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Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is where we disagree. I think the potential is there. What you may not see -- and may not happen -- is that the biggest party in Canada is the Apathy party, the people who feel unrepresented, or don't care because they don't understand what's going on anyway.

That's how Justin got elected -- he didn't take votes away from the Conservatives, he attracted new voters to the polls.

I have tried to show how policy is being downgraded in elections now. The real issues -- the institutionalization of anti-white male attitudes, for example. Family breakup and all the gender issues is another. Immigration and the legitimate fear of Moslem extremism as well. The unrecognized drug epidemic. The Carbon tax is another box to tick.

All of these cannot really be talked about without risking the enmity of the social justice mob, and with that the risk of career destruction -- because they go for your job!

It's my feeling that the first person that brings these issues into discourse will become the major opposition player. It's a sad reality, but the Conservative Party is "all in" on destroying Bernier. They frolic like frat-boys, posing as the champions of the Milk Cartel and delighting in the ousting of the best thing the party has going for it in Quebec.

It may cost Scheer power. Fair enough, but that's what Bernier puts at stake -- the possibility of four more years of Trudeau. That's Bernier's leverage.

I would like to see the party unified under Bernier, as a goal. But between now and the election, Bernier should be allowed to use his leverage. There are degrees of effectiveness to benchmark. First, is preventing Scheer from getting a majority. A higher level is electing members in the House. An even higher level is achieving party status. Beyond that, is getting a majority.

You seem to have only one standard of success. For myself, I want to see Bernier use his leverage until the campaign starts. Then I'll start deciding who to vote for -- but the best thing that could happen between now and Labour Day is a swelling support behind Bernier. That's my view -- because it will achieve one level of success or another.

What we are reaping now is the result of the 'weighted' voting system the party tall foreheads brought in ... it's not just me anymore, there's a hope that Scheer hasn't shown what he's got yet ... but more likely, he has. When the reporters start calling you "Andrew Scheep" ... it says something.

It's not Scheer's fault. I blame the high-foreheads. However, Bernier should have been the leader of the party, and he would be doing things that excite elements of the population ... fleshing out the dream that Canadians have for this country.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
This is where we disagree. I think the potential is there. What you may not see -- and may not happen -- is that the biggest party in Canada is the Apathy party, the people who feel unrepresented, or don't care because they don't understand what's going on anyway.

That's how Justin got elected -- he didn't take votes away from the Conservatives, he attracted new voters to the polls.

I have tried to show how policy is being downgraded in elections now. The real issues -- the institutionalization of anti-white male attitudes, for example. Family breakup and all the gender issues is another. Immigration and the legitimate fear of Moslem extremism as well. The unrecognized drug epidemic. The Carbon tax is another box to tick.

All of these cannot really be talked about without risking the enmity of the social justice mob, and with that the risk of career destruction -- because they go for your job!

It's my feeling that the first person that brings these issues into discourse will become the major opposition player. It's a sad reality, but the Conservative Party is "all in" on destroying Bernier. They frolic like frat-boys, posing as the champions of the Milk Cartel and delighting in the ousting of the best thing the party has going for it in Quebec.

It may cost Scheer power. Fair enough, but that's what Bernier puts at stake -- the possibility of four more years of Trudeau. That's Bernier's leverage.

I would like to see the party unified under Bernier, as a goal. But between now and the election, Bernier should be allowed to use his leverage. There are degrees of effectiveness to benchmark. First, is preventing Scheer from getting a majority. A higher level is electing members in the House. An even higher level is achieving party status. Beyond that, is getting a majority.

You seem to have only one standard of success. For myself, I want to see Bernier use his leverage until the campaign starts. Then I'll start deciding who to vote for -- but the best thing that could happen between now and Labour Day is a swelling support behind Bernier. That's my view -- because it will achieve one level of success or another.

What we are reaping now is the result of the 'weighted' voting system the party tall foreheads brought in ... it's not just me anymore, there's a hope that Scheer hasn't shown what he's got yet ... but more likely, he has. When the reporters start calling you "Andrew Scheep" ... it says something.

