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cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
Watching Mulcair revel in the collapse of the party he led has been the most entertaining thing about the last year of Canadian Politics.


I know Muclair seems to have deep resentment towards the ndp at the moment , he's already predicted they lose his old riding and basically come out and said Singh was a failure


The most damning part is he is likely right on both counts.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Federal NDP lags rivals in nominating candidates for upcoming election, trailing even Green Party


The NDP currently has just 30 nominated candidates, 20 of whom are incumbent MPs. The Green Party, meanwhile, has 33 nominated candidates to date


Maura Forrest Maura Forrest
More from Maura Forrest

Published on: February 6, 2019 | Last Updated: February 6, 2019 7:01 AM EST


OTTAWA — As Canada’s political parties prepare for this year’s federal election, the federal New Democrats lag far behind their rivals in the number of candidates they have nominated, trailing even the Green Party.

The NDP currently has just 30 nominated candidates, 20 of whom are incumbent MPs. The Green Party, meanwhile, has 33 nominated candidates to date, with their lone MP, leader Elizabeth May, planning to run again. The Liberals and Conservatives, in contrast, have nominated 165 and 198 candidates respectively. The vast majority of the Liberal candidates — all but eight — are incumbents, while 86 of the Conservative candidates are sitting MPs.

The NDP has been trying to find its footing since voting to oust former leader Thomas Mulcair in April 2016, triggering an extended leadership campaign during which some say the party machinery was left to atrophy. Since Jagmeet Singh was chosen as leader in October 2017, it has struggled to rebuild. “Candidate recruitment often gives us a peek into electoral readiness of a party,” Farouk Karim, a former NDP press secretary, told the National Post. “There is no doubt that the NDP has to shift gear and close the gap with the other parties.”


But Karl Bélanger, former national director of the NDP, said it’s unsurprising that the party is behind in nominating candidates, since its focus now is on an upcoming byelection in Burnaby South, where Singh hopes to win a seat in the House of Commons.

“I think a lot of potential candidates … are waiting to see what’s going to happen in the byelection on Feb. 25,” Bélanger told the Post. “Once Jagmeet has a seat in the House, you put an end to some of the uncertainty the NDP is facing. … Once that’s done, I think it is easier to put the team together.”

Both Karim and Bélanger downplayed the Green Party’s edge to date in candidate numbers. “The Green Party has a number of dedicated people who are running time and time again,” Bélanger said. “I don’t make much of it.”

However, Mulcair suggested on CTV’s Question Period last weekend that the NDP could lose progressive votes to the Greens, implying that Singh has offered mixed messages on the environment. The Green Party has also made recent strides at the provincial level. Polls suggest the Greens could form government during this year’s election in Prince Edward Island, and the party recently won three seats in the New Brunswick legislature, up from just one. The Green Party currently holds the balance of power in British Columbia, where the NDP formed a minority government in 2017, and Ontario Green Party leader Mike Schreiner won the party’s first seat in the provincial legislature last year. Federally, the Green Party just had its best-ever fundraising year outside of an election year, taking in $3.1 million in 2018. The NDP raised just $5.2 million, compared to $16.6 million for the Liberals and $24.3 million for the Conservatives.

Aside from the 20 NDP MPs already nominated, another seven have signalled their intention to run again, including House leader Ruth Ellen Brosseau, one of the party’s bright lights in Quebec. This week, a Léger survey in Quebec had the NDP polling at just eight per cent in that province, with the Liberals leading the way at 39 per cent and the Conservatives and Bloc Québécois tied at 21 per cent.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh speaks to party staff in December. “Once Jagmeet has a seat in the House, you put an end to some of the uncertainty the NDP is facing,” a former party official says. Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press/File

But of the 44 NDP MPs elected in 2015, at least 10 will not run under the party’s banner this year, including six who say they don’t plan to run again, three who’ve resigned their seats, including Mulcair, and one — Erin Weir — who was expelled from caucus following a harassment investigation.

