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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 12:59 pm    Post subject: 3 Federal By Elections on February 25 Reply with quote

( new thread for all news about the now official 3 federal by elections on Feb 25 )


Trudeau calls byelections for 3 seats, including closely watched Burnaby-South


Voters in B.C., Quebec and Ontario ridings are heading to the polls early


CBC News · Posted: Jan 09, 2019 12:48 PM ET | Last Updated: 5 minutes ago



NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh poses for a photograph with a woman during a visit to a bakery while on a tour of the Montreal borough of Outremont on Saturday. Singh will be on the ballot as his party's candidate in the upcoming byelection in Burnaby South. (Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press)


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February could give Canadians a sneak peak at what's to come during the upcoming federal election as voters in three ridings head to the polls for byelections.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced today that byelections for the ridings of York–Simcoe in Ontario, Outremont in Quebec and Burnaby–South in B.C. will be held Feb. 25.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is hoping voters in that last contest will give him a seat in the House of Commons.



The byelection calls come after Opposition allegations that the Liberals were purposely delaying the byelections and leaving the ridings vacant.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trudeau-byelections-burnaby-south-1.4967449
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some early predictions , most seem to think Outremont will return to the liberals unless something drastic happens there . most seem to think York Simcoe will stay conservative . and most think Burnaby South will be very close either way

I'd say Burnaby South is a highly unpredictable by election , with a couple possible outcomes . we really won't know the outcome until the votes are counted on election night

I've been thru York Simcoe many times before , it hasn't been anything but conservative ( federally or provincially) since it was re created in 2004 . you usually see a lot of blue signs in the rural parts of the riding , less sure how places like Bradford and Keswick will vote as there is so many new residents in those places but it should stay cpc , I'm wondering why the cpc didn't try and get former MP Lois Brown to run there its rate beside Newmarket and be an easier way for her to get back in the house than wait to run again in Newmarket Aurora


Outremont was always a funky ndp pick up and at its core has always been a liberal riding , its pretty much the easiest ndp seat in Quebec for the liberals to regain especially with a low profile ndp candidate but could signal the start of more ndp loses in Quebec if the by elections is not close ( within 5 % / 10% ) and ndp at least puts up a fight )



David Akin 🇨🇦‏Verified account @davidakin · 15m15 minutes ago

Contractually obligated to offer early pundit predictions on three just-announced by-elections so here goes: Outremont: #LPC steal from #NDP | York-Simcoe: #CPC Hold (early #PPC test) | Burnaby South - Leaning #NDP. #elxn42
Bottom line: #NDP could come out of this down 2.



Michael Taube‏ @michaeltaube · Jan 7

Replying to @mileslunn @_MarkSutcliffe and 2 others

I think Burnaby South will be very close, but the Libs have a slight edge (which could spell the end of Singh's career). Libs will easily hold Outremont. Tories will have no trouble in York-Simcoe. There are no declared candidates in Nanaimo-Ladysmith, but the NDP should hold it.



Michael Taube‏ @michaeltaube · Jan 7


Replying to @mileslunn @_MarkSutcliffe and 2 others

Can't see the Tories winning in Burnaby South, although they'll have a decent showing. Nanaimo-Ladysmith result may depend on the Tory candidate, but NDP support is solid in that riding. I don't see the PPC getting double digits in York-Simcoe, and I agree re. Outremont!
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Burnaby-South by-election to be held at end of February


by Denise Wong and the Canadian Press
Posted Jan 9, 2019 9:44 am PST
Last Updated Jan 9, 2019 at 9:59 am PST



BURNABY (NEWS 1130) – We now know when voters in Burnaby-South will go to the polls in a federal by-election.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced the by-election to fill the seat, left vacant when Kennedy Stewart became the mayor of Vancouver, will be held on Feb. 25.

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh is hoping to win a seat in the House of Commons in this by-election. The Liberals have nominated Karen Wang to challenge him.

By-elections in the Ontario riding of York-Simcoe and Montreal’s Outremont will also take place on Feb. 25.

The byelections will be a crucial test for New Democrats, who’ve been struggling to find their footing since their party was relegated to a distant third in the 2015 general election.

