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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kenney fends off attacks in Calgary-Lougheed byelection debate



Meghan Potkins, Calgary Herald Meghan Potkins, Calgary Herald
More from Meghan Potkins, Calgary Herald

Published on: December 10, 2017 | Last Updated: December 10, 2017 8:42 PM MST




Calgary-Lougheed candidates square off at a debate in Braeside Sunday. Postmeda / Postmedia



United Conservative Party Leader Jason Kenney defended himself against accusations of holding “extremist” views at a debate Sunday for candidates in the Calgary-Lougheed byelection.

In a wide-ranging debate that touched on issues like the carbon levy, diversifying the economy and class sizes, it was sometimes four-against-one as Kenney’s opponents took turns taking shots at the perceived front-runner.

Kenney, for his part, focused his attacks on NDP candidate Phillip van der Merwe, slamming the government and accusing the New Democrats of employing “apocalyptic talking points” when speaking about the UCP and its policies.

“I understand why the NDP is running a fear-and-smear campaign, because they’ve got nothing else to say,” Kenney told reporters after the debate.

“I’m not the kind of conservative who surrenders. I’m going to tell the truth when they lie about our policies. I’m going to correct the record.”


Sunday’s forum also included Liberal Party Leader David Khan, Green Party Leader Romy Tittel and Independent candidate Wayne Leslie. Nearly 300 attended the boisterous event hosted by the Calgary Leadership Forum and YYC Cares at a packed Braeside Community Centre.


Van der Merwe, a Calgary physician, told the forum that a return to conservative government in Alberta will mean drastic cuts to health and education.

“I believe that Mr. Kenney is actually out of touch with both Alberta and Calgary,” van der Merwe said following the debate, citing the UCP leader’s nearly two decades in Ottawa.

“People here do not support his archaic, out-of-date and out-of-touch social policies to begin with. But on top of that, this is a (party) that is not supportive of those services that matter to families, like health care and education. He will essentially rip the heart from out of that, and we’ll (see) longer waits in emergency rooms and thousands of nurses and teachers fired.”

Khan, a Calgary lawyer who won the Liberal leadership in June, said voters need to remember “there is a better way — that isn’t the far left or the far right.”

During the debate, Khan raised concerns about the nascent economic recovery in Alberta, calling it a “jobless recovery” and calling for more efficient spending and tax reforms to help incent growth.

“I think there’s a lot of rhetoric and hyperbole on the left and right, as you could see in that room, but real Albertans are a looking for forward-thinking solutions and not just the inflated rhetoric from the left and right,” Khan said afterwards.

The Calgary-Lougheed byelection will be held Thursday, triggered when MLA Dave Rodney stepped aside to make way for Kenney, who returned to provincial politics to helm the UCP after serving nearly 20 years as a member of Parliament.


http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....ion-debate
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Donald Trump" "Alt-Right" and "Extremist Views" appear to be the new hip buzz words for many politicians on the center and left who are fighting off challenges from the right.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
"Donald Trump" "Alt-Right" and "Extremist Views" appear to be the new hip buzz words for many politicians on the center and left who are fighting off challenges from the right.




I guess although politics at the provincial level in alberta , in my view the level of debate and awareness of the actual issues has been going down hill in recent years


if we look back the election in 2012 was largely won by the alberta pc's cause they were successful in smearing the Wildrose party as too right wing and there was some idiot outbursts by wildrose candidates which only made this worse . although pretty much as soon as Alison Redford won the election her support went down and eventually she was forced to quit

so the idea to smear your opponents if there on the right , isn't really new in alberta , its clear the ndp doesn't have a lot to run on and historically ndp surges are difficult to recreate 4 years down the road as we saw in other places , like ( Ontario in 1990 , quebec in 2011 , Nova Scotia 2009 and east coast federally in 1997 ) the ndp 4 years later was only able to win a much smaller number of seats in the first election after the surge happened , ndp surges seem to only happen once

although ndp provincial governments in places like BC , Saskatchewan and Manitoba managed to get re elected a few times before being thrown out eventually
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the advance polls appear to be over although yet to see numbers as to how many voted early )


Final day for voters to cast advance ballots in Calgary-Lougheed byelection

Advance vote
It's the final day for electors in the riding of Calgary-Lougheed to cast ballots in the advance vote.


