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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

‘New Brunswick is in a death spiral’: Why this election is more serious than you think

In a province suffering some of Canada’s hardest economic times, Brian Gallant’s Liberals and Blaine Higgs’s Progressive Conservatives have been mostly steering clear of alarming statistics on the campaign trail. But after election day, whoever wins will face a hard reckoning, Jessica Leeder explains


Jessica Leeder Atlantic reporter

Moncton


Published 13 hours ago

Updated September 17, 2018



On their campaign buses, New Brunswick Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs and Liberal Leader Brian Gallant get ready for a televised debate. New Brunswickers head to the polls on Sept. 24.

Darren Calabrese/The Globe and Mail

On the morning after his toughest day yet on the campaign trail, the retired oil executive angling to unseat the youngest premier in Canada sat on his blue coach bus with a bottle of Tylenol at the ready.

“This was never on my bucket list,” Blaine Higgs said. The leader of New Brunswick’s Progressive Conservative Party, in the midst of his first contest to become premier, was still recovering from a shove onto the defensive by Brian Gallant, a dimple-cheeked former hockey and tennis player-turned lawyer in the hunt for his second mandate.

Political leadership for Mr. Higgs, a former provincial finance minister, is a retirement pursuit. Mr. Gallant, 36, is career politician. His first run for office was in his fifth-grade class; he stepped into the provincial political spotlight more than a decade ago, in his mid-20s, when he challenged Progressive Conservative premier Bernard Lord, and lost. Of Acadian and Dutch descent, he had immediate heartthrob status (he won a Mr. New Brunswick pageant as a university freshman and, earlier, a mall contest for impersonating a Backstreet Boy). Although Mr. Gallant shed his bachelor status last year, his youth continues to appeal to New Brunswickers, who have a long-standing tradition of electing young leaders: four of the province’s past seven premiers won the role in their 30s.



The Liberals' Mr. Gallant speaks with a supporter at a gas station during an impromptu stop in Moncton.

Darren Calabrese/The Globe and Mail

Election polls suggest Mr. Gallant’s Liberals are likely to win a second mandate, but victory is not certain: No premier has managed to win a second consecutive term in the province since 2003. With less than a week left before election day, both candidates have settled into campaigns of reassurance that some observers argue mute the high stakes New Brunswick will soon have to reckon with.



“It’s becoming a contest of who will be protecting health and education. But protecting means freezing the status quo,” said Richard Saillant, an economist and author of A Tale of Two Countries: How the Great Demographic Imbalance is Pulling Canada Apart.

“Whoever is elected will have a choice between presiding over New Brunswick’s downfall or putting it back on the path towards sustainability,” he said, adding: “It’s a cliché to say that all elections are important. But this one really is pivotal. New Brunswick is in a death spiral.”



Only Prince Edward Island receives more federal cash than New Brunswick, where the Auditor-General recently tabled a damning report on provincial finances that declared getting “a handle on this problem will be like turning the Titanic.” The damage is not one government’s doing; the ship has been listing dangerously for years.

Over the past decade, in which both Progressive Conservatives and Liberals have governed, New Brunswick’s net debt has doubled to more than $14-billion, far outpacing the increases posted in other Atlantic provinces. Job opportunities and the working-age population are shrinking. Required job skills are not always a match for open positions in the bilingual province. Deaths now outpace births; in 2017, the province had its lowest number of births since Statistics Canada began tracking figures in 1946. Population forecasts for the next decade predict a decline of between 40,000 and 100,000 residents.

However, the election campaign has mostly steered clear of focusing on such alarming statistics.

“No one is talking about demographic decline and the fact that we’re facing labour shortages ... across a wide spectrum of industries,” Mr. Saillant said. “It is not popular to be too realistic. In public, a lot of people will keep a very upbeat tone.”


This includes Mr. Gallant, who, in an interview, wanted to draw attention to his new wife, Karine – this is the first election in which he has shared the spotlight with a partner – before discussing his platform.

Visibly tentative in the public eye, Mrs. Gallant has nonetheless hovered close to her husband throughout the entire campaign. She is a quiet presence on his bus, but her smile has Meghan Markle wattage. Supporters have watched, rapt, as the notoriously health-conscious couple sampled local potato chips, lobster rolls, even beer. With cameras clicking, they have read storybooks to preschoolers and bestowed arm pats on elderly supporters.


Open this photo in gallery


Mr. Gallant and his wife, Karine Lavoie, laugh while having dinner on the picnic tables at The Clam Digger during a campaign stop in Chamcook.

Darren Calabrese/The Globe and Mail


Open this photo in gallery


Children listen as Mr. Gallant reads a story at Cheryl’s Home Away from Home Daycare in Saint John.

Darren Calabrese/The Globe and Mail

The pair are somewhat of a distraction from the Liberal platform, which is built on the themes of fairness and opportunity and chock-full of spending promises designed to propel the economy. There is a plan to freeze power rates over four years, introduce private-sector pay equity and provide subsidized child care to low- and middle-income families. Three economic “superclusters” will be created; youth who have left the province will be lured back with help finding jobs.

If elected, Mr. Gallant’s government would hold off on balancing the budget until they are three years into their mandate. But Mr. Higgs’s Progressive Conservatives say they can do it in two years.

