Home FAQ Search Memberlist User Groups Register Login   

BloggingTories.ca Forum IndexBloggingTories.ca Forum Index
    Index     FAQ     Search     Register     Login         JOIN THE DISCUSSION - CLICK HERE      


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next  

Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 2 of 4
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green Party optimistic of making inroads in New Brunswick election


Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, August 30, 2018 4:42PM EDT



FREDERICTON -- After making inroads in recent provincial elections across Canada, the Green party is looking for fresh gains when New Brunswickers go to the polls next month.

Currently, provincial Green Leader David Coon is the party's only member in the legislature, having won in 2014, and political scientist Tom Bateman says Coon is likely to win his seat again.

"He has been an articulate MLA and a very good constituency MLA," said Bateman, of St. Thomas University in Fredericton.


The party is concentrating on a couple of key ridings, with federal Green Leader Elizabeth May in the province to help campaign this week.

"I feel quite confident in David Coon, having had a spectacular record in four years. I have every expectation when the election is over and he returns to the legislature he will return with a caucus of Green MLAs from New Brunswick," May said Thursday.

She spent a couple days campaigning with Coon in his Fredericton South riding and with Megan Mitton -- the party's candidate in the Sackville-area riding of Memramcook-Tantramar.

The two ridings are seen by many as the Greens' best chances to win seats, and May said she is seeing a groundswell of support.

"In 20 minutes in Sackville we raised $24,000. In 20 minutes last night at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery we raised $17,000. You don't have people showing up for fundraisers in large numbers unless there's something going on. And there's something definitely going on in New Brunswick," she said.

Bateman said parts of Memramcook-Tantramar, home of Mount Allison University, are much like David Coon's Fredericton riding, and many people there could be looking for a new place to put their vote.

"It is a university community and there has been some support for the left historically, so maybe," Bateman said.

To make gains Sept. 24, Bateman said he expects the Greens will have to be on the popular side of a particular issue, especially in ridings that feature multi-party races.

"That means they could get in with 35 to 40 per cent of the vote," Bateman said.

Across the country, the Greens now have eight elected members, having made gains in British Columbia, Ontario and Prince Edward Island.

On P.E.I., the Greens now have two MLAs -- and polls have suggested they are in second place as the province heads towards an expected provincial election next year.

Greens in New Brunswick have consistently placed third in the polls, but Coon said he believes that will change.

"People are really looking this election for an alternative. They're tired of the flip-flopping back and forth between Liberals and Tories. They don't see much difference between them."

Coon said more than half his candidates are women, three are Indigenous, several are millennials, and there's an octogenarian.

Bateman said aside from the Liberal, Tory, and Green parties, candidates for the People's Alliance Party and former Liberal Speaker -- now independent -- Chris Collins in Moncton could play a significant role on election night.

"If we can get two or three alternative MLAs in there, they could very well hold the balance of power and make politics in New Brunswick interesting again," Bateman said, noting that the governing Liberals don't currently hold a majority.

At dissolution, the seat count in the legislature was 24 Liberals, 22 Progressive Conservatives, one Green, one independent and one vacancy.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/green-party-optimistic-of-making-inroads-in-new-brunswick-election-1.4074673
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Tuesday

Brian Gallant
New Brunswick Liberal Leader Brian Gallant and wife Karine Lavoie are greeted by supporters after arriving at a campaign stop in Oromocto, N.B., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/James West)
.


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Tuesday, September 4, 2018 7:49AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Tuesday, Sept. 4, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

Liberals: Brian Gallant greets children before school at a private residence at 27 Fairview Drive in Moncton, N.B., at 7:30 a.m. At 10:00 a.m., he makes a platform commitment announcement at Ganong Hall at the Saint John campus of the University of New Brunswick at 100 Tucker Park Road. Later in the day, he visits Fredericton and Island View.

Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs spends the day preparing for upcoming debates.


Greens: David Coon holds a news conference at 9 a.m. to launch the party's economic development plank at the Saint John Tool Library at 160 Union Street, Saint John. He and candidate Marilyn Merritt-Gray then participate in an editorial board meeting with Brunswick News at 10 a.m. At 3:30 p.m. Coon visits Shannex Parkland with candidate Susan Jonah, before he participates in a local candidate's town hall hosted by the Capital Region Medical Society at the Kingswood Lodge at 31 Kingswood Park in Fredericton.

New Democrats: Jennifer McKenzie makes an education-related announcement at 1:30 p.m. in front of the Samuel-de-Champlain School at 77 Ragged Point Road, Saint John. She canvasses in Saint John Harbour at 4 p.m., then at 8 p.m. she discusses the party's education platform on Facebook Live.

People's Alliance: Kris Austin spends most of the day campaigning in Ripples.



https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-tuesday-1.4078797
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Three weeks left in N.B. election as health care, jobs remain top of mind



New Brunswick Liberal Leader Brian Gallant speaks at a campaign stop in Oromocto, N.B., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018.James West / THE CANADIAN PRESS



The Canadian Press
The Canadian Press


September 3, 2018
12:53 PM EDT

Last Updated
September 3, 2018
4:22 PM EDT

Filed under
PMN Canada



FREDERICTON — Politicians in New Brunswick made promises regarding labour and health care on Monday, with three weeks to go before the province heads to the polls.

