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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Electoral reform ‘still important’ as District 11 residents cast ballots in advance polls for byelection


Mitch MacDonald mitchell.macdonald@theguardian.pe.ca
Published: Nov. 19, 2017, 6:48 p.m.



District 11 resident Wilbert Murray casts his vote during Saturday’s advance poll for the byelection at Eastlink Centre while district returning officer Bonnie MacDonald looks on. MITCH MACDONALD/THE GUARDIAN


Proportional representation was weighing on the minds of some voters when they marked their early ballot this weekend.

It was one of the bigger issues for resident Trevor Forbes when he cast his vote on Saturday during the first of three advance polls being held at Eastlink Centre for the District 11 byelection.


Forbes said he felt last year’s plebiscite, which saw a majority of respondents choose a form of proportional representation, should have been honoured by the province.

“I think it’s important to come out and show there are some of us who view that as a big deal. We need to stand strong and show government it’s important to us,” said Forbes, who went to the polls with his wife Martha, three-year-old son Liam and nine-month-old daughter Ellie. “It’s important to vote and I think there is a lot that has come up in the past couple of years that has made this ballot an important one to show whether you support or don’t support what the government is doing.”

Forbes wasn’t the only one marking the ballot with electoral reform on his mind.

Amalia Campbell said it was also a big issue for her.

“It was just really, I guess, sad to find out we went through that process… and (proportional representation) is not even really seen as a potential thing,” said Campbell.

Hundreds of Islanders went through the advance poll for a number of reasons on Saturday.

Martha noted she went to the poll since she was going to be away on the day of the election.

“For people who, for one reason or another, can’t do it or aren’t going to be here on election day, it’s important they have their say,” she said.

For Erica Harris, voting in the advance poll was better due to a visual impairment.

“Its just easier for me because I can’t see very well. It’s less people, less hassle,” said Harris, who added that Elections P.E.I. staff on site were also helpful.

Allison MacDonald, polling station supervisor, said the day went smooth with the only complication being a computer that went down at the registration desk for about 10 minutes.

However, Elections P.E.I. was prepared, he said.

”We did have a backup on hand,” said MacDonald, adding that those who had their voter identification cards were for the most part in and out of the polling station in a couple minutes. “We really appreciate the fact that people did bring their voter identification cards”

Those who have not received a voter identification card in the mail should bring two pieces of ID with them to the advance polls.

Voters also agreed the advance poll ran smoothly.

Campbell, who went to the polls with her husband Jordan, said she came prepared with some bills to prove she had recently changed her address.

She also called ahead and brought her marriage certificate, just in case, since the two had been married early last month.

Despite changes to her address and the recent nuptials, Campbell said the process was smooth.

“It was pretty painless as long as you bring the right pieces of paper.”


http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/n.....on-163194/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Byelection profile–Liberal Bob Doiron hopes to make the jump from city council




Mitch MacDonald Mitchel.MacDonald@theguardian.pe.ca
Published: Nov. 21, 2017, 5:47 a.m. Updated: a day ago


Liberal party candidate for the District 11 byelection Bob Doiron chats with supporter and father-in-law Leslie Rogerson at his campaign headquarters on Kensington Road in Charlottetown. ©THE GUARDIAN/Mitch MacDonald


Bob Doiron wants to seize the opportunity to become a stronger voice for city residents.

The Liberal party candidate in the District 11 byelection first entered the political world when he was elected to Charlottetown city council three years ago in 2014.

Wanting to “make a difference,” Doiron said that since getting a taste for municipal politics he has wanted to create greater change on the provincial level.

“I wanted to ask how do these decisions get made and I wanted to be at the table when the decisions are made. When this opportunity presented itself, it was an opportunity to go further in the political world and see if I can make some change,” said Doiron, who was vocal on city council issues such as paving, hiring practices and pesticide fees.

“When you jump into provincial politics, it’s a whole bigger picture. It just opens up a whole new book of opportunities and the ability to get in, say my piece and hopefully make District 11 a better place to live.”


Liberal party candidate Bob Doiron answers a question during a forum hosted by Young Voters of P.E.I. at bar1911 in Charlottetown.Liberal party candidate Bob Doiron answers a question during a forum hosted by Young Voters of P.E.I. at bar1911 in Charlottetown.