“That’s just not what I believe we need to do,” said Mr. Gallant, who pointed out his finance degree. “I have a different philosophy than many of the pundits that are trying to encourage us to balance the books quicker … at the expense of important investments in education and health care.”

He added: “We need to invest strategically in things that are going to help us spur growth.”


Economists fear Mr. Gallant’s plan to spend the province’s way to prosperity is not realistic.

“They are appealing to voters that aren’t actually the big taxpayers in society,” said Herb Emery, a labour economist at the University of New Brunswick. “They don’t really see a cost to all of these things. It sounds good.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau indicated earlier this year he supports Mr. Gallant’s approach.

“You can’t cut your way to success, you have to invest wisely,” Mr. Trudeau said in an interview with a local newspaper during a stop in New Brunswick earlier this year.

Mr. Emery read the comment as an endorsement of Mr. Gallant. “It seemed to imply that the federal government would be along to help things out,” he said.


Open this photo in gallery


March 22: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right, meets with Mr. Gallant in Sussex, N.B.

Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

The campaign has been full of signs that the federal Liberals are pleased with Mr. Gallant, whose escalating profile is rare for a New Brunswick politician who does not hail from a political dynasty. He is close with local MP Dominic LeBlanc, who campaigned for the Premier earlier this month – Mr. Gallant initially met the cabinet minister when he gave the MP’s stepson tennis lessons. Having grown up with blue-collar roots – his father worked in grocery stores – Mr. Gallant taught and coached sports to help pay his way through university.

Mr. LeBlanc encouraged Mr. Gallant to run for the provincial party’s leadership in 2012, and the bilingual lawyer, then just 30, won.

To back Mr. Gallant’s second run for premier, Mr. LeBlanc has lent him one of his staffers, Kevin Lavigne. (Mr. Lavigne is a long-time friend of Mr. Gallant and gets credit for setting the Premier up on the blind date that led to his marrying Karine).

Meanwhile, the Liberal machine has quietly worked to erode Mr. Higgs’s campaign.


Open this photo in gallery


Mr. Higgs is seen through the window of a constituency office following a campaign announcement in Moncton.

Darren Calabrese/The Globe and Mail

The one-time finance minister found himself under fire a few weeks ago for his poor French skills. Last week, the headaches of language politics were replaced by questions about an alleged secret plan for education cuts after Liberal communications staff released a study that dated back to Mr. Higgs’s time in cabinet. It recommended big cuts to provincial education programs at the time.

Mr. Higgs, a soft-spoken father of four daughters, was vaulted back onto the defensive. At a news conference the next day at a campaign office in Moncton, volunteers sipped Tim Horton’s coffee and munched on Timbits while Mr. Higgs outlined a plan not to cut funding for teachers, but to give them more decision-making power in the classroom.

The loudest applause, though, came when he backed away from the gritty details of his plan to increase test scores and announced that he also plans to scrap the Gallant government’s ban on junk food and allow chocolate milk back into schools.

For this, supporters set down their coffees and gave such raucous applause that Mr. Higgs had to raise his voice.

“Government regulation,” he said, “shouldn’t be required for people to use common sense.”


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-new-brunswick-is-in-a-death-spiral-why-this-election-is-more/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Election Day 27: Where the leaders will be on Tuesday



More platform announcements expected as campaign enters final few days


CBC News · Posted: Sep 18, 2018 8:00 AM AT | Last Updated: 2 hours ago


Campaign announcements are expected from four of the party leaders on Tuesday. (CBC)


Tuesday marks Day 27 of the New Brunswick election campaign and party leaders will make announcements and campaign across the province.



Green Party Leader David Coon is expected to launch his party's platform on rural development at 1 p.m. at Family Farms, 1818 Route 510, in Lower Main River.


He will be joined by candidates Kevin Arsenault (Kent North) and Byron J. Connors (Southwest Miramichi-Bay du Vin).

Earlier in the day, Coon is scheduled to be in Moncton with Moncton-Centre candidate Jean-Marie Nadeau to meet with students and employees at the University of Moncton cafeteria at 9 a.m.

At 10:30 a.m., Coon and Nadeau will attend the launch of the "Renewed Global Strategy" of l'Association acadienne des artistes professionnelles du Nouveau-Brunswick (AAAPNB) at the Aberdeen Cultural Centre.

Then at 6:30 p.m., Coon will participate in the New Brunswick Student Alliance's forum on post-secondary education.



NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie will start her day in Saint John by making an announcement at King's Square at 11 a.m. related to "standing up for women's equality."

At 2:30 p.m., McKenzie will visit the McCarthy Residents nursing home at 212 Pitt St., before canvassing in Saint John Harbour.

At 7 p.m., she is scheduled to return to the nursing home to attend the Saint John District Labour Council's special meeting about WorkSafeNB.



Liberal Party Leader Brian Gallant will also make an election announcement at 10 a.m. in Oromocto at the Fay Tidd Public Library, 54 Miramichi Rd.

Later in the day, he and the campaign bus will make their way to Doaktown, Miramichi, Salisbury, and Saint John.


Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs will make an announcement at 9:30 a.m. in Oromocto at Larry Warren's Used Cars, 260 Restigouche Rd.

In the evening, he's scheduled be in Grand Manan for a kitchen party slated for 7:30 p.m. at Newton's Mercantile & Café.