Michael Franklin, Digital Producer

@CTVMFranklin
.
Published Saturday, December 9, 2017 5:42PM MST


Time is running out for voters in the southwest riding of Calgary-Lougheed to cast their advance ballots in the upcoming byelection later this month.

UCP leader Jason Kenney is running for his seat in the legislature after longtime MLA Dave Rodney stepped down in November.

The leader of the Liberal Party, David Khan, is also running in the byelection alongside four other candidates.

A candidate forum is scheduled at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday at the Braeside Community Centre.

The advance polls close at 8:00 p.m. and Election Day is on December 14.


http://calgary.ctvnews.ca/fina.....-1.3714938
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there has been a surge in advance voting , an odd thing in alberta where by elections are often ignored and turnout low)



71% more advance voters turn out for Calgary-Lougheed byelection than last time

Turnout in riding up significantly compared with 2015 early voting, Elections Alberta says

CBC News Posted: Dec 11, 2017 1:18 PM MT| Last Updated: Dec 11, 2017 1:47 PM MT

A constituent votes at an advance polling station at South Gate Alliance Church for the byelection in Calgary-Lougheed.


External Links

■Elections Alberta

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)



Four days of advance polls drew 3,534 early voters for the byelection in Calgary-Lougheed, an increase of 71 per cent over the last time people in the riding went to the polls.

In the 2015 general election, 2,062 advance votes were cast, Elections Alberta said in a release Monday.

The polls were open from Wednesday to Saturday.


The riding became vacant when MLA Dave Rodney stepped down to allow new United Conservative Party Leader Jason Kenney to run for a seat in the legislature.

The seven candidates running are:
■Larry Heather, Independent.
■Jason Kenney, United Conservative Party.
■David Khan, Alberta Liberal Party.
■Wayne Leslie, Independent.
■Lauren Thorsteinson, Reform Party.
■Romy Tittel, Green Party of Alberta.
■Phillip van der Merwe, Alberta NDP.

The byelection is set for Thursday.

Voting locations will be open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

CBC Calgary has profiled some of the candidates so far:
■Get to know your Calgary-Lougheed byelection candidates: Romy Tittel
■​Get to know your Calgary-Lougheed byelection candidates: David Khan
■Get to know your Calgary-Lougheed byelection candidates: Jason Kenney

​More information is available from Elections Alberta.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4443231
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Calgary-Lougheed, the little byelection with huge impact


Don Braid, Calgary Herald Don Braid, Calgary Herald
More from Don Braid, Calgary Herald

Published on: December 11, 2017 | Last Updated: December 12, 2017 9:35 AM MST



Campaign signs line a street in the community of Woodlands in Calgary-Lougheed. A byelection will be held in the riding on Dec. 14, 2017. Britton Ledingham / Postmedia


The Calgary-Lougheed byelection set for Thursday looks like a typical Jason Kenney political lab, sterilized and sealed, the ideal test run of the UCP leader’s master plan for Alberta.

There he is, the sole conservative candidate with an audience. The options to the right of him (Alberta Advantage, Reform Party of Alberta, the inevitably appalling Larry Heather) are electorally meaningless.

Meanwhile, the centre-left is splitting itself between the NDP candidate, Phillip van der Merwe, and Liberal Leader David Khan, whose campaign is surprisingly energetic and effective.

For the first time in an actual vote for a legislature seat, the anti-Kenney forces are now in the same weak position as Wildrose and the Progressive Conservatives were before the 2015 election.

As they start to feed on each other, they weaken their ability to beat the ideological opponent.

The earlier conservative split allowed Rachel Notley and the NDP to come out of nowhere to win. Kenney today is far better known, and infinitely more prepared, than Notley was in the early stages of that campaign.

The conventional wisdom is that this makes Kenney unbeatable, first on Thursday, and in any other vote before he glides to the premier’s office in the 2019 general election.

But it’s a long run to spring of 2019. Much can change.