It's not Scheer's fault. I blame the high-foreheads. However, Bernier should have been the leader of the party, and he would be doing things that excite elements of the population ... fleshing out the dream that Canadians have for this country.




there is never going to be 100 % voter turnout , there is always going to be a % of the population that does not bother to vote


the liberals attracted new voters several ways , some were young men who wanted to see marijuana legalised , others were young women who though JT was hot or First Nations voters who liked there first nations policy . they found many voters thru a number of different issues


the people's party perhaps by not being in power might be able to focus and raise issues not being discussed in Ottawa . the tories are often accused of focusing too much on older and suburban voters well ignoring younger more urban voters .


and perhaps that's one demographic where they will find an audience


but I can't think of any seats outside of Beauce that they currently have a chance of picking up and under first past the post its going to be hard for them to win ridings this early in there history


but the threat of another 4 years of trudeau is very real , so I'm not really sure what the people's party hopes to accomplish in 2019 if they are unable to actually win new seats
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you imagine how "soft" Trudeau's vote is, under the circumstances? A lot of his appeal was single mothers who were given as much as $650 a month/child as a government check. For 16 years or so. Not bad.

And I wonder if how many loose voters are wondering who to vote for next in the collapse of the NDP in Quebec?

I wonder how many old line 'progressive' Conservatives that don't see Scheer as the solution?

At some point, you have to have faith. You don't need to get every vote of the Apathy Party. You only need enough to prevent a majority goverment from forming.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Can you imagine how "soft" Trudeau's vote is, under the circumstances? A lot of his appeal was single mothers who were given as much as $650 a month/child as a government check. For 16 years or so. Not bad.

And I wonder if how many loose voters are wondering who to vote for next in the collapse of the NDP in Quebec?

I wonder how many old line 'progressive' Conservatives that don't see Scheer as the solution?

At some point, you have to have faith. You don't need to get every vote of the Apathy Party. You only need enough to prevent a majority goverment from forming.




one of the most likely areas of growth for the people's party would be the urban ridings where the cpc does very poorly and generally don't have a strong following in . ( like Montreal , Toronto and Vancouver ) there is younger millennial voters in these ridings who don't pay much attention to the federal conservatives but might be willing to listen to the what people's party is about


the vote split argument doesn't stand up in those places if they never vote cpc anyways but still an uphill battle to beat a liberal or ndp incumbent


but likely a 2 or 3 election long game strategy before they would be able to win those sorts of ridings
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I reiterate, the most likely outcome (in the short run) will be that Bernier will have considerable power to affect the agenda, at least that part of it that they dare expose to the public.

Remember Ross Perot, in the US -- the guy with the big ears? He put 'the giant sucking sound' on the agenda, rose quickly in support? George Bush I had his presidency ended, and Bill Clinton won that election as a result. You don't always have to win an election to make your point. Clinton acted as if he would do all the things that Trump is talking about.

Bernier can't help himself. What do you think motivates the Ford Nation? He has to find a way to make an issue out of things like immigration without being racist, or gender issues, without being sexist. That's the key. That's where the risk is, because the media will mischaracterize any honest effort to bridge that gap.

To speak to those issues from the point of view of those who feel voiceless is something that they will attempt to pillory.

Why? Because a lot of the suppositions of 'identity politics' rest on generalizing from group characteristics to individuals. The population has been indoctrinated by goverhment education to think that (right-wing = Hitler.) And Hitler = Racism.

By that logic, any white male conservative is going to be seen (by TC's crowd, for example) as a bigotted misogynist and homophobe because ... you know ... Hitler.

Which means what any spokesperson says will be dismissed from the start. The playbook covers how to handle these situations. (Isn't that how it goes with TC and myself?)

That's the fault of what we laughingly call "the intelligentsia" in the media. They will organize a mugging if they can. It is important to keep on slogging because, trust me, events will prove the Bernier view to be one they can't ignore!

The proponent has to be very sure of his claims, and must -- in every way -- contradict or directly confront the narrative of the muggers.

This means you must be verbally agile, and at the same time, disciplined on message. You must look for solutions, not blame individuals, but policy. You must not denigrate women, you point out that the achievements of men (even the white ones) are pretty phenomenal ... women know. Men invented electricity for Christ's sake -- what does a cateory of humans have to do for the other half to get some peace?

When have the lives of so many been so abundant? The Patriarchy did that.

That's the kind of line that has to be taken. And the internet has to be used as much as possible. The media won't soften in the face of hostile facts -- they will double down. So it is essential to use the internet to get around the Globe&Mail.

