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Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:34 am    Post subject: Canada is diplomatically isolated in Saudi spat Reply with quote

Quote:

‘We don’t have a single friend’: Canada’s Saudi spat reveals country is alone

As Saudi officials lashed out at Canada, the US remained on the sidelines, signaling a blatant shift in the relationship

Ashifa Kassam in Toronto
Sat 11 Aug 2018 10.00 BST Last modified on Sun 12 Aug 2018 00.52 BST.

Soon after Donald Trump took office, it became clear that the longstanding relationship between the United States and its northern neighbour was about to change: there were terse renegotiations of Nafta, thousands of asylum seekers walking across the shared border and attacks on against Canada’s protectionist trade policies.

But this week laid bare perhaps the most blatant shift in the relationship, as the US said it would remain on the sidelines while Saudi officials lashed out at Canada over its call to release jailed civil rights activists.

“It’s up for the government of Saudi Arabia and the Canadians to work this out,” state department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said this week. “Both sides need to diplomatically resolve this together. We can’t do it for them.”

Canada’s lonely stance was swiftly noticed north of the border. “We do not have a single friend in the whole entire world,” Rachel Curran, a policy director under former Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper, lamented on Twitter.

The UK was similarly muted in its response, noted Bob Rae, a former leader of the federal Liberal party. “The Brits and the Trumpians run for cover and say ‘we’re friends with both the Saudis and the Canadians,’” “Thanks for the support for human rights, guys, and we’ll remember this one for sure.”

The spat appeared to have been sparked last week when Canada’s foreign ministry expressed its concern over the arrest of Saudi civil society and women’s rights activists, in a tweet that echoed concerns previously voiced by the United Nations.

Saudi Arabia swiftly shot back, making plans to remove thousands of Saudi students and medical patients from Canada, and suspending the state airline’s flights to and from Canada, among other actions.

Speaking to reporters in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister urged Canada to “fix its big mistake” and warned that the kingdom was considering additional measures against Canada.

Analysts and regional officials said the spat had little to do with Canada, instead characterising Riyadh’s actions as a broader signal to western governments that any criticism of its domestic policies is unacceptable.

Several countries expressed support for Saudi Arabia, including Egypt and Russia. But Canada continued to stand alone, even as state-run media in the kingdom reported the beheading and “crucifixion” of a man convicted of killing a woman and carrying out other crimes.

Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, said Canada was continuing to engage diplomatically and politically with Saudi Arabia. “We have respect for their importance in the world and recognise that they have made progress on a number of important issues,” he told reporters this week.

He insisted, however, that his government would continue to press Saudi Arabia on its human rights record. “We will, at the same time, continue to speak clearly and firmly on issues of human rights at home and abroad wherever we see the need.”

In this particular dispute, Canada did not need US help, said Thomas Juneau, a professor at the University of Ottawa. “Saudi Arabia-Canada relations are very limited, so there’s not a lot of damage being done to Canada right now,” he said. “But this should be a source of major anxiety: when a real crisis comes and we are alone, what do we do?”

The week’s events have added impetus to a conversation that is slowly getting underway in Canada, Juneau said. “We are starting some serious soul-searching in the sense of what does it mean for Canada to have a US that is much more unilateral, much more dismissive of the rules and the norms and of its leadership role in the international order that it has played for 70 years?”

These changes south of the border have clearly emboldened Saudi Arabia, Juneau argued, describing the kingdom’s recent actions in Yemen, Qatar and Lebanon as a pattern of aggressive, ambitious and reckless behaviour.

He saw no immediate end to the row, particularly as neither side is suffering significant costs in the dispute. Saudi Arabia has shown little inclination in recent years to walk back from its reckless and impulsive behaviour, he said, while Canada’s federal government – facing an election in 14 months and already under fire for signing off on the sale of more than 900 armoured vehicles to Riyadh – is loth to be seen adopting any kind of conciliatory posture towards the conservative kingdom.