Former premier Jim Prentice won four byelections on Oct. 27, 2014. In December, he thought he’d co-opted Wildrose with floor-crossings. PCs were euphoric. Only five months later they lost the election.

The case isn’t parallel, obviously, but it shows the danger of assuming too much.

Advance polling in Calgary-Lougheed indicates high interest. One-third more ballots were cast than in the 2015 advance vote. And that was an emotional general election about change.

All this would seem to favour Kenney, but the New Democrats still hope to give him a scare.

They’re throwing all they have at the campaign, hoping not so much for victory as a result that shows Kenney isn’t all-powerful. They’d be thrilled to score 40 per cent.

The NDP attacks are often exceptionally personal. The strategy is to paint Kenney into a corner formerly occupied by right-wing elements of Wildrose.

He has left doubts among some voters, especially with the UCP’s opposition to Bill 24, which strengthened protection for LGBTQ kids in gay-straight alliances.

Kenney’s rebuttals to NDP attacks are undeniably ferocious, and sometimes inaccurate, but they’re not so personal.

Both sides leave the nastiest stuff to their trolls, who take these attacks to unprecedented extremes. (As one UCP loyalist says, “They’ve got their loonies, we’ve got ours.”)

The UCP feels the dial has already moved sharply from the Bill 24 uproar at the start of the fall legislature sitting, to hard economic issues that deeply concern most Albertans — unemployment, the looming carbon tax increase, deficit spending and much more.

If Kenney does win on Thursday, he’ll immediately have more stature as leader of the official Opposition, as well as the pay — $160,000 annually before perks.

Victory will also cement his authority over the UCP caucus, which hasn’t always been as firm as it looks. He probably wouldn’t face the NDP this year because the house will rise before he’s sworn in.

Kenney will then turn to the big hole at the centre of UCP plans; this party has no official policy, and hasn’t even been formally founded by its members.

There will be a founding convention in Red Deer on May 4, and a policy meeting will come later, probably in the fall of 2018.

The UCP types say the main policy lines won’t change. Kenney promises to repeal the carbon tax and legislate a sustained period of tax relief and fiscal restraint.

Until policy is official, however, the UCP looks like an empty vessel, which the NDP ardently fills with every negative possibility.

The path to 2019 looks clear to many conservatives. Kenney keeps winning, sweeps NDP aside.

And yet, Alberta politics haven’t been predictable since the strange day in 2006 when the PC party voted to reject Premier Ralph Klein.

Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald

http://calgaryherald.com/opini.....uge-impact
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bell: NDP's slash-and-burn bogeyman is dead


Rick Bell


Published:
December 13, 2017


Updated:
December 13, 2017 5:00 AM UTC


Filed Under:

Calgary SUN ›
Opinion ›
Columnists ›


UCP Leader Jason Kenney Jason Franson / The Canadian Press



Dead. Deep-sixed. Its existence, such as it was, is extinguished. A memory. Rest in peace.

There’s been a lot of NDP talk about a 20% cut to the provincial budget if United Conservative number one Jason Kenney ever gets the chance.

You even hear it on the doorsteps of southwest Calgary when the Notley NDP candidate speaks to voters before Thursday’s byelection.

The chatter is unnerving, downright scary, Halloween not Christmas.

But, like Halloween, the ghosts are not real, the skeletons are pretend, the menace made-up, all to create fear and loathing of the unknown, predicting a supposedly dark future if the Notley NDP government is no more.


Yes, we often hear the haunting tones from the government side on what life would be like without them calling the shots. Life under the axe-wielding Kenney and his 20% cut.

Healthcare ripped apart. Ditto schools, colleges and universities. No new cancer centre in Calgary. Painful slashing and burning. Visions of past scissor work. Brutal ways. This is the picture of a 20% cut in a horror show staged by the NDP.

The problem for the NDP is … er … nobody is saying they will cut 20%. No one is saying anything near it.

Kenney states his position again on Tuesday.

“The 20% cut scenario is ridiculous. That is a fiction. The NDP, as usual, is making stuff up. I’ve never proposed we cut spending by 20%. It’s not realistic to cut spending by that much.”

The United Conservative leader says he is calling for “a period of sustained fiscal restraint.”