Doiron, who was chairman of the city’s environment and sustainability committee and economic development, tourism arts and culture committee, is a lifelong resident of Charlottetown and has volunteered with various teams in the Sherwood-Parkdale’s baseball, hockey and soccer associations.He has been married to his wife, Lori, for 30 years and together the two have three children and two grandchildren.Doiron, a graduate of the Atlantic Police Academy, has also been working at UPEI for nearly as long as his marriage. Today, he serves as a corporal with UPEI’s security police department and cited safety concerns as being part of the reason he wanted to enter politics.

He has specifically pointed to relocating the Allen Street propane tanks away from residences and businesses as something he’d like to achieve, while also acknowledging an overall need to adapt to new development in the area.

“All of that new development brings new concerns,” said Doiron, pointing to a need for more seniors housing and affordable housing in the district. “I’d like to get in and work towards those.”

With Doiron running for the party currently in government, he said he’s heard a number of ideas from residents during the campaign trail on how to improve services.

“I’ve talked to a number of nurses who are on the front lines every day, and they’re giving me lots of information on how we can improve,” said Doiron, who mentioned a need for long-term nursing beds in the district.


About Bob Doiron
•- Doiron is a lifelong resident of Charlottetown and lives in Sherwood with his wife, Lori. The couple has three children and two grandchildren.
•- Doiron attended UPEI and is a graduate of Holland College’s Atlantic Police Academy. He is a corporal in UPEI’s security police department.
•- Doiron is Charlottetown’s councillor for Ward 6 and is currently on leave for the byelection campaign. He was chairman of the city’s environment and sustainability committee as well as chairman of the economic development, tourism, arts and culture committee.
•- Doiron has volunteered with local baseball, hockey and soccer associations.

Doiron said he has also heard concerns about last year’s plebiscite on proportional representation and that he’s glad the province has committed to a referendum on the issue during the next election.

He says many in the district were pleased with the work done by former MLA Doug Currie.

“People were genuinely happy with Mr. Currie, he had some strong portfolios where he worked hard,” said Doiron. “I’m going to try and work as hard as he did. I just ask for (residents’) support.”

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/n.....il-163585/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals breaking rules to swing byelection, Opposition charges

PC MLA asks for ruling on whether P.E.I. Liberal newspaper ad was a breach of privilege

By Kerry Campbell, CBC News Posted: Nov 21, 2017 8:49 PM AT| Last Updated: Nov 21, 2017 8:49 PM AT

'It saddens me to see this premier continually undermining the Legislative Assembly,' says PC MLA Matthew MacKay.


The Opposition PCs claim Wade MacLauchlan's Liberal government is breaking the rules of the legislature trying to influence the current byelection in District 11 Charlottetown–Parkdale.
■Charlottetown-Parkdale byelection: 4 issues of concern to voters

Since Friday, the Tories have asked the Speaker of the House for three separate rulings — two regarding the rollout of the capital budget and one regarding the announcement Monday of the province's new culture strategy, made at a city coffee shop.

"Yesterday was yet another attempt to influence voters in a byelection," PC MLA Matthew MacKay told the House Tuesday, noting Speaker Buck Watts has twice before ruled that major government announcements should be made before the legislature if it is in session.

"It saddens me to see this premier continually undermining the Legislative Assembly, putting his own political interests above the House. Mr. Speaker, I strongly encourage you to come down on this government and their repeat offence behaviour."

'Confidential details'

PC MLA Steven Myers has also asked the Speaker for rulings on two points of privilege regarding the release of the capital budget on Friday.

In one case, Myers asked the Speaker to look into how the P.E.I. Liberal Party was able to tweet details from the province's capital budget as the finance minister was delivering his budget address — before the budget document itself had been tabled.

District 11 byeelection ad for Bob Doiron
The Liberal Party must have had 'confidential details of the budget speech' to get this ad for candidate Bob Doiron to The Guardian newspaper on time, says PC MLA Steven Myers. (P.E.I. Liberal Party/theguardian.pe.ca)

The budget is a privileged document, Myers said, and even MLAs aren't allowed to disclose details before it's tabled. He claims the Liberal tweets of "intimate budget details" constitute a breach of privilege of all MLAs in the legislature.

Myers also asked the Speaker to rule whether an ad for the Liberal candidate in the byelection that appeared in The Guardian newspaper Saturday constituted a breach of privilege.

The ad for Bob Doiron included specific details from the capital budget.

