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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 8:08 am    Post subject: Hamilton Centre ndp mp David Christopherson retiring Reply with quote

( in yet another blow to the ndp , longtime Hamilton centre mp David Christopherson is retiring , although it could provide a possible route for Singh into the house as his seat is very safe for the ndp and held by Andrea Horwath provincially a close ally of Singh )



Longtime NDP MP David Christopherson retiring from politics

By Kelsey Johnson. Published on Jul 5, 2018 6:16pm


NDP MP David Christopherson stands in the House of Commons during Question Period in Ottawa, Friday, June 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand


Longtime NDP MP David Christopherson won’t be running in 2019 federal election.

A federal MP for 14 years, Christopherson said Thursday he wants to spend more time with his family, but will remain in office until the end of the current term.


He was previously a city councillor in Hamilton, so in all, he’s served some 30 years in public office.

“I could not have had the career I’ve had without the love, support and understanding of my daughter Kayla, my wife Denise, my mother June, my sister-in-law Rose, and my late brother Mark,” Christopherson said in a statement. “Family is so very important and I look forward to spending more time with them in the not so distant future.”

He also thanked his staff “for their outstanding dedication and commitment to my office and the people we represent,” before recognizing his riding association and the many volunteers who support his campaigns.

A well-known figure on Parliament Hill, Christopherson is known for his ability to filibuster. According to Maclean’s, he once tabled 7,000 words in an hour in 2014 after the Conservative government refused to let the Procedure and House Affairs Committee take the Harper government’s Fair Elections Act on the road.

He’s also a longtime member of the House of Common Public Accounts Committee, where he serves as vice-chair. It’s a role he was temporarily stripped of this spring after he broke ranks with the NDP to vote in favour of a Conservative motion.

The motion condemned the Liberal government’s new policy of requiring any group applying for funding under the Canada Summer Jobs program to attest that their core mandate respects Charter rights, including a woman’s right to have an abortion.

After the vote, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh removed Christopherson from the role in March. Singh’s decision to punt him from his chair shocked many senior New Democrats, including at least three MPs who went public with their unhappiness.

The NDP leader retracted the punishment a week later.

He joins other NDP MPs leaving Ottawa including former leader Tom Mulcair and B.C. MP Kennedy Stewart, who is running to be mayor of Vancouver, as well as Erin Weir, who was expelled from caucus in May after an investigation found evidence to support several complaints of harassment.


https://ipolitics.ca/2018/07/05/longtime-ndp-mp-david-christopherson-retiring-from-politics/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Christopherson has been in public life a long time and is in his early 60s;
One of the better NDP MPs by far, losing him is a big blow to the NDP caucus.

With that said; unless they are feeling like a snap election is coming around the corner why not step down immediately to give Singh a riding to run in?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder if it's the new currents running in the left wing these days? He was there when the NDP changed from a party that spoke for the common man, to one that spoke for what we have come to know as 'identity groups'.

For a pragmatic leftist, the antics of the transgendered, for example, must seem to be a refutation of everything you banked on.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David Christopherson, long-time Hamilton Centre MP, says he won't run again



Christopherson, an autodidact with a ninth grade education, went on to become a cabinet minister


Samantha Craggs · CBC News · Posted: Jul 05, 2018 4:24 PM ET | Last Updated: July 5


David Christopherson, a long-time NDP politician from Hamilton, says he won't run next year. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)


Hamilton's perennial NDP politician, known for his thundering oration and staying power, is retiring.

David Christopherson, who's been in politics more than 30 years, issued a statement Thursday saying he won't run again.

"I have made the decision to not seek a sixth term as Member of Parliament and I plan to step away from public life when my current term expires in October 2019," Christopherson said.

Christopherson has served as a Hamilton Centre MP, MPP and city councillor.