The remaining seven, including party heavyweights like B.C.’s Nathan Cullen and several members of the Quebec caucus, have yet to announce whether they’ll run again, with several saying they’re waiting to make a decision until after the outcome of the Feb. 25 byelection Singh is contesting.

Bélanger said he’s “a little surprised” by how long it’s taken many caucus members to announce their plans. “It’s always been a challenge for all parties when members of parliament announce too close to the election date that they are retiring,” he said. But he added that it’s often not too difficult to find good candidates to replace departing MPs, because their ridings are “deemed winnable.”

In a statement to the Post, the party said it has several more nomination meetings planned over the next few months. “The nomination process is following its course as planned with many interesting candidates having expressed their intention to run for the NDP,” the statement said. “We are confident that we will put together a remarkable slate of candidates everywhere across the country.”

To date, the Bloc Québécois has just one nominated candidate, but all 10 of its caucus members plan to run again. The People’s Party of Canada, led by Maxime Bernier, has not yet chosen any candidates for the general election aside from Bernier himself.

Here’s where all the NDP MPs stand with regard to the 2019 election:

NOMINATED

B.C.

Randall Garrison
Rachel Blaney
Alistair MacGregor
Gord Johns
Richard Cannings
Don Davies
Peter Julian
Wayne Stetski

Saskatchewan

Sheri Benson

Manitoba

Niki Ashton
Daniel Blaikie

Ontario

Cheryl Hardcastle
Charlie Angus
Scott Duvall
Tracey Ramsey

Quebec

Brigitte Sansoucy
Alexandre Boulerice
Pierre-Luc Dusseault
Karine Trudel
François Choquette

PLAN TO RUN, BUT NOT YET NOMINATED

B.C.

Jenny Kwan

Saskatchewan

Georgina Jolibois

Ontario

Carol Hughes
Brian Masse

Quebec

Matthew Dubé
Ruth Ellen Brosseau
Guy Caron

UNDECIDED

B.C.

Nathan Cullen: One of the NDP’s highest-profile MPs, Cullen has said he won’t announce whether he’s running again until after the Burnaby South by-election later this month.

Murray Rankin: Like Cullen, Rankin says he’ll make his decision after the Feb. 25 by-election.

Quebec

Christine Moore: Moore says she’s awaiting the birth of her third child, due in April, before making a decision about her political future.

Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet: A member of her staff told the Post that Boutin-Sweet expects to make a decision in March.

Robert Aubin: Aubin has said publicly that he is considering running for mayor of Trois-Rivières. His office didn’t tell the Post when he’ll be making a decision.

Pierre Nantel: Last month, Nantel told a Quebec radio station that he was still considering how best to represent the interests of Quebecers.

Anne Minh-Thu Quach: Quach has previously said that personal and family considerations will guide her decision.

NOT RUNNING

B.C.

Fin Donnelly: Donnelly announced in December that he would not seek re-election, saying he wanted to spend more time with his family.

Alberta

Linda Duncan: The party’s sole Alberta MP, Duncan announced in August she would not run again.

Ontario

Irene Mathyssen: Mathyssen announced her retirement in August, ending a political career that began in 1990. Her daughter, Lindsay Mathyssen, was nominated in November as the NDP’s new candidate in the London riding.

David Christopherson: The veteran Hamilton MP declared in July that he wouldn’t run again, and planned to step away from public life.

Quebec

Romeo Saganash: Saganash, whose private member’s bill seeking to ensure that Canada’s laws conform to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples passed the House of Commons in May, will not seek another term. One of his staff, Valérie Dufour, is seeking the NDP nomination in his riding.

Hélène Laverdière: A prominent Quebec MP, Laverdière announced in July she wouldn’t seek re-election, saying she planned to spend more time with her family.

RESIGNED

B.C.