"The deadline to submit ads for Saturday's Guardian is Thursday morning at 11," Myers told the House. "That means not only did the Liberal party have confidential details of the budget speech on Friday, but that the Liberal party's advertising agency had those same details at least one full day ahead of this very chamber."

A spokesperson for the premier's office said the matters are before the Speaker, and government would wait for his ruling.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4413171
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BYELECTION PROFILE: PC Melissa Hilton says experience on city council will be strong asset for P.E.I. legislature


Mitch MacDonald Mitchel.MacDonald@theguardian.pe.ca
Published: Nov. 22, 2017, 6:56 a.m. Updated: 2 hours ago


Progressive Conservative party candidate Melissa Hilton chats with supporter Chester Gillan, who is also a former PC cabinet minister, while campaigning earlier this month. Hilton says her 12 years of experience in Charlottetown city council will be an asset in the provincial legislature. ©THE GUARDIAN





Melissa Hilton is no stranger to how provincial and municipal concerns can often overlap.




The Progressive Conservative candidate in the District 11 byelection was first elected to Charlottetown city council during a municipal byelection in 2005.

During her three re-election campaigns since, Hilton said she’s become familiar with how provincial and municipal issues can intertwine.

“The levels of government work very closely with each other, and when you’re campaigning and going door to door talking to people, they share their concerns with not only the direction the municipality may be headed in but also the direction the province may be headed in,” said Hilton, who chaired the city’s finance committee until taking leave to campaign for the byelection.

“I act on the concerns of my constituents and it has shown with respect to me being re-elected three times. I feel my experience on city council is certainly an asset to bring into the legislature.”

Hilton said the concerns shared by residents during this campaign have encompassed a variety of issues from seniors and affordable housing to education, job retention, mental health and addictions support.


Progressive Conservative party candidate Melissa Hilton answers a question during a forum hosted by Young Voters of P.E.I. at bar1911 in Charlottetown. ©THE GUARDIAN-Mitch MacDonald

While on council, Hilton has been a critic of the province’s tax system, which she said has taken millions of dollars from city residents.

She said many residents are also worried about the rising costs of living, an incoming federal carbon tax and increasing energy costs.

“They’re all very real concerns and there’s just so much uncertainty,” said Hilton.

A specific issue Hilton said she would like to address if elected is the high number of medically discharged patients who are in hospital waiting for available nursing beds.

“It’s very stressful on their families,” said Hilton. “There are nursing beds available, it’s just whether or not the province is willing to license the beds that are available for our medically discharged patients. I would like to see that eradicated before 2019.”

Having grown up in Charlottetown, Hilton graduated from UPEI with a bachelor of arts with a major in psychology.

She now lives with her husband, Rob, and their two daughters and works in a family-owned business.

She also worked at the Charlottetown Spa for more than 20 years and taught aerobics classes in addition to volunteering as manager of the Sherwood Parkdale Rural Minor Hockey Association.

“I’ve always been very physically active and it’s very important to me to be active and to teach my children remain to be active,” Hilton said during a forum hosted by the Young Voters of P.E.I. earlier this month.


Candidate profiles

Editor’s note: This is the second of four profiles of candidates for the District 11 byelection to be held on Nov. 27. On Thursday, The Guardian will profile Hannah Bell, who is running for the Green Party. See Bob Doiron profile.



About Melissa Hilton
•- Hilton was born and raised in Charlottetown and lives with her husband, Rob Gallant, and their two daughters, Nicole and Robyn.
•- Hilton received her bachelor of arts degree with a major in psychology from UPEI in 1990.
•- Hilton is Charlottetown’s councillor for Ward 9 Stonepark and is currently on leave for the byelection campaign. She was chairwoman of the city’s finance committee at the time she went on leave and has previously chaired the Parks and Recreation and Leisure Activities Committee.
•- Hilton has volunteered with the Sherwood Parkdale Rural Minor Hockey Association, including in managerial roles, and has been a board member with the Four Neighbourhood Community Health Centre and the Island Fitness Council. She’s also a member of the community advisory committee focusing on homelessness in Charlottetown and Summerside.

Hilton said the District 11 byelection campaign has been eye-opening.

With a desire to help residents, Hilton said she hopes to become a vocal member of the legislature.