Christopherson speaks to supporter Sheri Selway in 2015 after winning another term as Hamilton Centre MP. (Samantha Craggs/CBC)

He served as an MPP from 1990 to 2003, including stints as solicitor general and minister of correctional services in the Bob Rae government and as house leader under Howard Hampton. In 2003, he unsuccessfully ran for mayor of Hamilton. He's served federally since 2004.

Christopherson, 63, has been reelected even when his party was unpopular, including after the Rae government's term.

He said in 2015 that he was prepared to be swept away by Justin Trudeau's red wave.

"I've been in a number of those tsunamis, coming in and going out," he said then. "They are powerful forces of political nature."


Christopherson spoke at the 2015 launch of a bicycle pump track in Gage Park. (Kelly Bennett/CBC)

Christopherson took an unusual path to politics, but one that was true to his Steeltown roots.

He dropped out of high school after ninth grade, but educated himself through years of voracious reading. At 19, he started work at International Harvester, where he remained for 11 years. He was also one-time president of the now-defunct United Auto Workers Local 525.

Christopherson said Thursday that he "truly love(s) our city and the people who call it home."

"I have loved my time as your Member of Parliament and I can't thank you enough for your support. My staff and I will continue to work hard during the remainder of my term in office and I look forward to seeing many of you in the community over the next 15 months."


In another life, I think he would have been a southern Baptist preacher.

- Matthew Green, Hamilton city councillor

Federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh tweeted that Christopherson "has served the people of Hamilton with unmatched integrity."

"David dedicated his career to the idea that governments belong to the people."


Christopherson joined Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath onstage after the election results June 8. (Samantha Craggs/CBC)

But the pair haven't always seen eye to eye. In March, Singh removed Christopherson from his role as vice-chair of a powerful parliamentary committee. He did this after Christopherson supported a Conservative motion protesting the Liberal government's changes to the summer job program.


He puts the people above the partisanship.

- Filomena Tassi, Liberal MP for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas

Singh later reinstated him.

•NDP was powerless against Liberal 'tsunami', Christopherson says

Matthew Green, NDP supporter and Ward 3 councillor, has fielded questions over whether he'll seek the nomination. He wouldn't talk about that Thursday.

"Today is really about David Christopherson and the 33 years of leadership and public service to Hamilton," he said.

Christopherson, he said, is "the quintessential people's champ, an underdog who came up through labour."

Christopherson is also known as being a powerful public speaker. "There are very few people who can command a stage like David Christopherson," Green said.

"In another life, I think he would have been a southern Baptist preacher."

Filomena Tassi, Liberal MP for Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas, agrees that Christopherson has powerful public speaking skills.

She's had to speak after Christopherson at community events, she said, and "following him is always a tough act."

Tassi ran against him for the Liberals in Hamilton Centre in 1995. She's recently served with him on the parliamentary procedure and House affairs committee.


"He puts the people above the partisanship," Tassi said. "I just think that's so important. When I've worked with him, my experience is he's always treated me as a friend and colleague and not a rival."

David Sweet, Conservative MP for Flamborough-Glanbrook, worked with Christopherson in several capacities, including on the parliamentary steel caucus.

"You always knew where David was at on an issue, he kept his word and was always dignified in our interactions," he said. "I will truly miss working with him."


Christopherson poses with Marnie Alexander, widow of Lincoln Alexander, at city hall in 2014. An NDP MP tried to use unanimous consent to declare Jan. 21 Lincoln Alexander Day, but the Conservative government at the time introduced it as a government bill. “Whatever,” Christopherson said. “The important thing is that we get a bill that establishes the day." (Samantha Craggs/CBC)

Andrea Horwath, Ontario NDP leader and Hamilton Centre MPP, said Christopherson has impacted people "in profound ways.


"From one Steeltown scrapper to another: thank you."