While some in Canada had been disappointed to see the UK and Europe opt to publicly stay out of the diplomatic spat, Juneau described it as unsurprising. “When Saudi Arabia had comparable fights with Sweden and Germany in recent years, did Canada go out of its way to side with Sweden and Germany? No, not at all,” he said. “We stayed quiet because we had nothing to gain from getting involved. So on the European side, the calculation is the same.”

Canada’s lonely stand for women’s rights in the kingdom did earn the support of some around the world; this week saw the Guardian and the New York Times publish editorials urging Europe and the US to stand with Canada. So did the Washington Post, going one step further by publishing their editorial in Arabic.

Their call was echoed by a handful of prominent voices in the US, including Bernie Sanders. “It’s entirely legitimate for democratic governments to highlight human rights issues with undemocratic governments,” the US senator wrote on Twitter. “The US must be clear in condemning repression, especially when done by governments that receive our support.”
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/11/canada-saudi-arabia-support-us


Remember Justin's promises -- how he was going to give us a more dynamic economy? Three years later, we are diplomatically isolated and our economic future is 'uncertain'. Yet we are way higher taxes for a performance that has been lacking and is on the brink of disaster.

If only there were a leader in this country that was capable of relating to our real problems, rather than the problems of (rich) Saudi women.

Can anyone say any different?
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
It’s time for the Trudeau government to move past its errors and post some wins in foreign policy
John Ibbitson
JOHN IBBITSON
PUBLISHED 14 HOURS AGO
UPDATED AUGUST 13, 2018
The painful confrontation with Saudi Arabia is yet another example of the continuity-of-error that defines much of this Liberal government’s approach to Canada in the world.

“It’s a sad tale of unfulfilled promises and possibilities left unexplored and amateurish stumbling about,” says Daryl Copeland, a foreign policy analyst who spent three decades as a diplomat at Foreign Affairs. "And it needn’t be so.”

Chrystia Freeland’s mishandling of the contretemps with the Saudis is truly baffling. Yes, Riyadh wildly overreacted to the tweets from the Foreign Affairs Minister and her department demanding the release of human rights activists. But the prolonged detention of those activists is now virtually guaranteed, which is the very opposite of what Ms. Freeland hoped to achieve.

Beyond that, Canada earned the hostility of an important power in the Middle East. Other regional players have lined up in solidarity with the Saudis, and Canada’s traditional allies, including the United States and Britain, refuse to take sides. We are very much alone.

"Why don’t we just talk to them? Why do we have to tweet about it?” asks Richard Nimijean, a political scientist at Carleton University. Traditionally, Canadian governments have secured the release of political prisoners through quiet diplomacy. Those tweets were neither quiet nor diplomatic.

All this appears to be part of a general Liberal incoherence on foreign policy. A key aspect of that incoherence is the government’s tendency to over-promise and under-deliver.

So a “Canada is back” commitment in Paris to fight climate change morphed into the nationalization of the Trans Mountain pipeline project, to the alarm of environmental activists.

And while Mr. Trudeau promised that Canada would resume its traditional role in peacekeeping, the government took forever to commit to the mission in Mali, and that commitment was far less than originally promised.

Then, there is the Liberals’ high-minded promotion of human rights internationally, which at times has harmed this country’s national interests. Canada’s insistence on including labour, gender and environmental issues as part of trade negotiations with China caused China to walk away from those talks. Members of the new Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement are still fuming over Canada’s last-minute demands, which included new environmental and cultural provisions. And now, we have the Saudi imbroglio.

People in the Prime Minister’s office appear to be receiving bad advice from officials at Global Affairs, or ignoring good advice – the latter seems more likely – leading to gaffes and embarrassments. Remember the trip to India?

“The government is spread thin, and they are making missteps,” says Lana Wylie, a political scientist at McMaster University. "They’re making rookie mistakes, though they’re not a rookie government any more.”

Mind you, standing up to an angry tyrant such as Prince Mohammed bin Salman is popular at home. Odds are good that polls will show most Canadians support Mr. Trudeau’s refusal to back down in the face of Saudi demands for an apology. If foreign policy is really domestic politics in disguise, then the Saudi affair may be politically savvy.

