Canada
•Dorian Baxter, Progressive Canadian Party
•John Turmel, Independent


https://www.bradfordtoday.ca/local-news/york-simcoe-byelection-candidates-debate-in-bradford-tonight-1240683
paulalexdij





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
Louras’ campaign team, meanwhile, predicts widespread Conservative support in Quebec; however, it is wary of resistance in Outremont, which has never elected a Conservative MP. Jonah Presser, Louras’ volunteer coordinator and director of the election process, expressed optimism for an oncoming ‘blue wave.’


given that this riding did actually elect a tory in 1988, and given that the tories scored 12.7% of the vote as recently as 2006, anything less than that -- in a byelection -- would be extremely disappointing ...
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( advance polls start tomorrow and run until the 18th )


Jay Shin‏ @jayshin2019 · 8m8 minutes ago


Advanced Polls in the #BurnabySouth by-election starts February 15. Continues February 16, 17, 18. All days 12pm - 8pm. To find the right polling station, please go to www. http://elections.ca . #shinforthewin
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

York-Simcoe byelection candidates spar in debate — through rhyme


Six of the seven candidates in the Feb. 25 federal byelection answered questions on climate change, small business, and the Highway 400-404 Connecting Link in Bradford West Gwillimbury

about 19 hours ago by: Jenni Dunning


An Elvis tribute artist, a rhyming gambler, and a politician walk into a community centre.

It sounds like the start of a joke, but it became reality in Bradford West Gwillimbury on Wednesday night at a debate of York-Simcoe federal byelection candidates.

Six of the seven candidates sat at the front of an auditorium at the Bradford and District Memorial Community Centre, taking questions on a variety of topics, punctured by the independent candidate John Turmel standing up and boisterously yelling many of his replies in rhyme.

In his introductory statement, the self-proclaimed “bank-fighter extraordinaire,” who has tried starting his own political party three times and has faced gambling charges, recited part of a poem about how the late Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau ended interest-free loans:

“All governments must borrow now, new funds from private banks
And raise new tax to pay the interest, with bankers’ thanks
But worse, in 1968, Pierre lifted the cap
On interest from six per cent to 60, that’s the rap …
So, Oh Canada, Pierre Trudeau is responsible for debts out of control
By lifting rate cap and ending interest-free loans, his role
Oh Canada, sure could have offered all the living swell
But Pierre, in 1974, turned Canada from heaven into hell.”

Some members of the audience laughed during Turmel’s answers, while the other candidates sat silently, some smirking.

“I’m trying to stop financial waste. I’m the smartest man on Earth, and these people aren’t on the same side of the bell curve,” Turmel said, referring to his opponents. “You’re being scammed. I can’t be scammed.”

Elvis was in the building

Six candidates took part in the debate, while Progressive Canadian Party candidate Dorian Baxter, known as Elvis Priestley because he is an Elvis tribute artist and an archbishop at Christ the King, Graceland Church in Newmarket, sat at the back of the room with promotional materials.

He told BradfordToday after the debate he informed the Town of BWG he would be participating instead of the Bradford Board of Trade, which hosted the event.

“I’m disappointed I could not debate. It was an unfortunate error of events,” he said. “I used to live here. I thought I could really make some inroads.”

Baxter, a single dad who raised his two daughters in BWG, said he wants residents to know the Progressive Canadian Party adheres to the “Westminster model of democracy that says you never vote for the party, you vote for the person.”

“I’ve got all the qualifications to really represent this area,” he said, adding his Top 3 priorities for York-Simcoe are the full extension of the Highway 400-404 Connecting Link into outer regions of Georgina, immediate implementation of the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan, and more federal funding for seniors to improve retirement and nursing home facilities.

Is the byelection a waste of money?

All the other candidates took questions read by Bradford Board of Trade members on topics that ranged from climate change, to small business, to whether a byelection is a waste of money.

“Everyone gets very excited about a byelection. I don’t think it’s a waste of time,” said Progressive Conservative (PC) candidate Scot Davidson. “I think it’s a referendum about the Liberal government and how people feel about it.”

Several candidates pointed to former PC York-Simcoe MP Peter Van Loan, who retired from politics last fall, sparking the upcoming byelection, as a reminder of why residents are heading to the polls Feb. 25 only to do it all over again in a federal election this fall.

“(Van Loan) had a commitment, and he didn’t fulfil it,” said Green Party candidate Matt Lund.

“Peter Van Loan was elected in 2015 to hold his place for four years. If he had held on for another couple of months, we wouldn’t be in this position,” added Liberal candidate Shaun Tanaka. “We wouldn’t be wasting taxpayers’ dollars on something that was unnecessary, but here we are. I don’t think it’s a waste of time. It’s just unnecessary.”