Timeline

1984: Christopherson makes his first run for public office in the federal election.
1985: Worked as a constituency assistant to NDP MP Ian Deans (Hamilton Mountain).
1985: Elected a Hamilton city alderman and regional councillor for Ward 4.
1988: Reelected to Ward 4.
1990: Elected MPP for Hamilton Centre. He would go on to serve as solicitor general and minister of correctional services.
1995: Reelected MPP for Hamilton Centre.
1999: Elected MPP in the newly created riding of Hamilton West.
2003: Finished his third term in the Ontario Legislature and in the fall of 2003 lost his bid to become Hamilton mayor.
2004: Elected MP in the new federal riding of Hamilton Centre.
2006: Reelected MP for Hamilton Centre.
2008: Reelected MP for Hamilton Centre.
2011: Reelected MP for Hamilton Centre and appointed a Deputy Leader of the Official Opposition.
2015: Reelected to a fifth term as Member of Parliament for Hamilton Centre.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/david-christopherson-1.4735606
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( more bad news for the ndp , a montreal mp is also retiring in 2019 )


Hélène Laverdière, from the NDP, leaves federal politics


Hélène Laverdière will not be a candidate for the next federal election scheduled for the fall of 2019.

Photo: Jacques Nadeau Le Devoir Hélène Laverdière will not be a candidate for the next federal election scheduled for the fall of 2019.



Marie Vastel
in Ottawa
Parliamentary Correspondent

July 9, 2018

Canada


The New Democratic Party loses one of its big players in Quebec. Montreal MP Hélène Laverdière


The Laurier-Sainte-Marie candidate will not be a candidate in the next federal election, scheduled for the fall of 2019, Le Devoir learned . "The reason is very simple: in 2019, I'm going to be 64 years old. I want to take a break a bit. And I think it's important to leave room for others, new blood, "she told Le Devoir .

Laverdière, who had a career at the Foreign Ministry, surprised many in 2011 by being elected in the Bloc bastion Laurier The NDP elect repeated the exercise in 2015, beating Mr. Duceppe again with, once again, 5,000 votes ahead of his Bloc rival.

The NDP's electoral prospects are, however, much less promising this time around. The new leader Jagmeet Singh is struggling to get support from the electorate, in the polls, and the party lost feathers in the three by-elections held in Quebec for a little over a year.

Hélène Laverdière denies that this influenced her decision to leave federal politics. She says she still supports the leader - who she supported during the party's leadership race

Still, recent polls put the support of the NDP around 15% in Quebec - 10 points lower than the election results of 2015, which had allowed the New Democrats to elect 16 MPs in Quebec. Some predict that the party will lose the majority, if not almost all, of its seats next year. New Democrats say that the riding of Laurier-Sainte-Marie is one of the safest in the party, as is its neighbor, Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie.

On Friday, Ontario MP David Christopherson announced that he would not be a candidate in the 2019 elections either. He was elected to the federal government in 2004 after being a provincial minister and MP in Ontario.


https://www.ledevoir.com/politique/canada/531978/npd
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are an NDP MP who won your seat with less than 40% of the popular vote (11 of the 16, and it should be noted one of the five is Mulcair) in 2015, chances are you are likely not getting re-elected in the next election.

Laverdière is one of those 11.

Its not uncommon for MPs, MPPs, MLA, MNA's etc who see the end coming over the horizon to walk away prior to getting defeated on election night.

Look at the legion that walked away from the Ontario Liberals in the lead-up to the 2018 election.

No one wants to have that awkward Charles Sousa -esk press conference on election night after a loss.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( I'm starting to wonder if there will even be a caucus left once Singh finally gets a seat , Kennedy Stewart gone , Dave Christopherson gone , Mulcair gone , Helene Laverdiere gone , Erin Weir gone , Christine Moore likely done and these are some of the ndp mp's who might of survived a bad year due to being well liked in there own ridings , now the ndp must defend open seats )



Montreal-area MP who beat ex-Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe twice won’t run again


By The Canadian Press — Jul 9 2018


MONTREAL — Helene Laverdiere, a popular NDP MP who defeated Gilles Duceppe in both the 2011 and 2015 elections, has announced she won't run again next year.

Laverdiere says she will be 64 next April and that it is time to pass the torch.