People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin will continue door-to-door campaigning in his riding of Fredericton-Grand Lake.

The party will highlight its plans for a tuition tax credit as a way to keep post-secondary graduates in the province.

Voters are scheduled to head to the polls on Sept. 24.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/new-brunswick-election-day-27-leaders-campaign-1.4826475
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2018 8:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

2 veterans hoping to make political comeback in Edmundston ridings



Jeannot Volpé returns for PCs, while J.C. D’Amours jumps back into politics for the Liberals



Gabrielle Fahmy · CBC News · Posted: Sep 18, 2018 6:30 AM AT | Last Updated: 3 hours ago


Jeannot Volpé, left, and Jean-Claude D'Amours, right, are two political veterans vying for the affection of voters this election. (CBC)


​Voters in Edmundston are split between two provincial ridings, but no matter which side of the electoral boundary they're on, they're watching a veteran politician attempting a comeback.

On one side of the divide, in Madawaska-Les-Lacs-Edmundston, is Jeannot Volpé, an outspoken cabinet minister in Bernard Lord's government who was interim leader of the provincial Tories before becoming a vocal critic of his own party.


And in Edmundston-Madawaska-Centre, three-term Liberal MP Jean-Claude D'Amours is hoping to revive his political career with a term as Liberal MLA.


Together, the two ridings make up the northwestern tip of the province, taking in rural communities from Sainte-Anne-de-Madawaska to Haut-Madawaska, with Edmundston as the urban centre. They have more similarities than differences, with candidates from the two ridings often campaigning as a team.


The province has been run by a teenager.

- Jeannot Volpé , PC candidate

Signs for both Volpé and his main opponent, Liberal Francine Landry, and D'Amours and his PC opponent, Gérald Lévesque, are sprinkled throughout the city of 16,000.

Volpé's decision to come out of retirement to run took many by surprise.


Edmundston is known for the Twin Rivers pulp mill, the city's largest employer, but the outskirts are home to many other factories, from slaughterhouses to trucking companies. (CBC)

"The province has been run by a teenager," said 68-year-old Jeannot Volpé. "He's in a candy jar right now and throwing money everywhere.

"Somebody needed to get involved, we've got real challenges in this province."

The northwest of the province differs in that the jobless rate is low — 4.8 per cent, according to Statistics Canada numbers from last month — the lowest in the province.

What's worrying employers and workers alike there is how to bring people to the region to fill the estimated 500 jobs that are currently sitting empty, according to the Edmundston Chamber of Commerce.

Critical of leader in past

Volpé has been critical of key decisions taken by his party since he left in 2010, especially when current leader Blaine Higgs was finance minister.

Those included the reform to MLA pension plans — which he filed a human rights complaint against and blamed "a few dummies" on Alward's staff for — and a 2014 forestry plan, which he said increased the dominance of large companies on Crown land.

But candidate and leader appear to have set aside whatever differences they may have had, with Higgs saying he welcomed Volpé's straight talk and Volpé considering Higgs "a great leader."


Progressive Conservative candidate Jeannot Volpé is vying for a seat in the riding he held onto for 16 years before retiring. (CBC)

"First when he came in I had some, not concerns, but a few questions for him. I met with him on quite a few occasions," said Volpé.

On Sept. 8, midway through the campaign, Higgs made a stop in Edmundston to pledge to overhaul New Brunswick's forestry laws.

"Small woodlot owners are suffering," he said at the announcement alongside Volpé and Lévesque.

Volpé will have to beat Liberal MLA and minister Francine Landry, who is confident she will get re-elected on Sep. 24.


Liberal cabinet minister Francine Landry said she is confident she will get re-elected for the Liberals against Volpé. (CBC)

"I know Jeannot as well. He's entitled to his own opinion," said Landry. "What I hear is people were happy with what I've done, how I brought investments from the government to projects they've been working on for quite a few years."

Denis Boulet is running for the Green Party and Cécile Richard-Hébert for the NDP.

Another familiar face

Next door, in the riding of Edmundston-Madawaska-Centre, Liberal candidate Jean-Claude D'Amours is trying to carve himself a spot on the political scene again.

After three terms, the former federal Liberal MP left politics in 2011, defeated by Conservative Bernard Valcourt.

The 45-year-old said he was always planning a comeback. The move from federal to provincial politics was in part to be closer to his family, he said.


Jean-Claude "J-C" D'Amours was elected three times for the federal Liberals. (CBC)

"You can't imagine, I was waiting for that moment to go back on the campaign trail. It was a thrill," said D'Amours.

The Edmundston-Madawaska-Centre seat is up for grabs since longtime Progressive Conservative MLA Madeleine Dubé — the party's only elected member in francophone New Brunswick — announced she was leaving politics in February.

Dubé held on to the seat for the Conservatives for almost 20 years, but the 2014 vote was close.


It's imperative ... that a French candidate sit at the table.

- Gérald Lévesque , Conservative candidate

The former minister of social development, health and education, among other portfolios, was the only PC francophone cabinet member.


Gérald Lévesque is hoping to win Madeleine Dubé's seat for the Progressive Conservatives. (CBC)

"It's imperative in my view that a French candidate sit at the table — be it me, be it Kevin Haché or Robert Gauvin," said Edmundston lawyer and PC candidate Gérald Lévesque, who is running against D'Amours.

