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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
It all depends on when the Burnaby South election ends up being;
If it gets announced for early to mid Spring and Singh loses to a Liberal Candidate I would argue the NDP doesn't have the time or the money to hold another leadership race.

The Liberals winning the by-election simply further weakens the NDP which they need in order to maintain a majority if they are expecting losses in the West and Ontario.

The logistics of resigning in March, throwing together a leadership convention by summer (lets say July) and then fundraising, developing a platform, and then campaigning by October is ambitious. The other issue is there is no obvious successor which usually means a large field of candidates who take on personal debt to lose the race and then have to march right back out and campaign in a few months for their seats.




it would seem like Singh now has no choice but to run in Burnaby as the Brampton East riding is not vacant and no longer likely to see an immediate by election


the articles online seem to indicate the PM has indicated he's going to call 3 by elections in January with votes in February and these would be the final by elections ( last ones he could legally call ) until the next general election


no one seems to know what would happen to Singh if he loses ? Elizabeth May lost and changed ridings a couple times before she won a seat but not sure the ndp would be that sympathetic
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you going to tell me that you wouldn't enjoy seeing Christine Moore elected to lead the NDP? She could have Tommy Douglas declared a white male, and they could tear down whatever statues of him there are in Regina. Possibly agitate to rename some public schools after Canada's first transsexual ... do we know who {s}he is?

It would be fab-yoo-lous!
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Are you going to tell me that you wouldn't enjoy seeing Christine Moore elected to lead the NDP? She could have Tommy Douglas declared a white male, and they could tear down whatever statues of him there are in Regina. Possibly agitate to rename some public schools after Canada's first transsexual ... do we know who {s}he is?

It would be fab-yoo-lous!



I don't think Christine Moore has ever expressed interest in leading the NDP and hasn't even confirmed if she plans to run again


think its a fair question to ask , what exactly has Jagmeet Singh accompolished so far ? why is he the only person in canada qualified to lead the ndp ?


at this point and after all his time as leader , I would be hard pressed to name one single thing he has accompolished or done at this point ,
by election success ? nope ( in fact he has not even campaigned in most of them , he doesn't even do his job , shouldn't it be his job to visit ndp candidates and support there campaign even if the riding is not really ndp turf ) ,
private member bills ? nope ,
fundraising success ? nope ,
recruited star candidates ? nope ,
won a seat in parliament ? nope


he seems like one of those people who wanted a fancy position but once they had it , seemed to have no clue what to do with there new position . he doesn't come across as someone with any real agenda or grand vision for Canada .
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

things don't look good for the ndp , there has now been 14 by elections since the 2015 election , True that singh was not ndp leader for all of them but here are there results during that time ( with some numbers rounded , meaning they might of actually got 2.5 % but I rounded it to 3 )


Medicine Hat , Alberta - 1 %

Ottawa Vanier , Ontario - 28 %

Calgary heritage , Alberta - 3 %

Calgary Midnapore , Alberta - 3 %

Markham Thornhill , Ontario - 3.5 %

Saint Laurent , Quebec - 8 %

Sturgeon River Parkland , Alberta - 8 %

Lac Saint Jean , Quebec - 12 %

Scarborough Agincourt , Ontario - 5 %

Bonavista Burin Trinity , Newfoundland - 5 %

South Surrey White Rock , BC - 5 %

Battlefords Lloydminster , Saskatchewan - 13 %

Chicoutimi Le Fjord , Quebec - 9 %

Leeds Grenville , Ontario - 3 %



out of 14 , 11 of there candidates failed to even crack the 10 % mark , only 1 candidate actually did better than 2015 ( Ottawa Vanier ) and it occurred before Singh was selected as leader , the other 13 all did worse than 2015


the trend doesn't look good for Singh's by election as they cannot afford to lose any % of the vote there as they only won the riding with 35% of the vote in 2015 . he needs to improve on the 2015 numbers or at the very least hold there % of the vote and hope the liberals or cpc doesn't gain


and according to Wikipedia the former ndp mp Kennedy Stewart also spent as insane amount of money to hold the riding , $177,796 which was way more than the others ( cpc spent $83,000 and libs only $ 33,000 ) and spending limit will be much less for the by election and ndp has little money now anyways , so considering he was personally popular enough to be elected Vancouver mayor , outspent him opponents by a huge amount yet still only won by 500 votes doesn't look good for singh in a riding that is 40% Chinese people and only 8 % south Asian
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How many safe NDP seats are left in Canada?
Essentially what's the floor for NDP seats in the next election?
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
How many safe NDP seats are left in Canada?
Essentially what's the floor for NDP seats in the next election?





