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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polls are now open as New Brunswickers elect a new government



Brian Gallant's Liberals are seeking a second term in power


CBC News · Posted: Sep 24, 2018 6:00 AM AT | Last Updated: 4 hours ago



Fredericton residents made their way to the polls on Monday as New Brunswick prepares to elect a new provincial government. (James West/Canadian Press)


144 comments


It's election day in New Brunswick, and droves of voters are heading to the polls to choose the next governing party.

Elections New Brunswick is hoping for a better voter turnout after the historic low of 64.7 per cent in 2014. An increase in advance voting this year could be a positive sign — more than 87,000 ballots were cast compared to 67,317 last election.


Polls in the 49 ridings are now open and will close at 8 p.m.



The Brian Gallant Liberals are aiming to be the first government to receive a second term since the Bernard Lord Tories in 2003. The party lost its slim majority — 25 seats is the minimum needed for a majority — in the months leading up to the election campaign.

When the legislature dissolved, there were 24 Liberals, 21 Progressive Conservatives, one Green, one independent and two vacancies.


New Brunswick's party leaders, from left, NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie, Green Party Leader David Coon, People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin, Liberal Leader Brian Gallant and PC Leader Blaine Higgs will be anxiously watching the returns roll in Monday night. (Marc Grandmaison/The Canadian Press)

The challengers

The PCs, led by former finance minister Blaine Higgs, are the main challenger, but a host of smaller parties are hoping to make a significant impact Monday.

Green Party Leader David Coon made history in the 2014 election, becoming the first Green MLA elected in the province by winning Fredericton South. Now, the party wants to build from Coon's growing profile and name recognition after four years in office.

The People's Alliance leader was defeated in Fredericton-Grand Lake by 26 votes in the last election, but Kris Austin has returned with a groundswell of support behind him as the party seeks multiple seats in the legislative assembly.

NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie, who is running in Saint John Harbour, steered the party away from the centre and back to its leftist roots in hopes of capturing their first seat in 15 years.

Gallant is running in Shediac Bay-Dieppe, while Higgs is running in Quispamsis.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/new-brunswick-election-day-1.4835463
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( crazy results from NB , lib and pc's each at 21 , Green party 3 , People's alliance 4

one of the green party ridings is only a lead of 10 votes over the liberals , although appears to be no polls left to count there

the People's alliance leads in 4 ridings , 3 were previously pc and 1 liberal , 2 are in the Miramichi area and 2 Fredericton ridings

it was 22 pc , 20 lib , until Saint John's Harbour went liberal by 11 votes at the last poll , oddly it had been the riding the ndp leader ran and lost in

2 former mp's got elected provincially , Greg Thompson former cpc mp for the pc's ( didn't know he was even running ) and Jean Claude D'amours a former liberal mp )




CBC New Brunswick‏Verified account @CBCNB · 4m4 minutes ago



CBC is projecting a minority government in New Brunswick, but we don't know which party yet. Liberals and PCs tied at 21 seats. Here is our full results page:
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals intend to form government despite Tory minority


People's Alliance, Green Party have historic showings on election night


Colin McPhail · CBC News · Posted: Sep 24, 2018 6:00 AM AT | Last Updated: 7 hours ago



Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs, left, won more seats, but Liberal Leader Brian Gallant still intends to form government. (CBC)


531 comments


New Brunswick's electoral landscape was thrown into chaos Monday, as both the Progressive Conservatives and the incumbent Liberals hope to form government after the first minority legislature in almost 100 years.

It came down to the final poll in the final riding, when the Progressive Conservatives eked out an apparent minority government, 22 seats to the Liberals' 21, in a legislature where 25 is required for a majority.


The Tories claimed victory, but both parties plan to visit Lt.-Gov. Jocelyne Roy Vienneau tomorrow in an attempt to form government.

"As in any race, the one who has the most numbers wins," said Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs.


However, Liberal Leader Brian Gallant said he intends to speak with the lieutenant-governor about working with other parties to pass legislation on a vote-by-vote, issue-by-issue basis.

"Clearly there is some uncertainty tonight," Gallant said, noting there will be automatic recounts.