Running for the Green Party is Sophie Vaillancourt and Anne-Marie Comeau for the NDP.

Acute labour shortages

Whoever is elected in both ridings will have to attack the increasingly problematic issue of labour shortages in the region.

Like most of the north, the region is facing demographic struggles: an aging population coupled with young people who moved to southern New Brunswick or out of province.

Labour shortages aren't unique to Madawaska County. It's the "new reality" of the province, according to economist Pierre-Marcel Desjardins. But Desjardins said it is much more acute in Edmundston than elsewhere.


Pattison, the Edmundston company behind many commercial signs displayed throughout Canada, is one of those facing acute labour shortages. (CBC)

"That economy there has been doing well for a long time," said Desjardins, citing the strategic location close to U.S. and Quebec markets.

And it's not just factory jobs. There is a budding entrepreneurial scene, with some young people coming back to region in the past four years.

"The people are entrepreneurial, they roll out their sleeves and get to work," said . Thomas Raffy, president of the New Brunswick Economic Council. "They don't just own a single business. They own two, even three different businesses in that region."

No long-term strategy

André Morneault one of those entrepreneurs.

He works as a software engineer for a U.S. company but is also a director with the local microbrewery and has a startup business. He is a born and raised Edmundstonian and would like to see the economy grow.

He admitted, frankly, he's discouraged with all parties.


André Morneault doesn't feel any of the parties have a long-term vision. (CBC)

"Right now we're having a lot of labour shortages. And it's getting to a point where companies have stopped investing in the area," said Morneault.

"I'd like to see a clear long-term plan. I don't feel like there's a plan, there's a strategy, I feel like they're all winging it."


I feel like they're all winging it.

- André Morneault , voter

Desjardins and Raffy agree none of the leaders addressed issues of labour shortages and immigration this election, still focused on messages around job creation instead.

"They're more interested in putting forth a message that they think the population wants to hear, not the message the population needs to hear," said Desjardins.

First Nation voters

Adding to the mix are the voters is the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation — a community home to multiple million-dollar businesses, including its casino, and one that's billed itself as one of the most prosperous in the province.

Traditionally, First Nations don't vote much in provincial elections, but this time, chiefs across New Brunswick urged people to head to the polls on Sept. 24.


The Grey Rock Entertainment Centre is one of several multimillion-dollar businesses on the Madawaska Maliseet First Nation. (CBC)

Madawaska chief Patricia Bernard called her community to vote Liberal because she said they were the first party in New Brunswick to recognize the duty to consult First Nations about unceded lands.

"That's a big step in itself," said Bernard. "Historically, Aboriginal people don't necessarily feel that it's going to affect them. But it has a huge effect, particularly in our community. We want to see the continuity of our tax-agreement with the province."

Language, language, language

Though the economy is top of mind of business people like Morneault, language will be the top issue when he goes to cast his ballot.

He doesn't know which way he'll vote yet. In his opinion, all parties have failed on that front.


It's not pretty.

- André Morneault , voter

"It's not pretty," said Morneault.

"We have the Liberals that are telling us they are the champions of francophone rights, but there's no record to support that in the last four years. And then you have the Conservatives, who decided to elect a leader who is not even bilingual and has a COR background, so that's not flying around here as well."


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/two-veterans-comeback-edmundtson-2018-1.4822186
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

N.B. hires 'election ambassadors' in bid to generate youth excitement
.


By Kevin Bissett, THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Tuesday, September 18, 2018 6:24PM ADT
Last Updated Tuesday, September 18, 2018 8:05PM ADT


FREDERICTON -- Election officials and student groups have launched a concerted effort to get students to vote in next week's New Brunswick election -- including flexible voting rules and the hiring of "election ambassadors" to generate excitement.

Chief Electoral Officer Kim Poffenroth said just 44 per cent of people between the ages of 18 and 24 cast their ballots in the 2014 election.

"If those individuals continue to vote at the rate they voted at in 2014, we're going to have a voter turnout well below 50 per cent. We want to get them started earlier and hopefully they will continue," she said Tuesday.



Kim Poffenroth
Chief Electoral Officer Kim Poffenroth said just 44 per cent of people between the ages of 18 and 24 cast their ballots in the 2014 election.

Campus voting stations have been set up at 18 post-secondary institutions for this Monday's election -- up from 13 in 2014 and just four locations during a pilot project in 2010.

Poffenroth said Elections NB has produced posters, bookmarks, pencils and other swag as a way to get the message out, while larger campuses have been given grants to hire students as election ambassadors.

"The role of these ambassadors will be to raise excitement among the student population and create awareness," she said.

"The sooner you instill that habit of voting, that it's part of your civic duty but it's also a privilege, it becomes a habit and they'll continue to vote."

The New Brunswick Student Alliance has partnered with Elections NB on the four campuses they represent: Mount Allison University, St. Thomas University, and the Saint John and Fredericton campuses of the University of New Brunswick.

Emily Blue, executive director of the student alliance, said it's important that students become engaged in the election process.

"The decisions made in this province affect those students quite a bit," she said.

Originally from Prince Edward Island, Blue is voting in her second New Brunswick election.

She said the voter turnout among young people in 2014 was very disappointing.