“I love helping people, and being a part of James Aylward’s Progressive Conservative team really excites me. They’re invigorated, they’re energized, they’re alive and it’s wonderful to be a part of that,” said Hilton. “I’d like to thank all of the residents that have opened up the doors and have allowed me to enter and share with me their very serious concerns. Hopefully when elected on Nov. 27, I’ll be a strong voice for them in the legislature.”

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/n.....re-163938/
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elizabeth May, leader of the federal Green Party, comes to P.E.I. in support of provincial byelection candidate Hannah Bell


The Guardian
Published: Nov. 24, 2017, 5:48 a.m.

Federal Green Leader Elizabeth May, left, meets Thursday with Hannah Bell, the Green party’s candidate in the upcoming District 11 byelection. ©THE GUARDIAN-Jason Daley


By Jason Daley

The Guardian

Federal Green Leader Elizabeth May was in Charlottetown Thursday evening to put her support behind a provincial Green party candidate in the Nov. 27 District 11 byelection.

At a meet-and-greet event held downtown in honour of Hannah Bell, May alluded to the issue of being a party’s sole representative on a political stage, in reference to P.E.I Green Leader Peter Bevan-Baker, the lone Green party representative in the P.E.I legislature. She’s hoping Bell can join him.

“I’m a lone Green party MP. No matter how much people say what a wonderful thing it is to be there improving stability and working so hard, the reality is that it’s much harder to be alone,” said May, adding that electing a Green party representative to the legislature would have the greatest overall impact on Islanders.

“With Hannah Bell elected for District 11, the impact on that legislature will be far more, with all due respect for the other candidates running. Any other party winning a seat makes no real difference in that legislature.”

May believes that adding a second Green party member to the legislature can be done. She pointed to B.C. as an example.

“In May, three Green MLAs were elected in the general election in B.C. It’s made a huge difference. It means the Green Party in B.C. remains an opposition party but willing to work co-operatively with both parties in the legislature.”

Bell said she and the party are inspired by the representation they have received with Bevan-Baker.

“Peter has shown that it’s possible to elect a Green. He’s already broken that barrier.”

She said the main theme her supporters talk to her about is the need for the Green party to continue to make progress in having its voice heard on the political stage.

“Despite the fact that we don’t have proportionate representation, we’re still managing to break down those barriers of the traditional systems. The response that I’m getting is that people are really looking for that change. And they’re going to make it happen with or without proportionate representation. We’ve done it before. We can do it again. That’s so exciting,” said Bell.

The District 11 byelection was called following former Liberal MLA Doug Currie’s resignation in October. It is slated for Monday, Nov. 27.

The other candidates running are Liberal Bob Doiron, PC Melissa Hilton and Mike Redmond from the NDP.


http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/n.....ll-164606/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Voters in District 11 cite variety of issues as P.E.I. byelection looms


Teresa Wright Teresa.Wright@theguardian.pe.ca
Published: Nov. 24, 2017, 8:03 p.m. Updated: 4 hours ago


Steve Love is one of many undecided voters in District 11. He told The Guardian the candidate with the best vision for the district would win him over. (Teresa Wright/The Guardian)


CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. - When it comes to the issues most important to voters of District 11 Charlottetown-Parkdale, it really is a mixed bag.

Monday’s byelection has shone a political spotlight on the urban riding, with P.E.I.’s four registered parties duking it out to garner the seat left open by former cabinet minister Doug Currie’s sudden resignation last month.


Candidates have been going door-to-door, mailing campaign materials, visiting coffee shops and hosting events – all in the hopes of wooing the 3,300 registered voters in the district and convincing them to choose a “voice in government,” to “send Wade a message” or to “vote for real change”.

But if you ask voters in the riding what they make of finding themselves suddenly so valuable to the upper echelons of the political machinery in P.E.I., many of them will offer a humble chuckle.

Simply put –– they are looking for someone they can trust to represent them. And often, they say, that comes down to a personal relationship with the candidate.

“The party is part of it, but I know the person that I’m voting for and I know his parents,” said Sharon Fortier.

“It’s a person I know, so I feel comfortable with that.”

The Guardian went door-to-door in some of the neighborhoods of District 11 to gather input from voters on issues important to them and heard a variety of views.

A number of people echoed Fortier’s sentiment, saying they planned to vote for someone they knew personally.

“For me, it’s the person who’s running. I don’t want someone who is just going to toe the party line. We want somebody who will look after the issues that we’re interested in,” one man said.