But the race in Outremont, left vacant after former NDP leader Tom Mulcair resigned, will also be seen as a test of whether the NDP can hang on what’s left of the orange wave that swept Quebec in 2011.

The Conservatives are expected to easily keep York-Simcoe, left vacant by the resignation of long-time Tory MP Peter Van Loan.

Trudeau has not called a by-election in another B.C. riding, Nanaimo-Ladysmith, vacated last week by New Democrat MP Sheila Malcolmson, who is seeking a seat in the provincial legislature.


https://www.citynews1130.com/2019/01/09/burnaby-south-by-election-called/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

not mentioned in the early news coverage but these by elections have an insanely long campaign period of close to 48 days if you count today , instead of the typical 36 day campaign


not sure why the liberals choose such a long campaign period , perhaps they had planned to announced them this weekend or next but were tired of being accused of delaying them so went early ?


but something about a close to 48 day by election campaign does seem odd


( elections Canada has also yet to release the official info as to the dates and such but does appear to be very long campaigns )
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has the potential to be a bad night for the NDP;

The Liberals will pick up Outremont but if the NDP finishes behind the Liberals by miles it certainly lends some credibility to the idea that they are largely done in Quebec.

As far as Burnaby goes;
Its an NDP riding but not one that was won by a massive margin, Singh needs to win but the margin of that win is also important as he will be contesting it in a few months without the benefit of spending the entire campaign within that riding.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
It has the potential to be a bad night for the NDP;

The Liberals will pick up Outremont but if the NDP finishes behind the Liberals by miles it certainly lends some credibility to the idea that they are largely done in Quebec.

As far as Burnaby goes;
Its an NDP riding but not one that was won by a massive margin, Singh needs to win but the margin of that win is also important as he will be contesting it in a few months without the benefit of spending the entire campaign within that riding.



I don't think the question for the ndp in Outremont is if they hold the riding or not , it seems that is already highly unlikely

its more what are the margins of victory , Mulcair got , 47 % 2007 , 39 % 2008 , 56 % 2011 and 44 % in 2015


in the elections prior to mulcair the ndp got , 5 % in 2000 , 14 % in 2004 and 17 % in 2006 and came in 3rd most of those years


in the Leeds Grenville by election they fell to 2000 levels of support , if they fall that low , certainly not a good sign but more realistically they hit the low 30's or mid 20's

but could do worse if the campaign falls flat ( they only got 8 % in Chicoutimi and 11 % in Lac saint jean by elections ) in both those ridings in 2015 they got close to 30% of the vote



I would agree the problem for Singh is even if he wins in Burnaby by a small margin there is another election in a few months and if he has to campaign all out just to hold his own seat that doesn't help the ndp's chances nationally
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( I'm not sure how much interest the York Simcoe by election will generate ,

I think some of the riding's residents will be more interested in the lake simcoe ice fishing season which will occur during it than the by election , we may see our first ever canvassing at " ice huts " in this race )



York-Simcoe byelection scheduled for Feb. 25

Federal byelection one of three announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

News 01:54 PM by Aileen Zangouei  Georgina Advocate|



Scot Davidson wins to become the York-Simcoe federal CPC candidate replacing MP Peter Van Loan. Heather Fullerton and BWG resident Jason Verkaik were vying for the spot as well, at Mt.Albert Lion's Hall. Oct 20, 2018 - Steve Somerville/Metroland


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has scheduled the York-Simcoe byelection to take place on Monday, Feb. 25.



Byelections will also occur the same day in the ridings of Burnaby South and Outremont. The seat for the York-Simcoe riding was previously held by former Conservative cabinet minister Peter Van Loan.



Van Loan announced that he was calling it a career on Parliament Hill in the summer of 2018. He retired from the House of Commons on Sept. 30, 2018.



Scot Davidson of Georgina will be running for the Conservatives in this byelection.



In addition, Georgina resident Jenna McLean has been acclaimed as NDP candidate for the upcoming byelection.



https://www.yorkregion.com/news-story/9117281-york-simcoe-byelection-scheduled-for-feb-25/
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andrew Coyne: Trudeau's exquisitely timed byelection call may have sealed NDP's fate

It is safe to say Singh has not proved quite the rock star New Democrats hoped. For the Liberals, on the other hand, Singh is the answer to their prayers


Andrew Coyne

January 9, 2019
8:23 PM EST

Filed under
Full Comment

The prime minister’s belated decision to call a byelection in Burnaby South, one of three to be held on Feb. 25, brings to a close one of the more entertaining displays of bipartisan humbug in recent political history.