The balance of power could now shift to two smaller parties that had breakthrough nights: The Green Party, which previously had one seat, and the People's Alliance, which had none, won three each.

"We have heard New Brunswickers loud and clear," Gallant said. "New Brunswickers have sent third parties into the legislature in a way they haven't before. They want us to work collaboratively with third parties."


The Liberals find themselves in a difficult spot despite taking a larger piece of the popular vote in the province's 39th general election. With all polls reporting, the Liberals received 37.8 per cent of the votes compared with the PC share of 31.9 per cent.

The PCs and the Liberals were a dead heat at 21 seats when the final votes were counted in the 39th provincial general election. The last poll in Southwest Miramichi-Bay du Vin secured re-election for Tory Jake Stewart and the party's 22nd seat.

The province's last minority government happened in 1920, when the United Farmers party held the balance of power.

Possible recounts

An automatic recount is triggered if a riding is won by 25 votes or less. Saint John Harbour, which was won by Liberal candidate Gerry Lowe, and the Greens' win in Memramcook-Tantramar were decided by 10 and 11 votes, respectively.

The Tories are close behind in Saint John Harbour, while the Liberals could overtake the Greens in Memramook-Tantramar if a recount goes in their favour. So the PCs could extend their lead or the Liberals could draw even again, depending on the outcomes.

Parties can make a case for a recount if it's not triggered automatically.


There are three other ridings — Oromocto-Lincoln-Fredericton, Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou and Southwest Miramichi-Bay du Vin — that were decided by fewer than 100 votes.

Smaller parties have breakthroughs

Monday was a night to remember for New Brunswick's smaller parties.

With 12.6 per cent of the vote, the People's Alliance won three ridings. The party had never won a seat before, and only captured 2.1 per cent of the vote in 2014.

The People's Alliance made history as party leader Kris Austin captured Fredericton-Grand Lake, Rick DeSaulniers took Fredericton-York and Michelle Conroy won Miramichi, home to Liberal minister Bill Fraser.

Austin discussed partnering with another party in a minority-government scenario.


People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin poses for a photo before voting Monday. Austin made history Monday by capturing one of the party's first-ever seats. (CBC)

"I'm willing to work with any party that has some of the ideas that we have been pushing," Austin said in a speech to supporters.

"We're going to make New Brunswick better than it's ever been"

The Green Party, with 11.9 per cent of the vote, won three ridings.

Green Leader David Coon retained his Fredericton-South seat, Kevin Arseneau won Kent North and Green candidate Megan Mitton defeated Liberal incumbent Bernard LeBlanc in Memramcook-Tantramar.

In 2014, Coon became the first Green MLA elected in New Brunswick.


"The people of Fredericton South voted for hope, not fear," he said during his victory speech in downtown Fredericton. "They voted for kindness. They voted for change, not the status quo."

NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie, sitting third in Saint John Harbour, conceded in front of a room of supporters. The party received five per cent of the vote.

"Tonight, people have decided to send others to the legislature," she said.

The last seat the provincial NDP won was in 2003.

4 Liberal ministers lose seats

The Liberals, who had 24 seats before the election, have lost four ministers.
•In Fundy-The-Isles-Saint John West, PC candidate Andrea Anderson-Mason defeated longtime MLA Rick Doucet;
•In Saint Croix, former federal cabinet minister Greg Thompson, a PC, ousted John Ames.
•In Miramichi, the People's Alliance's Conroy defeated Fraser.
•And, in Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou, PC candidate Robert Gauvin defeated Wilfred Roussel Gauvin by 99 votes.


The Progressive Conservatives had hoped to take back the legislative assembly from the Liberals and extend the recent string of single-term governments.

The last provincial government to be re-elected was the Bernard Lord Tories in 2003.

When the legislature dissolved, there were 24 Liberals, 21 Progressive Conservatives, one Green, one independent and two vacancies.

Language divide

The PCs dominated the predominantly anglophone southern New Brunswick, except for the urban riding of Saint John Harbour, while the Liberals maintained their grip on the primarily francophone northern New Brunswick.