Kennedy Stewart: Stewart resigned his seat in September to run for mayor of Vancouver, winning the municipal election in October. His resignation vacated the Burnaby seat that Singh now hopes to win.

Sheila Malcolmson: Malcolmson resigned her seat to run for the provincial NDP in a Nanaimo by-election, which she won last week.

Quebec

Thomas Mulcair: The former leader officially resigned his seat in August. A by-election in his former riding of Outremont is slated for Feb. 25.

TURFED

Saskatchewan

Erin Weir: Weir was expelled from the NDP caucus in May following an investigation related to harassment allegations. His riding association in Regina has been pushing the party to allow him to run again, but the party says Weir will not be an NDP candidate in the upcoming election.


https://www.vulcanadvocate.com/news/politics/federal-ndp-lags-rivals-in-nominating-candidates-for-upcoming-election-trailing-even-green-party/wcm/
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don Martin: Until the byelection is over, no NDP news is good news


Don
Don Martin, Power Play Host

@DonMartinCTV
.
Published Thursday, February 7, 2019 5:52PM EST
Last Updated Thursday, February 7, 2019 8:01PM EST

If you believe there’s no such thing as bad news, the NDP had a banner day earlier this week.

On the popular Nationalnewswatch.com aggregator website, the party commanded four of the five banner stories.

But the reality is that this rare single-party feat of newsworthiness reflected a devastating state of affairs for the once-mighty Orange Wave.


Jagmeet Singh
NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh speaks with the media following caucus on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Wednesday November 28, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The top story featured a major flip flop in the NDP’s inexplicable original position on Venezuela, which opposed Canada siding with pro-democracy president Juan Guaido over election-rigging, economy-destroying Nicolas Maduro.

The caucus foreign affairs critic then announced the new party position was supporting Guaido after all, only to have NDP leader Jagmeet Singh insist the NDP had no presidential preference.

That was followed by stories about record-low party popularity in Quebec and the discovery of a fake news story about Singh owning a $5-million mansion in Vancouver, which he doesn’t.

And then, just to prove the NDP problems aren’t limited to the federal realm, the final story was how the Ontario NDP failed to redact secret documents revealing Doug Ford health care reforms. Their whistleblower paid for that leaker-identifying oversight with his job.

It couldn’t get worse, right? But, oh, it did.

Within hours the soul of the party, compassionate former MP Paul Dewar who was beloved by all sides, was confirmed to have died of brain cancer.

That was followed in rapid succession by the party’s national pharmacare plan landing with a no-news-pickup thud and the leader being attacked in a debate over positions he doesn’t support.

It was a slow motion train wreck of cringe-worthy coverage. In short, dumpster meet fire.

Amid rumbles of more NDP MPs opting not to run in what the polls foreshadow as an electoral annihilation, it’s increasingly obvious we’re seeing the implosion of the party Jack Layton built into a force for change in Canadian politics.

As the NDP limps toward a rendezvous with destiny, that being a B.C. by-election which will either confirm or kill Singh’s leadership, perhaps the party should embrace a new view to attracting headlines.

Until the byelection is over, no NDP news is good news.

That’s the Last Word.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/don-martin-s-blog/don-martin-until-the-byelection-is-over-no-ndp-news-is-good-news-1.4287512
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NDP facing an election without a quarter of its caucus as Rankin ponders retirement


'I’ve got to figure out with my family whether … taking me into 2023 of my life is something I want'


Peter Zimonjic, Hannah Thibedeau · CBC News · Posted: Feb 08, 2019 5:09 PM ET | Last Updated: February 8


NDP MP Murray Rankin has not yet committed to running for the party in the upcoming federal election. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)


175 comments


New Democrat MP Murray Rankin said today he's still thinking about whether to run for his party in this year's federal election — despite having said he intended to make a decision about his future by early January.

"I'm one of those people in the yet-to-be-nominated, yet-to-confirm category," Rankin told CBC News.