She argued a Liberal MP is needed to work collaboratively alongside the current federal government, but other candidates suggested it was time to mix things up.

NDP candidate Jessa McLean said voters can “build momentum and fight for real change” by replacing their MP now.

“When Stephen Harper was in power for eight years, we had a Conservative representative that did very little to address serious issues. Send a message this byelection that we know the system is not working for us,” she said.

“There is no left, there is no right. There’s only the haves and have-nots,” said Robert Geurts, of the People’s Party of Canada, a party formed last September by former Quebec MP Maxime Bernier. “The solution is to send a lightning bolt to Ottawa (with a new government).”

Climate change

The candidates sparred about climate change, with Tanaka challenging Davidson’s comment the PC Party has a “climate change program” but it will not be released until months from now.

“I believe climate is changing … and we have to be take it very seriously,” he said, noting a carbon tax is “not the way forward.”

“It’s rich to hear someone say they care about climate change and say wait six months to see a plan,” quipped Tanaka.

Lund called climate change “the definitive issue for our generation” before piling onto Davidson’s comments.

“To Scot, who has said they’re saying our climate change plan is coming, I’ll believe that when I get to see Donald Trump’s taxes as well. If you need help drafting your legislation, I got a book for you: Global Warming for Dummies.”

McLean argued whether Canadians can afford a carbon tax is a “distraction” from neither the PCs or Liberals having a plan for climate change.

While climate change is real, “how are we going to (deal with it) if we’re all broke?” Geurts said, adding the government needs to give money back to Canadians so they can hold provinces accountable for the environment.

Highway 400-404 Connecting Link

The link is a “critical piece” for York-Simcoe, said Davidson. “It’s very important to me infrastructure dollars come into York-Simcoe. At the end of the day, those are your tax dollars.”

The NDP is committed to infrastructure funding, said McLean.

The candidate elected as York-Simcoe’s MP must work collaboratively with different levels of government to build the link, Tanaka said.

“We have made infrastructure and growth a top priority,” she said.

Geurts, however, took the stance that the link is not a federal issue, rather provincial.

“You can’t keep turning every issue into a tri-government issue,” he said, suggesting that makes it more difficult to hold individual levels of government accountable.

It could also mean the federal government could then be responsible for funding other provincial projects if it funds the link, he said.

Lund, a member of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, said the link is one of the organization’s top priorities and he is scheduled to speak about it in front of Premier Doug Ford in August.

“We’re trying to get this done for you now,” he said.

Turmel said the link could easily be funded if banks changed their interest policies.

“If we could program the Bank of Canada like it was before 1974, we could fund it interest free,” he said.

Small business

All of the byelection candidates said they had plans to help small business owners.

“We want to cut payroll taxes directly,” said Lund. “(That) is going to make it easier for employers to pay their employees. It’s going to make it a lot easier for employers to be able to help guide their companies and make their profits.”

McLean said the best way to help small businesses is the same way to help everyone else — increasing wages, making housing more affordable, and investing in Pharmacare will increase people’s buying power because they will have more money, she said.

“Our riding has one of the worst rates (of unaffordable housing) in the province,” she said. “Voters want to know what — what — is going to be done.”

Turmel said helping small businesses comes down to one thing: “I want businesses and citizens to have interest-free accounts” to increase the money in their pockets.

Tanaka, who operates a business with her husband, pointed to how the Liberals have lowered the tax rate for small businesses from 11 per cent, to nine per cent.

She said the Liberals want to “advance your interests” through every stage of life.

Geurts said his plan is to get rid of capital gains and increase capital allowance, as well as tackle “wage stagnation.”

Many millenials, he said, are finishing post-secondary education with tens of thousands of dollars in debt but are getting jobs that only pay $30,000 a year.

“We can help the millenials with a creative solution revolution.”

Davidson said he wants to be part of a “new Conservative government” to help small businesses thrive and increase opportunities for small businesses.

“Small business is a huge economic driver for the economy, (but) there’s small business people holding on by their fingernails,” he said.”


https://www.bradfordtoday.ca/local-news/york-simcoe-byelection-candidates-spar-in-debate-through-rhyme-1243979
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advance polling starts Friday in Burnaby South byelection


Staff Reporter / Burnaby Now
February 14, 2019 05:40 PM

It’s getting down to crunch-time in the Burnaby South federal byelection.

Advance polls open on Friday, with NDP Leader and Burnaby South candidate Jagmeet Singh and his wife Gurkiran Kaur casting their votes as soon as the polls open at noon at the Nikkei Centre, 6688 Southoaks Ct.

Residents of Burnaby South who wish to vote ahead of the Feb. 25 election date are able to cast a ballot in advance polls from Feb, 15 until the evening of Feb. 18, from noon until 8 p.m. at five locations across the riding.