Marching in the sludge of Andrew Scheer is going to take us into his version of a carbon tax ... and maybe more for single mothers. Besides, he doesn't lead -- he prods from behind, and flicks the reins. Always remember -- he won by less than 1% on the thirteenth ballot of a weighted vote system, and because his parents enrolled him in immersion French. This is not Napoleon.

All of us should encourage Bernier until Labour Day approaches -- and then take stock on the question of voting. Forcing the wingtip shoe types into the debate the people want is what we should want until then. My view.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this article brings up the question is the struggling ndp or Bernier's people's party the conservatives biggest challenge rate now ? what will happen to soft ndp voters ? and is bernier's party attractive former cpc voters or people who hadn't been involved in the past cause they didn't like the old parties ? )




Struggling NDP could be the biggest worry for federal Tories as House returns


Mia Rabson

Ottawa

The Canadian Press


Published 2 hours ago

Updated November 19, 2018


Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press

The federal Conservatives return to the House of Commons today after a tumultuous two weeks that included losing one of their best-known MPs to a sexual-misconduct scandal.

But for leader Andrew Scheer and company, it’s not Tony Clement’s online activities, the potential spillover of harassment allegations against provincial Tory politicians, or even the growing popularity of former Tory Maxime Bernier’s new political party that are keeping them up at night.

The Tory nightmare now is the fall of the NDP.

“That’s where I’m actually worried, frankly — from a strategic perspective, that’s what I’m watching,” said Alexandre Meterissian, a conservative strategist with Montreal firm Hatley Strategy Advisors. “The collapse of the NDP is a big problem for the party.”

Meterissian in particular is concerned about a Mainstreet Research Poll published Nov. 14 that had the Liberals with a comfortable lead and the NDP down at 10 per cent, barely ahead of the Green Party. That was an unusually bad poll for the New Democrats but Meterissian said there is a downward trend for the party and leader Jagmeet Singh, who is struggling with caucus discontent and communications problems.


Meterissian said the Conservatives need to figure out how to attract NDP voters in Quebec and northern Ontario, because otherwise those votes will all go to the Liberals.

Scheer said in an interview that going back into the House of Commons after a break week for Remembrance Day, his party is going to focus on being united and not dwelling on the difficulties of the last few weeks or even months.

Scheer said sexual harassment is not a partisan issue, all the parties have had to contend with it, and all the parties have to figure out how best to investigate and address it. Clement is the fourth MP since the last election to be forced out of a caucus because of allegations of improper behaviour. Two have been Liberals and one was a New Democrat.

“We’ve had our issue, we’ve dealt with it and now we’re focusing on going back to holding this government to account and putting forward innovative policy options,” Scheer said.

He acknowledged losing an MP as experienced and well-known as Clement is a bit of a blow. Clement has been a cabinet minister in the Ontario and federal governments, a leadership candidate and the party’s justice critic.


“Obviously Tony held significant roles in our caucus,” Scheer said. “That said, we have a great team with a lot of depth.”

Clement — who admitted to sending explicit photos to women online — is just one of at least five conservative politicians and staff members at the federal level and in Ontario and Manitoba who have quit or were forced out in the last few weeks after allegations of sexual misconduct.

The publication last week of former Ontario Tory leader and former federal MP Patrick Brown’s book, in which he threw deep shade at many of his former staff and fellow Tories, added to the disarray.

At best, the stories were a distraction for Scheer, whose major policy announcement on how the Conservatives would address gang and gun problems went largely under the radar.

The Tories almost had a big win against the Liberals when the government changed rules and sent child-killer Terri-Lynne McClintic back to prison from a healing lodge. But then came the news Nov. 13 that during the Conservatives’ own time in office, 10 people convicted of killing children had been in such lodges for at least some of their sentences.

The Conservatives are also about to receive a report on how the party handled allegations in 2015 that then-MP Rick Dykstra had been accused of sexual assault. The party, including leader Stephen Harper, allowed Dykstra to stay on as a candidate and the report is to examine the propriety of that decision. (Dykstra has never been charged in the matter and denies the allegation.)


Meterissian said most of these stories are gossip that will not live long in the minds of voters.

The Conservatives are also, however, facing a challenge from the right in Scheer’s one-time leadership rival Maxime Bernier. Bernier quit the Conservative Party of Canada to launch his own. Bernier’s People’s Party of Canada is growing in popularity, claiming more than 30,000 members signed up and more than $300,000 raised in just its first few weeks.