Liberal Leader Brian Gallant says that if re-elected, his party will modernize New Brunswick’s labour laws by partnering with the Government-Labour Steering Committee and other stakeholders to update multiple labour acts, including the Employment Standards Act and the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

“Ensuring that workers in New Brunswick are well supported and protected will help us continue to grow the economy in a way that ensures fairness for everyone,” said Gallant in a news release.

He also recently pledged to increase the province’s minimum wage from the current $11.25 to $14 an hour by 2022.

Over its previous mandate, the government said it began providing paid leave and job protection for victims of domestic, partner and sexual violence, added workplace harassment and violence protections to the Occupational Health and Safety act, and supported enhancements to the Canadian Pension Plan.


The Tories, meanwhile, spent the long weekend campaigning on the issue of health care, promising on Monday afternoon that their government would reduce wait times by 50 per cent for hip replacements, knee replacements and gynecological surgeries.



Party leader Blaine Higgs said the Progressive Conservatives would achieve this by recruiting more doctors, training more nurses and using technology to match patients with the right care.

The party said it will invest $23.9 million over the next four years, which would cover the hiring of 10 specialists, eight family doctors and six physician assistants.

“New Brunswickers deserve world class health care,” Higgs said in a release. “Delaying access to needed care through government mismanagement adds cost — but more importantly, it adds unnecessary suffering.”

The two parties had previously sparred over health-care costs, particularly senior care, at the end of August, when the Liberal government pledged to build three new nursing homes and add 86 memory-care beds if re-elected, as part of a five-year program to add 1,000 beds and make more than $100 million in renovations to existing nursing homes throughout the province.

At the time, Higgs took a less bricks-and-mortar approach to senior care, saying that a Progressive Conservative government would consult with seniors about how they want to live and provide supports so they can remain in their own homes longer.

On Friday, Green Party Leader David Coon released their plan to address poverty in the province, saying he would like to see “inadequate” social assistance rates replaced by a basic income guarantee.

The party seeks to raise minimum wage to $15.25 per hour over the next four years and pilot a basic income guarantee in three regions for three years, with the objective of phasing it in over time.

“New Brunswick will thrive if everyone has the means to fully participate in the economic, social and political life of their cities, towns and rural communities,” said Coon in a release.

Coon has plans to launch his party’s economic development plank Tuesday morning.

The New Democratic Party focused on the economy as well over the long weekend, with leader Jennifer McKenzie canvassing for pay equity and a $15 minimum wage.

The party also released its plan for carbon reduction on Friday, which entails introducing a carbon reduction fund to help the province transition to green energy.

McKenzie said the fund would be used to support low and middle-income people in the form of rebates, as well as to invest in green energy, infrastructure, and innovation


https://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/three-weeks-left-in-n-b-election-as-health-care-jobs-remain-top-of-mind
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Thursday

Jennifer McKenzie
New Brunswick NDP leader Jennifer McKenzie makes a campaign announcement in Fredericton on Sept. 5, 2018.

.


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Thursday, September 6, 2018 7:52AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Thursday, Sept. 6, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

Liberals: Brian Gallant makes a platform announcement at the New Brunswick Community College, 80 University Ave., Miramichi at 10 a.m. The campaign bus later makes stops in Caraquet, Miscou, and Tracadie.

Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs makes an education announcement at 11 a.m. at the Kennebecasis Public Library in Quispamsis. At 12:15 p.m. he has lunch with Saint John-area candidates at AJ's Family Restaurant, 638 Manawagonish Rd., Saint John. In the afternoon, he campaigns in the Saint John area.


Greens: David Coon will be at the New Brunswick Women's Institute, which is across from Slocum's Farm Fresh Produce at 6175, Route 105 in Waterborough). He plans to launch the party's plan for home-care services at 10 a.m.

At 6 p.m. he attends the Freddy Beach barbecue for students at Officer's Square, and at 7 p.m. he participates in a local candidates' town hall hosted by the Fredericton Arts Alliance at the Charlotte Street Arts Centre in Fredericton.

New Democrats: Jennifer McKenzie makes an announcement about innovation and economic growth at 11 a.m. at ConnexionWorks, 1 Germain St., Suite 300 Brunswick Square Business in Saint John. At noon she meets with residents of Cozy Manor, 188 King St. East, Saint John, and at 4 p.m. canvasses in her riding of Saint John Harbour.

People's Alliance: Kris Austin campaigns in the Woodstock area in the morning, visiting a sawmill and touring Covered Bridge Chips. He helps canvass in the Carleton-Victoria riding in the afternoon, and then at 5 p.m., he attends a meet-and-greet at Big Axe Park on Otis Drive in Nackawic.


https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-thursday-1.4082033
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Wednesday



THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Wednesday, September 5, 2018 8:31AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Wednesday, Sept. 5, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

Liberals: Brian Gallant makes an announcement at the New Brunswick Community College, 26 Duffie Drive, Fredericton, at 11 am.

Later in the day he and the campaign bus travel to Moncton, Riverview, and Miramichi.




Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs makes a health announcement at Family Plus Life Solutions, 199 Chesley Drive, Saint John. At 11:15 a.m. he has lunch at the City Market in Saint John. At 4 p.m. he attends Murray's trucker appreciation days at Murray's Truck Stop in Beardsley, N.B. (near Woodstock)

Greens: David Coon spends the day preparing for the upcoming televised leaders debates. Then at 7 p.m. Coon and Fredericton West-Hanwell candidate Susan Jonah host a town hall discussion at St. James Presbyterian Church, 1991 Route 640, Hanwell.

New Democrats: Jennifer McKenzie meets with the Fredericton Golden Club at 10 a.m., 245 Westmoreland Rd. in Fredericton. She makes an announcement at noon about post secondary education at UNB Fredericton. She attends the Unifor Community Day BBQ at 4:30 p.m. at 85 Durham, Saint John, and later canvasses with Tony Mowery, candidate in Saint John Lancaster.

People's Alliance: Kris Austin canvasses with candidates in the Saint John area ridings.


https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-wednesday-1.4080391
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2018 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Election spotlight on New Brunswick's low literacy rate: 'An embarrassment

.

Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, September 6, 2018 4:40PM EDT



FREDERICTON -- New Brunswick Tories are promising to address literacy rates in a province where advocates say about half the population isn't literate enough to fully participate in society.

Campaigning for this month's provincial election, Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs said Thursday the province's literacy rate is an embarrassment.

Nearly 20 per cent of New Brunswick adults have literacy levels below the national average.


Blaine Higgs
New Brunswick Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs speaks at his official nomination in Quispamsis, N.B., on Monday, Aug. 27, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/James West)

"We have too many people unable to participate fully in society because of their low literacy skills," said Linda Homer, executive director of the Literacy Coalition of New Brunswick, estimating that amounts to about half of the adult population.

"We are not only looking at reading the words -- the world has changed and technology has moved in, so we need digital literacy skills, document reading and use, and computers skills. They're all kind of part of that important learning that we need today to function," Homer said.

Recent Canada-wide assessments show that, with the exception of Manitoba, New Brunswick Grade 8 students lag behind their Canadian counterparts in reading.

An international literacy report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2013 found that Canada ranked just above average among 24 participating countries and regions.

Among provinces and territories, Yukon, Alberta, B.C., Ontario, Manitoba, P.E.I. and Nova Scotia were above average among those aged 16 to 65, according to the report. Trailing behind were Quebec, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, the Northwest Territories, Newfoundland and Labrador and, finally, Nunavut.

Higgs is pledging to have 85 per cent of students meet or exceed Grade 2 reading standards by 2022, and that the Grade 2 class of 2022 will be top three in Canada in literacy and math.

He said the Tory plan would include a program to support schools through community mentors, after-school learning and tutoring, and family support programs.

He also said there would be a review of the format for reports cards to ensure they are providing adequate information for students and parents.

Homer said part of the reason for New Brunswick's low scores is its historic dependence on resource sectors like forestry and the fishery.

She said it has been possible for people to spend their entire working career working in a mill or on a boat and get by without developing their skills for reading and writing.

She said the problem occurs when those people become parents and are unable to help their children develop their literacy skills.

"There's a huge impact in our early childhood literacy learning that gives us a lifelong effect. If we don't get a good start early on, then things don't go as well. Parents in the home environment are the most influential factor," she said.

The province's Liberal government has boasted record spending on education, and last year it launched its Comprehensive Literacy Strategy.

The strategy set numerous priorities such as exploring ways to provide learning opportunities beyond the traditional school day, and working with employers to develop adult literacy and skills training.

At the time, Liberal Premier Brian Gallant said the government had spent nearly $2 million to hire more than 35 new literacy leads, and earmarked $7 million per year for literacy programming for children and adults.

But on Thursday, Higgs said there's a need to spend wisely and address specific issues. He said only then would there be results.

"The literacy rate in this province is an embarrassment that we cannot put up with any longer," Higgs said.

Greg Byrne, a Liberal campaign spokesperson, said in a statement Thursday that Higgs is offering targets but no real plan on meeting them.

"What's important to note is that we are making significant investments in education, including investments in literacy. Unlike Blaine Higgs, we believe it is important to make these investments if we want to see real improvements."

Homer said there have been improvements in recent years, but not enough and not quickly enough.

She said she's pleased the political parties are talking about education and specifically about literacy.

"It gives me much hope. I think there's a sincere interest in the recognition of the importance of literacy and how it's tied into our quality of life, economy and health," she said.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/election-spotlight-on-new-brunswick-s-low-literacy-rate-an-embarrassment-1.4083000
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As Carleton-Victoria goes, so goes the province?


Results coming out of the western New Brunswick riding may signal the PCs' chances of forming government


Jacques Poitras · CBC News · Posted: Sep 10, 2018 6:00 AM AT | Last Updated: September 10


The rural northwestern New Brunswick riding includes the communities of Florenceville-Bristol, Perth-Andover and Tobique First Nation.


Jim Pickett may be the ultimate political bellwether in Victoria County.


Decades ago, he was one of the first Progressive Conservatives to call for a leadership review against then-Premier Richard Hatfield — a move that heralded Hatfield's crushing defeat two years later.


In the 2014 election, he rebelled again, joining other PC supporters in Perth-Andover to support Liberal candidate Andy Harvey. Harvey won the riding of Carleton-Victoria by 82 votes.