"I'm thinking about it. It's four more years. I'm not a spring chicken anymore. I've got to figure out with my family whether … taking me into 2023 of my life is something I want. All those things have to be sorted out. I am definitely thinking about it right now."


Rankin said that he will make a decision within the next month, despite having told the Canadian Press last year that he would make the decision by early last month.

If he decides to join other NDP MPs and leave federal politics before the fall campaign, he'll leave behind a party facing down an election cycle without a quarter of its current caucus.

Tom Mulcair gave up his seat in Outremont after he was ousted as party leader. Kennedy Stewart, the former NDP MP for Burnaby South, stepped down to launch a successful run for mayor of Vancouver.

Both of those seats go to byelections Feb. 25. Party Leader Jagmeet Singh is hoping to secure the seat in Burnaby South for himself.

Sheila Malcolmson, the former MP for Nanaimo-Ladysmith, gave up her seat to run as a B.C. MLA in Nanaimo, an election she won last month.

Erin Weir, the former NDP MP who now sits as a party of one representing the defunct CCF, was kicked out of caucus by Singh a year ago after sexual harassment allegations were made against him.

The ones not running again

Another six NDP MPs have announced they will not run in the next federal election: David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre), Fin Donnelly (Port Moody-Coquitlam), Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), Hélène Laverdière (Laurier-Sainte-Marie), Irene Mathyssen (London-Fanshawe) and Romeo Saganash (Abitibi-Baie-James-Nunavik-Eeyou).

Robert Aubin, the MP for Trois-Rivières, has said he is pondering a choice between carrying on in federal politics or making a run for mayor in Trois-Rivières.

Rankin, meanwhile, has accepted a job — an unpaid one, he told CBC News — as the B.C. government's representative in its Indigenous reconciliation process with the Wet'suwet'en.

The news that Rankin has yet to commit himself to running in the fall comes as his party continues to struggle in Quebec, scene of the 'Orange Wave' that propelled the party to the Official Opposition benches in 2011.

Over the past month, three polls have put the NDP below the 12.2 per cent of the vote the party captured in Quebec in the 2008 federal election, when Mulcair was the province's sole NDP MP. The party stands at 13.8 per cent support nationally in the CBC's Poll Tracker aggregate of federal polling.

A recent Nanos poll found that just six per cent of Quebecers pick Singh as the best person to be prime minister, well behind Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (44 per cent), Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer (18 per cent) and People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier (10 per cent).

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/rankin-considering-whether-to-run-1.5012213
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the ndp is also indicating they will run a scaled back campaign focused on ridings they can do well in )


Battling money woes, NDP will have to target ridings it can win: campaign co-chair


Latest fundraising returns show the party struggling to raise funds


CBC News · Posted: Feb 09, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 5 hours ago


Facing a grim bank balance and poor fundraising figures, the NDP will have to be strategic in targeting resources at ridings where it can do well in the coming election campaign, says one of its campaign leaders.

"Obviously we aren't going to have the same scale of campaign that the Liberals and Conservatives will have," NDP campaign co-chair Marie Della Mattia told host Chris Hall on CBC Radio's The House Friday.

"They've got lots of dough, they get that from lots of people."

According to the quarterly fundraising return posted to Elections Canada's website last last month, the Conservatives, Liberals and Greens all set new fundraising records in the fourth quarter of 2018.

But the New Democrats continued to trail their rivals, raising just $1,974,257 from 18,637 contributors. That's the party's lowest fourth quarter result since 2011.

It puts the total for the NDP at $5.1 million for the year — better than 2017, still below its fundraising numbers from 2011 to 2016. Heading into the 2015 election, when the NDP was still the Official Opposition, the party had raised $9.5 million.

"That will affect how we do [a national campaign]," said Della Mattia, who has been involved in more than 40 municipal, provincial and federal elections and has worked with five NDP premiers.

"We have to play to the things that we do well and we have to make sure we're connecting to people where it matters."