A number of others said they were undecided, still waiting to hear more specifics from the candidates about where they stood on core government issues like education and health care.

Max Knetchel said his key voting issue revolved around arts and culture and wanted to hear how the different candidates planned to support artists in P.E.I. (Teresa Wright/The Guardian)Max Knetchel said his key voting issue revolved around arts and culture and wanted to hear how the different candidates planned to support artists in P.E.I. (Teresa Wright/The Guardian)

Max Knetchel said his key voting issue revolved around arts and culture and wanted to hear how the different candidates planned to support this.

“I’d like to see some more support for Island artists,” he said.

“Also, just in general – space and how space is being used, in terms of housing and in in terms of the environment,” he added, noting a concern over lawn pesticides.

Steve Love said he, too, was undecided, but that the candidate with the best vision for the district would win him over.

“I’m voting based on what would be best for the community because I want the community to be strong.”

For political watchers who like to make predictions, it has been a tough race to call.

The district itself has a history of voting for both the Liberal and Conservative parties. The Liberals have held the seat since 2007, when Currie was first elected to the legislature. Before that, it was a Progressive Conservative seat, held by Chester Gillan from 1996 to 2007. Previous to that, the entire legislative assembly had two levels of membership – councillors and assemblymen – and the voters in this riding generally sent a candidate each from the Liberal and PC parties to the dual representative legislature.

District 11 byelection coverage. (The Guardian)District 11 byelection coverage. (The Guardian)

But this byelection is seeing a new dynamic for the area with a four-way race. The NDP and the Green parties are fighting hard with high-profile candidates to gain ground against the two main political parties.

And it appears they may be making inroads.

Ellen Mullally is a vocal supporter of the Green party who says she is voting Green in this byelection because the candidate is someone she identifies with and is championing causes and issues she personally cares about.

One of those issues is electoral reform.

Seventy-five per cent voters in District 11 who cast ballots in the plebiscite last year supported changing to mixed-member proportional representation.

Mullally says she remains unhappy about government’s dismissal of the results based on low voter turnout.

“I just felt extremely disappointed with the MacLauchlan government that they did not acknowledge that was legitimate. They say there was not enough people turn out, but I don’t know. They don’t say that for other elections if they have a low voter turnout,” she said.

Mullally also cited a concern over how cosmetic pesticides have been handled by both the city and the province and is hoping her preferred candidate can make inroads in banning cosmetic pesticides.

But many of the voters who spoke with The Guardian said they felt it almost didn’t matter who they voted for. They expressed feelings of having become disheartened by the partisanship and bickering they witness in both the provincial legislature and the House of Commons in Ottawa.

“It doesn’t really make that much difference if you go between Liberal and Conservative,” a retired teacher told The Guardian.

Her husband agreed.

“We just find through the years, whether it’s Liberal or Conservative, it doesn’t really matter. The policies end up being the same, whether it’s education or health care. So, if everything is going to be the same that way, you might as well vote for someone who actually listens to our opinion on things.”

Their next-door neighbour said he “grew up Liberal,” but also believed politicians of all political stripes are “all the same.”

“I can’t stand watching it on TV with question period. They’re just like a bunch of kids,” he said.

“They don’t do anything. It’s always just – you did this and you did that – and they don’t accomplish anything. They’re going to get in whether I vote or not, and they’re going to do whatever they want whether I like it or not. It’s sad, but that’s the way it is.”

Voting on byelection day, Nov. 27, will begin at 9 a.m. and extend until 7 p.m. Three advance polling days were held last week. Results will be tallied after the polls are closed and announced to the public Monday evening.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/n.....ms-164835/
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Government using funding announcements to influence byelection, PCs say

With questions around school construction dates, PCs once again accuse government of trying to 'buy votes'

By Kerry Campbell, CBC News Posted: Nov 24, 2017 8:00 PM AT| Last Updated: Nov 24, 2017 8:00 PM AT

PC Leader James Aylward says funding announcement was 'made in haste during a byelection in District 11.'


During the last question period before some Charlottetown voters head to the polls in a byelection, the Opposition once again accused government of using the announcement of a new school to try to swing the election.