This year? He's undecided — and unwilling to predict the outcome.


"I can't tell you how it's going to end up on the 24th," he says from the armchair in his home near the Trans-Canada Highway. "It's going to be fascinating to see what the final vote is."


Indeed, Carleton-Victoria is a prime target for the PCs if they have any hope of winning the election. If they can't overturn a narrow Liberal win in this Tory heartland, their path to a majority becomes difficult.


Harvey won the seat in 2014, despite a topsy-turvy campaign in which fraud and forgery charges against him led to his temporary suspension from the Liberal team.


Then, just 10 days before the election, the charges were abruptly dropped, and Harvey squeaked into office.


PC opponent had baggage


Many local supporters of the Progressive Conservatives supported the Liberal candidate last time because they felt their incumbent PC MLA, Wes McLean, had been shoved aside. (CBC)


Two things worked in his favour.


In the Perth-Andover area, PC supporters suspected their local MLA, incumbent Wes McLean, had been shoved aside as the candidate in favour of Dr. Colin Lockhart, a physician from Bath.


As a result, "quite a few of us Tories" switched their support to Harvey, Pickett says.

Lockhart also had baggage on health care.


In Perth-Andover, people have long considered their small hospital, Hotel-Dieu of St. Joseph, to be under threat and in need of a vigilant defence. There were fears that flooding in 2012 would be used as a pretext to close it and centralize services in Waterville.


Because Lockhart had championed the Waterville hospital when it was built under Bernard Lord's PC government, voters in Victoria County worried he might not fight for the Perth-Andover facility.


A record to defend


Liberal Andy Harvey now has something he didn't have during the 2014 campaign — a record to run on, which can be both a blessing and a curse. (Jacques Poitras/CBC)


Four years after his narrow win, Harvey is now the incumbent with a record to defend.


"Last time you were presenting your case: 'we should be doing this and this and this,'" Harvey said while knocking on doors on Till Road.


Now "people are judging me and my team on my record locally, and our record provincially and what we've done."


Voters here don't seem to be in a surly, anti-incumbent mood.


"I think he's all right," resident Romeo Bellefleur says of Harvey while eating lunch at a local dairy bar. "Seems to be OK. Easy to talk and seems to be friendly. I don't see anything wrong with him."


"I ain't had no trouble with him," adds Bellefleur's friend Allan Wright.


And Jim Pickett and his fellow Harvey-supporting PC defectors?


"I haven't talked to many of these people to see what's going to happen this year," he says. "I can tell you Margaret has been very, very active. But Andy has left his mark. He's put a lot of money into our hospital. He's put a lot of money in roads."


Millions spent on roads, hospital


Harvey says the Brian Gallant government has spent millions in the riding, including $8 million on the Perth-Andover hospital, which partially flooded in 2012. (Government of New Brunswick)


Harvey has all the figures at hand: he says there's been $61 million in road projects in Carleton-Victoria since he was elected in 2014.


The Liberal government has also spent almost $8 million on the Perth-Andover hospital. A section of the old building that was in the flood plain is being demolished, with services there shifted to a new addition.


"That'll provide some certainty on that structure for the staff and the patients and the residents of the area," Harvey says.


Meanwhile, near the Trans-Canada Highway, a new Ambulance New Brunswick bay and one of the province's retail cannabis stores are under construction.


Spending a problem, says PC candidate

Progressive Conservative candidate Margaret Johnson says she's running because of the province's poor finances and isn't taking the party's traditional support in the riding for granted. (Jacques Poitras/CBC)


Even Harvey's main opponent, PC candidate Margaret Johnson, admits all that spending will probably turn some heads. But she says it's part of the problem she wants to solve.


"Pavement gets people excited, and to do it now, before the election? I'm not that naive to think it's not a ploy to get votes.

"And it does have an impact on the voter. People think, 'This is what I need. This is what I've been asking for.' But we've got to stop shaking the money tree. The leaves are gone."


Johnson, a longtime PC supporter from Florenceville-Bristol, says she's thought about running for a long time and she's doing it this time because of the province's poor finances.


But she is not taking for granted the long PC voting tradition in most parts of the riding.


"I think it's probably going to be close again, but the response I'm getting is very good," she said. "People are ready for a change, and people appreciate that we can't run our households with deficit financing, so why should we run our province that way?"


A new challenge for the PCs


Liberal ads attacking PC Leader Blaine Higgs and a more visible People's Alliance presence in the riding may provide further challenges to the PCs. (Catherine Allard/Radio-Canada)


The Liberals have launched repeated attacks on PC Leader Blaine Higgs, accusing him of wanting to close small hospitals.


Johnson says she's been assuring voters that's not true.


"The Higgs team has absolutely no intention of closing hospitals or schools," she says. "There is no intent to that."


Another challenge for the Tories is that the People's Alliance is running a candidate in the riding for the first time. The party wasn't on the ballot in 2014.


But Johnson brushes off the possibility that Terry Sisson will take votes from her. She points out the NDP, Greens, and Keep It Simple Solutions party all have candidates in the riding as well.


"Where are all these votes going to come from, and are they coming from the Tories or the Liberals?"