Kenney assumes about 3% growth and a freeze in spending, or at the most, a 1% or 2% cut in spending. In budget year 2022, the books will balance.

“But for the NDP, it’s Apocalypse Now,” he says.

So where does the 20% come from?

Kenney points out the Alberta government spends about 20% more per person than the B.C. government. There is a lesson to be learned from comparing the numbers.

“We should be able to find some efficiencies without reducing front-line services.”

Kenney hopes in the long run, in a decade or more, Alberta could run as efficiently as elsewhere.

“I don’t see any reason why we should be happy to be the most inefficient provincial government in Canada. I’m simply pointing out how inefficient we are. The NDP seems to think that’s a point of pride. I think it’s a problem.”

“For the NDP inefficiency is a feature, not a bug. It’s a good thing, not a problem. The NDP sees spending more for less as a good thing because it means more for the special interests who support them.”

Trevor Tombe, a well-respected and oft-quoted University of Calgary economist, says if the economy grows at 3% a year after 2019 then Alberta needs a spending freeze plus $8 billion in royalties to balance by budget year 2022.

Kenney pegging growth at 3% is actually lower than other crystal balls calling for more growth.

But Kenney’s claims, though not deep in specifics, aren’t out in Fantasyland.

For Tombe, the idea of balancing the books by 2022 with his numbers is “entirely credible.”

“A spending freeze would do it. You don’t need cuts. You just need a freeze,” says the professor.

“You don’t need to make any heroic assumptions about economic growth or about royalties. You just need to make very reasonable ones.”

The province is going to grow, as is oilsands production. More money coming in, budget stays flat. Pretty soon, the books are back in the black.

The idea anyone would need to cut 20% to balance the budget is “completely false.”

Tombe can see why the NDP government promotes that story. It works for them. But it “completely mischaracterizes” what’s needed to get the Alberta government’s financial house back in order.

Growth. Government spending freeze. Balanced budget.

You mean it would not take even a little spending cut as Kenney figures, 1% or 2%?

“I don’t think he would need that,” says Tombe.

The economist tells us Klein had to take tougher action because the province was paying more interest on the debt in a weaker economy. Those were different times.

He also says when comparing how much provinces spend it would not be unfair to match Alberta against Ontario and Quebec. Alberta’s government spends 26% more per person than Ontario and 30% more than Quebec. Yikes.

So, tying this yarn up with a Yuletide bow, why would anyone push for a 20% cut?

“No one is,” says the man working the numbers


http://calgarysun.com/opinion/.....an-is-dead
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 13, 2017 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Calgary-Lougheed byelection a significant moment in Alberta politics

James Wood James Wood
More from James Wood

Published on: December 13, 2017 | Last Updated: December 13, 2017 4:46 PM MST


Two candidates in the Calgary-Lougheed byelection. On the left, Jason Kenney, UCP and on the right, Phillip van der Merwe, NDP.



There’s been little drama throughout the campaign but Thursday’s byelection in Calgary-Lougheed will mark a significant moment in Alberta politics.

The Dec. 14 vote was triggered by the October resignation of United Conservative Party MLA Dave Rodney, who stepped down to open a legislature seat for Jason Kenney, the newly-elected leader of the fledgling party.

Kenney is the heavy favourite in the race and if he wins, as expected, the legislature will be a showcase for the former federal cabinet minister’s blunt-edged brand of of politics, said Mount Royal University political scientist Lori Williams.

“He’ll be able to speak for himself and his party and hold the government’s feet to the fire,” Williams said Wednesday.

“He’s got a very strong combative style … it will be interesting to see how that style works up against the NDP and Rachel Notley.”

However, if a titanic upset occurs and Kenney loses to NDP candidate Phillip van der Merwe or Liberal Leader David Khan, “then Jason Kenney and the party are in big trouble,” said Williams.

The Calgary-Lougheed byelection is the first electoral test for the UCP, formed this summer as a new party by agreement of Progressive Conservative and Wildrose members. The south Calgary riding has long been a bastion for the Tories, though the NDP finished around 500 votes shy of Rodney in 2015.

Williams said that while the race has been short of fireworks, there have been several interesting dynamics in play, including the fact three party leaders are vying for the seat (Green Party Leader Romy Tittel is the third besides Kenney and Khan).