PC MLA Brad Trivers pointed to shifting timelines put forward for construction and completion of a new Sherwood Elementary in the week since the announcement was made in the capital budget address on Friday, Nov. 17:
■In his budget speech, Finance Minister Allen Roach said construction would begin in 2019;
■In debate on the budget Thursday evening, Education Minister Jordan Brown said construction would start in the 2021 or 2022 school years;
■In question period the next day, Brown said construction would most likely begin in 2019, with students in the new school in 2021.

"The premier and indeed this whole Liberal government is trying to buy votes in a District 11 Charlottetown-Parkdale byelection by announcing a project that won't start for three years," Trivers said.

"And won't be completed for at least five years."

'That's exactly what the five-year budget' is for

​"Honourable member, I don't think that I led you astray last night, but if I did, my apologies for that," Brown said Friday in question period when confronted with the shifting dates.


'I think that all Islanders can see through this announcement and what it was really about.'

—James Aylward

It takes time, Brown continued, "to get the construction underway and to complete the construction."

"That's exactly what the five-year budget planning process is for, is to make that commitment so that those students and the community around Sherwood school understands our commitment to them and to education in that area."

PC leader James Aylward took aim at another government announcement on education funding made during the byelection: a commitment of $2.8 million to hire 41 new educators in the current school year.

'It was made in haste,' Aylward charges

Over and over, Aylward asked whether the funding would be permanent.
■Monitoring key to Water Act success, says Opposition
■Opposition aims to double fine for passing a school bus

"What I'm asking, very clearly, these positions that you announced: are they going to be permanent positions, embedded in our school system, or is this just a one-off for this year?"

Brown explained how teachers are allocated to schools based on enrolments from the previous school year.

Jordan Brown
Education Minister Jordan Brown says government's made a commitment to the people of Sherwood with the announcement of a new school. (Natalia Goodwin/CBC)

He said the new funding "allowed for a flexible mechanism here to address an issue that has resulted from a very successful growth strategy, and we feel that it's a great way to address frontline teaching issues."

"I think that all Islanders can see through this announcement and what it was really about," Aylward responded. "It was made in haste during a byelection in District 11."

Aylward urged government to review its instructional staffing model to put more educators into the school system.

"Temporary top-ups to staff and complement in these schools are not a viable long-term solution."


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4418882
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Charlottetown-Parkdale byelection sees 34% turnout for advance polls

1,194 of 3,548 registered electors in District 11 have voted

By Cody MacKay, CBC News Posted: Nov 25, 2017 10:51 AM AT| Last Updated: Nov 25, 2017 10:51 AM AT

The candidates for District 11, left to right, are Liberal Bob Doiron, Progressive Conservative Melissa Hilton, New Democrat Mike Redmond and the Green Party's Hannah Bell.


About 34 per cent of eligible voters cast their ballots in the advance poll for the Charlottetown-Parkdale byelection.

As of Friday night, 1,194 of 3,548 registered electors in District 11 voted. Friday marked the final day of three advance polling days.

The seat was left vacant when Liberal Doug Currie resigned unexpectedly in October.
■Meet the candidates for Charlottetown-Parkdale
■Charlottetown-Parkdale byelection: 4 issues of concern to voters

The race to fill the seat in District 11 concludes on Monday when one of four candidates will be elected:
■Bob Doiron for the Liberals.
■Hannah Bell for the Greens.
■Melissa Hilton for the PCs.
■Mike Redmond for the NDP.

Paul Alan, manager of election operations for Elections P.E.I., said advanced voter turnout was "on par" for general election advanced polls, and that it's a great sign for voter engagement.


On Monday, the polls will open at 9 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. at the Eastlink Centre.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4419668
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( they released the advance polls first and pc candidate has a 4 vote lead , looks like it could be a close one , greens also doing very well , more to come as results come in )


By-Election - November 27, 2017 - Unofficial Results


POLLS (Green)
HANNAH
BELL (Liberal)
BOB
DOIRON (PC)
MELISSA
HILTON (NDP)
MIKE
REDMOND

VOTES 341 380 384 87

PERCENT 28.6% 31.9% 32.2% 7.3%

POLL POLL BY POLL TOTALS - LEADING CANDIDATE HIGHLIGHTED
A 341 380 384 87

http://www.electionspei.ca/results/by-election.php
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( new numbers shockingly have the green candidate ahead although not by much )

District #11 Charlottetown - Parkdale

By-Election - November 27, 2017 - Unofficial Results


POLLS (Green)
HANNAH
BELL (Liberal)
BOB
DOIRON (PC)
MELISSA
HILTON (NDP)
MIKE
REDMOND
VOTES 444 436 431 121
PERCENT 31.0% 30.4% 30.1% 8.4%