Bernier’s party is polling between three and five per cent on most surveys at the moment. But a lot of Conservatives worry that even if the party can’t win a lot of seats, it can steal enough votes from the Conservatives to help the Liberals win.

Meterissian isn’t convinced of that, believing Bernier is really attracting people who otherwise would not vote.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-struggling-ndp-could-be-the-biggest-worry-for-federal-tories-as-house/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andrew Scheer's Camp Says Pressing Doug Ford On Ontario's French Services Cuts ‘Like Talking To A Wall’
The Ontario premier has set off a national debate that could hurt federal Tories in 2019.
By Althia Raj

OTTAWA — Blindsided by the Ontario premier's decision to cut French services, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer's camp is hoping that Doug Ford realizes he's set off a national debate that could hurt Scheer in next year's federal election.

"We are associated to a decision that we did not help make, that we were not aware of — we learned this at the same time as everybody else when they made their announcement — and now, it's like, as if by association, we are OK with that decision," a frustrated member of Scheer's team told HuffPost Canada on Sunday.

In a fiscal update Thursday, the Ford government announced it was backing away from its election promise to fund a French-language university in Toronto and was eliminating the Office of the French Language Services Commissioner — moving some of those responsibilities to the province's ombudsman.
https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/11/19/andrew-scheer-doug-ford-french-cuts_a_23593494/?utm_hp_ref=ca-politics
=================================================

Scheer wants to kick Doug Ford out of the party. Good.

How does this make good sense? Anyone want to share a foxhole with Andy?
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( mainstreet did a riding specific poll for Beauce and it has Bernier losing by a small margin to the conservative candidate


Nanaimo By-Election A Dead Heat; Singh And Bernier In Trouble In Their Ridings

November 19, 2018|Mainstreet Research|British Columbia, Featured, Public Polling, Québec


19 November 2018 (Ottawa ON) – The BC NDP and the BC Liberals find themselves in a statistical tie in the upcoming provincial by-election in Nanaimo.

Also, Jagmeet Singh and Maxime Bernier would lose in their respective ridings if an election were held today.

Those are the findings from three polls in the federal ridings of Beauce and Burnaby South and the provincial riding of Nanaimo.

“The upcoming by-election in Nanaimo is important for both parties as it could let the Liberals take the lead in the seat count in the BC legislature,” said Quito Maggi, President and CEO of Mainstreet Research. “When asking Nanaimo residents what party they would vote for, the NDP lead by eight, but they are virtually tied when Nanaimo residents were asked about what candidate they would vote for.”

Among decided and leaning voters, Sheila Malcolmson of the NDP has 39.8%, while Tony Harris of the BC Liberals has 38.2%.

In Beauce, recently nominated candidate Richard Lehoux of the Conservatives has 37.9% support, while Bernier has 34.7% support among decided and leaning voters.

“Bernier narrows the gap when we ask Beauce residents which candidates they would vote for,” continued Maggi. “But there is no mistake that Bernier would be in trouble if the election were held today.


https://www.mainstreetresearch.ca/nanaimo-by-election-a-dead-heat-singh-and-bernier-in-trouble-in-their-ridings/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scheer vs. Bernier: Unfinished business spills into 2019 election
By PENNY COLLENETTEColumnist
Sun., Nov. 18, 2018
Just how much political damage can Maxime Bernier cause to Andrew Scheer, Leader of the Conservative Party, in the run up to the next election?

More importantly, will Bernier’s well known libertarian principles impact our national discourse, possibly shifting the debate, not only for Scheer, but for all leaders? Will “Mad Max” be a lightning rod for discontent, or simply a safety valve for malcontents? [....]
https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/11/18/scheer-vs-bernier-unfinished-business-spills-into-2019-election.html
================================================

This is what Bernier supporters want to happen. The point is to shake up the box and force the politicians to wake up to the real problems in Canadian society. And squeezing Mexico to institutionalize gender discrimination for the benefit of Mexican women in the work force is NOT one of them.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is the heart of the problem ... the guy who split the party! Who told you first?

It seems like Scheer wants to have the position of leader, but he doesn't actually want to lead -- by which I mean he doesn't want to go through the grotty stuff necessary to actually rally opinion ... what does HE believe in, what is HIS vision of country? If hwas asked that, he's probably say he'd get back to you on that.