Higgs' inability to converse in French posed a significant hurdle for the PC leader's attempt to make inroads in francophone ridings. Yet, the PCs managed to flip Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou for a rare win in the Acadian Peninsula — one of the three Liberal ridings the party flipped Monday.


Liberals, Tories trade jabs

The Liberals chose a pro-spending campaign in the face of concern from economists and the public to improve the province's finances. The party promised heavy spending on infrastructure, health care, nursing homes and education, while also pledging to freeze power rates.

If Gallant wasn't touting his record or making a spending pledge, he was attacking Higgs. The Liberals routinely targeted the PC leader's record as finance minister as well as his connections with big business and warned the electorate of cuts to public services.



The PCs were just as active in criticizing Gallant, saying the province "can't afford" another four years of "reckless" Liberal spending.

Higgs stood by his record and even said — in rather dramatic fashion — the Liberals approached him about taking a job in their government following the 2014 election. Gallant denied the claim.

Stabilizing provincial finances and boosting the economy were the pillars of Tory messaging. The party promised to balance the budget two years into their mandate without making cuts to education and health care.

Higgs also campaigned against the "job-killing" carbon tax.

A two-party province no longer

New Brunswick has been a two-party province for, well, forever. Only twice in the past 100 years has a third party held more than one seat in a legislature.

Two parties other than the Liberals or Tories occupying seats in a legislature at the same time had also only happened twice before Monday.

Feeling the smaller-party pressure, both Gallant and Higgs had cautioned against vote splitting.

Coon made history in the 2014 election, becoming the first Green MLA elected in the province by winning Fredericton South. The party built off Coon's growing profile and name recognition after four years in office.

During the campaign, Coon emphasized the party's economic policies, letting voters know they're well beyond a single-issue organization.

The People's Alliance leader was defeated in Fredericton-Grand Lake by 26 votes in the last election, but Austin has returned with a groundswell of support behind him as the party sought its first seats in the legislative assembly.

The Alliance has gained a fervent following in the past eight years, culminating in its largest field of candidates (30) this year. However, some of its policies, particularly on language issues, have spurred controversy and alienated voters.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/new-brunswick-election-day-1.4835463
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Deadlocked the morning after

Both the Liberals and Conservatives will be seeking alliances with third parties to try and form a government. And if that fails, another election?
by The Canadian Press

Sep 25, 2018



New Brunswick is in uncharted territory today, with the province’s two main political parties manoeuvring for power after an election that ended in a near dead heat—and two smaller parties potentially holding the keys.

Observers say backroom deals brokered over the coming hours and days could determine whether a tenable coalition is formed—with either Liberal Brian Gallant or Tory Blaine Higgs as premier—or whether New Brunswickers are back at the polls before Christmas.

After all the votes were counted Monday, the seat count sat at 22 for the Progressive Conservatives, and 21 for the Liberals.

Donald Wright, a political science professor at the University of New Brunswick, says the lieutenant-governor will likely first invite the incumbent, Gallant, to find the confidence of the house.

He says the Liberal leader is likely to approach the Green party—which won three seats, including that of Leader David Coon—as they are more “ideologically compatible.”

Wright says if Gallant cannot find the confidence of the house, Higgs will be given a chance—presumably through a deal with the right-of-centre People’s Alliance, which also won three seats.

Both Gallant and Higgs indicated in their speeches late Monday that they would seek to govern.

“New Brunswickers … want us to work collaboratively as political parties to get things done,” Gallant said.

“We will be open to do what we can to listen to other political parties and do the best we can on a vote by vote basis.”

Higgs, meantime, claimed his party had won a mandate.

“Perhaps Brian Gallant and I will both be lining up at the lieutenant-governor’s in the morning,” Higgs said.

Wright said if neither main party can gain confidence of the house, the legislature will be dissolved and another election will be held.

Political scientist Mario Levesque said one issue with such a close election is that the party or coalition in power will have to elect a Speaker.

“The challenge here is even if they do form a pact—the Alliance goes with the Conservatives or the Greens with the Liberals—there is not enough there to elect the Speaker,” said Levesque, a professor at Mount Allison University in Sackville, N.B.