She surprised political pundits by beating Duceppe in the Montreal riding of Laurier-Sainte-Marie when he was Bloc Quebecois leader in 2011.

Laverdiere repeated the feat four years later.

Her announcement comes four days after longtime Hamilton Centre MP David Christopherson said he will not seek re-election.

Christopherson was first elected to the Commons in 2004 and has served as deputy NDP leader since 2012.

The Canadian Press

https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2018/07/09/montreal-area-mp-who-beat-ex-bloc-leader-gilles-duceppe-twice-wont-run-again/#.W0OUdUn2Zjp
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
If you are an NDP MP who won your seat with less than 40% of the popular vote (11 of the 16, and it should be noted one of the five is Mulcair) in 2015, chances are you are likely not getting re-elected in the next election.

Laverdière is one of those 11.

Its not uncommon for MPs, MPPs, MLA, MNA's etc who see the end coming over the horizon to walk away prior to getting defeated on election night.

Look at the legion that walked away from the Ontario Liberals in the lead-up to the 2018 election.

No one wants to have that awkward Charles Sousa -esk press conference on election night after a loss.



another factor is some of the ndp mp's from Quebec are starting to become "pension eligible " laverdiere is in her 60's and been an mp since 2011 so she would qualify for one once she left in 2019

but some of the others are too young although have enough time served in Ottawa to qualify but could not collect until they were much older

but I doubt this is going to be the last ndp mp to announce they aren't even running in 2019 , the federal ndp is in deep trouble , no money and a leader who is struggling to gain any traction with Canadians


the looming loss in Outremont is the least of there worries at this point , it might already be long gone , the question is can they save the other 40 or so ndp seats they still hold ?
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a hill times article mentions another ndp mp from quebec isn't running again , Romeo Saganash , said he announced in October last year although never seen any articles on this , another major blow to ndp as not sure who could possibly hold his riding for them )


A dozen MPs won’t run again in 2019, starting ‘snowball effect’ with more to come, say insiders

By Shruti Shekar Jul. 11, 2018


Three MPs in a week have announced they won’t run in the next election.


A dozen MPs have so far said they're not running again in 2019. They are, from left, top row to bottom: Conservatives Bev Shipley, Dave Van Kesteren, Robert Sopuck, Jim Eglinksi, Brad Trost, and Kellie Leitch; New Democrats Thomas Mulcair, Hélène Laverdière, Romeo Saganash, Kennedy Stewart, and David Christopherson; and Liberal Nicola Di Iorio. The Hill Times photographs by Sam Garcia, Andrew Meade, Shruti Shekar, file, and House of Commons and Twitter photos


NDP MPs David Christopherson, Hélène Laverdière, and Conservative MP Bev Shipley all announced in the last week they will not seek re-election in 2019, adding to a list that has now reached a dozen, and political insiders expect this is the start of a “snowball effect” of MPs calling it quits in the months to come.

The others on the list include: NDP MPs Tom Mulcair, Romeo Saganash, and Kennedy Stewart; Conservative MPs Brad Trost, Kellie Leitch, Jim Eglinski, Dave Van Kesteren, and Robert Sopuck; and Liberal MP Nicola Di Iorio.



NDP to lose several MPs

Mr. Singh briefly removed (later backing down) Mr. Christopherson from his role as vice-chair on the Procedure and House Affairs Committee earlier this year for voting against the party line on a Conservative motion that condemned the Liberal government’s controversial recent changes to applications for summer jobs grants.


At the time, Mr. Saganash (Abitibi-Baie-James-Nunavik-Eeyou, Que.) and NDP MP Charlie Angus, a former leadership rival to Mr. Singh, both spoke out against the leader’s treatment of Mr. Christopherson.

The Hill Times reached out to Mr. Christopherson to ask if his departure was linked to differences with Mr. Singh, but did not hear back from him by deadline. His announcement did not cite specific reasons for his departure. Mr. Singh praised the MP on Twitter for his years of service after his announcement.