'We have to be creative'

Despite the less-than-stellar numbers, the longtime strategist said she remains optimistic, pointing out that the party is used to having a smaller war chest than either the Liberals or the Conservatives.

"I think we have to be creative about it. We know how to stretch a dollar because we've been doing it for a long time and we know how to get the most out of it. And that's what we're going to do this time," Della Mattia said.

That will mean playing to ridings where the party has its best chance of winning, she said.

"We want to hold, obviously, all our incumbent seats and we want to make sure that we're picking up seats where we have particular opportunity to build on our strengths," she said.

Money isn't the NDP's only problem going into the federal campaign; a handful of its longtime MPs have signalled they won't be running this year. The party also has been struggling in the polls — particularly in Quebec, where a large number of its incumbents are based.

On Friday, Victoria NDP MP Murray Rankin said he's still mulling over whether to run again.

"I'm one of those people in the yet-to-be-nominated, yet-to-confirm category," Rankin told CBC News.

"I'm thinking about it. It's four more years. I'm not a spring chicken anymore. I've got to figure out with my family whether … taking me into 2023 of my life is something I want. All those things have to be sorted out. I am definitely thinking about it right now."

The ones taking a pass on 2019

Tom Mulcair gave up his seat in Outremont after he was ousted as party leader. Kennedy Stewart, the former NDP MP for Burnaby South, stepped down to launch a successful run for mayor of Vancouver.

Sheila Malcolmson, the former MP for Nanaimo-Ladysmith, gave up her seat to run as a B.C. MLA in Nanaimo, an election she won last month.

Erin Weir, the former NDP MP who now sits as a party of one for CCF, was kicked out of caucus by Singh a year ago after sexual harassment allegations were made against him.

Another six NDP MPs have announced they will not run in the next federal election: David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre), Fin Donnelly (Port Moody-Coquitlam), Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona), Hélène Laverdière (Laurier-Sainte-Marie), Irene Mathyssen (London-Fanshawe) and Romeo Saganash (Abitibi-Baie-James-Nunavik-Eeyou).

Over the past month, three polls have put the NDP below the 12.2 per cent of the vote the party captured in Quebec in the 2008 federal election, when Mulcair was the province's sole NDP MP. The party now stands at 13.8 per cent support nationally in the CBC's Poll Tracker aggregate of federal polling.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/ndp-fundraising-strategy-1.5012443
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2019 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( it was also revealed today the liberals tried to lure away some quebec ndp mp's but this one turned down there offer )



NDP's Ruth Ellen Brosseau says she turned down offer to run for Liberals


Brosseau said that talks with the Liberals never reached a serious level and that her loyalty lies with the NDP.

Presse Canadienne
Updated: February 15, 2019



NDP MP Ruth Ellen Brosseau says her loyalty lies with her party. Wayne Cuddington / Ottawa Citizen



New Democratic Party MP Ruth Ellen Brosseau says she’ll remain a candidate for her party in the general election in October despite overtures from the federal Liberals to run for them.

In an interview with Le Nouvelliste, the NDP’s agriculture critic said that talks with the Liberals never reached a serious level and that her loyalty lies with the NDP.

Brosseau, 34, was first elected in the 2011 general election along with dozens of other NDP candidates in what has since been dubbed the Orange Crush.

However her debut in politics was not without controversy. Brosseau was elected despite reports she had spent several days of the election campaign on vacation in Las Vegas. Her poor command of French was also remarked upon, given the largely francophone make-up of her riding of Berthier-Maskinongé.

However Brosseau soon acquired a reputation as a hard worker, not only for her constituents but also in her efforts to improve her French.


In the 2015 election that saw the NDP returned to third-party status, Brosseau was handily re-elected with more than 42 per cent of the ballots cast, well ahead of the Bloc Québécois candidate.