its really tough to say , surely there is some personally popular incumbents who would still hang on if even Singh fails miserably but there caucus would be no where near its current size and be lucky to maintain even a small presence in Quebec



the current polls may also force the ndp to spend a lot more time defending there current seats than 2015 , when they left many of them open and vulnerable, maybe just assumed they'd easily get back in and so spend the money trying to win new seats instead ( when the ndp numbers briefly surged ) only for the liberals to target them late in the campaign and pick off some seats no one though would switch parties
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a good question. I look at it from the point of view of how many seats are they apt to lose? I think the next election will see Quebec discard the NDP, and they will lose around a dozen seats. The NDP will also lose some seats in BC. They now have about 44 seats. They could lose 15-20 of those, particularly if the leadership problem isn't fixed. Just an opinion. That would leave them with between 25 and 30 seats.

Singh won't be responsible for those losses, although a more energetic performance might save some seats.

I think the looming big unknown is going to be the participation rate. The Leeds election illustrates that. The Conservative turnout was above the general participation rate. The Liberals were off by 10% (in round numbers) and the NDP was off by 30%.

Participation rate is vital. As an example, the Conservatives got 5.8 million votes in 2011 when they got a 166 seat majority in a smaller Parliament. In 2011, they got 5.6 million -- down 200,000 votes, and that cost them 67 seats!

The secret is that two things happened -- the NDP lost a million votes and 59 seats, for one thing. But perhaps more important -- another 2.8 million people voted, and almost all of them must have voted for the Liberals.!

Ignatieff's Liberals had fallen to 2.8 million votes and 34 seats. Trudeau's version of the Liberals got 6.9 million votes, more than double what Iggy got.

If all of the million votes from the NDP and the 200,000 that Harper lost had gone to the Liberals, that would only have taken them to 4 million votes. They actually polled 6.9 million! Pretty incredible. But it means that Trudeau won because he attracted 2.8 million new voters to the polls ...

How are those excitable voters going to feel this time out? My bet is that half of them think that there isn't anything to get excited about anymore. It's more like avoiding an embarrassment.

The Liberals will lose a lot of those votes to the Apathy Party, just as a regression to the mean. That would mean that their vote total is likely to go down by perhaps a million to 1.5 million votes. Bear in mind, this is with a good economy ... but what if things turn bad. It could get ugly fast. The pipeline failures, the bungled trade negotiations, even the failed promise on Proportional Representation ... you end up asking -- what did they do, except tax us more heavily?
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Singh's leadership got a rare boost with news that a former Toronto ndp mp plans to run again and try and recapture his old riding of Davenport . which went for the provincial ndp by a massive margin earlier this year although the federal race will be much tougher . no word if any other former ndp mp's from Ontario plan to run again , I don't believe any others have declared interest

also looking thru the people nominated or interested in running , I don't see any other former ndp mp's on the list anywhere in Canada , not even any from quebec where there is an endless list of former ndp mp's available as candidates )



Federal NDP nominates Andrew Cash to run in Toronto's Davenport riding


Nomination of singer-songwriter marks party’s 1st candidate in city ahead of 2019 election


CBC News · Posted: Dec 09, 2018 5:25 PM ET | Last Updated: December 9


Andrew Cash has been formally nominated as the NDP’s candidate for Toronto’s Davenport riding. (Michael Charles Cole/CBC)


18 comments


The federal NDP formally nominated Andrew Cash to run in Toronto's Davenport riding on Sunday, making the singer-songwriter the New Democrat's first candidate in the city heading into the 2019 election.

Cash previously won Davenport for the NDP in 2011, but lost his seat in 2015 to Liberal MP Julie Dzerowicz. The Liberals swept every single downtown riding in that election.

An enthusiastic Cash wasn't afraid to look back at his time in the House of Commons in a speech to supporters Sunday.