Karl Bélanger, a former national director of the NDP, said it wasn’t a “direct link,” and added that Mr. Christopherson had given some thought about leaving prior to the leadership race that took place last fall.

“Certainly, one of the considerations for some individuals is where the party is at [in] the polls and the electoral chances of the party,” he said, adding the same of Mr. Christopherson could be said of Mr. Saganash. The NDP is currently in third place in the polls, hovering at around 20 per cent voter support.

Mr. Saganash said last October he wouldn’t run again. He was first elected in 2011.

Mr. Jordan said it is not uncommon for an MP to leave when they’re not on the same page as their party.


https://www.hilltimes.com/2018/07/11/departure-12-mps-beginning-snowball-effect-close-political-chapter-say-insiders/150756
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wasn't aware Romeo Saganash was not running again;

He was another personally popular MP within his riding and I would imagine the NDP will struggle to retain in the next election.

The party is largely purging itself of a lot of the MPs from the Layton Era.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
I wasn't aware Romeo Saganash was not running again;

He was another personally popular MP within his riding and I would imagine the NDP will struggle to retain in the next election.

The party is largely purging itself of a lot of the MPs from the Layton Era.



it doesn't appear to have been posted anywhere and nothing came up in google , although the hill times is a pretty credible source so I don't think they would of published it if it hadn't been confirmed

much like the other ndp mp who just retired , he would also be pension eligible as he was elected in 2011 and be old enough to collect once he leaves in 2019


his riding of Abitibi Baie James Nunavik would be a huge challenge for the ndp to hold onto especially without a high profile incumbent , its voted for other parties in the past , had been Bloc Quebecois and liberal , even pc in the past
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( retirement rumours are in full swing in Ottawa , this article mentions a few who might decide to not run in 2019 , although none are ndp )


Don Martin: MPs mulling their political best-before dates


Don
Don Martin, Power Play Host

@DonMartinCTV
.
Published Thursday, July 12, 2018 3:47PM EDT


It's that time of the pre-election cycle when MPs ponder their private lives and then take the pulse of their ridings to gauge the odds of being rewarded with re-election or facing the risk of a voter pink slip.

A dozen MPs are on the way out so far, but more are expected to engage the political churn in a retirement decision that some say has been influenced by the premature deaths of respected MPs Gord Brown (heart attack) and Arnold Chan (cancer).

Among the notables sources say are toying with the idea of packing it in (or perhaps should be contemplating an exit based on their longevity in office) are:


Lawrence MacAulay: The mild-mannered agriculture minister is expected to announce that he won’t seek re-election for a tenth time to his PEI riding. This may come very soon given the anticipated cabinet shuffle next week, which should be the final moving of the boxes ahead of the election.

Lisa Raitt: Despite being given much-needed flexibility by the party leader to help her husband cope with early onset Alzheimer's, whispers have the popular Conservative deputy leader taking a break from politics. The party is fighting to keep her on the ballot, knowing it would be their big loss if she leaves.

Carolyn Bennett: The Indigenous Relations Minister is undeniably enthusiastic about connecting with First Nations, but insiders say she's been approached about a diplomatic post as a soft exit from politics.

She laughed it off when I asked her about it, but what else was she supposed to say? Stay tuned.

Rob Nicholson: First elected 34 years ago, Nicholson has served as defence, foreign affairs and justice minister, yet still seems to enjoy opposition politics. Defeated for interim leadership of the Conservatives and unlikely to be a minister if Andrew Scheer forms a government, it's arguably a good time for the 66-year-old Niagara Falls MP to exit center stage.

Ralph Goodale: After 25 straight years in the House in a political career that also included a single term way, way back in 1974, one might think Saskatchewan’s only Liberal MP has earned a well-deserved putting-out-to-pasture. But Public Safety Minister Goodale's reluctant to quit until a worthy successor can be found to keep his seat safely in Liberal hands. So far that hasn’t happened.