"Being able to mobilize those voters is really important in making sure that all the voices are heard and to make sure they have greater participation in the electoral process as they grow up," she said.

New Brunswick students have the choice of voting for candidates in their home community or in the riding where they are living while going to school.

Students from outside the province can also vote as long as they meet residency requirements.

Students must have lived in New Brunswick for 40 days to vote. That compares to a number of provinces that have a six-month residency requirement, while Saskatchewan has no requirement other than being a resident on the day of the election.

Blue said they want a turnout greater than 44 per cent.

"We don't have a target number, we really just want to increase engagement as much as possible. We want to increase the conversation that students are having," she said.

The overall voter turnout in 2014 was 65 per cent.


https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/n-b-hires-election-ambassadors-in-bid-to-generate-youth-excitement-1.4099373
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Thursday



THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Thursday, September 20, 2018 7:28AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Thursday, Sept. 20, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

Liberals: Brian Gallant will release the party's election platform at Coburn Farms in Keswick Ridge (107 Route 616) at 10:30 a.m. He'll participate in a televised roundtable on CTV at St. Thomas University in Fredericton at 6:30 p.m.

Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs makes a 12:30 p.m. announcement at the Fredericton Inn and then at 6:30 p.m. takes part in a televised roundtable on CTV at St. Thomas University in Fredericton.


NDP: Jennifer McKenzie will be at New Brunswick Community College in Saint John (950 Grandview Avenue) at 10:45 a.m. She'll visit residents and nursing home workers at Rocmaura (10 Parks Street) at 2:30 p.m. At 6 p.m., McKenzie will canvass on the west side of Saint John.

Green Party: David Coon will attend the United Way kickoff at Currie Centre in Fredericton at 11:30 a.m. Coon will also participate in a televised roundtable on CTV at St. Thomas University in Fredericton at 6:30 p.m.

People's Alliance: Kris Austin campaigns in his riding of Fredericton-Grand Lake.

https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-thursday-1.4101750
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its interesting the pc leaders plans to spend most of the day in tough liberal held ridings in northern NB , seats the pc's aren't very likely to win as francophone vote is heavily liberal in NB )


New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Friday


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Friday, September 21, 2018 7:36AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Friday, Sept. 21, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

Liberals: Brian Gallant makes an announcement at 9:15 a.m. at the Willie O'Ree Centre, 605 Cliffe Street, Fredericton. Later, the campaign bus will make its way to Saint John, Moncton, Miramichi, Petit Rocher, and Campbellton.

Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs will make an announcement at 9 a.m. at the Upper Kingsclear Fire Department (22 Mazerolle Settlement Road). He'll attend a rally at noon in Moncton (476 Elmwood Drive), one at 3 p.m. in Miramichi (20 Fountain Head Lane), and another rally at 5:30 p.m. in Shippagan (200 Boulevard J.D. Gauthier). At 7 p.m., Higgs will attend Tracadie Music Night in Tracadie-Sheila (3360 Boulevard Dr. Victor Leblanc).


NDP: Jennifer McKenzie makes a "wrap up announcement" at 10:30 a.m. at Fort Latour, 124 Chesley Drive, Saint John. In the afternoon she canvasses in her Saint John Harbour riding and then joins the Take Back The Night march at 7 p.m. at Saint Joseph's Community Health Centre, 116 Coburg Street, Saint John.

Green Party: David Coon holds a news conference with David Suzuki at noon at the Chateau Moncton Hotel, 100 Main Street, Moncton. In the evening, Coon canvasses in his riding of Fredericton South.

People's Alliance: Kris Austin campaigns in his riding of Fredericton-Grand Lake.


https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-friday-1.4103564
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( in an odd move , the other 3 liberal premiers from the east coast are going to campaign in the New Brunswick election . don't think I can recall such a thing ever taking place before , at least not recently , definitely odd to bring in premiers from other provinces last minute )


September 21, 2018 1:07 pm

Atlantic premiers to campaign with Gallant on N.B. campaign’s last full day


By Staff The Canadian Press




Brian Gallant is bringing in some campaign help ahead of Monday’s New Brunswick election: Atlantic Canada’s other Liberal premiers.



Nova Scotia’s Stephen McNeil, Prince Edward Island’s Wade MacLauchlan, and Dwight Ball of Newfoundland and Labrador will join New Brunswick’s Liberal leader Sunday.

Gallant, who is in a tight race with Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs, says the premiers’ support is “much appreciated.”


He notes in a press release that the Atlantic premiers have “worked together in unprecedented ways” to help the regional economy.

The region is also represented federally entirely by Liberal MPs.


https://globalnews.ca/news/4474339/atlantic-premiers-campaign-for-gallant/
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

September 22, 2018 12:40 pm

N.B. campaign enters final weekend before Monday’s election


By Staff The Canadian Press



New Brunswick’s party leaders have a busy weekend ahead of them, as the election campaign taking up much of their time over the past few weeks draws to a close on Monday.



Governing Liberal Leader Brian Gallant will spend much of Saturday travelling through the province, continuing his bid to become the first sitting premier since 2003 to win a second term.



The Liberals have promised 118 commitments at a projected cost of $155 million over four years during their campaign – spending that has drawn scorn from Tory Leader Blaine Higgs, who has cast his party as tight-fisted, fiscal conservatives.