"In our riding, we all really believe that the job of the elected rep isn't to bring the voice of parliament to the people of Davenport, it's to bring the voice of the people of Davenport to the parliament," Cash said.

'Champion for urban issues'

The NDP called Cash a "champion for urban issues," and at his nomination, he spoke about previous legislative wins like protections for unpaid interns, a ban on pay-to-play interactions and a fight to reunite immigrants with their families.

"If this is what we can accomplish in a really harsh Harper-Conservative majority government, imagine what we can do the next time around," Cash added.

Newly nominated NDP candidate Andrew Cash with federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on Sunday. (Michael Charles Cole/CBC)

"What about right now? If there were more New Democrats from Toronto in Ottawa, our MPs would not be sitting silent while Doug Ford tried to rip power out of this city."

Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh was also at the Gladstone Hotel Sunday afternoon to help celebrate Cash's nomination.

"It is incredibly exciting to have someone like Andrew Cash lead the charge for us," Singh said.

"With Andrew Cash and with New Democrats you'll have fighters in your corner."

Singh faces his own electoral contest in the coming months as the party prepares for the October vote. He is currently the only federal party leader without his own seat in the House of Commons.

Singh is set to run in a February byelection in the B.C. riding of Burnaby South, though polling data suggests he faces an uphill battle. If he loses, the fate of his party leadership will hang in the balance.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ndp-andrew-cash-nomination-davenport-1.4938814


Last edited by RCO on Mon Dec 10, 2018 10:30 am; edited 1 time in total
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a long hill times article goes further into the by election and ndp's problems , it indicates Singh plans to spend much time in the riding and that a campaign office and team of volunteers is ready .

although high profile BC mp Nathan Cullen is still undecided if he will run again )



‘Failure is not an option’: NDPers say they’re optimistic heading into 2019, despite falling political fortunes, but much rides on Singh’s byelection win

By Laura Ryckewaert Dec. 10, 2018



Though hopes are high, Mr. Singh, a former Ontario MPP, isn’t exactly a shoe-in in Burnaby South. A byelection in the riding is expected to officially be called in January, with the vote to take place in February, as first reported by The Hill Times.

Former NDP MP-turned-Vancouver mayor Kennedy Stewart won the riding with roughly 35.1 per cent of the vote in 2015, coming out 1.2 percentage points, or just 547 votes, ahead of the Liberal candidate.


While the Green Party has committed to not running a candidate against Mr. Singh in the upcoming race, the Liberals and Conservatives will. The Conservatives nominated lawyer Jay Shin on Sept. 18; the Liberals will hold a nomination meeting in the next few weeks.

Asked what would happen should Mr. Singh lose, Mr. Karim said: “Failure is not an option.”

“If he doesn’t [win], then it becomes another cycle of a narrative that’s negative and people questioning what’s going on,” he said. “All the energy is on winning.”

The NDP holds 41 seats in the 338-seat House, including one in Alberta, 13 in British Columbia, two in Manitoba, eight in Ontario, 15 in Quebec, and two in Saskatchewan. In the last election, the NDP won 44 seats and a total of 19.7 per cent of the vote. But it lost 51 seats from the previous Parliament. The NDP has seen its vote share decrease from 2015 levels in all but one of the 14 federal byelections held since the last general election, the exception being Ottawa-Vanier, Ont. In that case, repeat NDP candidate Emilie Taman boosted her vote share in the April 2017 byelection by 9.7 percentage points.


But in the 13 other ridings, the NDP has seen stark drops, with support slipping by as much as 21.1 percentage points as happened in the June 2018 byelection in Chicoutimi-Le Fjord in Quebec—a province where, in 2011, the party swept 59 of the then-75 federal ridings, helping elevate it to official opposition status for the first time. In eight of these 13 ridings, the NDP garnered roughly five per cent or less of the vote. In the most recent byelection in Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, Ont.—which ultimately saw Conservatives hold the seat—the NDP candidate received just 24 more votes than the Green Party’s candidate.

NDP national director Melissa Bruno said the party is “very confident” that Mr. Singh will win his byelection, saying: “We’re seeing the excitement on the ground all the time.”

