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Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Legault wants nothing to do with oil pipelines other premiers crave
"There are some who maybe will want to talk about petroleum. I am going to talk to them about hydro electricity."

PHILIP AUTHIER, MONTREAL GAZETTE Updated: December 7, 2018

Premier François Legault said he doesn’t want to hear any more talk about oil pipelines crossing Quebec because the issue is no longer socially acceptable.

Arriving for what is shaping up to be an acrimonious meeting of Canada’s first ministers in Montreal and where some of his counterparts want oil moved up on the agenda, Legault signalled that it’s a nonstarter for Quebec.

“There are some who maybe will want to talk about petroleum. I am going to talk to them about hydro electricity,” Legault said arriving at the downtown Sheraton Hotel for meetings.

Asked more specifically if he has any interest in resurrecting the failed Energy East pipeline proposal which TransCanada abandoned last year citing regulatory hurdles — and which was staunchly opposed in Quebec — Legault slammed the door.

“There’s no social acceptability (for oil) in Quebec,” Legault told reporters continuing to polish his government’s less than green image in the face of Quebec’s growing climate-action movement.

But as the premiers gathered Wednesday evening for dinner at Marvin’s in Park Extension, there were lingering signs of a spat over the focus of their meeting Friday with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Trudeau is the one who invited them to the restaurant, which is in his home riding of Papineau.

In the last few hours, some of the premiers complained about the draft federal agenda for the meeting because they say it is too tilted to Ottawa’s priorities.

Legault confirmed the premiers’ beefs himself, mentioning many found there was too much time for presentations and not enough time for premiers to “express themselves.”

And many of them appear ready to give Trudeau an earful. On Thursday, Ontario Premier Doug Ford threatened to walk out of the meeting if the agenda was not changed to specifically include the federal carbon tax which he opposes.

Ford later dropped the idea of walking out, telling reporters he hopes the federal-provincial meeting results in “constructive dialogue.”

“We want to be sure the agenda is about exactly what we want to talk about,” Ford told reporters arriving in Montreal, adding he didn’t feel like being “lectured” at by Trudeau’s ministers Friday afternoon when their meeting takes place at the Marriott Château Champlain.

“We want to talk about things important to our provinces,” he said.

Trudeau responded saying he is always ready to sit down and talk. [....]
https://montrealgazette.com/news/quebec/legault-wants-nothing-to-do-with-oil-pipelines-other-premiers-crave
===============================================
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alberta answers back ...
================================================

Alberta’s fury is aimed at Quebec (again)
Gary Mason
GARY MASON NATIONAL AFFAIRS COLUMNIST
VANCOUVER
UPDATED DECEMBER 11, 2018

The howls of outrage were as certain, and predictable, as winter snow on the prairies.

It happens each time the federal government reveals how much funding have-not provinces such as Quebec will receive under the national equalization program – Alberta goes ballistic. And with oil-price angst running at new highs and a provincial election around the corner, the fury emanating from Wild Rose country has been a sight to behold.

Perhaps no one has embodied the righteous indignation that is almost defining Alberta at the moment more than Jason Kenney, Leader of the United Conservative Party and the best bet to become premier after next spring’s election.

Yes, the fun may only be beginning.

The federal Finance Ministry recently revealed details of next year’s transfer levels, and they showed, among other things, that Quebec will receive $13.1-billion – which represents a $1.4-billion increase from the previous year and two-thirds of the total amount in the equalization pot.

This has become an increasingly bitter pill for people in Alberta to swallow for two reasons: the oil industry is in the tank right now and Quebec is against the Energy East pipeline going ahead. Quebec Premier François Legault inflamed the situation by saying last week he’s not “ashamed at all of refusing dirty energy.” (Emphasis added)

A needless and thoughtless provocation under the present circumstances, to be sure.

This, of course, set Mr. Kenney off. He rarely needs an excuse to go after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and this was fodder too rich and tasty to pass up. So to Twitter he took: “PM Trudeau gave Quebec a veto over any future Energy East Pipeline. Premier Legault exercised that veto, saying oil is ‘not socially acceptable in Quebec.’ Now QC gets $1.4 billion more in equalization for a total of $13 billion, thanks in part to Alberta’s oil industry.”

“Albertans are generous,” he said in another tweet. “But we shouldn’t be taken for suckers.”

Mr. Kenney would have known, likely as he tweeted those words, that is not true. Perhaps in a post-truth world, that doesn’t matter. The federal government didn’t give Quebec a veto over Energy East. The reason the project died was because Ottawa brought in new, tougher environmental regulations the proponent didn’t like so it walked away.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-albertas-fury-is-aimed-at-quebec-again/
=================================================

This looks like the next big fight that Trudeau gang are going to get into. This is what split the country in the elder Trudeau's term.