Polls have suggested the governing party has the advantage, but pundits say the race has tightened between them and the Progressive Conservatives.



New Brunswick’s smaller parties will be busy Saturday as well: Green Party Leader David Coon will spend the day canvassing in his riding before attending a private event with environmentalist David Suzuki in the evening.



New Democratic Party Leader Jennifer McKenzie and People’s Alliance Leader Kris Austin will both spend most of the day canvassing in their respective ridings.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4477510/n-b-election-campaign-final-weekend/
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( with the green party and people's alliance polling so high , its unknown what sort of impact that will have on the overall race )



September 21, 2018 2:50 pm Updated: September 21, 2018 4:53 pm

Vote-splitting speculation ramps up in final days of N.B. election campaign

By Andrew Cromwell
Digital Broadcast Journalist Global News



With the New Brunswick election campaign entering the home stretch, it’s becoming clear that the Liberals and Conservatives are in a tight race. With that in mind, more attention is being paid to the potential impact of the province’s third-party candidates.

Gallant, campaigning Friday morning in Fredericton, was asked about the possibility of vote splitting.


“There’s no doubt that there’s some people who are toying to vote for the Green Party or the NDP, and I would ask them humbly to look at our progressive platform,” said Gallant.


“If they don’t, the fear is that because of some vote splitting there could be a Conservative government led by Blaine Higgs that is prepared to make cuts.”


Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs began his day campaigning in Fredericton and Moncton before heading for northern New Brunswick. He also addressed the potential of vote splitting.

“(Gallant)’s out there … basically suggesting to and trying to manipulate the other voters who would support Green or NDP,” said Higgs.

There is the sentiment that a vote for the People’s Alliance Party would erode Conservative support. Higgs admits vote splitting is a concern.


“I think the threat for that is another four years of Brian Gallant and the province can’t afford that.”


Meanwhile, well-known Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki was on hand in Moncton to support the Green Party’s campaign. Leader David Coon called Gallant’s comments on vote splitting interesting, given recent remarks.

“He was very clear and explicit that he looked forward to working with Green MLAs in the Legislative Assembly should we be given the balance of responsibility,” Coon said.


Campaigning in Saint John, the leader of the NDP spoke of the possibility of a minority government, calling a majority government more dangerous.

“You have complacency and they don’t work hard for the people who put them in power,” added Jennifer McKenzie.

Meanwhile, Liberal premiers from Nova Scotia, P.E.I. and Newfoundland and Labrador will join Gallant on the campaign trail this weekend.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4474792/n-b-election-vote-splitting/
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2018 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( mainstreet did a poll on this election , although the final outcome remains unclear as both the green's and people alliance are polling so much higher than past years . potential for weird vote splits to allow for unusual outcomes in some ridings .

the liberals might be able to steal some pc's seats if they lose votes to the people's alliance but pc's might be able to steal some liberal seats if they lose votes to the greens , its all very uncertain to say the least .

ndp vote has collapsed entirely , some shocking numbers , polling between 0 % and 3 % among voters 18-34 years old , yes 0 % among younger voters , hard to believe as that age group was key to the Ontario ndp success )


NB Liberals Leading as Election Draws To A Close

September 23, 2018|Mainstreet Research|Featured, New Brunswick, Public Polling


23 September 2018 (Ottawa ON) – The New Brunswick Liberals have a six point lead as New Brunswickers head to the polls on Monday.

“Premier Gallant has a smaller lead than what he won with in 2014,” said Quito Maggi, President and CEO of Mainstreet Research. “The Liberal vote is very ineffecient and the lead they have at this moment may not be enough for Gallant to win re-election on Monday.”

The survey polled 526 New Brunswickers, 18 years and older on September 20th and 21st. The margin of error of this poll is +/- 4.26% and is accurate 19 times out of 20.

Among decided and leaning voters, the Liberals have 35.2% support while the PCs led by Blaine Higgs has 28.8%. The Greens led by David Coon currently enjoy 16% while the People’s Alliance with Kris Austin at the helm has 14.8%. The NDP led by Jennifer McKenzie has 3.2%.

The Liberals have leads in every region in New Brunswick, but the PCs are competitive in both the Fredericton area and in the areas outside of Moncton and Fredericton.

The survey also asked respondents if they had a favourable or unfavourable impression of each of the five party leader. The poll found that New Brunswickers only rated David Coon positively.

“The fact that more New Brunswickers view four out of the five party leaders negatively is a big sign of voter ambivalence,” continued Maggi. “Whoever wins on Monday is certainly not being embraced warmly by the voters.”

Gallant has a -3.6% net rating, while Higgs has a -6.8% rating. Coon has a +4.6% rating. McKenzie and Austin has a -25.5% and -9% net rating respectively.

“Since Coon is the only leader with a net positive rating, there is a chance that the Greens outperform our numbers,” Maggi concluded.

https://www.mainstreetresearch.ca/nb-liberals-leading-as-election-draws-to-a-close/
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Campaign hits final day; tight race expected




Keith Doucette and Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, September 23, 2018 7:57AM EDT
Last Updated Sunday, September 23, 2018 11:39PM EDT


FREDERICTON -- Atlantic Canada's four Liberal premiers don't always see eye to eye on major issues but the four were united on Sunday with the message to get out the Liberal vote in Monday's New Brunswick election.

