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RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2018 9:59 am    Post subject: Federal Liberals to begin nominating candidates Reply with quote

( this will certainly lead to more speculation that trudeau is eyeing a date earlier than oct 2019 , as it does seem early to start nominating candidates although the conservatives have nominated some already )



June 22, 2018 6:38 pm Updated: June 23, 2018 8:25 am

Flurry of Liberal nominations signals start of marathon 2019 election race


By Joan Bryden The Canadian Press




The Liberals will begin nominating candidates next week, starting with the acclamation of Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains in his riding of Mississauga-Malton.


The next federal election is still 15 months away but governing Liberals are already gearing up.


They will begin nominating candidates next week, starting Wednesday, with the acclamation of Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains in his riding of Mississauga-Malton.

And lest anyone doubt this marks the start of the marathon race to the Oct. 21, 2019, finish line, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is to be in attendance to fire the starting gun.

After that, party spokesman Braeden Caley says, nominations will take place at “a very quick pace” over the summer.


For most, if not all, the 183 Liberal MPs, the nominations will be simple acclamations.

The party has decided that incumbents won’t have to fight open nomination contests for the right to carry the party’s banner in the next election – provided they meet a number of conditions on fundraising and voter-engagement.

Among the conditions, an MP and his or her riding team must have:
•Taken part in at least two “voter contact day of action” events in the previous 12 months;
•Knocked on at least 3,500 doors or made 5,000 phone calls;
•Stocked the riding war chest with money amounting to at least half of the riding’s anticipated election expenses limit for the 2019 election and provided a written plan for raising the other half;
•Signed up at least 30 new monthly donors;
•Signatures of support from at least 150 registered Liberals in the riding.


Liberal associations in the 155 ridings not currently held by the governing party must also meet a number of conditions before a nomination contest can be held. They include: documenting that a thorough search for female candidates has been conducted; having at least 15 per cent of the election expenses limit in the bank; having at least 150 registered Liberals in the riding; and having recruited at least 15 new monthly donors.

The new nomination rules were announced six months ago.

Since then, Caley says, “dozens and dozens and dozens” of MPs and unheld ridings have already met the conditions required to hold nomination meetings, although they were given until October to do so. Indeed, he says more than one third of the 338 ridings across the country are in position hold their nominations by the end of July.

“The fact that so many Liberal ridings are ready to move forward now shows how much organizational heavy lifting has already been done at the local level to prepare for the 2019 campaign,” he said, predicting that the voter engagement requirements will give Liberals “a real head start” on the campaign.

So far this year, Liberal teams across the country have participated in six “national days of action” to meet with voters and identify supporters. Caley said there will be similar mobilizations of volunteers every weekend in July and August.


https://globalnews.ca/news/4292248/liberal-nominations-2019-election-race/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When an opposition party does this its usually just an attempt to get the ground game in place as they usually have no say over the next election date.

When the Government starts to do it;
Its going to at least raise some questions.

If the plan is to go to the polls to "unite" against the American President and for a better NAFTA deal and try and make it an "Economy" election, I think that may be about as much as the CPC could hope for.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
When an opposition party does this its usually just an attempt to get the ground game in place as they usually have no say over the next election date.

When the Government starts to do it;
Its going to at least raise some questions.

If the plan is to go to the polls to "unite" against the American President and for a better NAFTA deal and try and make it an "Economy" election, I think that may be about as much as the CPC could hope for.


its not unheard of for a governing party to nominate early but often its when there is a minority parliament and there worried opposition will trigger an early election and they want to be ready just in case

this is somewhat different as they have a majority and can call the election themselves , they control the timing

its also interesting the liberals choose Mississauga Malton as the first riding , Kathleen Wynne was also oddly obsessed with that same riding , think it had been pointed out she visited it like 6 times during the election and liberal mpp still came in 3rd as pc's won and ndp second

but federal race will be much different , although it might still be a riding with a strong ndp base as its so close to Jagmeet singh's riding
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are obviously looking for members who can finance their own local campaign. They are treating the seat like the "Liberal franchise" in each riding -- like Starbucks. The national party will handle the big decisions, and the local candidate has to 'play' the local issues to his advantage.

Will they be able to get candidates that come up to this standard in every riding? I am sceptical. But they will come up with a full-slate anyway.

The Liberal Party is on the edge of rough times. They seem committed to the boneheaded route, but let's hope that's only a negotiating posture. But if you were a young up-and-comer, which party would you seek your career in? Which would be your vehicle?