The fixed date for the federal general election is Oct. 21, 2019.



https://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/ndps-ruth-ellen-brosseau-says-she-turned-down-offer-to-run-for-liberals
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2019 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( although some rare good news for the ndp in Quebec , Robert Aubin has decided to not run municipally which was perhaps a surprise as so many other ndp mp's are leaving . either way Trois Rivieres will still be a tough seat for the ndp to hold this year )


February 14, 2019 / Updated at 7:20 AM


Robert Aubin seeks a third term at the federal level


Marie-Eve Lafontaine


The Nouvellist



Robert Aubin gives up the idea of ​​running for mayor of Trois Instead, he announced Thursday morning that he would be seeking a third term as a Member of Parliament.


IHe assured him of having thought long enough about running for mayor of Trois "I am honored by all the attention and love I have received from the people of Trois Complete the revision of the pyrrhotite standard, better compensate the victims, bring the train back to Trois We have a duty to give the next generations a healthy planet and I am already working with my colleagues on a bold proposal that neither the Liberals nor the Conservatives can match, "the NDP MP said in a news release.


https://www.lenouvelliste.ca/actualites/robert-aubin-sollicite-un-troisieme-mandat-au-federal-adb3729afdce0f0dbddbfc8cc51549ba
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the ndp is losing 2 more quebec mp's , trying to find more information on this announcement , which wasn't suppose to be made until March )


Éric Grenier‏Verified account @EricGrenierCBC · 2h2 hours ago



NDP Quebec MPs Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga), Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salabarry–Suroît) announce they won't be running for re-election.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Federal elections: Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet will not stand in Hochelaga



PHILIPPE-OLIVIER CONTANT / QMI AGENCY

QMI Agency

Thursday, February 21, 2019 12:05

UPDATE Thursday, February 21, 2019 12:05



MONTREAL - NDP MP Hochelaga Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet will not be seeking re-election for a third term in the federal election next fall.

She explained that this decision "was difficult to take".

"I'm going to be 64 in the next federal election and I realize I do not have the same level of energy I had in 2011. Out of respect for the people of Hochelaga, it was out of the question to represent you only halfway. Even if the heart is there, the energy level is no longer there, "she said in a statement released Thursday morning.

Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet mentioned that she will remain in place by the poll.

The latter, who is the New Democratic Party's critic for housing, said she plans to focus her efforts in the Commons over the coming months on access to social housing, the fight against social inequalities and the protection of housing. the environment.

She was particularly proud to have treated 1,400 citizens' files, as well as to have contributed to the relocation of the Dopamine organization and the opening of the Saint


https://www.journaldemontreal.com/2019/02/21/elections-federales-marjolaine-boutin-sweet-ne-se-representera-pas-dans-hochelaga
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 12:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pregnant, Anne Quach will pass the torch to take care of her family


Photo by Mario Pitre

Mario Pitre

mpitre@gravitemedia.com


Thursday, February 21, 2019, 10:46


Pregnant, Anne Quach will pass the torch to take care of her family
Mother of a little girl, Anne Quach announces at the same time that she is pregnant with a second child.

Photo credit: Journal Saint

The member for Salaberry
In a statement sent to the media, Ms. Quach writes:

" ... I decided to pass the torch especially for family reasons. My daughter Mila, whom you have seen growing up, will enter kindergarten next September and my heart as a teacher and mother wants to accompany her in this crucial stage of her life. Also, I have the happiness to announce that I carry the life, for the 2nd time, in my belly. I admit that I intend to enjoy the joys of maternity leave, in the privacy of the family cocoon.

My life in recent years has been a rolling fire of public activities, to share the good moves of the organizations during dinners or dinners spaghetti, during festivals of district or municipalities. I loved this way of life, but if I want to keep my husband by my side, I'd better start giving him a little more attention!

To the people of the riding of that time and today: I have lived eight breathtaking years representing you, surveying the vast, but oh so beautiful territory that we share. The riding is very diverse and has many challenges. Thanks to you, I learned to discover the agricultural world, the business community (a milieu that has long intimidated me), the colorful community community and the importance of the Akwesasne Mohawk First Nation in the history of the territory and the issues related to their sovereignty.