What I want to know is this -- why hasn't some faction of the part recruited a young women to make some false allegations?
=================================================

John Ivison: Andrew Scheer’s ‘problematic’ leadership sparks concern among Conservatives
If the Conservatives win, or even hold Justin Trudeau to a minority, Scheer’s position is assured. Any other outcome leaves him vulnerable

The contrast is stark between Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, left, and the brash Ontario Premier Doug Ford.Jack Boland/Postmedia Network
John Ivison
November 23, 2018
7:11 PM EST

When Andrew Scheer was elected leader of the Conservative Party 18 months ago, I suggested it was a fair bet he would one day be prime minister.

“Short of a meltdown,” I suggested the odds were with him — of 22 Conservative leaders since Confederation, 13 went on to become prime minister. Scheer will only be 44 years old in 2023, by which time Canadians may have had their fill of sunny days.

But my thinking has evolved.

If the Conservatives win, or even hold Justin Trudeau to a minority, Scheer’s position is assured. Any other outcome leaves him vulnerable. There are simply too many Conservatives, in and out of caucus, complaining that he is failing to show decisive, dynamic leadership.

The election of Doug Ford in Ontario has done him few favours. The contrast is stark. Ford is brash and injudicious but his larger-than-life personality is eclipsing the apparently irresolute federal leader.

Ford’s recent decision not to fund a francophone university in the province highlighted Scheer’s shortcomings as a leader. The federal Quebec caucus demanded the leader condemn the decision. Scheer, conscious that he will need the support of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives in the coming election, gave a rather tepid response saying he had “concerns” with the decision.

One member of the Conservative shadow cabinet contrasted the response with Stephen Harper’s decision to support Liberal legislation to amend the Official Languages Act in 2005. Harper told caucus some members might have difficulty supporting the amendment that required the federal government to promote French-speaking minorities outside Quebec, but that they would do so to convince francophone voters that the Conservative Party could be trusted on language policy.

Not that Scheer can be Harper, anymore than he can be Trudeau.

But he has emerged as a junior partner to Ford in Ontario, just as he has to Jason Kenney in Alberta. Kenney is said to have introduced Scheer as the newspaper-clippings guy from the Opposition Leader’s Office (before being elected, the Conservative leader worked in the correspondence unit of the OLO).

It may have been said in jest but it reflects a lack of peer-to-peer respect that still afflicts Scheer among those senior colleagues who toiled in the trenches of Harper’s cabinet while he sat on the backbench or in the Speaker’s chair.

“It’s problematic,” a senior member of Scheer’s shadow cabinet repeated over and over, while professing to have no clue as to how to fix the problem of his leadership.

The Conservatives were sitting pretty in the polls in the spring and through the summer — statistically tied with the Liberals or even ahead. As fall has turned to winter, support has ticked lower, in some surveys falling below the psychological bar of 30 per cent. The concern is that this is not because a significant number of voters are defecting to Maxime Bernier’s new party. Rather, the worry is that the support is shifting to the Liberals, who are now more than 10 points up in some polls.

“Every MP is hearing: ‘Scheer needs to be strong, he needs to be out there’. And he is out there, but we are in an age where people want a fighter,” said the second shadow-cabinet member.

I’m concerned there is no compelling narrative

On any number of issues from the Canada Summer Jobs program to moving the Israeli embassy to Jerusalem, the leadership’s position has been slow to emerge.

“They seem to be afraid to take a position on things that might go against provincial partners, and so speak out of both sides of their mouth,” said one party insider.

He said that the Opposition Leader’s Office is “somewhat chaotic and not well organized.”

This is not a case of an internal rebellion by a disgruntled faction. Even those who are critical say that Scheer is thoughtful and considerate, and has fostered a strong camaraderie in caucus that easily weathered Bernier’s departure.

The leader is deemed to have performed well on certain issues — such as the drive to force the government to change the law on offenders like child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic.

But there are fears that small victories on individual files are not translating into broad support.

“I’m concerned there is no compelling narrative,” said one well-respected Conservative. “We should have stuck to a continuous message for weeks on end. It’s only when we’re sick and tired of it that people out there start hearing it.”

He said he expected the leadership to pivot to a major platform-commitment this fall.