Amber Keane, a constituency assistant to B.C. NDP MLA Raj Chouhan, is Mr. Singh’s byelection campaign manager, and is overseeing a team of “a couple hundred volunteers,” according to Ms. Bruno, more than half of whom are new sign-ups. Supporting her is Ryan Chaput, the federal party’s lead organizer on-the-ground in B.C. from now into the 2019 campaign.

A campaign office on Royal Oak Avenue in Burnaby has been open since the beginning of October, and Ms. Bruno said Mr. Singh has spent almost every break week and weekend in the riding since announcing he’d seek the seat in September. He’s set to spend much of the coming winter break there as well.


“We have a full campaign team ready to go,” said Ms. Bruno. “They already have their signs, they have their lists, they have their buttons … we’re just waiting for the writ to drop.”

So far, six NDP MPs have announced they won’t run for re-election in 2019: David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, Ont.), Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, Alta.), Hélène Laverdière (Laurier-Sainte-Marie, Que.), Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo-Ladysmith, B.C.), Irene Mathyssen (London-Fanshawe, Ont.), and Romeo Saganash (Abitibi-Baie James-Nunavik-Eeyou, Que.).

The NDP was the last of the major federal parties to begin nominating candidates for 2019 but as of Dec. 9 has 18 official candidates.


NDP MP Nathan Cullen says he’s feeling better about the party’s direction heading into 2019. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

Five-term NDP MP Nathan Cullen (Skeena-Bulkley Valley, B.C.) is among those still deciding whether or not to reoffer in 2019. Last week, he told The Hill Times he’s likely to decide over the coming winter break. With a young family and a roughly 4,700-kilometer commute, Mr. Cullen said he’ll base his decision “almost entirely” on personal reasons.

While he said the NDP has a “ton of work to do” before the next election, Mr. Cullen said caucus is feeling “better than where we were even a month ago.”

“We’ve brought some new people in, the messaging seems to be focusing and getting more effective,” said Mr. Cullen. “Having a new leader, inexperienced, and inexperienced staff—it’s better to have a mix, right, of folks brand new to the environment and people who have seen it before.”

Two-term NDP MP Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, Que.), who’s among those officially nominated, said while there were some internal caucus distractions earlier this year, he thinks the NDP is “on the right track.”

Asked about recent polling, Mr. Dusseault noted that things can change fast during elections, pointing to the 2015 election, in which the third-party Liberals came from behind to form government, as an example.

“I’m hopeful and optimistic, as I always have been, to maybe form the next government with our team with the NDP,” he said.

A number of changes have happened among the NDP staff ranks, on the Hill and within the party, in recent months.


https://www.hilltimes.com/2018/12/10/ndpers-tout-optimism-heading-2019-lots-riding-singh-byelection-win/180454
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With Fin Donnelly out;
https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/british-columbia-ndp-mp-fin-donnelly-says-he-s-not-seeking-re-election-in-2019-1.4211829

And talk that Murray Rankin (Victoria) may follow, I think its fair game to discuss the possibility the NDP may not secure party Status in 2019.

Its a reach but its certainly not outside the realm of possibility.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
With Fin Donnelly out;
https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/british-columbia-ndp-mp-fin-donnelly-says-he-s-not-seeking-re-election-in-2019-1.4211829

And talk that Murray Rankin (Victoria) may follow, I think its fair game to discuss the possibility the NDP may not secure party Status in 2019.

Its a reach but its certainly not outside the realm of possibility.




I wasn't aware Fin Donnelly was not running although it appears he only announced today his plans . a riding the cpc should certainly put some effort into , they only lost by 6 % during a really bad year and when facing a popular incumbent . so 2019 could be a lot different


Murray Rankin would seem like a possible candidate for retirement as he's in his late 60's and just passed the 6 years of service mark ( enough time to qualify for a pension )
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is an example of the demoralizing effects the last election has had on the NDP. Singh doesn't help but the basic situation is one of disappointment and -- worst of all -- further losses in the future. For MPs, this is a career move. They have to think about it this way.

It is now just a matter of gauging how bad it is going to be. They are a strong brand, but they seem to have hit a dead-end. Cosmo dares to think less than 12 seats. I think it goes back to "Audrey levels" scaled up to the current seat total. Maybe 30 seats.