You have especially pushed me to always listen to the desperate needs of the poorest people so they can enjoy better public services. You are people of heart, solidarity and fighting

You have trusted me twice and I will be eternally grateful. You fed me with files to raise in the House of Commons, you participated actively in my public meetings, you commented on my publications on social networks, and your actions and interventions pushed me to give the best of myself. even to bring your voice and concerns to Ottawa. "

The MP was convinced of the future of the NDP both in the region that parout the country, due to its values of solidarity, commitment and protection of our common good.

She recalls the various issues she has brought in the riding, the Kathryn Spirit, the establishment of a youth committee, the creation of editions of Femmes de tête, or a local purchasing policy to support farmers.
She took the opportunity to thank her leader Jagmeet Singh, her colleagues, the activists and the Vietnamese communities in Canada, who taught her a lot about her roots in Vietnam.

" I entered active politics without a strategic calculation, with the specific objective of representing the best citizens of my riding. Be fearless, the hyperactive in me will continue to be involved as a citizen committed to the planet and public services, the two main battle horses that inspired me to present myself for the first time in 2008, "concludes she.


https://www.journalsaint-francois.ca/enceinte-anne-quach-passera-le-flambeau-pour-soccuper-de-sa-famille/
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

with the looming loss of 2 more Quebec mp's , I think its time the ndp really need to worry about losing party status in 2019 if things don't turn around


out of there 44 mp's elected in 2015 , the quebec mp's numbered 16 , we already know at least 4 of them won't even run for re-election and its likely at least a couple more ndp mp's join that list


with the looming loss of Outremont , that brings them down to 15 quebec seats , at a time when there polling 6 % according to leger in that province


if they aren't able to win any of those seats back , that puts them into the mid 20 seat range

but there likely to loss seats in Saskatchewan , Alberta and BC too , which could easily put them below 20 seats and party status isn't far away once you drop below 20 seats
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are not wrong. The poll numbers are shocking ... in the west, they're basically in the same range as the People's Party and the Green. Maybe this is the Green's chance.

Ontario is the most electorally stable part of the country ... they've seen so much of Gerald Butts that they must think it's the normal craziness.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Federal NDP loses another incumbent as Quebec MP says she won't seek re-election

by The Canadian Press
Posted Feb 21, 2019 1:43 pm EST


National



OTTAWA — The federal NDP is losing another incumbent, as Quebec MP Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet says she will not be seeking re-election later this year.

The decision represents the latest blow to the third-place party, which has already seen a slew of MPs leave or announce their decision not to run for another term in October.

That list includes Alberta MP Linda Duncan, Ontario MPs Irene Mathyssen and David Christopherson, Quebec MPs Tom Mulcair, Helene Laverdiere and Romeo Saganash, and B.C. MPs Kennedy Stewart, Sheila Malcolmson and Fin Donnelly.

Boutin-Sweet was first elected during the so-called Orange Wave in 2011, when the NDP under then-leader Jack Layton rode historic gains in Quebec to become the Official Opposition.

But in a statement Thursday, Boutin-Sweet said she did not “have the same energy I had in 2011,” which was why she had decided not to seek a third mandate.

Yet while Boutin-Sweet expressed confidence that “a spirited next generation is waiting at the NDP to continue my work,” her departure underlines the party’s recent struggles, particularly in Quebec.

Not only has the NDP suffered several poor byelection results under current leader Jagmeet Singh, it has also had trouble raising money while support in the polls has largely stagnated.

New Democrats are hoping to turn things around next week in byelections for the Montreal riding of Outremont, which was held by their former leader Mulcair, and the B.C. riding of Burnaby South, where Singh is running.



The Canadian Press


https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/02/21/federal-ndp-loses-another-incumbent-as-quebec-mp-says-she-wont-seek-re-election/
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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