And then there is the card that could trump all others, for better or worse. Nothing – not offending the Indians, affronting the Chinese, enraging the Saudis or upsetting the environmentalists – matters more than successfully renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement, which U.S. President Donald Trump is threatening to cancel.

If the government is spread thin elsewhere, that’s because so much attention and so many resources have been dedicated to saving NAFTA. Success on this file matters more than all other issues combined.

“If the government secures a good deal with NAFTA, then all will be forgiven,” predicts Jason Zorbas, who teaches Canadian foreign policy at University of Saskatchewan. But failure, or a renewed deal in which Canada is forced to sacrifice key interests, such as a dispute resolution mechanism, would be disastrous. We may know the outcome in a matter of weeks.

On good days, Canadian governments find a niche role for a middle power with good intentions but a tight purse. Fighting apartheid in South Africa under Brian Mulroney. Helping establish the International Criminal Court and the landmines treaty under former prime minister Jean Chrétien. Stephen Harper’s maternal health initiative.

On bad days, Canadian foreign policy is an unwholesome mix of high-minded declarations, inadequate commitment and confusion. The Trudeau government has experienced more than its share of bad days. It’s time to post some wins.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-its-time-for-the-trudeau-government-to-move-past-its-errors-and-post/


They're a bunch of losers, in other words, and they control our fate.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Canada will meet with Saudis to discuss diplomatic rift: Freeland
Talks between Freeland, Saudi counterpart could be first step to restoring relations
Evan Dyer · CBC News · Posted: Sep 25, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago

Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says she'll meet with her counterpart from Saudi Arabia on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

The goal of the meeting would be to begin to mend fences between the two countries after an explosive dispute this summer following Canadian criticism of the kingdom's arrests of human rights activists.

"I have been in close touch with Adel [bin Ahmed al-Jubeir] all summer. We call each other on our cell phones," she told a crowd at the Council of Foreign Relations​ in New York City Tuesday morning.
"We are going to meet in New York ... We are hoping to meet in New York this week and I think that's a good thing."

Ottawa called for the release of Samar Badawi, the sister of well-known detainee Raif Badawi, on Aug. 2. Samar Badawi is also the sister-in-law of a Canadian citizen.

"We feel a particular obligation to women who are fighting for their rights around the world, women's rights are human rights," said Freeland. "And we feel a particular obligation to people who have a personal connection to Canada. A Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.

Saudi Arabia responded with a string of harsh measures that included telling thousands of Saudi students on government scholarships to leave Canadian universities and relocate to other countries, a ban on Saudi flights to Canada, and orders to brokers and bankers to suspend transactions with Canadian entities.

The kingdom also declared the Canadian ambassador persona non grataand gave him 24 hours to leave the country. He has not returned.

Neither the aging and infirm King Salman, nor his son and the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman, plan to speak at the UN General Assembly.

Instead, Jubeir is in New York.

It was Jubeir who spoke for Saudi Arabia at the height of the dispute with Canada, holding a news conference where he appeared to lecture Canada on its responsibility to defuse tensions.

"Canada knows what it needs to do," he said. "Canada started this, and it's up to Canada to find a way out of it."

[...]

The spat with Canada generated headlines around the world and was widely seen as a sign of the impetuous and aggressive style of the new crown prince, known to many Saudis by his initials MBS.

The government of Canada has sought to defuse tensions with Saudi Arabia, but has said it will not apologize for its stance.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/freelant-to-meet-saudi-regime-1.4837033


So, the two officials will meet in a Starbucks off the lobby of the UN building, where Crystia will use 'charm' to convince the Saudis to pull up their socks when it comes to the treatment of women.

She, doubtless, will employ the same 'charm' she has used with such withering effect on Trump and his minions.

Face it folks, this is putting lipstick on a pig. This is not an official meeting at all, it's just a chance to get together ... which seens to be only pencilled in. Or a fib.