No scandals this time


After being named the minister of agriculture, mines and rural affairs, Harvey says he was 'not interested' in re-examining dropped charges against him. During the 2014 campaign, Gallant called for an independent inquiry but didn't call one after the election. (Jacques Poitras/CBC)


However the race shakes out, it likely won't be as dramatic as the 2014 race, when Harvey's campaign was rocked by the fraud and forgery charges.


The allegation was that Harvey, his brother David and their father Fred had forged paperwork to make it look like wood cut on Crown land came from private land.


Reporters were tipped to the charges in the first week of September. Liberal Leader Brian Gallant questioned the timing, given the PC party was in power.


The retired provincial enforcement officer who laid the charges, Allen Goodine, later told CBC News they weren't politically motivated.


But Goodine also said he got a phone call from a senior government official asking for details of the charges, including in which courthouse they were laid. The anonymous tip to reporters happened four days later.


'A little bit of a different campaign'


Harvey says 2018 is definitely a little bit of a different campaign.' (Jacques Poitras/CBC)


Ten days before the election, the charges against the three Harveys were dropped. Crown prosecutors said "a secondary review" had found the charges "didn't meet the threshold required to prosecute."


Gallant suggested there should be an independent inquiry into what happened. But after the Liberals won the election he decided not to order one.


Harvey said last year when Gallant appointed him as a cabinet minister that he was not interested in re-examining the matter.


"I let the people speak," he said. "We presented our position, other parties represented their positions, there was a rough go in the middle, but we won. I moved forward from that point on, and the government has."


Last week in Perth-Andover, Harvey would say only that 2018 is "definitely a little bit of a different campaign. I'll leave it at that."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/carleton-victoria-goes-province-1.4815008
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Wednesday
.


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Wednesday, September 12, 2018 7:52AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Wednesday, Sept. 12, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

The leaders will participate in a televised debate on CBC in Riverview at 6:30 p.m.

Liberals: Leader Brian Gallant will make an announcement at Four Points by Sheraton in Moncton (40 Lady Ada Blvd.) at 9:00 a.m. Later in the day.


Greens: Leader David Coon will spend the day preparing for the debate.

Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs plans to make an announcement at 10 a.m. at Ecole Champlain on Erinvale Drive in Moncton.

https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-wednesday-1.4090152
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Party leaders hours away from squaring off in campaign's first debate




5 party leaders are prepping for the CBC's leaders' debate on Wednesday


CBC News · Posted: Sep 12, 2018 7:30 AM AT | Last Updated: 19 minutes ago





The CBC's English-language leaders' debate is set to begin at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday.


The countdown is on for the first debate of the New Brunswick election campaign.

The CBC's English-language leaders' debate is set for 6:30 p.m. Wednesday on CBC Television at the Riverview Arts Centre. It can also be seen online through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


The debate will also be translated in French on the Radio-Canada website.


Tom Bateman, a St. Thomas University political science professor, said one important variable in the possible outcome is the diversity that the five leaders bring to the table.


"The leaders of the small parties will have a prominence they have not really enjoyed, that means the leaders of the big parties have to share some of the stage time and limelight with them," he said.

"That would certainly produce a potential for more diverse array of topics and criticism for the leaders of the main parties and that should be quite interesting."


'Winners and losers'

The debate, hosted by Harry Forestell, will include Liberal Party Leader Brian Gallant, Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs, Green Party Leader David Coon, New Democratic Party Leader Jennifer McKenzie, and People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin.


Bateman said smaller party leaders may use the opportunity to raise structural issues that "keep the big guys in or near power and the little people out of power," citing electoral system reform as a possible example.


"That will certainly come up within the debate," said Bateman. "We will probably hear something about the dignity of the legislature and how the main parties are actually not interested in having the legislature sit for extended periods to debate the public's business."


This is the second time participating in a leaders' debate for Coon, Gallant and Austin as they all ran last election, and Bateman said that may give them an advantage.


"[Debates] are competitions, there are winners and losers … we want to see who moved the ball downfield and also who fumbles it."


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/leaders-debate-cbc-1.4819490
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick Liberals’ lead narrows midway through 2018 election campaign




The Sackville Tribune Post
Published: 22 hours ago
Updated: 22 hours ago


['The corporate logo of Corporate Research Associates of Halifax that does polling four times per year of political leadership across the region.']
CRA



Liberal support stronger in Northern New Brunswick


HALIFAX, N.S. – With just under two weeks remaining in the 2018 provincial election campaign, the New Brunswick Liberal Party’s lead in voter support has narrowed, as compared to pre-campaign results, according to the most recent survey conducted by Corporate Research Associates Inc.

Specifically, just under one-half of New Brunswick decided and leaning voters support the Liberals (45 per cent, compared with 50 per cent of leaning and decided voters prior to the 2018 election campaign). Meanwhile, one-third of decided and leaning voters back the PC Party (33 per cent, compared with 30 per cent), and one in 10 support the Green Party (10 per cent, compared with seven per cent). Preference for the New Democratic Party rests at six percent (compared with seven per cent), while five percent of decided and leaning voters back the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick (compared with six per cent).