“I thought we’d put something in the window to get people enthused. But there’s nothing. We chase an issue and then we go down a rabbit hole.”

Before the party convention in Halifax in the summer, there was a suggestion Scheer would make an unabashed pitch to disgruntled Liberal voters to come over to a moderate Conservative Party of the centre-right. But that pitch was not made and there has been little in what Scheer has said or done since then that might appeal to persuadable Liberals.

The leader remains an unknown quantity to many Canadians — a Nanos Research tracking poll suggested more than one third of respondents are so unsure of his qualities they can’t even rate him.

Scheer has been underestimated before — namely when he beat Lorne Nystrom to win a Regina seat the NDP veteran had held for 32 years.

But as one Conservative veteran pointed out, the unwritten rule that leaders automatically got two kicks at the can is a thing of the past in an age of social media and heightened partisanship.

Would Scheer survive a leadership review if he loses the next election, I asked the second shadow cabinet member?

“I don’t think so. Someone would stick the knife in,” they replied. “It is problematic.”
https://nationalpost.com/opinion/john-ivison-andrew-scheers-problematic-leadership-sparks-concern-among-conservatives
=================================================

This is just what I have been saying for a year. Don't tell me some of them weren't thinking the same thing a year ago. I understand their caution ... but put it this way -- if columnists like Iverson are now going public with these doubts, it means the media is already disenchanted with Andrew Scheer. He's a year away from people makig jokes about him as they did with Joe Clark.

It's another sign that something should be done.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'A breath of fresh air': Maxime Bernier holds 1st Manitoba rally since forming Canada's newest federal party
Holly Caruk · CBC News · Posted: Nov 28, 2018 11:36 PM CT | Last Updated: 10 hours ago

The leader of Canada's newest political party was in Winnipeg Wednesday evening to speak with his supporters here for the first time since striking out on his own.

Maxime Bernier addressed a crowd of over 200 people at the Holiday Inn on Ellice Avenue before taking questions from the audience.

"I think that's a big success and I'm very happy. I'm showing to Canadians that we are not alone, there's people out there who believe in our ideas," said Bernier after the event.

"They are coming here because we are doing politics differently, we're not afraid to speak about what we believe, and I think they appreciate that."

In August, Bernier made waves within the Conservative Party and across the country for a series of tweets about Canada's diversity.

At the time, Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer accused Bernier of playing identity politics and being more occupied with advancing his own profile than the needs of the party.

Bernier had lost the bid to lead the Conservatives to Scheer at last year's leadership convention.

He quit the Conservative party in August and started the People's Party of Canada in October.

'A breath of fresh air'
Winnipeg is just one of many stops on his tour to build support for the party, which now has 1,100 members in Manitoba.

The crowd of mostly men listened as the Quebec MP spoke about his platforms on equalization payments, immigration and eliminating corporate welfare.

He also spoke of deregulation, abolishing the CRTC and defunding the CBC.

Many stayed to the end to ask questions and take photos with the PPC leader.

Jared Van Beveren said Wednesday's event was the first political rally he's ever attended. He follows Bernier on social media and wanted to hear him speak in person.

"I was very disappointed that he lost the Conservative leadership, I'm not a huge fan of Andrew Scheer," said Van Beveren.

"When [Bernier] announced he was starting his own party, I was sort of excited. I wanted to see where it would go."

Van Beveren said he was pleased with what he heard at the rally and feels that Bernier is different from other politicians.

"I don't always agree with him 100 per cent, but at least he explains himself in a way that I think is clear and concise and speaks to voters," said Van Beveren.

I consider him a breath of fresh air because he says what he has in mind, which happens to resonate with a lot of Canadians," said Akhidime.

He said many Canadians are tired of political correctness and want to be able to speak their minds without fear of being criticized.

"We have been looking for an opportunity to have a leader who actually speaks the minds of the people," he said.

'No opposition right now'
Bernier also addressed fears about splitting the opposition vote and weakening the Conservatives against Justin Trudeau's Liberals.

"We won't split the opposition because there is no opposition right now. Scheer and Trudeau, on a lot of subjects, they're the same," he said.

Bernier wouldn't say whether he had any Manitoba candidates in mind yet, but said the party already has people working in 13 of the 14 ridings and is confident they will be well represented in the 2019 election.