It has also seen two openly-gay candidates — van der Merwe and Khan — challenging Kenney on the UCP’s position on issues such as gay-straight alliances in schools, and three candidates running to Kenney’s right: the Alberta Reform Party’s Lauren Thorsteinson and Independents Wayne Leslie and Larry Heather, she said.

Most of all, the Calgary-Lougheed campaign has served as a dry run for the 2019 provincial election, with the parties testing out issues and themes ahead of the next vote, said Williams. Kenney has lashed the NDP for what he says is fiscal and economic mismanagement since taking office while the New Democrats have slammed the UCP as social conservatives who will slash public services.

Khan and the Liberals meanwhile are hoping to attract dissatisfied voters who see the UCP as too far right and left, respectively.

Premier Rachel Notley said Wednesday’s she’s proud of the campaign run by van der Merwe and the NDP but downplayed the byelection’s connection to the next provincial election.

“Byelections are historically difficult for governments. Byelections with the leader of the opposition in a riding I don’t think they’ve ever lost, is probably not the best measure,” the premier said in an interview with Postmedia.

Kenney was not made available for comment Wednesday.

Voting in the riding closes at 8 p.m. Thursday. With Elections Alberta running a pilot program of electronic voting tabulators, a large number of results could be known within 20 to 30 minutes of polls closing.


http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....a-politics
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the by election is coming to a close , everyone seems to think Kenney will win , only question might be by how much ? and who comes in second ? even notley seems to be trying to lower ndp expectations by saying in recent articles that party leaders never lose they sort of by elections )



Jason Kenney seeks Alberta legislature seat in Thursday by-election


UCP Leader Jason Kenney introduces his leadership team in Edmonton on Monday, Oct. 30, 2017.

JASON FRANSON/THE CANADIAN PRESS



Bill Graveland

CALGARY

The Canadian Press


Published December 14, 2017

Updated 1 hour ago



Former federal Conservative cabinet minister Jason Kenney is seeking to win a seat in the Alberta legislature today as leader of the province's newest party.

A byelection in Calgary Lougheed became necessary when Dave Rodney, a member of the United Conservatives, stepped aside to make room for a run by Kenney, who became leader of the party on Oct. 28.

Kenney was the architect of a merger between Alberta's two centre-right parties, the Progressive Conservatives and the Wildrose, and would like a seat in the house so he can go head to head with NDP Premier Rachel Notley before the 2019 provincial election.



He is one of seven candidates in the constituency, a sprawling community of palatial homes, multi-purpose dwellings and new neighbourhoods deep in the city's southwest. It has traditionally voted Conservative.

Lori Williams, a political scientist at Mount Royal University, expects Kenney to win, but suggests his victory needs to be convincing.

"If it's close, it will show there's a whole lot more diversity in Alberta politics — a lot more than he wants to claim," she said in the days before the vote.

"He says Alberta is a conservative province and the NDP somehow hoodwinked Albertans into voting for them. That narrative would just be decimated completely if he were to lose or if it is close."

Kenney said he has received a positive reception going door to door, but noted only about one-third of voters turn out for a byelection.

"I hope we can do better than that, but it's close to Christmas and people are busy at this time of year," he said.

"You quickly realize that a significant number of people don't spend any time thinking about politics."


Kenney is facing challenges from the NDP's Phillip van der Merwe, a medical doctor, Alberta Liberal Leader David Khan and new Green Party Leader Romy Tittel.

Rounding out the slate are Wayne Leslie of the Alberta Advantage Political Party Association, Lauren Thorsteinson from the Reform Party of Alberta and independent Larry Heather.

Khan, who is also looking for his first seat in the legislature, said he is the only real alternative to the United Conservatives and NDP.

"I'm a better choice than the regressive policies and deep austerity cuts that Kenney has in mind for the province and also the fiscal mismanagement of the NDP, which appears not to have a plan to tackle the deficit," Khan said.