At a glance:
•Two weeks prior to the provincial election, the gap between the Liberals and the PC Party has narrowed in terms of voter support.
•Just under one-half of New Brunswick decided and leaning voters support the Liberal Party, while one-third prefer the PC Party.
•The Liberals have a wide lead in Northern New Brunswick, while voter support is more evenly split between the Liberals and the PCs in Southern New Brunswick and in the Moncton area.

Of note, Liberals hold a wide lead over the PC Party in Northern New Brunswick, while voter support is more evenly split between the Liberals and the PCs in Southern New Brunswick and in the Moncton area.

The number of residents who are undecided rests at 13 per cent (compared with 14 per cent), while three per cent refuse to state a preference (compared with six per cent), and seven percent either support none of the parties or do not plan to vote (compared with five per cent).

“The election has narrowed significantly since the start of the campaign and is now likely to be a close race despite the apparent comfortable lead by the Liberals in overall voting intentions. This is a consequence of the disproportionate support that the Liberals have in Northern New Brunswick, which skews the voter intention numbers provincially,” said Don Mills, chairman and CEO of Corporate Research Associates Inc. “Indeed, the outcome of the election will largely be determined by voters in the southeastern portion of the province where the race is currently tight.”

These results are part of the CRA Atlantic Quarterly®, an independent telephone survey of Atlantic Canadians, and are based on a sample of 519 adult New Brunswickers, conducted from Aug. 23 to Sept. 9, 2018, with overall results accurate to within ± 4.3 percentage points, 95 out of 100 times.

http://www.sackvilletribunepos.....gn-240343/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Friday
.


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Friday, September 14, 2018 7:55AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Friday, Sept. 14, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

The six leaders will participate in a pair of 90 minute debates on Rogers TV: 5:30 p.m. in English and 7:30 p.m. in French.

Liberals: Leader Brian Gallant makes an announcement at Targetts Windows and Doors Centre, 808 St Marys St. in Fredericton at 10 a.m.


Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs makes an announcement at 10 a.m. at 366 Aberdeen St. in Fredericton, and another announcement at noon at Sir James Dunn Hall, St. Thomas University.

Greens: Leader David Coon visits residents at Risteen's Landing, 151 Queen St. in Fredericton at 11 a.m.

New Democrats: Jennifer McKenzie visits the Salvation Army's Hope Cafe for a mock election at 10:30 a.m., 27 Prince Edward St. in Saint John. At 11 a.m., she takes part in Recovery Day in Saint John at King Square.


https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-friday-1.4093831
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2018 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the pc leader is now claiming the liberals offered him the position of finance minister in 2014 but that talks fell thru . if true shows how desperate the liberals were to hold onto power as numbers were tight in the legislature in New Brunswick back then )


New Brunswick Tory leader drops job offer bombshell during leaders debate


Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, September 12, 2018 8:01PM EDT
Last Updated Thursday, September 13, 2018 12:13AM EDT


RIVERVIEW, N.B. -- New Brunswick's Progressive Conservative leader dropped a bombshell during the first televised leaders' debate of the provincial election campaign, claiming Liberal Premier Brian Gallant offered to hire him as finance minister after the Liberals won the 2014 election.

For much of the debate, Gallant and PC Leader Blaine Higgs clashed over each other's records, largely ignoring the other three leaders on the stage. Higgs then pulled a piece of paper from his pocket.

"Brian Gallant rails on about my time as finance minister," Higgs said. "I find it very ironic that Brian Gallant offered me a position as minister of finance or as deputy minister, and I have a sworn affidavit that says this."


Gallant laughed, but Higgs persisted, saying he chose not to take the job because he felt the Liberal the government was "irresponsible."

The young Liberal premier quickly denied any job offer was made.

"Blaine Higgs was not invited to be the finance minister of our government," Gallant said. "We have no interest in you being the finance minister of this government."

"You'll swear an oath on that?" Higgs replied.

"I will swear an oath on that, absolutely," Gallant said.

An affidavit, later produced by Higgs, states that Gallant made the offer in a series of text messages exchanged after the election in October 2014.

Gallant issued a statement later in the evening, saying he did meet with Higgs after the 2014 election to talk about the province's finances, but he refutes any claim of a job offer.

"As I chatted with Blaine Higgs, it became clear that he was indeed the architect of the cuts to education, health care, and infrastructure of his government and in fact he would have cut deeper. Therefore, we did not meet again. At no point did I want Blaine Higgs to be finance minister, at no point did I offer him finance minister, nor did I authorize anyone to offer him finance minister," the statement reads.

It was easily the most surprising part of the 90-minute debate, but there were more sparks when the leaders sparred over language, climate change and the economy.

Members of the public and party staff were barred from attending the debate inside the Riverview Arts Centre, but that didn't help with the decorum.

Despite tight controls, it was often a free-for-all, with the leaders talking over each other in an effort to get their points across.

On language, People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin said he'd get rid of language duality in the health and education systems and use the savings to improve service.

"It's only when governments implement ridiculous policies -- that causes the tensions among us," he said. "That's why we are committed to ending duality. With a $14-billion debt ... we would do well to afford one system. Let alone two. These parties will not talk about it ... but we cannot take a politically correct, sanitized approach."

But NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie said duality needs to be embraced.

"To open the language debate at this time is counterproductive," she said. "We need to unite the province, not divide the province."

Gallant said his party's platform includes providing free second-language training for adults in Canada's only officially bilingual province.