"Keep it up, and double-down over the next 24 hours. We can take no vote for granted," Brian Gallant told supporters at a rally in Moncton Sunday.

He is looking to become the first New Brunswick premier to win a second term since 2003.


The month-long New Brunswick election campaign neared the finish line with a final day of campaigning in what's seen as a tightening race between the rival Liberals and Progressive Conservatives.

The possibility of vote splitting, as the result of support for third parties, was a common point of discussion among the parties over the weekend.

"Vote splitting could have us waking up Tuesday morning with a Blaine Higgs and Conservative government, maybe propped up by a third party," Gallant warned. "That, in my opinion, would be the wrong direction for our province."

In spite of their differences on issues such as the federal carbon tax and softwood lumber, the four Liberal premiers rallied around Gallant.

"There will be close ridings. There will be close votes. There may be people who don't get around to getting out to vote without the effort that everyone in this room will give," said Prince Edward Island's Wade MacLauchlan.

Newfoundland and Labrador's Dwight Ball told the crowd gathered at the Moncton Press Club that he won his first election campaign by just 16 votes.

"So look around this room. It's easy to wrap your arms around 16 people. That's the difference tomorrow in some of those ridings," Ball said. "Let's not wake up on Tuesday morning and say, 'Could we have found 16 more votes?"'

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil told the crowd that the electorate is volatile and they shouldn't take any riding for granted.

"I need you to give every ounce of energy you have right to the final tick of the clock to get those votes out. I believe there are more Liberal votes in New Brunswick for tomorrow. The question is, are we up to the challenge to get them out?," he said prompting the crowd to begin chanting "Four more years."

At a campaign rally in Fredericton, Tory Leader Blaine Higgs was asked about Gallant calling in help from his Atlantic counterparts.

"It's desperation," said Higgs. "(Gallant) brings in political friends from the other provinces, but are they going to stay and help him? Is that the plan if he wins?"

Higgs scheduled a series of rallies through the central and southern part of the province as he looks to close the gap.

He appeared before several dozen enthusiastic supporters at a Fredericton hotel ballroom along with six Tory candidates from the area.

Higgs touched on familiar themes to applause from the crowd, touting a fiscally conservative agenda aimed at bringing back a provincial economy he said lags behind the rest of Canada.

He said it's a formula that will put the party over the top at the polls on Monday.

"I'm really excited about the potential for tomorrow," he said. "I'm excited because we are going for a majority government despite what anyone might say."

The economy and jobs, along with fiscal management, have been key issues during the campaign, while the question of language in the officially bilingual province also played a lower grade role on the hustings.

Gallant spent the rest of the day attending rallies along the east coast of the province, ending with the Liberal's traditional final rally in Neguac.

The campaign buses have to be off the roads and out of sight by midnight, prior to the start of election day, and have to remain parked until after the polls are closed Monday night.

Higgs toured the northern half of the province on Saturday, saying a vote for any party other than the Tories will put Brian Gallant back in the premier's office.

Green Party Leader David Coon was in his Fredericton riding Sunday as was People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin, while NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie spent the day in her Saint John riding.

The third parties aren't expected to make big inroads Monday, although they may play a factor in vote-splitting in some of the province's 49 ridings.

Going into the election campaign, the seat count in the legislature was 24 Liberals, 21 Progressive Conservatives, one Green, one Independent and two vacancies.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/new-brunswick-election-campaign-hits-final-day-tight-race-expected-1.4105782
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tight race between Liberals and Tories as New Brunswick goes to the polls



The Canadian Press
Published Monday, September 24, 2018 4:38AM EDT



FREDERICTON -- New Brunswick voters go to the polls today in a provincial election that appears to be a tight race between the incumbent Liberals and the Progressive Conservatives.

Liberal Leader Brian Gallant is looking to become the first New Brunswick premier to win a second term since 2003.

Just over a month long, the campaign focused on jobs, the economy and fiscal management, while the role of language in the officially bilingual province also became a lower grade issue on the hustings.



The two front-runners spent Sunday on one final push to energize supporters and warned of the possibility of vote splitting, as the result of support for third parties.

Gallant appeared at an event in Moncton with Atlantic Canada's three other Liberal premiers, before wrapping up the campaign with several stops along the province's east coast.

Tory Leader Blaine Higgs also attended several rallies through central and southern parts of the province before ending his campaign with an event in his home riding of Quispamsis.

Green Party Leader David Coon, People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin, and NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie are vying to establish some influence, although the third parties aren't expected to make big inroads.

Going into the election campaign the Liberals held 24 seats and the Progressive Conservatives 21, while there was one Green, one Independent and two vacancies.

Gallant is scheduled to cast his vote at the Boys and Girls Club in Dieppe early Monday before spending the day with his family. He is to speak to supporters at his election night headquarters in Grand-Digue once the results are known.

Higgs, who voted in an advance poll, is to accompany his wife Marcia Higgs while she votes at St. Mark's Catholic Church in Quispamsis. His campaign said he will watch the results at home before going to his headquarters in Quispamsis to address supporters.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/tight-race-between-liberals-and-tories-as-new-brunswick-goes-to-the-polls-1.4106465
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Race tightening on eve of New Brunswick election



Keith Doucette and Kevin Bissett

FREDERICTON

The Canadian Press


Published September 23, 2018

Updated 12 hours ago



Atlantic Canada’s four Liberal premiers don’t always see eye-to-eye on major issues but the four were united on Sunday with the message to get out the Liberal vote in the New Brunswick election on Monday.