These are the candidates for Burnaby South, according to Elections Canada:
• Terry Grimwood, independent
• Richard Lee, Liberal Part of Canada
• Jay Shin, Conservative Party of Canada
• Jagmeet Singh, New Democratic Party of Canada
• Laura-Lynn Thompson, People’s Party of Canada
• Valentine Wu, independent

More information about advance voting and the locations can be found at elections.ca.

https://www.burnabynow.com/news/advance-polling-starts-friday-in-burnaby-south-byelection-1.23635167
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( bernier also appears to be making a second campaign stop in Outremont although I'd personally have low expectations for them in the by elections , new parties typically don't do well at the start )



PPC HQ - People's Party of Canada‏ @peoplespca · 11h11 hours ago


*LUNCH IN OUTREMONT*
Come meet @MaximeBernier and our candidate in Outremont @sealejames this Saturday at a fundraising lunch to support his candidacy.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( advance polls are now open in the 3 by election ridings and run for 4 days )


Advance Voting in Federal By-elections Begins Friday

News Release

Gatineau, Wednesday, February 13, 2019

•Advance voting for the federal by-elections in Burnaby South (British Columbia), Outremont (Quebec) and York–Simcoe (Ontario) begins on Friday, February 15, and continues on Saturday, February 16; Sunday, February 17; and Monday, February 18.

•Advance polls are open from 12:00 noon to 8:00 p.m. (local time).

•Electors can find the address of their advance voting location on the back of their voter information card. They can also visit elections.ca or call 1-800-463-6868.

•To vote, electors must show proof of identity and address. The list of accepted pieces of identification is online.

•The voter information card is not an authorized piece of identification, but we encourage electors to bring it with them for faster service at the polls.

Elections Canada is an independent, non-partisan agency that reports directly to Parliament.

Information:
Elections Canada Media Relations
1-877-877-9515
elections.ca


http://www.elections.ca/conten.....amp;lang=e
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

paulalexdij wrote:
RCO wrote:
Louras’ campaign team, meanwhile, predicts widespread Conservative support in Quebec; however, it is wary of resistance in Outremont, which has never elected a Conservative MP. Jonah Presser, Louras’ volunteer coordinator and director of the election process, expressed optimism for an oncoming ‘blue wave.’


given that this riding did actually elect a tory in 1988, and given that the tories scored 12.7% of the vote as recently as 2006, anything less than that -- in a byelection -- would be extremely disappointing ...



88 was a funky year for the pc's in Quebec , I don't know if that will ever be repeated


the conservatives would of likely loved a by election in Quebec rate now but in just about any riding other than Outremont . there is lots of other ridings that might of got really interesting and had potential for the conservatives


but Outremont is so left wing and downtown Montreal , my guess would be they'd get around 10 % of the vote or slightly better , depending on what becomes of the ndp vote and Bloc vote
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

paulalexdij wrote:
RCO wrote:
Louras’ campaign team, meanwhile, predicts widespread Conservative support in Quebec; however, it is wary of resistance in Outremont, which has never elected a Conservative MP. Jonah Presser, Louras’ volunteer coordinator and director of the election process, expressed optimism for an oncoming ‘blue wave.’


given that this riding did actually elect a tory in 1988, and given that the tories scored 12.7% of the vote as recently as 2006, anything less than that -- in a byelection -- would be extremely disappointing ...


I tend to agree;

Polling has suggest that the CPC may be ahead of the BQ and NDP in second place within the Province, while the Tories should be destroyed in this riding if they finished in and around the low double digits it may lend some credibility to the fact that they may be view as the secondary party in the Province.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh votes in advance byelection

The Burnaby South byelection takes place Feb. 25
The Canadian Press/
Feb. 15, 2019 3:48 p.m./
News



NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says he is taking nothing for granted as he continues to work hard to win a byelection in Burnaby, B.C., and gain a seat in Parliament.

Singh made the comments after voting for himself in an advance poll on Friday ahead of the Feb. 25 byelection in Burnaby South.

Asked whether recent Liberal government turmoil has helped his chances, he says Canadians are very disappointed with what’s happening.

He says they’re troubled by the allegation that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould to drop criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin.


Trudeau has denied his office directed Wilson-Raybould and said Friday that the departure of former Treasury Board president Scott Brison necessitated a cabinet shuffle that prompted her move to Veteran’s Affairs.

Singh says he is confident he will win in Burnaby South because he’s working his hardest to connect with people to let them know he’s on their side and fighting for a better Canada.

“We’re going to go to Ottawa. We’re going to put some pressure on this government. We’re going to make sure they start investing in building housing, making our medication more affordable and actually push them to implement a universal medication coverage plan,” he said.

“We want to see action on the environment. These are some of our priorities.”