The B.C. riding has been without an MP since New Democrat Kennedy Stewart stepped down in September to run for mayor of Vancouver. More to the point, it is the riding NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has chosen for his long-delayed bid to enter Parliament.

The prime minister’s reluctance to call a vote might therefore seem familiar. Prime ministers have been known to put off elections in the past when needed to thwart a surging opponent. The novelty of the current situation is that Justin Trudeau would appear to have done so not because he fears he might lose, but because he fears he might win.

It is safe to say Singh has not proved quite the rock star New Democrats hoped when they elected him leader in October 2017. Undertaker would be closer to the mark. While the party trundles along at a little under 17 per cent in the polls, about its historic average, Singh himself is in single digits, slightly behind Elizabeth May as Canadians’ choice for prime minister.

Singh’s trajectory is a cautionary tale on the importance of experience in politics. With just six years in the Ontario legislature, Singh was barely ready for the job of provincial leader, still less the much sharper scrutiny to which federal leaders are subject. It has showed.

He appears frequently to be poorly briefed, on one memorable occasion having to ask a member of caucus, in full view of the cameras, what the party position was on a particular issue. He badly mishandled what should have been a softball question on where he stood on Sikh terrorism, and alienated many in the party with his knee-jerk expulsion of Saskatchewan MP Erin Weir for what appeared to be no worse a crime than standing too close to women at parties.

The decision not to seek a seat in the House until now has robbed him of what visibility the leader of a third party can expect, though his manifest weakness as a communicator makes it debatable whether this is a plus or a minus. Fundraising has dried up. Party morale is in freefall. Caucus members speak openly, if not on the record, of their desire to be rid of him.

For the Liberals, on the other hand, Singh is the answer to all their prayers. The prime minister’s own approval ratings may have dropped precipitously, but as long as the NDP vote can be kept to current levels of support or less the Liberals are unlikely to lose. (The NDP’s average share of the popular vote when the Conservatives win: 19.5 per cent. When the Liberals win: 14.8 per cent.) And nothing so guarantees a calamitous NDP showing as Singh’s continued leadership.


I have no doubt Trudeau would prefer to put it off even longer than he has


Hence the curious unspoken subtext of the Burnaby South race, with Liberals more or less openly rooting for him to win — and New Democrats hardly less publicly hoping he loses.

Were he to be defeated, that is, in his first encounter with the voters, the conventional wisdom is he would be forced to resign as leader. Admittedly, all previous experience would suggest this was unwise, so late in the electoral cycle and with no obvious replacement in the wings. His critics in the party will have reasoned, however, that they are unlikely to do worse, no matter who it is.

On the other hand, were he to win in Burnaby South he would probably have to stay on. Unhappily for Liberal hopes, that looks iffy. The NDP won the riding by a little over one percentage point in 2015. A November poll of the riding by Mainstreet Research had the NDP squarely in third. Singh himself appears to have little name recognition in the riding, 3,300 kilometres from his home in Brampton, Ont.

The furious demands from New Democrats in recent months that the prime minister call the byelection forthwith might therefore be something less than the robust show of support for the leader they would otherwise appear — just as the prime minister’s obvious stalling until now may have other explanations than the usual.


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh announces he will run in a byelection in Burnaby South, during an event in Burnaby, B.C., on Aug. 8, 2018. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press/File

Indeed, I have no doubt he would prefer to put it off even longer than he has, and would have, but for the unpleasant odour of cynicism that had begun to attach itself to the decision. Had he taken the full six months the law allows him, pushing the byelection into April or even May, the NDP would have been left in a bind whatever the result, with too little time to replace Singh even if he were to lose.

I think that offers an answer to the obvious question: if the Liberals were so keen on Singh winning, why did they even bother to put up a candidate against him? (For the record, she is Karen Wang, a local daycare operator.) There is, after all, the semi-tradition of the “leader’s courtesy,” not often observed in recent years, by which the other parties are supposed to offer a new leader unobstructed entry to the House. Why not use that as a pretext?