Higgs said it's unfortunate that language is still a source of debate in New Brunswick. He said poor second-language scores in the schools is the result of politicians constantly changing the curriculum.

Green Leader David Coon said both the Liberals and Tories have divided people.

"We can't play favourites," he said.

On the issue of climate change, the federal carbon tax became the target, with Higgs saying the Tories would fight it in court. He said large emitters need tougher regulations.

"New taxes aren't going to fix it," Higgs said.

Austin said adding more tax is not going to address climate change. He said the government needs to help people move to solar, geothermal and other renewable energy sources.

The Green party also supports tougher limits on large emitters, but Coon also said there needs to be better public transportation across the province.

The parties also squared off on issues facing First Nations, rural communities and pay equity.

Higgs repeatedly accused Gallant of making expensive promises that will burden the province with more debt.

"The reason our opportunities are being restricted is because money is being blown out the door by promises, expensive promises to buy votes," Higgs said, raising his voice. "I've said I will not do that in this campaign."

At one point in a debate over Indigenous rights, Coon took direct aim at Higgs, suggesting the Tory leader didn't understand some basic concepts about such a weighty issue.

"The Indigenous people are rights holders, Mr. Higgs -- not stakeholders," Coon said as Higgs looked on in silence.

"We have a government-to-government relationship with First Nations in this province, and we need to start behaving that way. To suggest that they are simply stakeholders has got to be insulting."

McKenzie also seized on the Indigenous rights issue, saying New Brunswick had to do a better job of making sure First Nations get the help they need.

"Right now, they are not getting the same level of service, the same level of health care, the same living conditions. They are struggling. And while we point fingers ... they are hurting," she said.

Gallant said his government had taken Indigenous issues seriously, pointing to negotiations to allow the proposed Sisson mine to proceed.

The leaders face each other again Friday in English and French-language debates on Rogers TV.

At dissolution, the seat count in the legislature was 24 Liberals, 22 Progressive Conservatives, one Green, one Independent and one vacancy.

The election is set for Sept. 24.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/new-brunswick-tory-leader-drops-job-offer-bombshell-during-leaders-debate-1.4091579
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2018 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( forum did a poll on the New Brunswick election which had some interesting findings . a rather unknown 3rd party has surged in the polls . the people's alliance party of New Brunswick has 15 % . its unclear if they'll win any seats but will certainly affect the outcome . ndp support has also entirely collapsed at only 4 % . the green party is also gaining ground at 11 %

but forum thinks the pc's could possibly win with these numbers as so much of the liberal support is concentrated in French speaking ridings and Moncton area )



Liberals Lead But PCs Tracking for Thin Majority

September 14, 2018 @ 1:00 PM | Filed under: National


CC Image courtesy of Dennis Jarvis: https://bit.ly/2x9Pe1v


Liberals Lead But PCs Tracking for Thin Majority

People’s Alliance and Green battling for third

Toronto, September 13th – In a random sampling of public opinion taken by The Forum Poll™ among 1300 New Brunswick voters, amongst those decided and leaning, just over a third (37%) say they would vote Liberal if an election were held today, while a third (32%) says they would vote Progressive Conservative.



One-sixth (15%) say they would support the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick, with 1 in 10 (11%) saying they would support the Green Party.



Few (4%) identify as NDP voters, or as supporting another party (1%).


Coon most popular leader, half disapprove of Gallant

Only a third (34%) approve of the job Brian Gallant is doing as premier, while half (54%) say they disapprove. 1 in 10 (11%) say they do not know.



Gallant’s net favourable score (approve – disapprove) is -20.


A third (35%) say they approve of the job Blaine Higgs is doing as leader of the PCs, while 4 in 10 (40%) say they disapprove. One-quarter (25%) say they do not know.

Higgs’ net favourable score (approve – disapprove) is -5.

4 in 10 (40%) say they approve of the job David Coon is doing as leader of the Green Party, with a quarter (22%) saying they disapprove. 4 in 10 (38%) say they do not know.

Coon’s net favourable score (approve – disapprove) is +19.

One-fifth (18%) say they approve of the job Jennifer McKenzie is doing as Leader of the NDP, with almost a third (29%) saying they disapprove. Half (53%) say they do not know.

McKenzie’s net favourable score (approve – disapprove) is -11.

A quarter (27%) say they approve of the job Kris Austin is doing as leader of the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick, while a similar proportion (28%) say they disapprove. More than 4 in 10 (45%) say they do not know.

Austin’s net favourable score (approve – disapprove) is -1.

Gallant and Higgs seen as best Premier


One quarter (28%) say that Brian Gallant would make the best Premier of New Brunswick, while a similar proportion (26%) say Higgs would make the best Premier.

1 in 10 (12%) say David Coon would make the best Premier, while a similar proportion (11%) say Kris Austin would make the best premier.

Few (4%) identified Jennifer McKenzie as the best premier.

One-fifth (19%) do not know which candidate would make the best premier.

Almost half say Liberals most likely to win

More than 4 in 10 (46%) say the Liberals are most likely to win, with a third (30%) saying it would be the PCs.

1 in 10 (8%) say the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick is most likely to win. Few identify either the NDP (2%) or Green (2%) as likely to win.