This woman is like the energizer bunny of bad foreign policy. Since when is Canada's national interest bound up in achieving 'equality' for Moslem women? How about a little 'eqality' for Canadian men?
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Saudi minister mocks Canadian demands for release of female activists
By The Canadian Press
Thu., Sept. 27, 2018

OTTAWA—Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister says Canada’s demand for the immediate release of social activists is akin to the Middle Eastern kingdom demanding the federal government immediately allow Quebec to separate.

Adel al-Jubeir made the comments in an interview Wednesday with the Council on Foreign Relations in New York City almost two months after diplomatic relations between Saudi Arabia and Canada were suspended after Canadian officials urged the Saudi government in a series of tweets to release female political activists.

Adel Ahmed Al-Jubeir, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, left, shakes hands with United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres at United nations Headquarters on Tuesday.
Adel Ahmed Al-Jubeir, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, left, shakes hands with United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres at United nations Headquarters on Tuesday. (KIM HAUGHTON / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Saudi Arabia recalled its ambassador, cancelled future financial investments in Canada, stopped direct flights between the two countries, and are looking for new options for thousands of Saudi students studying at Canadian schools.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland — whose tweet was among the ones the Saudis objected to — say the issue is about human rights.

Al-Jubeir says it is an issue of national security and that Canada’s tweets provoked extremists who use foreign funding to try and undermine Saudi Arabian reform efforts.

He says the only way to fix the stalemate is for Canada to admit it made a mistake and apologize.
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2018/09/27/saudi-minister-mocks-canadian-demands-for-release-of-female-activists.html


She has to go. Sooner or later, we have to realize that having a twat doesn't mean you are too fragile to be criticized ever. Let the boneheads defend that proposition. This female paragon is messing things up big-time because she can't separate her goals froj the goals of the country. She's as bad as the goof that's her boss.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some, so partisan , fail to see the reaction of another country as absurd and way over the top .

It is well known (Im guessing not by some) that the reaction of SA was nowhere near the same level of the supposed offence committed by our country.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some, so slow-witted, fail to see that they blame the other guy every time, without fail. She even blames Trump for her failures with NAFTA negotiations. She as screwed up like no other, not even the goof in charge ...

Chrystia never realized that the Saudis actually meant to use the military vehicles they purchased in a war they're involved in. No wonder she's upset. She thought that stuff was for parades.

When the SHTF, Crystia changed the subject to women's rights ... on the theory that women can never have enough rights. In fact, how could a woman ever have enough rights?

We won't get a trade deal ... because, you know ... it's 2018!
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're ever the loner. No one believes Freeland is wrong, that she has made mistakes, yes, but even the US ambassador thinks you're full of shite ! LOL.

Not to mention, she is very accomplished and that drives you nuts. She is lauded and that drives you nuts. See a pattern?



But the rest of the world shrugged at the Saudis reaction due to sheer hypocrisy.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why would the man who has to negotiate with her want her to be removed? She combines abrasiveness with ignorance, and he probably applauding her stupidity.

She's a reporter who had an office job with Reuters. She doesn't know beans about trade.

It's like a Las Vegas shark playing poker with a dentist from Omaha ... sheep to be shorn.

The best thing she has going for her is that Trudeau knows even less than she does, and he can't find another woman -- it's 2018, after all -- to take on the job. He's already scraping the bottom of the female MP barrel.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Why would the man who has to negotiate with her want her to be removed? She combines abrasiveness with ignorance, and he probably applauding her stupidity.

She's a reporter who had an office job with Reuters. She doesn't know beans about trade.

It's like a Las Vegas shark playing poker with a dentist from Omaha ... sheep to be shorn.

The best thing she has going for her is that Trudeau knows even less than she does, and he can't find another woman -- it's 2018, after all -- to take on the job. He's already scraping the bottom of the female MP barrel.


When one is a petty ignorant doofus about women, the best thing is to double down leaving one no doubt how pissed you are a women has achieved far beyond whatever you wished for.

Pretty funny how vexed you get about it.

Not only are you ignorant about her accomplishments, "a reporter w Reuters'...is that it huh...?...you promote a horribly misogynistic attitude.