"We have the momentum and we are a principled party," he said.

'I'm working for all Canadians'
Bernier spoke openly about taking a pause on immigration in Canada, and has been critical of what he calls Canada's "extreme multiculturalism."

Akhidime, a permanent resident from Nigeria, said he agrees with those views.

"People can bring a positive change or a negative change to a society. If you have a majority of people with a negative mindset who do not value the culture of the land, they may sway it in a completely different direction," he said.

When asked what he would do to earn the votes of diverse Canadians, Bernier said he'd do nothing.

"I won't do anything for the Muslim community, I won't do anything for the Christian community, I won't do anything for the Jewish community," Bernier said.

"For me, you are a Canadian and I'm working for all Canadians.

"I don't try to pander to every special ethnicity or special interest group."
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/leader-canada-s-newest-political-party-winnipeg-1.4925095
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Instead of worrying about Scheer’s performance, Conservatives should be concerned about Bernier as a ‘disrupter’ in next election, says pollster Nanos
By ABBAS RANA DEC. 3, 2018

Pollster Nik Nanos describes Conservatives who are second guessing Andrew Scheer's performance 10 months before an election as ‘Nervous Nellies.' Jean Chrétien coined the term back in 1993 when Liberals were nervous about losing the federal election, but ended up reducing the Progressive Conservatives to two seats.

Even if Maxime Bernier and his newly launched People’s Party don’t make any significant electoral gains in the House in 2019, they’ll still be “disrupters and a nuisance” for Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, whose party could lose some seats, especially in closely contested ridings if the vote is divided on the right, says leading pollster Nik Nanos.

“If you are a Conservative caucus member, I would probably be worried more about Maxime Bernier than worrying about Andrew Scheer’s performance, at this particular point in time,” said Mr. Nanos, chair of Nanos Research, in a recent interview last week with The Hill Times. “The likelihood of them [the People’s Party] winning an election or coming second is not high today, but it is possible for Maxime Bernier to be a disrupter.”

Based on his weekly polling results, Mr. Nanos said currently only one in 10 Canadians would consider voting for Mr. Bernier’s (Beauce, Que.) People’s Party. So, it appears highly unlikely at this time that the People’s Party will make any significant electoral gains in 2019, but it’s still bad news for Andrew Scheer’s (Regina-Qu’Appelle, Sask.) Conservatives. The potential impact of the ‘Bernier factor’ in the next election is unknown, but Conservatives should pay close attention, as a divided vote on the right is not good news for the party, especially in closely contested ridings, said Mr. Nanos.

“The objective of Maxime Bernier would be to disrupt Andrew Scheer, especially during the next election, and try to shake loose disaffected Conservatives to the new party that Maxime Bernier is trying to build,” said Mr. Nanos, adding that for Mr. Bernier “to have an impact, he also needs Mr. Scheer to falter.”

In the 2015 election, there were 70 ridings nationally that were decided by a margin of five per cent or less of the vote. Of these, the Liberals won 34, the NDP won 16, the Conservatives won 15, and the Bloc Québécois won five. Twenty-eight of these closely fought ridings were in Ontario, 22 in Quebec, four in Alberta, nine in British Columbia, three in Manitoba, two in Saskatchewan, and one each in Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick.

According to the most recent weekly rolling Nanos tracking poll released on Nov. 27, the Liberals were leading the pack with the support of 40 per cent of Canadians, followed by the Conservatives with 32 per cent, the NDP 15 per cent, the Greens seven, and the People’s Party with one per cent support [....]

Tim Powers, a veteran Conservative political insider and vice chairman of Summa Strategies, agreed that Conservatives should pay attention to Mr. Bernier’s party, but added it’s not possible for him to predict how Canada’s newest federal party will perform. He said so far there’s no well-known person other than Mr. Bernier who has joined the party.

“Andrew Scheer should not be blind to Maxime Bernier’s project, but neither should he be in a state of paralysis about it,” said Mr. Powers. “It really is unclear at this juncture if Bernier’s adventure in leadership will amount to anything. When the People’s Party reaches beyond more than one person in the front window then an accurate assessment can be made [....]
https://www.hilltimes.com/2018/12/03/instead-worrying-scheers-performance-conservatives-pay-close-attention-berniers-peoples-party-pollster-nanos/178755
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Bernier launches the People's Party of Canada

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