“If the Alliance goes with the Conservatives, that’s 25, so a majority,” he said. “But then you have to take one away for the Speaker, and that gives them 24, which means they’re still vulnerable to a tie vote in the legislature.”

Erin Crandall, a professor in the politics department at Acadia University in Wolfville, N.S., called the emergence of two third parties “the big story for this election.”

“This is uncharted territory for New Brunswick, which is historically a two-party system,” said Crandall, who is originally from Moncton. “It’s always been a question of who’s going to be in a majority government—the PCs or Liberals.”

She said a minority government will change the dynamics of governing in New Brunswick, making third parties the “major influencer” in the legislature.

Crandall said Canadian political parties usually agree to co-operate for a certain period of time, without formal coalitions as in other countries.

“In Canada, you usually have one party governing and they rely on the goodwill of these smaller parties,” she explained. “Nobody wants an election right away so probably they’ll make things work.”

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/new-brunswick-election-deadlocked-the-morning-after/
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberals are being given permission to try and govern somehow even though they have less mla's than the pc's )



Paul Thomas‏ @pejthomas · 7m7 minutes ago



New Brunswick Lieutenant Governor Jocelyne Roy Vienneau confirms Premier Brian Gallant to remain in office to test the confidence of the legislature. His mission now is presumably to find a PC or PA MLA to take the job of speaker #CDNpoli #NBpoli
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( heading into uncharted waters in NB , and who is going to want to be speaker ? if its a liberal they drop to 20 mla's . its doubtful they'd want a People's alliance mla to hold the speakers job . that only leaves a green mla or red tory pc mla as speaker )


Premier Brian Gallant gets permission from lieutenant-governor to continue governing New Brunswick


Liberal leader met with the lieutenant governor in Fredericton on Tuesday, morning after provincial vote


Elizabeth Fraser · CBC News · Posted: Sep 25, 2018 11:52 AM AT | Last Updated: 41 minutes ago


Brian Gallant met with New Brunswick's lieutenant-governor on Tuesday, the morning after a near-dead heat provincial election, and was give permission to keep governing the province. (Photo: CBC)


155 comments


New Brunswick's lieutenant-governor on Tuesday gave Brian Gallant permission to continue governing the province while the Liberals try to win the confidence of the legislature with fewer seats than his main opponent.

Gallant, who remains as premier, met with Lt.-Gov. Jocelyne Roy Vienneau the morning after the results of the provincial election suggested the Progressive Conservatives had eked out a minority government — 22 seats to the Liberals' 21 — in a legislature requiring 25 for a majority.


Two third parties each won three seats.


In a media scrum, Gallant said he expected the New Brunswick Legislature to sit before Christmas, and if the Liberals lose confidence of the house, the government would resign.

"Nobody was given a mandate to form a government last night," Gallant said. "The

The Liberals find themselves in a difficult spot despite taking a larger piece of the popular vote in the province's 39th general election. With all polls reporting, the Liberals received 37.8 per cent of the votes compared with the PC share of 31.9 per cent.

The PCs and the Liberals were in a dead heat, at 21 seats, when the final votes were counted. The last poll in Southwest Miramichi-Bay du Vin secured re-election for Tory Jake Stewart and the party's 22nd seat.

"We recognize very much that New Brunswickers have sent a very strong message that they want things to change," he said.

"They did not clearly define who they wanted to lead that change, that is clear. But we did get the plurality of votes."

The province's last minority government happened in 1920, when the United Farmers party held the balance of power.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/brian-gallant-government-1.4837420?cmp=rss
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How Ottawa is reading New Brunswick's wild election result



Does the split result reflect momentum for Conservatives, or something else entirely?



Chris Hall · CBC News · Posted: Sep 26, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 8 minutes ago


New Brunswick Liberal Leader Brian Gallant addresses the media after meeting with Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau, in Fredericton on Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (James West/THE CANADIAN PRESS)


177 comments


The election results out of New Brunswick don't offer much in the way of clarity. The party that got the most votes failed to win the most seats. No party won a majority.