Your proven uneducated rantings are getting comical . If only your daughters could see how they are relegated to be 'twats' for the rest of their life.

Anyhow....well well well...how timely !

Quote:
Who likes Chrystia Freeland? Most people.
Sept. 28: Canada’s foreign minister may have rankled Donald Trump, but many are coming to her defence, impressed by her tough stance and intellect
by Maclean's Sep 28, 2018
.....
Even the U.S. ambassador to Canada, Kelly Craft, came to Freeland’s defence, saying she is among the smartest and most articulate women she knows.

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/who-likes-chrystia-freeland-most-people/


Ah bugs....but to laugh.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I understand that TC thinks our failing Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade is a gifted and accomplished politician.

He accuses me of being ignorant of her accomplishments. He's right! Are you aware of any? Is anyone out there aware of these accomplishments? I mean, being a librarian at Reuters isn't really preparation for her post ... is it?

But put that aside. Why is this supposedly intelligent and supposedly accomplished supposed woman screwing up so badly? Her NAFTA negotiations have made Canada a laughing stock. How did that do so far off the rails if she's so supposedly intelligent?

The Americans treat her like a pole-cat. (Which I find understandable.) Why does TC think she's so sharp? Is it just because she's a Liberal? Or is it because he is so dull?

It's good TC's around because she's going to need some friends.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shack my head, triple down stupidity.
Bugs wrote:
I understand that TC thinks our failing Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade is a gifted and accomplished politician.

No No...other people, smarter than I make that case.
Quote:

He accuses me of being ignorant of her accomplishments. Are you aware of any? Is anyone out there aware of these accomplishments? I mean, being a librarian at Reuters isn't really preparation for her post ... is it?


This alone proves your abject ignorance.

Quote:
She received her undergraduate degree in Russian history and literature from Harvard University and obtained a Master of Studies degree in Slavonic Studies from St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar.

Financial Times, The Washington Post, and The Economist, Chrystia took on a number of roles at the Financial Times, including UK News Editor, Moscow Bureau Chief, Eastern Europe Correspondent, Editor of FT Weekend Magazine, and Editor of FT.com. She served as Deputy Editor of The Globe and Mail between 1999 and 2001 before becoming Deputy Editor and then US Managing Editor of the Financial Times.

In 2010, Chrystia joined Canadian-owned Thomson Reuters. She was a Managing Director of the company and Editor

Chrystia has written two books

Chrystia speaks English, French, Ukrainian, Russian, and Italian.


Librarian. What a ignorant ass. Well done
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

She has exploited the quota system with skill, but I never said she wasn't selfish and ambitious. I know about her career -- the token female. She went to Harvard because she speaks Russian.

People thought that Mayor MIller was a wizard on the basis of his Harvard degree and nothing else, and look what a turkey he turned out to be. Looks like we have another turkey on our hands.

I said she had no accomplishments that would propel her into her present position. I mean, once we had Lester B Pearson ... now we have this pain-in-the-ass.

She has gone to a lot of schools ... that obviously didn't do her much good. But that isn't an achievement, like say ... building a bridge, or getting a treaty done. She can't do things like that. She's only good where men are scared shitless to say anything lest they be accused of something like not understanding women. (Which is soon going to be a crime.)

If her education was so all-powerful, what explains her record-breaking incompetence? And is there any doubt about how clumsy and stupid she has handled the negotiations? . I could be wrong, but a Canadian Foreign Minister who becomes persona non grata in Washington is a failure. A dud.

Hers is the worst performance by a major cabinet minister in a long time. Can you think of anyone who has done worse? Who else has taken the country to the brink of disaster in such a short time?

Personally, I think her problem is she's so narcissistic ... she thinks she really is some kind of hero that is going to lay Trump low. Instead, Trump is after her job, and isn't going to settle with Canada until Trudeau and Freeland suffer a humiliating defeat.

I say, put on the sackcloth now, and get it over with.
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Canada is diplomatically isolated in Saudi spat

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