1 in 10 (12%) say they do not know.

Included amongst those that said the Liberals are likely to win are (86%) of Liberal voters, a quarter (22%) of PC voters, a third (32%) of NDP voters, 4 in 10 (42%)Green voters, and one-fifth (18%) of People’s Alliance voters.

Included amongst those that said the PCs are likely to win are two-thirds (68%) of PC voters, (5%) of Liberal voters, a quarter (28%) of NDP voters, a quarter (25%) of Green voters, and a quarter (25%) of People’s Alliance of New Brunswick voters.

4 in 10 (41%) of People’s Alliance voters believes the People’s Alliance are likely to win, but only one-sixth (13%) of Green voters believe the Greens are likely to win. One-fifth (19%) of NDP voters believe the NDP are likely to win.

A third says the economy is their biggest issue

A third (30%) say the economy is the issue that is most likely to determine their vote. Healthcare (18%) and it’s time for a change (15%) following somewhat far behind.

Education (10%), local candidate (7%), and ethics in government (7%) are clustered together.

Few (2%) identify party loyalty as their biggest issue.

1 in 10 (10%) said another issue was their biggest.

Almost half (46%) of PC voters say the economy is their biggest issue, with a quarter (26%) of Liberals saying the same.

Narrow PC Majority

If the election were held today, the PCs project to secure 25 seats, with the Liberals serving as official opposition with 22. The Green and the People’s alliance would secure 1 seat each.

“The Liberals lead, but the Progressive Conservatives are likely much closer than they would want at this point in the campaign, with Gallant’s high level of disapproval potentially dragging their support down, somewhat” said Dr. Lorne Bozinoff, President of Forum Research. “Kris Austin and the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick have surged into third place and lead the Green Party. As of right now, it looks like it could be a fight to the finish for both the Premier’s chair, and the third party.”



Lorne Bozinoff, Ph.D. is the president and founder of Forum Research. He can be reached at lbozinoff@forumresearch.com or at (416) 960-9603.


http://poll.forumresearch.com/.....ve-1-2018/
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New Brunswick election: Where the leaders are Monday
.


THE CANADIAN PRESS
Published Monday, September 17, 2018 7:41AM ADT



FREDERICTON -- Where the leaders are Monday, Sept. 17, as the New Brunswick election campaign continues:

Liberals: Brian Gallant will make a 9:30 a.m. announcement at Victoria Hall in New Maryland (466 New Maryland Highway.) Later in the day he will participate in the New Brunswick Women's Council Leaders Debate at 6 p.m. at the Wu Conference Centre in Fredericton (6 Duffie Drive).

Progressive Conservatives: Blaine Higgs will cast his vote at St. Mark's Catholic Church in Quispamsis (171 Pettingill Road). At 1 p.m. he will make an unspecified announcement at Carleton Park in Fredericton, before attending the New Brunswick Women's Council Leaders Debate at 6 p.m. at the Wu Conference Centre in Fredericton.


NDP: Jennifer McKenzie will attend the city market in Saint John at 10 a.m. At 11 a.m., she will make an announcement about housing and addressing inequalities in front of 25 Albert Street in Saint John. She will speak with voters at 4:30 at the corner of Germain and Princess Streets in Saint John before ending the day by canvassing in the north end of Saint John Harbour.

Green Party: David Coon will spend the day campaigning in his riding. In the evening will participate in the New Brunswick Women's Council Leaders Debate at the Wu Conference Centre in Fredericton.

People's Alliance: Kris Austin will spend the day campaigning in his riding.

https://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/new-brunswick-election-where-the-leaders-are-monday-1.4096688
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 9205
Reputation: 301.5Reputation: 301.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2018 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( former PM Jean Chretien to campaign in the New Brunswick election ? seems rather odd in my view )


September 16, 2018 10:44 am

New Brunswick Election: Brian Gallant to campaign with former PM on Sunday

By Alexander Quon
Online Producer/Reporter Global News


The Canadian Press/Justin Tang


New Brunswick Liberal leader Brian Gallant is set to campaign with former prime minister Jean Chretien as the provincial election campaign continues on Sunday.


Gallant will begin the day in Gradne-Digue, N.B., before attending a rally in Moncton at 3 p.m., with Chretien at the Delta Beausejour.


PC leader Blaine Higgs is set to attend church at 10 a.m., followed by a 1 p.m. announcement at Covered Bridge in Saint Martins’s, N.B.

Higgs will wrap up his day by visiting a farm at 4 p.m.

People’s Alliance leader Kris Austin will spend the day canvassing in Fredericton-Grand Lake.

NDP leader Jennifer McKenzie will spend the day canvassing in Saint John Harbour. She will then host a meet and greet with Memramcook-Trantramar candidate Helene Boudreau at Goya’s Pizza in Sackville, N.B.


Green Party leader David Coon and Carleton candidate Amy Anderson will meet on the law of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick in Fredericton at 10 a.m. on Sunday to film a video about the work of an MLA.

Coon will end the day by canvassing Fredericton South, starting at 1 p.m



https://globalnews.ca/news/4454714/new-brunswick-election-sept-16/
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 2 of 4

Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next  


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum


New Brunswick Provincial Election on September 24

phpBBCopyright 2001, 2005 phpBB