And the leaders of both the provincial Liberal and Conservative parties — separated by a single seat — are claiming the right to first crack at forming a government.


As it stands now, the Conservatives hold 22 seats, the Liberals 21. The Green Party and the new People's Alliance each won three. That means those smaller parties will play a pivotal role in deciding whether the province remains Liberal red or turns Tory blue.

Up in Ottawa, federal politicians are paying attention. Party strategists are analyzing the results for clues to how voters in Atlantic Canada might be leaning, and which issues might spill over into the next federal election a year from now.

Momentum, or stalemate?

Start with the Conservatives. MPs on the Hill were quick to jump on the promise by New Brunswick Tory Leader Blaine Higgs that he would join other conservative-leaning premiers in opposing the Trudeau government's national price on carbon.


"We see this as proof that New Brunswickers stand with Saskatchewan, Ontario and Manitoba and would fight against the prime minister's carbon tax," deputy Conservative leader Lisa Raitt told the Commons on Tuesday as her colleagues cheered.

"This election is evidence that the people of New Brunswick will not be bystanders. They used their voice and chose to fight back against an unfair tax."


New Brunswick Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs addresses supporters at his campaign headquarters in Quispamsis, N.B. on Monday, Sept. 24, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Surprising no one, the reaction from the Liberals was more subdued. They've already seen Liberals swept out of power in Ontario. B.C.'s Christy Clark, an ally on pipelines and the need for a price on carbon, is also gone. Quebec's Liberal government could be next, with polls showing Premier Philippe Couillard faces an uphill battle to stay in office.

If New Brunswick Liberal Leader Brian Gallant is unable to form a government in New Brunswick, the Trudeau government's brand of cooperative federalism will be a much tougher sell.

That may explain why the federal minister responsible for New Brunswick is conceding nothing while Gallant tries to make a deal with the Greens to stay in power.


"Every vote counts," said Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc. "We'll see what happens when the legislature reconvenes."

Either way, there's a visible crack in the Liberal fortress in Atlantic Canada.

The federal Liberals hold all 32 seats in the region. Each of the four provinces has had a Liberal government since Justin Trudeau became prime minister.

That may be about to change, even though Gallant says he's going to carry on governing for now.

"The red wall in Atlantic Canada has been breached," said David McLaughlin, a former deputy minister in New Brunswick and chief of staff to former Conservative premier Bernard Lord.

'Time to get stuff done'

McLaughlin said he doesn't believe climate change was the deciding issue for voters in New Brunswick — but he's certain the results there indicate voters want something more tangible than what the Trudeau government is offering.

"People are voting for lower taxes, economic security. We saw that in Ontario with Doug Ford. And now we are seeing it in New Brunswick."

Liberal strategist Greg MacEachern cautions that Monday's results may only be the continuation of a pattern of one-term governments in the province. But he agrees there's a message there for the Trudeau Liberals.

"They need to convince Canadians that they are better off today than three years ago. They want to see the new infrastructure and more jobs in their community. They've done the aspirational. Now it's time to get stuff done."

There's always a risk of reading too much into a provincial election's implications for federal parties. But the outcome in New Brunswick, convoluted as it is, does offer a glimpse into what voters are thinking.

Big news for small parties?

The victory by three Green candidates on Monday is a good example. The party is now represented in four provinces — British Columbia, Ontario and P.E.I. are the others — and federal party leader Elizabeth May said the results in New Brunswick suggest the party's appeal extends beyond B.C., where she has her seat.

"Greens elected anywhere help Greens get elected everywhere," she said. "It tells Green voters they are not alone."


New Brunswick Green Party Leader David Coon speaks to the media after casting his vote at the Centre Communautaire Saint-Anne in Fredericton on Monday. (James West/Canadian Press)

The news is not at all positive for New Democrats. Despite a strong showing in the Ontario provincial election, where the party captured 33 per cent of the vote and now serves as the Official Opposition, the NDP was shut out in New Brunswick, winning only 5 per cent of ballots cast.

That's less than half the votes received by the Green Party.