My thought: if they get into ths fight before the election, what will they do after the election?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2018 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pipeline protests in Calgary ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_zM87Xj-GM

Watch Scheer ... will he stay in the background, or will he speak out for the West?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A month later --

Six-in-ten Canadians say lack of new pipeline capacity represents a crisis in this country
Six-in-ten Canadians say lack of new pipeline capacity represents a crisis in this country. Half say Trudeau government has been doing “too little” to build new capacity

January 16, 2019 – Against the backdrop of an election year, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is facing increasing pressure amid calls to move faster and more forcefully to complete a new oil pipeline in this country.

That pressure is underscored in new public opinion data from the Angus Reid Institute that shows six-in-ten Canadians say the lack of new pipeline capacity constitutes a “crisis”, while half say the Trudeau government has done “too little” to ensure new capacity is built.

This latest polling finds Canadians polarized along regional lines, with residents of Alberta overwhelmingly taking the view that the situation is a crisis. Where British Columbians are divided, Quebecers take an opposite view.

Regional and provincial divisions are also evident on questions of whether provinces west of Ontario are seen to have an adequate amount of influence and power in confederation.

These questions – and more – are canvassed in a wide ranging, four-part study exploring and measuring the nature and dynamics of Western Canadian identity, the way people in different parts of the country view each other and their institutions, and the depth to which feelings of alienation in certain parts of Canada are felt.

More Key Findings:
* Oil and gas are chosen as a critical industry by two-thirds of Canadians (65%) – the highest total among seven industries canvassed
* Seven-in-ten (69%) say the country will face considerable impact if no new pipeline capacity is built. Canadians are less likely to say an impact will be felt at the provincial level (58%) or within their own households (35%)
* Half of Canadians (53%) say they support both the Energy East and TransMountain pipeline projects. One-in-five say they oppose both (19%), while a handful support one or the other in isolation
* The highest numbers of Canadians say agriculture (47%) and oil and gas (46%) are industries that should receive more federal attention, well ahead of the third priority: technology and IT (28%) [....]
http://angusreid.org/western-canada-pipelines/
=================================================

Despite scattered protests throughout Alberta, and the "yellow-jacket" thing catching on. the media seems to have put this issue in a black hole. But this is the issue where the concrete incompetence of this regime shows the worst. It quickly backs up in the form of lost jobs.

It's fabulous, how the reporters can describe the electorate as 'volatile' and not understand that this 'volatility' is really a reaction to bad policy amongst people who feel they have no representation.

Do we have one politician in this country that can give voice to these people?
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Based on the way that Legault has operated over the course of the last few years, I have to wonder if this is about him being a Social Justice Warrior or if he just wants a better deal.

Energy East isn't a great deal for the Province as it sits;
You take a lot of risk and get a bunch of short term construction jobs, but then what?

The Pipeline was going to bring Oil to the Canaport Facility in New Brunswick which in term was going to generate a bunch of higher wage jobs in the region.

I would imagine in Quebec voters are either against it or apathetic towards the topic because of the minimal benefit and what's Legault intensive to go to the mat on an issue the current Federal Government would never green light the project to begin with?

If an agreeable government is in place in Ottawa and lets say there was a stop a long the pipeline in Levis, Quebec or better yet a new development further up the St. Lawrence for the purpose of refining, how hard is Legault fighting it then?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The problem is one of national benefit. When oil prices dropped, we lost a nickel off our dollar. It means imports are that much more expensive. And anything else that's sold to us at global prices, like gasoline.

Quebec would have the benefit of not having trainloads of oil being shipped to the refinery and all the accidents that could happen with that.

The problem is also evident in BC. Both provinces want to do what the aboriginal groups do -- extract a toll on the shipment of oil.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sure,
There is a whole bunch of benefits that Quebec will benefit from if Energy East went along its original path and ended up in New Brunswick

However, you have a government in Ottawa with no interest in the project and there is no benefit for Legault to come out in favor now when he could wait for a Government with the interest to build it who needs his buy in and then shake them down.

If the deal is some of the refining has to happen in Quebec or no Pipeline at all, I can't imagine refining doesn't occur in Quebec.

They hold all the cards to get this done and Legault knows that.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Alberta view

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DR0eFWXP8fE
queenmandy85





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alberta understandably, wants pipelines. They get all the benefit. BC doesn't want the pipeline because they get no benefit but take all the risk.
If the Trans Mountain line begins construction in the spring, how soon will oil begin to flow? 2years, 5 years?
In this country, we have a tradition of moving to where the jobs are. People on the Rock got jobs in Alberta and Saskatchewan. I moved first to the Yukon, and then to Saskatchewan to work. That's where the jobs were. If your town is dying, you are not a prisoner. I hear all this whining about all the jobs going to Ontario and Quebec. If that's how you feel, get off your ass and move there.
One of the few actually profound statements Pierre Trudeau ever said, " We are a nation of bitchers."
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