Liberal Richard T. Lee, Conservative Jay Shin and People’s Party of Canada candidate Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson are also running in Burnaby South. The New Democrats beat the Liberals by just over 500 votes in the riding in the 2015 election.

https://www.columbiavalleypioneer.com/news/ndp-leader-jagmeet-singh-votes-in-advance-byelection/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

by election update

3 days of advance voting are now finished with Monday being the last day to vote until the 25 th

elections Canada has yet to release turnout numbers , likely interest the highest in Burnaby South with Outremont the lowest , turnout in York Simcoe is a wildcard as advance polls occurred during the family day long weekend and unclear if people were interested or not


no leaders visited the ridings this weekend


Trudeau has been to all 3 at least once and unclear if he will visit any of them again


Scheer has been to Outremont and Burnaby South but not York Simcoe ( the riding the tories are most likely to actually win )


Singh has not left Burnaby South since by election called and unlikely to visit the other 2 by elections

Elizabeth May does not appear to have visited any of the 3 ridings

Bernier has been to Outremont and York Simcoe and I believe he has plans to be in BC later this week
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( elections Canada has released turnout figures , not sure they tell us much , highest turnout was in Burnaby with the other 2 close to 4000 votes each , all 3 were much less than 2015 which was expected )


Preliminary Turnout Figures from Advance Polls in
Federal By-elections Now Available

News Release

GATINEAU, Tuesday, February 19, 2019

•Preliminary figures indicate that 13,540 electors voted at the advance polls for the by‑elections in Burnaby South (British Columbia), Outremont (Quebec) and York–Simcoe (Ontario).
•As these figures are preliminary, they may differ from the official turnout results.
•The table below shows the number of electors who voted at advance polls in the current by‑elections and those who did so in the 42nd general election in 2015.


Electoral District

Preliminary Number of Voters at Advance Polls in Current By‑election

Official Number of Voters at Advance Polls in 42nd General Election

Burnaby South 5,462 - 9,376

Outremont 3,795 - 8,945

York–Simcoe 4,283 - 7,505

Elections Canada is an independent, non-partisan agency that reports directly to Parliament.

Information:
Elections Canada Media Relations
1-877-877-9515
elections.ca


http://www.elections.ca/conten.....amp;lang=e
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2019 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advance poll numbers don't show massive early turnout for Burnaby South vote



Byelections will be held Monday in Burnaby South, Outremont and York–Simcoe




Éric Grenier · CBC News · Posted: Feb 19, 2019 5:15 PM ET | Last Updated: February 19


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh was one of 5,462 people who voted in the Burnaby South advance poll over the weekend. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)


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NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is fighting for his political life in Monday's federal byelection in Burnaby South, spending the last few weeks campaigning in the riding to win himself his first seat in the House of Commons.

Voters don't seem to share his sense of urgency, however. New figures from Elections Canada put advance voting over the weekend on track with other byelections held over the last few years — byelections that didn't feature a national leader on the ballot.

Three byelections are taking place Monday in the ridings of Burnaby South in B.C., Outremont in Quebec and York–Simcoe in Ontario. Voters in the three ridings had the chance to cast their ballots early over four days between Feb. 15 and 18.


According to the advance polling figures released by Elections Canada Tuesday, Burnaby South boasted modestly higher turnout figures than the other two ridings, with 5,462 voters tramping out to the polls over the weekend.

York–Simcoe was next with 4,283, followed by Outremont at 3,795. When rendered as a share of the last tally of eligible voters (the list of electors is revised when new byelections take place), Outremont's advance polling turnout narrowly edged out York–Simcoe at 5.4 to 5.2 per cent.


For Burnaby South, that number was 7.2 per cent. In 2015, Burnaby South also had a higher number of people voting in the advance poll than either Outremont or York–Simcoe. As a share of all voters, advance turnout in 2015 was 12.3 per cent in Burnaby South — lower than Outremont's 12.6 per cent but higher than York–Simcoe's 9.9 per cent.

That suggests that while Burnaby South is punching a little above its weight in advance voting — an indication of some interest on the part of voters — it isn't a notably high number. Four byelections held since 2015 have had higher advance turnout, including two that flipped from one party to another and two that weren't particularly competitive.

The low turnout in Outremont — scene of Tom Mulcair's historic breakthrough for the NDP in a 2007 byelection — also signals that voters aren't taking an abnormally keen interest in these votes.

Byelection turnout typically is much lower than in general elections. It has averaged just under 34 per cent since 1997, while turnout has averaged just over 63 per cent in general elections. The new advance turnout figures in Burnaby South, Outremont and York–Simcoe suggest that these three ridings look to be about on track for that level of voter participation as well.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/byelections-advance-turnout-1.5025095
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