MacEachern said that tells him the federal Liberals shouldn't assume that disaffected NDP voters in next year's federal election will automatically come to them. He said Conservatives need to take the same view.

The New Brunswick voters who marked their ballots for the People's Alliance — a party that opposes official duality and corporate handouts — may lean more toward the policies being promoted at the federal level by Maxime Bernier than those offered by Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer. The People's Alliance is in favour of things like ending duality for school busing, loosening bilingual requirements for paramedics, and eliminating the office of the commissioner of official languages.

After Monday, the people of New Brunswick weren't at all clear about which party ended up on top. Federal leaders in Ottawa may be just as confused.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/new-brunswick-election-ottawa-1.4838504
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

a look at New Brunswick's 10 federal ridings and how the provincial results break down in each of them . although due to the smaller size of the provincial ridings ( 49 ) in total its not an exact fit .


Acadie Bathurst - almost all the ridings went liberal , also the only area where the ndp managed a couple 2nd place finishes . one small riding along the coast went pc that had previously been liberal

Beausejour - had been all liberal but 2 ridings went green this election ( 1 pending a recount due to 10 vote margin of victory ) surprising the green party managed to win 2 seats in a liberal stronghold . unlikely the federal green party could break thru there unless 1 of the new mla's was the candidate

Fredericton - most colourful results as all 4 parties won seats within the riding , liberal and green party won seats downtown . pc's and people's alliance won seats just outside city in suburban areas

Fundy Royal - all seats within the riding went strongly pc

Madawaska Restigouche - all seats within the riding went strongly liberal , including 1 won by the former liberal mp

Miramichi Grand Lake - mix , 1 went liberal ,1 pc , 1 people's alliance

Moncton Riverview Dieppe - liberals won the downtown ridings , pc's suburban areas of the city

New Brunswick Southwest - all the ridings went strongly pc this election, 2 had previously been liberal , 1 was won by the former cpc mp Greg Thompson

Saint John Rothesay - almost all the ridings went pc , except a small riding downtown that went liberal by 10 votes pending a recount

Tobique Mactaquac - rural ridings in the southern part went pc , also part of a people's alliance riding and the 2 northern ridings went liberal


although the results aren't necessary going to be the same federally but it gives us an idea of the political leanings of the province . and a look at where the conservative votes are . often people who vote pc provincially will vote conservative federally , although that is not always certain


but looking at the results , some ridings jump out as obvious cpc targets ,

- Fundy Royal ( rural riding that historically has been pc or conservative and rarely goes liberal other than 93 and 2015 )

- New Brunswick Southwest ( rural riding that has historically been pc or conservative and rarely goes liberal other than 93 and 2015 ) former mp John Williamson has already been nominated to run again

- Saint John Rothesay ( urban / suburban riding that has often flipped between the pc's and liberals , had been conservative when harper PM )

- Miramichi Grand Lake ( had went conservative in 2008/2011 elections , considered safe liberal but provincially appears more willing to vote on the right )

- Tobique Mactaquac ( rural riding that has flipped between liberals and conservatives and went liberal in 2015 as longtime cpc mp retired , southern portion is very conservative area , although north as you find more French voters starts to become more liberal )

- Fredericton might also be a possible riding , had been cpc in 2008 and 2011 , although former cpc mp Keith Ashfield has since passed away but doesn't seem to be a solid liberal area provincially and might be open to voting for another party federally


Acadie Bathurst , Beausejour , Moncton Riverview Dieppe and Madawaska Restigouche would seem to be solidly liberal ridings unless a star candidate emerged or liberal mp decided to retire
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

also mention that part of the problem the federal conservatives might face in New Brunswick is the weakness of the ndp . if they fall to levels similar to the provincial party ( which only got 3% of the vote ) that could make some races more challenging if there is not as much of a liberal / ndp split as years past when the ndp actually did well there in some ridings and won the Acadie Bathurst riding