Because they’d still like to win it, so long as they can be sure Singh stays on as leader. Hence the exquisite timing of the byelection call, neither so early as to permit Singh to be easily disposed of nor so late as to seem obvious. Still, the result is much the same: even a Feb. 25 vote leaves barely six months until Labour Day, the unofficial start of the federal election campaign. That’s not much time to force out one leader and elect another.

So Singh may yet survive, thanks to the prime minister’s delay in calling a byelection Singh himself had repeatedly demanded he call. Nice work: Singh will owe his political life to his opponent, while Trudeau’s fingerprints are kept off the absence of a dead body.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/andrew-coyne-trudeaus-exquisitely-timed-byelection-call-may-have-sealed-ndps-fate
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its also been revealed that Bernier's candidate in Burnaby South had tried to run for the conservatives in the past but was turned down )


Bernier's party taps anti-'trans agenda' activist as candidate in Burnaby-South


Former talk show host Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson running for People's Party of Canada


Catharine Tunney, Catherine Cullen · CBC News · Posted: Jan 08, 2019 4:08 PM ET | Last Updated: 9 hours ago


People's Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier, left, and Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson, right, pose for a photo. (Facebook)


616 comments


One of the first candidates out of the gate for Maxime Bernier's new party calls the idea of gender fluidity "the greatest and most insidious assault against our children that this nation has ever seen" and says she has dedicated her life to fighting it.

A devout Christian, ardent abortion foe and former talk show host, Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson might seem like a surprising choice for a party associated with libertarian principles.

But on Monday, the People's Party of Canada tweeted that Thompson had been chosen to run under its banner in the upcoming Burnaby-South byelection, where she'll try to beat NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh to a seat in the House of Commons. The official byelection call is expected any day now.


The party also announced that Jennifer Clarke, who has a relatively small online presence, will be the official candidate in another B.C. riding, Nanaimo-Ladysmith. New Democrat Sheila Malcolmson recently vacated the seat to run in a provincial byelection.
Martin Masse, Bernier's adviser and spokesperson, told CBC News that neither candidate is doing national interviews at the moment.


But you don't have to dig deep online to find Thompson's take on some controversial issues.

The Christian pundit has dedicated a portion of her life to fighting what she calls "a global initiative to make the ideology of the LGBTQ well accepted and taught even in pre-school," according to an article in Light Magazine.

Thompson worked as a host on The 700 Club Canada, a spinoff of the Christian Broadcasting Network's long-running flagship show, but left it in 2017. She blamed her departure on LGBT activists who allegedly "targeted me mercilessly by calling The 700 Club Canada."


Earlier this year, Thompson ran for a trustee position on Burnaby's school board on a platform opposing British Columbia's sexual orientation and gender identity policy, known as SOGI.

The provincial government policy outlines how educators and school administrators can address topics related to sexual orientation and gender identity in more inclusive ways. The goal of the program is to reduce discrimination and suicides.

Thompson has spoken out against SOGI and what she calls the "trans agenda" on her YouTube channel and at rallies, although she told the website Burnaby Now she supports trans students and "love[s] them to pieces."

"I think the most important issue facing schools is that parents are highly alarmed and very upset that children are being taught gender-fluid ideology. It has no place in school," she told the website during her trustee bid.


Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson, right, poses with former Ontario Tory leadership hopeful Tanya Granic Allen. Allen campaigned on an anti-sex education reform platform. (Facebook)


She went on to say that she doesn't oppose anti-bullying programs in schools, citing her own experiences with bullying in public school in the Arctic, where her parents were missionaries.

"I was the only white, blond girl in the entire school, if you can imagine," she told the site. "I stuck out like a sore thumb, and it was very scary, actually. It was very intimidating. It made me cry every day."

'Death of political correctness'

During the school board trustee race, Glen Hansman, head of the union representing teachers in B.C.'s public school system, called out Thompson after she retweeted a story from Rebel Media founder Ezra Levant about the murder of 13-year-old Marrisa Shen. A Syrian refugee with no previous criminal record was charged with first degree murder in the case.