Maxime Bernier: No other Quebec MP could stake a policy position against his party and his province and become even more popular. But the leadership runner-up is still on a campaign against dairy protectionism - and it pays off in supportive fundraising. Even so, he's got the wedding-skunk designation inside his caucus and, with Scheer riding high in the polls, some speculate Bernier might step away from politics for a comeback in the next leadership race.

Louis Plamondon: The longest serving MP in the House didn’t survive this long without knowing how to read the electoral tea leaves. With his Bloc Quebecois on the verge of extinction, he’s expected to bow out ahead of the blow out.

Finally, other unconfirmed retirement candidates in the speculation swirl include former Conservative cabinet ministers Ed Fast, Peter Kent and perhaps Diane Finley.

But, as always, there’s the chance some or all of the above will look in the mirror, decide the electorate can’t do without their services and stay – even if their best-before date expired years ago.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/don-martin-blog/don-martin-mps-mulling-their-political-best-before-dates-1.4010955
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A part of this has to do with the new cabinet.

It's a time when loyal party members get appointments to compensate them ... as much in gratitude for them gracefully stepping aside as for their long service. That's how McCollum became Ambassador to China, for example. Not all do that well. In fact, there's a shortage of plum positions for retiring politicians.

It will be interesting to see how many of each party decide to retire.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a high profile city councillor from Hamilton plans to run for the ndp nomination so perhaps this riding is one the ndp might not lose or at least put up a fight in )


Matthew Green to run for NDP in Hamilton Centre, aims to replace MP David Christopherson



It means Ward 3, which Green has held since 2014, will have no incumbent in the fall election


Samantha Craggs · CBC News · Posted: Jul 17, 2018 2:17 PM ET | Last Updated: 4 hours ago



Matthew Green says he plans to seek the Hamilton Centre NDP nomination next year. Antonio Damptey-Bonilla looks on. (Samantha Craggs/CBC)


Matthew Green, an outspoken Hamilton city councillor, wants to replace David Christopherson as the NDP MP for Hamilton Centre.

Green, who's represented Ward 3 in the central lower city for one term, says he hopes to get the NDP nomination for next year's federal election. That also means his council seat is up for grabs in the October municipal election.

Green made the announcement Tuesday, nearly two weeks after Christopherson said he was retiring. Christopherson has served as a local MP and MPP since 1990. Political insiders have long pegged Green, a supporter of leader Jagmeet Singh, as Christopherson's successor.

Green, 37, says he doesn't know if he'll be acclaimed as a candidate. The nomination process hasn't even started yet, he said. He announced his intentions Tuesday, he said, because "I felt I needed to communicate to my community."


Green, a former small business owner, says he'll spend the year in the community instead of running for council again and potentially triggering a byelection next year. (Samantha Craggs/CBC)

He won't run for council again only to vacate the seat a year later, he said.

"I believe when I shake someone's hand and commit to a full four years of public service, then by principle, it is a full four years that I should serve."

Green, the first black councillor in the city's history, has had some headline-grabbing moments.

In April, for example, a police tribunal rejected Green's claim a Hamilton Police Service officer had improperly questioned him on the street. He also filed an Ontario Civilian Police Commission complaint against fellow councillor Lloyd Ferguson over comments Ferguson made about the case on the radio. The commission found Ferguson's comments were "unfortunate" and "unfair."

Green has also deviated from fellow councillors on issues such as supporting marijuana distribution through privately owned dispensaries, and wanting to hold a public process to fill former councillor Donna Skelly's seat for four months.


Green met with Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath at an Ontario Works office in Hamilton in 2014. (Samantha Craggs/CBC)

During his time on council, he's been particularly outspoken on affordable housing, street safety and the need to regulate payday loan outlets. He also spent $25,000 of his ward budget to set up a screen in Gage Park and stream the final Tragically Hip concert.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/matthew-green-1.4749896
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Hamilton Centre ndp mp David Christopherson retiring

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