Some will see a party going off the rails, with a lineup at the patronage window already. And a celebrity leader that will be hard to dislodge. One more term at most, he might think.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Justin Trudeau, west of Toronto, bailing water

Paul Wells: A region of considerable Liberal strength in 2015 has become a region of Liberal woe today, and ‘Team Trudeau’ is taking notice

by Paul Wells
Jun 26, 2018


With 16 months to go until the 2019 federal election, it’s on.

A Liberal of my acquaintance phoned to make sure I hadn’t missed the notification for Navdeep Bains’s nomination meeting as the party’s Mississauga-Malton candidate in the 2019 election. Bains will be acclaimed, like most incumbent MPs. He’s been a force in political organizing in the Brampton and Mississauga area for more than a decade. All five Brampton Liberal MPs, freshly elected in 2015, are former protégés of Bains, as are several in neighbouring ridings (his own begins at Brampton’s south end).

Anyway this will be a big event, with many hundreds of supporters present. “A bit of a show of force,” I was told. And Justin Trudeau will be there. There are reasons for this.

It’s true that a Liberal wave in 2015 swept Bains back to office, after four years out of Parliament, and brought a handful of bright Bains students into Ottawa with him. Most of the region had been Conservative from 2011-15. The 905 belt around Toronto is where a Conservative majority became a Liberal majority.

But that wasn’t the most recent wave. This month, in the Ontario provincial election, a bunch of Liberal candidates lost—to New Democrats, mainly, in Brampton, and to Conservatives around it. The orange patch is where Jagmeet Singh’s old Bramalea—Gore—Malton riding split into four new ridings. Three went NDP, including Brampton East, now held by Singh’s brother Gurratan. In all four ridings, and several others in the area, the Liberal candidate came third (or even fourth).

So a region of considerable Liberal strength in 2015 became a region of Liberal woe in 2018. I know what you’re saying: apples and oranges. Party fortunes don’t simply transfer from provincial to federal politics. Jean Chrétien and Mike Harris both swept Ontario in the ’90s, and a million Ontarians voted in quick-ish succession for both Stephen Harper’s federal Conservatives in 2011 and for Kathleen Wynne’s provincial Liberals in 2014.

But federal party support in Ontario seems to have been strongly influenced by the provincial campaign. Nanos tracking shows the Trudeau Liberals down 11 points, and Singh’s NDP up 14, since mid-April. That’s the highest support Nanos has found for the NDP in Ontario, and the lowest for the Liberals, than in any week since the 2015 election.

That still leaves the Liberals six points up, at 32 per cent to 26 per cent for the NDP—but since Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives are chugging along even higher, at 36 per cent, it’s hard for the Liberals to take much comfort. Especially because, if there’s a corner of Ontario where the NDP should expect to show local strength next year, it’s probably Jagmeet Singh’s backyard, assuming he’s still the NDP leader by then.

So in the ridings around Bains’s event tomorrow, steady Conservative support, a soft Liberal vote and the potential for a strong NDP to at least split non-Conservative votes, would make the outcome unpredictable and worrisome for the Liberals in 2019. Maybe those splits would work out OK! Maybe they wouldn’t.

There’s plenty of room for all of these trends to change, well before the 2019 election. Trudeau seems disinclined to wait before trying to change them. The Facebook announcement for Bains’s nomination meeting calls it a “Team Trudeau” event; the Liberal party shows up only as a red-logo L. The Liberals still view their leader as their strongest asset. Expect him to travel a lot this summer, to shore up a re-election effort that now seems neither comfortably distant nor like a walk in the park.


https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/justin-trudeau-west-of-toronto-bailing-water/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The challenge the Liberals will have if there is an election earlier than October 2019 is the opposition will without Question dig up every photograph of the PM campaigning with Kathleen Wynne by his side in 2015.

While Trudeau is more popular than the former Ontario Premier, his numbers in Ontario have been lagging since the start of the year and while Singh and the NDP may prove unpopular in some regions, he was a campaigning rockstar for Andrea Horwath for the Provincial NDP in the 905s in general and Peel specifically.

A strong NDP in the 905s cost the LPC nearly every seat in 2011.

The problem the LPC is going to have is they are going to have to distance themselves from the previous OLP Government despite their similarities in policy unless Doug Ford steps in, but thus far his hasn't provided that "gaffe" the Liberals had hoped for which provided traction.