"It is abhorrent to see a candidate for school trustee in Burnaby spreading hatred against immigrants and refugees. Racism and xenophobia are not welcome in B.C. schools," he tweeted.


Thompson placed eleventh out of 13 candidates with 15,622 votes, according to the City of Burnaby's official results. (The winning seven trustees averaged between 23,879 and 20,915 votes.)

Despite the loss, she has now set her eyes on Ottawa.

On Monday, she took to Facebook to announce her nomination. She admitted she tried to run for the Conservative Party but was turned down twice.


Bernier, she wrote, "bravely declared the death of political correctness. He opened the door for conversations, healthy debate and holding fast to what is really Canadian ... freedom!"


When some of her 6,333 Facebook followers questioned Bernier's voting record on social conservative issues, Thompson argued that the former Conservative cabinet minister — who narrowly lost a race to replace Stephen Harper as Conservative leader to Andrew Scheer — at least allows members to talk about controversial topics like abortion, while Scheer shuts them down.

"The People's Party of Canada believes that this should be open for debate in a democratic society," she tweeted.

Along with Singh, Thompson will be facing off for the Burnaby-South seat against Liberal Karen Wang and Conservative Jay Shin. The Green Party has said it won't run a candidate.

Bernier launched his People's Party of Canada last September, presenting it as a repudiation of the "morally and intellectually corrupt" Conservative Party of Canada he had sought to lead.

While announcing the new party last year, Bernier said his supporters "don't believe that government intervention is a solution for everything.

"Government should not intervene to solve each and every problem on the road to a utopian and unrealistic vision of society," he said.

Bernier has said his goal is to run candidates in all 338 federal ridings.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/peoples-party-canada-bernier-tyler-thompson-1.4970112
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have to wonder if there is any truth to the rumbling of Andrea Horwath making the leap to the Federal level.

Her profile is high enough in Ontario that she could likely do better than Singh;
However, taking the job of her former deputy leader may be too much.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Have to wonder if there is any truth to the rumbling of Andrea Horwath making the leap to the Federal level.

Her profile is high enough in Ontario that she could likely do better than Singh;
However, taking the job of her former deputy leader may be too much.




doubtful at this time and her riding ( Hamilton centre ) already has an ndp candidate nominated


but she'd make an obvious option if Singh were to be forced out


personally think she'll try 1 more provincial election and if ndp doesn't do better she'll likely leave
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We are talking about a largely out of the ordinary situation;

Lets say that Singh loses the Burnaby by-election;
Does that trigger a leadership review? The NDP membership turfed Mulcair after securing the second largest NDP caucus in Canadian History.

They are a fickle bunch.

If you have to select a new leader, Andrea Horwath is really the only NDPer over the last few years across the country that has improved her parties situation consistently (Unless you count Premier Notley and Horgan and the former may not be in that same situation come a time that the Federal Party would need a new leader)

This is just a theoretical discussion;
Singh had to answer an interview question as to if he felt he would be leading the NDP into the General Election just the other day, clearly folks think their may be a chance he won't.

If he doesn't
Then who?
Its an interesting discussion.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
We are talking about a largely out of the ordinary situation;

Lets say that Singh loses the Burnaby by-election;
Does that trigger a leadership review? The NDP membership turfed Mulcair after securing the second largest NDP caucus in Canadian History.

They are a fickle bunch.

If you have to select a new leader, Andrea Horwath is really the only NDPer over the last few years across the country that has improved her parties situation consistently (Unless you count Premier Notley and Horgan and the former may not be in that same situation come a time that the Federal Party would need a new leader)

This is just a theoretical discussion;
Singh had to answer an interview question as to if he felt he would be leading the NDP into the General Election just the other day, clearly folks think their may be a chance he won't.