I don't see any NB ridings emerging as a top target for Jagmeet Singh so we'll have to see how things play out


the green party might also target some NB ridings , according to Wikipedia in 2015 they actually spent $ 159,022 trying to win Fredericton , only to get 12 % of the vote . I didn't know the green's on the east coast even had that kind of money but unless David Coon is there federal candidate its unlikely they'll take that riding any time soon
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( in a surprise announcement , the People's alliance leader , says he's willing to work with any party to make the minority work . even though the liberals have already ruled his party out )


September 26, 2018 12:31 pm Updated: September 26, 2018 7:12 pm

Kris Austin says he’s open to working with any party to make N.B. minority government work


By Staff The Canadian Press


A potential king-maker in New Brunswick’s deadlocked election says he’s willing to work with any party to make a minority government work – even if some leaders say they’re not willing to work with him.

“We understand that the people of New Brunswick have given all of us a mandate to work together,” Kris Austin, leader of the right-of-centre People’s Alliance, said Wednesday.


“That requires negotiation. That requires give and take. I’m willing to do that, and I think if the other parties are not willing to do that, I think New Brunswickers will see that for what it is as well.”


He said it’s unfortunate that Liberal Premier Brian Gallant has stated the Liberals would not form a coalition with his party, which won three seats.

The Liberals won 21 seats in Monday’s election – one less than the Progressive Conservatives – but Gallant remains premier as he tries to get support from other parties to maintain the legislature’s confidence.

“I’ve made it very clear that I would have no coalition government with the People’s Alliance,” Gallant said on election night.


“There are some fundamental values that I need to share with any party that we would be working with, and that’s not the case there. With that said, if we put something forward and they vote for it, that’s going to be their prerogative,” said Gallant, who told reporters he plans to call the legislature back before Christmas.

Green Leader David Coon, whose party also won three seats and is another potential king-maker, has been meeting with his new MLAs to discuss their next steps.

On Wednesday, he said the legislature session will be a real test, especially for the mainline parties.

“The others keep talking about doing politics differently but they never do. So I see that we as a Green caucus have a real opportunity here to help make that happen where we create a legislative assembly that actually starts to co-operate on behalf of the people of this province,” he said.

Coon said there are similarities in all the parties’ platforms, and he’s sure they can all find issues to support.

“Take the People’s Alliance even. They have a clear policy against spraying glyphosate over the forests. We agree with them. That’s a particular issue we could co-operate with them on. The Tories seem to be leaning in that direction too, so that’s interesting,” Coon said.

But Coon made it clear the Green party is not willing to compromise on linguistic rights. The People’s Alliance has called for efficiency in the delivery of services and not just what is known as “duality,” particularly in health and education.

Austin said party leaders need to put aside egos and agendas to make a minority legislature work.

“I think that’s why Mr. Gallant is having such a tough time because they’re used to running New Brunswick with an iron fist and now they don’t have that option,” Austin said.



Austin said while there were similarities in the platforms of his party and the Tories, that doesn’t mean the People’s Alliance would rule out working with the other two.

Robert Gauvin, a francophone who won the only northern seat for the Tories, has said he’s opposed to the positions of the People’s Alliance, but Tory Leader Blaine Higgs says Gauvin is “fully onside.”

Higgs was also asked about some kind of alignment with the People’s Alliance.


“Alignment is a strong word,” he said Tuesday.

“My goal is to go down through the platforms of each party and to say OK, where do we have common ground? Where do we have issues that we just aren’t going to change anything on our behalf – this is what we believe in and this will stay solid, and I think certainly linguistic rights are a clear example of that,” Higgs said.

“We have aims and principles in our party that are foundational and we are not going to be changing that.”

Austin said some people are fear-mongering, arguing that his party is anti-French.

He said it fully supports both linguistic groups, and is willing to sit down to discuss that with anyone.

“We’ve been saying for many years we respect the rights of both francophone and anglophone citizens to receive government services in their language of choice,” he said.