There are about 10 riding in Ontario alone the LPC won inside of 3% over the CPC;
When we widen that to 8% we get to 22.

This was with the LPC having a 10 point lead in Ontario in 2015, even if we assume the CPC lead doesn't exist but its a statically tie or even the LPC slightly ahead the majority is lost in Ontario alone.

Ontario has the potential to be a huge problem for the LPC;
Potentially more so that BC.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't forget the role that participation plays in elections.

Trudeau's success in 2015 was significantly tied up in his ability to draw people to the polls, many people who weren't very politically involved. The Conservatives didn't lose because they lost votes -- they lost because a bunch of new voters showed up, absolutely charmed by Justin.

But where's the charm gone now? And what will be left of it in 2019?

What happens if those people largely don't show up to vote next time? Or, now they see him against a backdrop of other world leaders, and understand how free of gravity he really is-- just like a unicorn! They might consider their previous vote a kind of electoral "wild oats" but now be getting serious about a choice between Jagmeet and Andrew!
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2018 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its interesting the liberals choose Mississauga Malton as a riding needing a boost and a visit from the PM. its been a pretty reliable liberal riding going back to 93 election other than 2011 when it went cpc , although it is geographically close to Ford nation ( etobicoke north ) and Jagmeet Singh's Brampton riding )



Navdeep Bains acclaimed as Liberals kick off 2019 federal campaign

Trudeau with Liberal MP Navdeep Bains
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appears onstage with Liberal MP Navdeep Bains during a nomination event in Mississauga, Ont., on Wednesday, June 27, 2018. Bains is being nominated as the Liberal candidate for Mississauga-Milton for the 2019 general election. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
.


The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, June 27, 2018 9:53PM EDT



MISSISSAUGA, Ont. -- The Liberals have nominated their first candidate for next year's federal election.

At a Toronto-area rally Wednesday evening that included a speech by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Navdeep Bains was acclaimed as the Liberal candidate in Mississauga-Malton.

The minister of innovation, science and economic development says he will run a positive campaign and will steer clear of fear-based politics.


He says the economy will be the party's number-one priority.

Trudeau, meantime, doubled down on his positive approach and the "sunny ways" campaign that brought his party to power in 2015.

He says negativity will surround both him and the party in the year ahead.

"Around the world, the politics of division, of polarization, of populism are taking more and more hold," Trudeau said to a cheering crowd of hundreds at a convention centre in Mississauga, Ont.

"We have to demonstrate here in Canada, for ourselves, for our communities, for our kids -- but also for the world -- that those don't always work."

The Liberals said last week that more nominations will take place at "a very quick pace" throughout the summer.

For most, if not all, of the 183 sitting Liberal MPs, the process will be a simple acclamation, after the party decided that incumbents won't have to fight open nomination contests.

That's provided they meet certain conditions on fundraising and voter engagement.

For the 155 ridings where the governing party isn't in control, a number of conditions need to be met before a nomination meeting can be held.

They include: documenting that a thorough search for female candidates has been conducted; having at least 15 per cent of the election expenses limit in the bank; having at least 150 registered Liberals in the riding; and having recruited at least 15 new monthly donors.

The next federal election is set for Oct. 21, 2019.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/navdeep-bains-acclaimed-as-liberals-kick-off-2019-federal-campaign-1.3992088
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this article seems to indicate most of the liberals from Nova Scotia plan to run again , although Bill Casey , Darrell Samson and Mark Eyking did not reveal there plans for 2019 )


Many N.S. MPs plan to reoffer in 2019

ANDREA GUNN Ottawa Bureau
Published July 8, 2018 - 8:21pm
Last Updated July 9, 2018 - 6:52am


The 43rd Canadian federal election is still more than a year away but eight of Nova Scotia’s 11 elected Liberals have already confirmed plans to reoffer in 2019.

Bernadette Jordan, the member of Parliament for South Shore-St. Margarets, didn’t miss a beat when asked if she plans to run again.

“Definitely. I still have to go through the nomination process but I’ll definitely be going through it,” she said.

Jordan, who was first elected in the 2015 election, said she has really enjoyed serving as an MP and believes in the work that she and her colleagues have done in the past three years.

“It’s never the same two days in a row and I think that’s what I like about it,” she said. “It’s always different.”

Rodger Cuzner, the only politician who has represented the riding of Cape Breton-Canso since its creation for the 2004 election, also plans to throw his hat into the ring once again.