If he doesn't
Then who?
Its an interesting discussion.




another though also comes to mind , its pretty typical for ndp candidates to often not win their first time . if you were to look thru there history a lot had to run a couple times before they first got elected


even Jack Layton lost in Toronto Danforth in 1997 before he later became party leader and actually held that seat


so to toss Singh to the curb after his first loss would not be how other losing ndp candidates have been treated , they were allowed to run again


but this does seem to be a unique situation and it won't really be clear until the votes are counted
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( although the ndp actually had a nomination meeting in this riding , I don't see them being a real factor especially with so much attention being paid to the other 2 by elections , this one is sure to be forgotten )



York-Simcoe byelection opportunity for change: NDP candidate Jessa McLean

News Jan 10, 2019 by Heidi Riedner  Georgina Advocate|


NDP candidate Jessa McLean


Georgina resident Jessa McLean is the NDP candidate running in the Feb. 25 byelection called for the federal riding of York-Simcoe. - Photo courtesy NDP


The York-Simcoe NDP candidate says the upcoming federal byelection finally called by Prime Minister Trudeau for Feb. 25 is an opportunity for the riding to have the representation it deserves.

The seat has been vacant since the September retirement of longtime Tory MP and former cabinet minister, Peter Van Loan.

The byelection is one of three called Jan. 9 by Trudeau, following opposition claims that the Liberals were deliberately delaying the byelections and leaving the ridings of York-Simcoe, Burnaby South in B.C. and Quebec's Outremont vacant.


York-Simcoe's NDP candidate Jessa McLean — who was acclaimed at the party’s nomination meeting Dec. 6 — says she is excited for the opportunity the byelection brings to the people of the riding “to choose the representation they deserve, the representation the working class needs and our environment needs.”

In her nomination acceptance speech, McLean said the riding has long sent representation to Ottawa and Toronto “that doesn’t reflect who we are, and who appear to be completely out of touch with most peoples’ lived reality” and, as a result, things haven’t improved all that much for most people in York-Simcoe and across Canada.

“People are working harder, but are not getting ahead,” she says.

“Our incomes aren’t keeping up with the cost of living, particularly housing. Inequality is on the rise, Indigenous relationships are deteriorating, and we are running out of time to effectively address climate change. We deserve better.”

A passionate community organizer, McLean says she is committed to making life better for everyday families.

McLean says she is determined to reshape conversations on the campaign trail and provide new alternatives to pressing issues.

“I will work tirelessly to champion bold new possibilities to eliminate poverty, ensure fair taxation, end our reliance on fossil fuels, and finally complete the mission of universal health care by making sure everyone has access to essential medications.”


McLean is a Georgina resident, raising a family in Sutton, and has previously worked as co-ordinator for a forensic engineering firm.

She has been active as a community organizer, most recently with the “$15 and Fairness” campaign.

McLean is running against fellow Georgina resident Scot Davidson, who is the Conservative party candidate.


The Liberals' nomination meeting is being held Saturday.


https://www.simcoe.com/news-story/9118350-york-simcoe-byelection-opportunity-for-change-ndp-candidate-jessa-mclean/
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2019 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( whats interesting is we've actually seen very few federal by elections in the area outside of Toronto compared to the number of provincial ones . when we have federal by elections in Ontario they always seem to be in Toronto

( there hasn't been any federal by elections in Northern Ontario as an example since at least pre 1993 and rural Southwestern Ontario has only seen 1 in recent memory , Perth Middlesex in 2003 ) . so the York Simcoe race is somewhat unusual in that sense . for there to actually be an important by election in a rural riding outside the city )


Trudeau calls byelection in York-Simcoe


Bradford West Gwillimbury will have new MP after vote in February. Longtime MP Peter Van Loan retired from politics last fall, leaving the seat vacant

about 19 hours ago by: Jenni Dunning


Residents of Bradford West Gwillimbury will officially have a new MP on Feb. 25.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called a byelection for the York-Simcoe riding, which was left vacant last fall after longtime MP Peter Van Loan retired from politics to join a Toronto law firm as a partner.

Scot Davidson, an entrepreneur from Sutton, won the Conservative Party of Canada nomination in October to represent the riding in the interim.

Shaun Tanaka, a former professor, is the Liberal candidate running in the byelection.

Jessa McLean, a workers’ rights activist, is the NDP candidate.

Trudeau also called byelections for the ridings of Burnaby South, B.C., and Outremont, Que.



https://www.bradfordtoday.ca/local-news/trudeau-calls-byelection-in-york-simcoe-1190663
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3 Federal By Elections on February 25

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