Van der Merwe said he doesn't feel any extra pressure because the New Democrats are in government. He said he has received plenty of support from motivated volunteers and legislature members who have helped him campaign.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/jason-kenney-seeks-alberta-legislature-seat-in-thursday-by-election/article37324076/
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Analysts predict an easy win for Jason Kenney in Calgary-Lougheed byelection


Michael Franklin, Digital Producer

@CTVMFranklin
.
Published Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:54AM MST
Last Updated Thursday, December 14, 2017 11:12AM MST

Voters head to the polls in the southwest riding of Calgary-Lougheed on Thursday and experts say that the race will be the easiest UCP leader Jason Kenney has faced this year.

Calgary-Lougheed has always been held by a Conservative candidate and the other parties know they have a challenge to defeat Kenney, but that hasn’t stopped them from campaigning.

Kenney’s team also said they aren’t taking anything for granted and say they’ve canvassed at every home in the riding twice.


Byelection in Calgary-Lougheed
Voters have until 8:00 p.m. to cast their ballot in the Calgary-Lougheed byelection.



Jason Kenney
Jason Kenney's team says they aren't taking anything for granted in Thursday's byelection.

The riding was originally held by UCP MLA Dave Rodney, who gave up his seat to make room for Kenney, who was voted to lead the party on October 28.

Candidates say there are a number of issues in the byelection, including high taxes, budget cuts and jobs.

Nevertheless, political scientists think the race will be Kenney’s to lose.

“Jason Kenney has been running in multiple elections in 2017. He won the PC leadership race, he led the ratification of the merger with the Wildrose and then he won the UCP leadership. Now, he’s fighting in the byelection. I think the byelection has been the easiest of these, but they’re leaving nothing to chance,” said Duane Bratt with Mount Royal University.

Bratt says it will be quite a showdown between Rachel Notley and Kenney should he win the seat.

That’s because they have much different views on how the province should be run and those opinions will come to a head once they are in the same room, speaking directly to one another.

In addition to selecting a new member for the provincial legislature, officials say the byelection is offering them an opportunity to test out some new voting technology.

The equipment, intended to streamline the process and cut down on the amount of mistakes on ballots, really does have an impact for voters.

Cheryl Cordsen says she was surprised at how little time it took.

"They check you, stick a piece of paper into a folder, you X or you can colour in it. You come back out, they put it into a computer and you wait a second until it accepts the vote and you're gone. I was in and out of there in less than a minute. It took me as long to say that as it did to do that."

She says that the new system should completely cut out lineups at the polls.

Another voter who cast his ballot in Calgary-Lougheed said it was very easy to vote.

"It took me about 30 seconds," said Manuel Campos. "They have this machine and they just put it in. They probably count them as soon as you scan them in."

The polls are open from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

About 3,500 people have voted in the advance polls, up from about 1,500 in the last general election.

https://calgary.ctvnews.ca/analysts-predict-an-easy-win-for-jason-kenney-in-calgary-lougheed-byelection-1.3721226
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( kenney leads by a large margin in a new mainstreet poll on the by election )

Kenney Leads Calgary Lougheed

December 12, 2017|Mainstreet|Alberta Issues, Featured

12 December 2017 (Calgary, AB) – A new Mainstreet Research poll finds that United Conservative party leader Jason Kenney ahead by a substantial margin in the lead-up to the byelection in Calgary-
Lougheed.

The poll surveyed 376 residents of Calgary aged 18 and over and was fielded between December 6th
and December 7th. The sample has a margin of error of +/- 5.05% and is accurate 19 times out of 20.

“Jason Kenney looks poised to win the Calgary-Lougheed byelection and enter into the Alberta
Legislature”, said Quito Maggi, President and CEO of Mainstreet Research. “Our poll shows that
Kenney has just under 60% of support among Calgary-Lougheed voters.

“Phillip van der Merwe of the Alberta NDP is second with just over 18% and Alberta Liberal leader
David Khan with just under 17%. Green Party leader Romy Tittel has 5.6% support.

“Because these differences are within the margin of error, it is would not be a surprise to see the NDP
capture second place in this by-election.”

Kenney’s support as a candidate in this by-election is below his provincial voter intent in Calgary-
Lougheed. If an election were held today, 61% of respondents said they would vote for the United
Conservative Party. 22% said they would vote for the NDP, almost 6% said they would vote for the
Alberta Liberals, where 2.3% indicated that they would vote Green.