“I’m still full-steam ahead, I’m raising money and working the riding as I would any other year,” he said. “I really believe in what our leader is doing and I think we’ve done some good stuff.”

Cuzner said as he gets older a lot of the stress that comes with being an MP becomes easier to handle.

“One thing about being in this stage of my career, once the kids are grown and gone and you’re not racing home to try to catch a hockey game or get to a concert or something like that, it becomes much more manageable,” he said.

Andy Fillmore (Halifax), Darren Fisher (Dartmouth-Cole Harbour), Colin Fraser (West Nova) and Sean Fraser (West Nova), all first elected in 2015, have also confirmed that they hope to run in 2019, as have longtime Halifax West MP and current House Speaker Geoff Regan and Kings-Hants MP and Treasury Board President Scott Brison. If approved as candidates, it will be Regan’s ninth election campaign and Brison’s eighth.

The Chronicle Herald reached out to Sydney-Victoria MP Mark Eyking, Cumberland-Colchester MP Bill Casey, and Sackville-Preston-Chezzetcook MP Darrell Samson about plans to reoffer but did not hear back by deadline.

In order for the six Nova Scotia MPs who were first elected in 2015 to qualify for their MP pensions after age 55, they must serve six years in office -- that means getting elected for at least a second term -- something that could weigh into their decision-making.

The next federal election is slated for Oct. 21, 2019, at the latest, but the government can trigger an early election at any point before then.

Although the Elections Canada deadline for nominations isn’t until well into the writ period, current Liberal MPs who want to be nominated again as 2019 candidates have to meet a series of new targets for community engagement by Oct. 1, 2018.

According to the Liberal Party of Canada website, those targets include participation in at least two 2018 ‘Day of Action’ engagements, working with volunteers to achieve at least 3,500 knocks on doors or 5,000 phone calls with the community, obtaining the signatures of 150 registered Liberals in the community and strong grassroots fundraising, such as 30 additional monthly donors and 50 per cent of the funds required for the 2019 local campaign.

“The fact that so many Liberal ridings are ready to move forward now shows how much organizational heavy lifting has already been done at the local level to prepare for the 2019 campaign – including tens of thousands of conversations with Canadians,” said party spokeswoman Marjolaine Provost in an email. “All of the community engagement targets are serious steps that will give Liberal campaigns a real head start as they work to win in 2019.”

Also under the new rules, any unheld electoral district association must be able to document a thorough search for potential women candidates and other candidates who reflect the demographics of the community prior to holding a nomination meeting.


http://thechronicleherald.ca/n.....er-in-2019
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

July 15, 2018 5:23 pm

Melanie Joly to run again as Liberal candidate in 2019 federal election

By Annabelle Olivier
Web producer Global News




Melanie Joly speaks to the crowds gathered in Ahuntsic-Cartierville as Joly is nominated as the Liberal candidate for the upcoming 2019 federal elections. Sunday, July 15, 2019.



With the next federal election just over one year away, the Liberal Party has put forward its first nomination in Quebec.




At an event in Ahuntsic-Cartierville, Melanie Joly was nominated as the Liberal candidate for that riding.


It’s a position she has held since 2015, on top of her role as Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Sunday’s announcement marks the first of many similar events expected in the coming months.


https://globalnews.ca/news/4332877/melanie-joly-to-run-again-as-liberal-candidate-in-2019-federal-election/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Liberals approach to Quebec will be a clear indication of if there is any truth to the snap election discussion.

They will lose seats out West and likely in Ontario, likely enough to cost them their majority.

If they feel they can make up that difference in Quebec and get a fresh mandate they will go to the polls, because if the economy slows and they continue with their spending commitments it will make re-election in a year and change more challenging.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition is the Member from the Quebec Dairy Cartel.

Let's see how much good that does him.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberals have also apparently found a candidate in Leeds Grenville although the by election is unlikely to be called until the fall )


Federal Agriculture minister’s chief of staff resigns to run in 2019 election

By Kelsey Johnson. Published on Jul 17, 2018 3:30pm


May Jean McFall left her post Monday.


VANCOUVER – Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay’s chief of staff has resigned to run for the Liberals in her home riding of Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes.

Mary Jean McFall left her post in MacAulay’s office on Monday, the minister’s office confirmed.

Her departure comes just before Canada’s agriculture ministers are to meet in Vancouver for their annual get together which starts Wednesday.