“Keep it up, and double-down over the next 24 hours. We can take no vote for granted,” Liberal Leader Brian Gallant told supporters at a rally in Moncton Sunday. He is looking to become the first New Brunswick premier to win a second term since 2003.

The month-long New Brunswick election campaign neared the finish line with a final day of campaigning in what’s seen as a tightening race between the rival Liberals and Progressive Conservatives.

The possibility of vote splitting, as the result of support for third parties, was a common point of discussion among the parties over the weekend.

“Vote splitting could have us waking up Tuesday morning with a Blaine Higgs and Conservative government, maybe propped up by a third party,” Mr. Gallant warned. “That, in my opinion, would be the wrong direction for our province.”



In spite of their differences on issues such as the federal carbon tax and softwood lumber, the three other Liberal Atlantic premiers rallied around Mr. Gallant.

“There will be close ridings. There will be close votes. There may be people who don’t get around to getting out to vote without the effort that everyone in this room will give,” said Prince Edward Island’s Wade MacLauchlan.


Leaders of the Progressive Conservative and Liberal parties gave a final push on Sunday, the last day of the New Brunswick election campaign. Outgoing premier Brian Gallant told supporters not to take a Liberal majority for granted. The Canadian Press

Newfoundland and Labrador’s Dwight Ball told the crowd gathered at the Moncton Press Club that he won his first election campaign by just 16 votes.

“So look around this room. It’s easy to wrap your arms around 16 people. That’s the difference tomorrow in some of those ridings,” Mr. Ball said. “Let’s not wake up on Tuesday morning and say, ‘Could we have found 16 more votes?' "

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil told the crowd that the electorate is volatile and they shouldn’t take any riding for granted.


“I need you to give every ounce of energy you have right to the final tick of the clock to get those votes out. I believe there are more Liberal votes in New Brunswick for tomorrow. The question is, are we up to the challenge to get them out?,” he said, prompting the crowd to begin chanting “Four more years.”

At a campaign rally in Fredericton, Tory Leader Blaine Higgs was asked about Mr. Gallant calling in help from his Atlantic counterparts.

“It’s desperation,” said Mr. Higgs. “[Mr. Gallant] brings in political friends from the other provinces, but are they going to stay and help him? Is that the plan if he wins?”

Mr. Higgs scheduled a series of rallies through the central and southern part of the province as he looks to close the gap.

He appeared before several dozen enthusiastic supporters at a Fredericton hotel ballroom along with six Tory candidates from the area.

Mr. Higgs touched on familiar themes to applause from the crowd, touting a fiscally conservative agenda aimed at bringing back a provincial economy he said lags behind the rest of Canada.


He said it’s a formula that will put the party over the top at the polls on Monday.

“I’m really excited about the potential for [Monday],” he said. “I’m excited because we are going for a majority government despite what anyone might say.”

The economy and jobs, along with fiscal management, have been key issues during the campaign, while the question of language in the officially bilingual province played a lower-grade role on the hustings.

Mr. Gallant spent the rest of the day attending rallies along the east coast of the province, ending with the Liberal’s traditional final rally in Neguac.

The campaign buses have to be off the roads and out of sight by midnight, prior to the start of election day, and have to remain parked until after the polls are closed Monday night.

Mr. Higgs toured the northern half of the province on Saturday, saying a vote for any party other than the Tories will put Brian Gallant back in the premier’s office.

Green Party Leader David Coon was in his Fredericton riding Sunday as was populist People’s Alliance Leader Kris Austin, while NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie spent the day in her Saint John riding.

The third parties aren’t expected to make big inroads Monday, although they may play a factor in vote-splitting in some of the province’s 49 ridings.

Going into the election campaign, the seat count in the legislature was 24 Liberals, 21 Progressive Conservatives, one Green, one Independent and two vacancies.


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-race-tightening-on-final-day-of-campaigning-in-new-brunswick-election/
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Liberals will likely win;
However it will be interesting to see if the People's Alliance recent bump in polls is realize at the ballot box and if so will it simply make the path to Liberal Victory easier or will they add enough seats to be a factor.
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The Liberals will likely win;
However it will be interesting to see if the People's Alliance recent bump in polls is realize at the ballot box and if so will it simply make the path to Liberal Victory easier or will they add enough seats to be a factor.



I don't have a good feel for how this election will turn out , federally vote splitting has typically benefitted the party leading in the polls in New Brunswick .

looking back at 2000 it helped the federal liberals , but in 2008 and 2011 it helped the federal conservatives win new seats as the ndp gained at the liberals expense

but I'm not sure how it all plays out tonight , the liberals might benefit if the People's alliance takes votes from the pc's . but the pc's could also benefit if the Green's take votes from the liberals

and the legislature was very close before the election so it only take a couple seats moving either way for a different outcome than last election

a minority is possible but only if the green's and people's alliance actually win seats , the ndp clearly is not going to win seats at 3%
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New Brunswick Provincial Election on September 24

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