But should they be a party, in the Age of Social Justice? Can they do better for single mothers than the Liberals are already doing? Is there something they can do for organized labour that the Liberals aren't willing to do?
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
This is an example of the demoralizing effects the last election has had on the NDP. Singh doesn't help but the basic situation is one of disappointment and -- worst of all -- further losses in the future. For MPs, this is a career move. They have to think about it this way.

It is now just a matter of gauging how bad it is going to be. They are a strong brand, but they seem to have hit a dead-end. Cosmo dares to think less than 12 seats. I think it goes back to "Audrey levels" scaled up to the current seat total. Maybe 30 seats.

But should they be a party, in the Age of Social Justice? Can they do better for single mothers than the Liberals are already doing? Is there something they can do for organized labour that the Liberals aren't willing to do?


I checked Wikipedia to see how Audrey did that year


but when Audrey McLaughlin was leader in 1993 they won 9 seats , and had won 44 seats in the election prior ( 88 ) and those 9 seats were all in western Canada , 5 in Saskatchewan when the ndp still popular there and her riding was the Yukon


so there is past examples of a similar sized ndp caucus going from 40 or so members down to only 9 , so if they don't turn things around soon , losing party status does not seem to be out of the question



but by 97 they quickly rebounded with Alexa Mcdonough as leader and won 21 seats ( but mostly because of a surge on the east coast ) no seats in Ontario or Quebec


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_federal_election,_1993
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2018 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'It is fair to say there are some worries': Singh prepares for challenging 2019

Jagmeet Singh
NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh speaks with the media following caucus on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Wednesday November 28, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld


Kristy Kirkup and Janice Dickson, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, December 10, 2018 12:00PM EST
Last Updated Monday, December 10, 2018 4:50PM EST


OTTAWA -- After a year as leader of the NDP, Jagmeet Singh is facing his biggest political fight: trying to secure a seat in Parliament amid anemic fundraising, polls that show his party stuck in third place, and a growing list of veteran members of Parliament who will sit the next election out.

A party leader who can't win a seat customarily steps aside, though it hasn't happened in a byelection since the 1940s. Singh won't say what he'll do if he loses the byelection in British Columbia's Burnaby South expected in February.

"I am confident that we will win," Singh said in an interview on Monday. "I am confident that our message and the solutions that we're proposing will connect to people."


Singh, a seatless leader since October 2017, said it's "fair to say" some in the New Democratic Party have worries about its prospects. He said he tells New Democrats to remember their constituents.

"I remind our team that we are there fighting for those folks to make their lives better and they count on us," he said. "I think there are some worries around some of the difficulties we've had over the past two years and the fact those two years have put us in a bit of a tough position."

Singh's confidence isn't shared universally by current MPs and longtime members, however.

Several privately grumble about Singh's leadership, party fundraising and the beleaguered state of the party that's left many wondering whether they will even put their own names on ballots in 2019.

The remaining MPs who won seats in Quebec in the NDP's "orange wave"of 2011 -- there were 59 of them after that breakthrough election and only 16 after the 2015 vote -- are particularly concerned. In one Quebec byelection earlier this year, the NDP placed fourth in a riding it won in 2011 and then lost narrowly in 2015.

Over the weekend, NDP MP Fin Donnelly joined a growing list of incumbents who will not seek re-election in 2019.

Donnelly has represented the British Columbia riding Port Moody--Coquitlam, previously called New Westminster--Coquitlam, since 2009. He said it's time for him to spend time with family.

"I have every confidence in NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and my local NDP community to carry (our) vision forward, and I look forward to the opportunities the future holds," Donnelly said.

The party is struggling, meantime, with the challenging of finding numerous new candidates to replace veterans.

In Quebec, MPs Romeo Saganash and Helene Laverdiere are not seeking re-election and former NDP leader Tom Mulcair gave up his seat in Outremont, Que., in August.

Ontario MPs David Christopherson and Irene Mathyssen and Alberta MP Linda Duncan have also announced that they are not running in 2019.

Former B.C. MP Kennedy Stewart resigned his seat in September, about a month before he was elected mayor of Vancouver.

B.C. MP Murray Rankin also said he will consider the issue of re-election over the holiday break, adding he will make an announcement in early January.


Singh insists he's "really confident" in the party's prospects for the 2019 election, adding the caucus is "united" in its determination.