No interim replacement has been named yet. McFall, who’s family owns Burnbrae Farms (one of this country’s largest egg farms) had held the post since January 2016.

McFall previously ran for the Liberals in the riding in 2015 but lost to Conservative incumbent Gord Brown, who clinched the rural Eastern Ontario riding by more than 3,800 votes. Prior to running federally, McFall served one term as as local councillor in Brockville, Ont.

In 2008, she was named Brockville’s Citizen of the Year.

Brown passed away unexpectedly in his Parliament Hill office on May 2 after suffering an apparent heart attack. No by-election has been called in the riding.

No stranger to agriculture, McFall – who trained and worked as a lawyer – is a former Egg Farmers of Ontario board member.

Her strong ties to agriculture, notably the egg industry, led then Conservative Agriculture Critic Chris Warkentin to muse publicly about conflict of interest concerns. Warkentin is now deputy house leader for the Conservatives.

MacAulay ardently defended his chief of staff, insisting her connections to agriculture were an asset to the sector and his office.

In 2016, Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson imposed a conflict of interest screen on McFall that instructed her to remove herself from specific meetings.

Under the screen, McFall was required to recuse herself from conversations with Egg Farmers of Canada, Egg Farmers of Ontario, the Farm Products Council of Canada, and Canadian Poultry and Egg Processors Council, along with any of the groups’ affiliates.

Conversations around McFall’s family business, Burnbrae Farms Limited were also off limits, Dawson said, as were “matters, other than those of general application, within the supply management system with respect to the egg industry and the Trans-Pacific Partnership.”

The screen did not satisfy one parliamentary watch dog. In an interview with iPolitics in May 2016, Democracy Watch co-founder Duff Conacher called the screen “a sham.”

McFall continued to be a controversial figure for the Conservatives throughout much of 2016 after it became known she was involved in an ongoing legal dispute, beginning in 2013, when her family’s egg-farming operation, Burnbrae Farms Ltd., was sued by Sweda Farms Ltd., a competitor.

The original case was eventually dismissed, but a former Sweda Farms employee named Stuart Jackson attempted to reinstate a private perjury prosecution case against McFall. His private prosecution case had been initially stayed in 2015.

Private prosecutions are rarely successful. The case was eventually thrown out by an Ontario Superior Court of Justice in October 2016.

However, prior to the court’s ruling, then Conservative Agriculture Critic David Anderson had demanded in the House of Commons McFall resign – a demand MacAulay refused outright.

“This is a very successful and upstanding member of her community, my chief of staff. She is a successful lawyer and a successful businesswoman. She has also been nominated citizen of the year,” MacAulay said at the time.

“I think it is an asset to agriculture and it is an asset to my office to have a woman with these credentials working in the office.”

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/07/17/federal-agriculture-ministers-chief-of-staff-resigns-to-run-in-2019-election/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh great, the Conservatives are owned by the Milk cartel, and the Liberals are penetrated by the Poultry cartel!
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2018 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this article seems to indicate that even though the liberals have a large majority and close to 180 mp's already . they have identified 25 opposition held ridings to target for which they have already started the candidate selection process . although the article doesn't say where the ridings are or what party holds them )




Liberals start nomination process for 25 unheld ridings

By Peter Mazereeuw Aug. 6, 2018


The ridings were opened for candidate applications after their Liberal electoral district associations met fundraising, membership, and diversity targets set out for them by the party, a new set of requirements for this electoral cycle, according to party spokesperson Braeden Caley.




Liberal MP Raj Grewal, who won Brampton East in the last election with 52 per cent of the vote, and his volunteers knocked on doors in his riding last summer, a staple of retail politics and now a requirement set by the party for Liberal MPs who wish to run for re-election. Liberals who want to run for an opposition-held seat have to wait until their local riding association meets a different set of criteria set by the party. Photograph courtesy of Twitter



The federal Liberal Party opened up applications for potential candidates in 25 unheld ridings in late June, the first formal step towards candidacy for Grits in 2019, according to the party's website. Those who want to run for the party in those opposition-held ridings can now formally ask the Liberal Party to send them nomination contestant packages. Prospective candidates must complete the packages they receive and return them to the party for review by a greenlight committee,



https://www.hilltimes.com/2018/08/06/liberals-start-nomination-process-25-unheld-ridings/153134
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Federal Liberals to begin nominating candidates

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