“What this indicates is that there is a fair bit of soft NDP support that is not translating into support for
the local candidate at this moment. But this could change as the governing party – I would imagine
– has a stronger ground organization and might able to put some daylight between themselves and
the Liberals on election day.”

Maggi also notes that this is a byelection where voter turnout will be low vis-à-vis general elections
and campaign’s ground organization will have an effect on the result.
“The UCP obviously will be motivated to make sure their party leader wins and wins comfortably,”
said Maggi.

“I think the NDP is interested in finishing a comfortable second”, Maggi continued. “They have enough
of a ground game to make that happen and I would not be surprised if the NDP outperform our
numbers, given how the NDP outpoll the Liberals comfortably in the other questions that we asked”.
“That said, second place is well within reach for David Khan and I expect the Alberta Liberals to work
hard to get that result”.


https://www.mainstreetresearch.ca/kenney-leads-calgary-lougheed/
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 14, 2017 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jason Kenney claims landslide victory in Calgary-Lougheed byelection


CTV Calgary Staff
Published Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:54AM MST
Last Updated Thursday, December 14, 2017 8:50PM MST


Voters in Calgary-Lougheed headed to the polls on Thursday to pick a replacement for Dave Rodney, who stepped down as the district's MLA in November, and UCP leader Jason Kenney proved victorious in the byelection.

Kenney was selected from a field of seven candidates that included Liberal leader David Khan and Dr. Phillip van der Merwe of the NDP. The Alberta Party did not field a candidate.

Preliminary results of the byelection (19 of 22 tabulators reporting) are as follows:



Jason Kenney - Calgary-Lougheed MLA
Jason Kenney greets his supporters after being elected as the MLA for Calgary-Lougheed



Byelection in Calgary-Lougheed
Voters have until 8:00 p.m. to cast their ballot in the Calgary-Lougheed byelection.



Jason Kenney
Jason Kenney's team says they aren't taking anything for granted in Thursday's byelection.
• Jason Kenney (UCP) **ELECTED** - 71.7%
• Phillip van der Merwe (NDP) - 16.5%
• David Khan (LIB) - 9.5%
• Lauren Thorsteinson (RPA) - 1.2%
• Romy Tittel (GPA) - 0.6%
• Leslie Wayne (IND) - 0.4%
• Larry Heather (IND) - 0.2%

Prior to the opening of polling stations, political experts declared the race as Kenney’s to lose.

“Jason Kenney has been running in multiple elections in 2017. He won the PC leadership race, he led the ratification of the merger with the Wildrose and then he won the UCP leadership. Now, he’s fighting in the byelection. I think the byelection has been the easiest of these, but they’re leaving nothing to chance,” said Duane Bratt with Mount Royal University.

Bratt says it will be quite a showdown when Rachel Notley and Kenney in the Legislature.

Elections Alberta introduced new voting technology, for the first time in Calgary, in this byelection. The tabulating machine allowed voters to feed their ballot through the machine and votes were automatically counted. The equipment was designed to speed up the voting process and produce faster results.

Cheryl Cordsen says she was surprised at how little time it took to make her choice. "They check you, stick a piece of paper into a folder, you X or you can colour in it. You come back out, they put it into a computer and you wait a second until it accepts the vote and you're gone. I was in and out of there in less than a minute. It took me as long to say that as it did to do that."


https://calgary.ctvnews.ca/jason-kenney-claims-landslide-victory-in-calgary-lougheed-byelection-1.3721226
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Braid: Humiliation in Calgary-Lougheed shows NDP needs drastic changes



Don Braid, Calgary Herald Don Braid, Calgary Herald
More from Don Braid, Calgary Herald

Published on: December 14, 2017 | Last Updated: December 14, 2017 10:13 PM MST




Jason Kenney works his way through supporters at his campaign headquarters after after winning the Calgary Lougheed by-election on Thursday December 14, 2017. Gavin Young/Postmedia


The New Democrats were trampled by the United Conservative Party in the suburban byways of Calgary-Lougheed on Thursday.