“What we want to do is make sure that it works in the best interest for all New Brunswickers so that we have more paramedics, more doctors, more teachers. The money we’re spending on duality can be invested in frontline services while still maintaining the rights of both linguistic communities,” Austin said.


https://globalnews.ca/news/4488491/kris-austin-nb-government/
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Higgs is calling for Gallant to resign , also says pc mla's are getting calls and offers from the liberals desperately seeking someone to cross the floor or become speaker I would assume )


New Brunswick Tory leader calls on Premier Gallant to resign

By Canadian Press. Published on Sep 27, 2018 1:34pm


New Brunswick Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs, seen here in 2011, is calling on the province's premier to resign. THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Smith



FREDERICTON — New Brunswick’s Progressive Conservative leader says Premier Brian Gallant should resign or immediately recall the provincial legislature.

Blaine Higgs issued the demand minutes after meeting with the province’s lieutenant-governor on Thursday, saying Jocelyne Roy Vienneau told him that if Gallant’s Liberals are unable to secure the confidence of the legislature, she will immediately call on the Tories to form a minority government.

“I am calling on Brian Gallant to do the honourable thing and recognize that he lost the election,” Higgs said outside the lieutenant-governor’s residence in downtown Fredericton.

“He does not have a mandate to govern and he is prolonging the inevitable. … If he refuses to resign, he should do what is right for New Brunswick and immediately call the legislature back, so the province has a stable and functioning government.”

The province has been in a political deadlock since Monday, when a provincial election resulted in a virtual dead heat between the Liberals and Conservatives.

The Tories won 22 seats in the 49-seat house, one more than the Liberals. The Green party and the People’s Alliance party won three seats each, which means that some form of minority government is inevitable.

Under parliamentary tradition, when election results are inconclusive, the incumbent premier is typically given the first opportunity by the lieutenant-governor to determine if his or her party can secure the confidence of the legislature. That process usually starts by convening the legislature for a speech from the throne.

Gallant has said he will call the house back before Christmas.

Higgs said that’s not fast enough and suggested the lieutenant governor is growing impatient.

“She indicated she will not wait months, or even weeks,” he said. “Her words were, ‘I want this to be weeks; we don’t want this to be months.’ ”

If Gallant’s party is defeated on a non-confidence motion in the house, Higgs said, the lieutenant-governor has indicated she will grant the Tories the “opportunity to immediately form government.”

“To be clear, if the house is called back and if Gallant is defeated, it will not trigger an election. He may give the impression that is the next step, but that is not.”

Higgs accused the Liberals of offering incentives to Tory caucus members to cross the floor to sit as Liberals.

“(Gallant’s) hoping that he can buy somebody from my side of the house,” Higgs said, adding he was with one of his caucus members on Wednesday night when a call came from the other party.

“The reception got real bad when I answered the phone.”

Higgs said he had no plans to form a formal coalition government with either of the third parties.

“We don’t need a coalition. … We don’t need to make backroom deals,” he said. “I have the most seats. That is typically how democracy works.”

As well, the Tory leader said he would not be cutting deals with members of other parties to join his caucus.

“If people join our party, that’s fine,” he said. “But I’m not going to buy their support.”

Gallant has confirmed he will seek a formal alliance with the Greens.

The premier said Wednesday the Liberals had not yet made an overture to the Greens, who had not yet decided how to proceed after Monday’s deadlocked election results.


https://ipolitics.ca/2018/09/27/new-brunswick-tory-leader-calls-on-premier-gallant-to-resign/
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the People's alliance is willing to prop up the pc minority but only for a year and a half )



People’s Alliance offers to prop up New Brunswick Tory minority

By Canadian Press. Published on Sep 28, 2018 1:26pm


People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin participates in the CBC televised debate of the provincial election in Riverview, N.B., on Sept. 12, 2018

. One of the small parties in New Brunswick is offering to provide support for a Progressive Conservative minority government for up to a year and a half.


THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marc Grandmaison



FREDERICTON — One of the small parties in New Brunswick is offering to support a Progressive Conservative minority government for up to a year and a half. People’s Alliance Leader Kris Austin says he told the province’s lieutenant-governor that he had met with Tory Leader Blaine Higgs and “agreed to provide stability for a Progressive Conservative



https://ipolitics.ca/2018/09/28/peoples-alliance-offers-to-prop-up-new-brunswick-tory-minority/
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New Brunswick Provincial Election on September 24

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