"I feel people are really pulling together," he said.

He also pointed to the recent nominations of Matthew Green, a Hamilton city councillor known for his advocacy on systemic discrimination, and Andrew Cash, a former Toronto NDP MP, as evidence of momentum going into the next election.



https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/it-is-fair-to-say-there-are-some-worries-singh-prepares-for-challenging-2019-1.4211829
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( in other ndp news , they actually nominated a candidate for the York Simcoe by election although its a safe cpc seat and by election likely to happen at same time as Singh's so unlikely they'll put much effort into it )



York-Simcoe acclaimed NDP candidate undaunted by challenges ahead


The York-Simcoe seat in the House of Commons was vacated in September when Conservative MP Peter Van Loan retired. It’s not yet know when or even if Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will call a byelection for the riding, but candidate said she and her team are ready

about 23 hours ago by: Kim Champion


Federal New Democratic Party of Canada York-Simcoe candidate, Jessa McLean. Kim Champion/NewmarketToday


Workers’ rights activist Jessa McLean is not one to shy away from a fight.

That’s a good thing since the acclaimed federal New Democratic Party (NDP) candidate for York-Simcoe may need to clear an additional hurdle in the form of an early 2019 byelection even before setting her sights on next October’s general federal election.

The York-Simcoe seat in the House of Commons was vacated in September when Conservative MP Peter Van Loan retired. It’s not yet know when or even if Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will call a byelection for the riding, but McLean said she and her team are ready.

“I think our riding is due for change,” McLean said, who is an organizer with the York Region chapter of Fight for $15 and Fairness. “We’re tired of electing really similar representation over and over again, who have similar policies that seem out of touch with people’s lived realities, especially for those who are struggling. We’ve reached a point where we’re seeing what damaging policies and austerity measures are doing provincially. The NDP is the only option to stop that from happening federally.”

McLean, who graduated at the top of her class with a political science degree from York University, said her long-held interest in issues of oppression, labour rights and equality is the cornerstone of her work as an activist and organizer. Throwing her hat in the ring now is all part-and-parcel of everything she believes in, she added.


“I’ve always been a supporter of the NDP and they are the only party here in Canada that comes close to challenging the narrative that keeps people down,” she said.

When McLean comes knocking at your door, you can expect to hear about new ideas and bold initiatives that will help to change the conversations usually heard on the campaign trail, she said.

For instance, the NDP believes housing should be explicit human right.

“You can’t secure other human rights without shelter, you can’t properly vote, you can’t receive social assistance that you need, it’s very difficult,” McLean said. “And that’s also talking about homelessness, as well as those sheltered precariously.


“We’re really going to challenge the other candidates and their parties to answer to people living in poverty and living in precarious situations,” McLean said. “We’re talking about building massive amounts of social and co-op housing that’s federally funded, and hopefully other levels of government can step up their game. But, nationally we can do this.”

The NDP has not yet won either a provincial or federal seat in York-Simcoe, but McLean is undaunted.

“We know we are traditionally the underdogs, so that makes us more determined to work that much longer and that much harder,” she said. “And, I think we’ll surprise people, even if it takes a moment or two to digest what we have to say. We’ve tried other parties’ ways, corporate tax cuts to stimulate job growth does not work. We’ve tried their approach to climate change, and now we’re in a dangerous position. We’re really working against the clock and the environment is a particular concern here in York-Simcoe. Our plan is to build a completely renewable energy economy, which will resonate here.”

New Democratic Party of Canada Leader Jagmeet Singh, himself, will vie for a first-time seat in the House of Commons in an upcoming February byelection in the British Columbia riding of Burnaby South. Singh will run against candidates put forward by both the Liberals and Conservatives.

So far in York-Simcoe, candidate Scot Davidson is running under the Conservative banner and former federal Liberal Party of Canada candidate Shaun Tanaka is once again vying for that party’s nomination. The Green Party of Canada has not yet nominated a candidate.

McLean lives in Sutton with her husband and young son.
For more information on York-Simcoe candidate Jessa McLean and the NDP, call 1-888-881-4637 or email contact@ndpyorksimcoe.ca.

https://www.bradfordtoday.ca/local-news/york-simcoe-acclaimed-ndp-candidate-undaunted-by-challenges-ahead-1154320
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