Government candidate Phillip van der Merwe polled a dismal 16.8 per cent of the byelection vote. Liberal Leader David Khan had 9.3 per cent.

UCP Leader Jason Kenney scored 71.5 per cent, beyond even the UCP’s wildest hopes.

Premier Rachel Notley airily waves this off, saving you can’t expect any other result when a major party leader is running on his home turf.

That may soothe tender egos, but there’s only bad news here for the NDP.

This is the third Calgary byelection the New Democrats have lost since their 2015 victory in the province at large. They were thumped in both Calgary-Greenway and Calgary-Foothills. And, now, they’re humiliated in Lougheed.

Results showed the NDP is vulnerable on both its progressive and conservative flanks. The Liberals nibble away at the New Democrats’ natural centre-left base, while the UCP corrals virtually all the conservative resentment with NDP economics.

Kenney often says that to predict UCP support, simply add together the votes for the former Progressive Conservative and Wildrose parties.

Well, he was wrong. Kenney scored eight per cent higher than the PCs and Wildrose did in 2015, when they got a combined total of 63 per cent in Lougheed riding.

There has to be a bow here to Kenney’s enormous political skills. Thursday marked his fourth victory in the five-step plan for conservative victory he first rolled out in July 2016.

First, Kenney had to win the PC leadership, then propel the PCs and Wildrose toward merger, then win the UCP leadership, then get himself elected to the legislature.

At the start, few people believed he could do any of it, partly because no Canadian politician had ever tried anything like it.

Today, not many doubt he’ll win the fifth and final prize — a provincial election in 2019.

The NDP has spent a lot of time painting the UCP as socially backward and even dangerous to LGBTQ kids. UCP member MLA Jason Nixon didn’t help this week, when it came out that his company fired a single mother of three who had been sexually harassed in the workplace.

These are extremely important matters. Kenney could reassure a lot of people by taking a more moderate, less combative stance when the NDP pins him down.

But the staggering rejection in Lougheed shows that the NDP will not win an election on these social issues alone. The economy is the overpowering problem that rules them all. In much of the province, Jason Kenney owns that debate.

It follows that if the NDP wants to protect its social agenda, it has to win the election. And to do that, it must sharply change economic policy.

Calgary is still staggering. Despite some recovery, there’s little revival in crucial areas.

The first months of 2018 could very well bring another flood of business closures. The downtown vacancy rate of 30 per cent is the worst of any significant international city, says the Chamber of Commerce.

The Chamber released a report Thursday that called for governments to stop “layering” new taxes and charges on business. These include everything from the carbon levy to minimum wage, as well as city taxes and fees.

According to the Chamber, all new and increased levies will raise costs for a typical restaurant from $17,641 this year to $60,710 in 2018. Larger companies in transport and delivery sectors will see costs rise nearly $300,000.

The city and province often “layer” these costs with no reference to each other. The Chamber pleads with them to stop, and well they should. Raising business costs sharply in a recession is both economically destructive and politically suicidal.

As if to make the point, Cenovus announced Thursday it will lay off between 500 and 700 employees.

The economic problem is deepest in Calgary, but the New Democrats face the same general anxiety nearly everywhere.

If they learn nothing from Calgary-Lougheed, they might as well start writing the 2019 concession speech.

Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald

http://calgaryherald.com/news/.....ic-changes
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the results would seem to indicate the United Conservative Party is going to be competitive in most of Calgary's ridings other than maybe a couple really liberal ridings downtown in the next election


the ndp could even possibly get swept out of the city entirely , much like the ndp federally in quebec city in 2015 , especially when considering the vote splitting on the left ( literally 4 parties going after the same small block of voters ) - ndp , liberal , alberta party and green party

but a lot of 2015 ndp voters appear to have simply stayed home this by election so its difficult to determine what they will do next election , but in this riding even if they had got all the votes they got in 2015 they still would of lost by a large margin to Kenney
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2017 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't recall a by-election where the winner despite the fact that turn out was lower than it was during the last general election (10,852 Vs 16,974) won the riding with more votes than the winner during the general (7,760 Vs. 5,939)
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Jason Kenney to seek seat in Calgary Lougheed

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