POLL POLL BY POLL TOTALS - LEADING CANDIDATE HIGHLIGHTED

A 341 380 384 87
001 34 24 30 14
002
003
004 8 18 8 9
005
006
007 61 14 9 11

http://www.electionspei.ca/results/by-election.php
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know if I can recall a by election results night anywhere where 3 candidates still had a chance to win after this many votes counted . truly unheard of
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( most media is declaring the green party candidate as the winner , the greens appear to have won with 35% of the vote and won 11 /12 polls in the riding , liberals second with 28% and pc's a strong 3rd with 27% )


The Guardian‏Verified account @PEIGuardian · 7m7 minutes ago

BREAKING: P.E.I. Green party's Hannah Bell wins District 11 byelection #peipoli
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its not clear what to make of the by election , the liberals had normally won this seat but seemed to have no answer for the green surge , the pc's had won the riding in the past but its not really your typical pc riding anymore as its urban Charlottetown now )


A message or just a byelection? Liberals, Tories react to Green win

Liberals and PCs surprised by loss

By Kevin Yarr, CBC News Posted: Nov 28, 2017 7:53 AM AT| Last Updated: Nov 28, 2017 9:26 AM AT

Hannah Bell came away with the byelection win for the Greens Monday night.


The Green caucus in the P.E.I. Legislature doubled in size Monday night, and the Liberals and Progressives Conservatives disagree on what that means for the Island's political landscape.

■Green's Hannah Bell wins District 11 byelection by 157 votes


The Green Party's Hannah Bell won the byelection in District 11, Charlottetown-Parkdale by a comfortable margin Monday. While the final tally still has to be confirmed by Elections P.E.I., the count Tuesday morning stands with Bell winning 35.3 per cent of the vote, almost seven percentage points ahead of second place Liberal candidate Bob Doiron.


It was a surprising loss for both the Liberals and the Tories. But while they shared surprise, their views on what it meant were different.

PEI PC Leader James Aylward
The province is ready for change, says James Aylward. (Randy McAndrew/CBC)


"Clearly, the MacLauchlan government, the tired Liberal government that we all know has been sent a message," said PC Leader James Aylward.


"Was it the message that I was necessarily hoping for tonight? Certainly not, but clearly they've been sent a message."


Aylward said the result shows Islanders are ready for a change in provincial politics.


But Liberal Premier Wade MacLauchlan cautioned against reading too much into a byelection result.

P.E.I. Premier Wade MacLauchlan
A byelection has its own local context, says Wade MacLauchlan. (CBC)


"I think you really have to look at a byelection as a byelection, with local context and what people have to take into account as they're making their choices," said MacLauchlan.


"And of course the turnout. That's the nature of byelections."


The byelection was called when Doug Currie resigned from politics last month. He had held the district for the Liberals for 10 years. Before that Progressive Conservative Chester Gillan held the seat for more than a decade.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4422482
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doiron, Hilton say they gave byelection everything they had


Dave Stewart dave.stewart@theguardian.pe.ca
Published: Nov. 27, 2017, 11:18 p.m. Updated: 10 hours ago



Liberal candidate Bob Doiron, right, is surrounded by supporters at his campaign headquarters Monday evening as they watch results come in from the District 11 byelection. Doiron finished second to Green party candidate Hannah Bell. (Teresa Wright/The Guardian)


CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. - With disappointment etched on his face, District 11 Liberal candidate Bob Doiron said he gave it everything he had.

Doiron finished second to Green party candidate Hannah Bell in Monday’s byelection.


“No regrets, I tried my hardest, and that’s democracy,’’ Doiron said as he received hugs from friends, family and Liberal MLAs at his party headquarters.

“I gave everything I could, and it wasn’t (meant) to be.’’

Bell won the race with 768 votes while Doiron came second with 611 votes. Melissa Hilton (Progressive Conservative) was third with 586 votes and NDP leader Mike Redmond came in last with 202 votes.

Doiron said he was humbled by how everyone came together and pitched in.

“People that I’d never met before jumped in here and volunteered for hours and hours and hours. I’m deeply humbled with the campaign, with how we worked together. I’m disappointed, of course, I’m not the winner, but I’ve learned a lot and we’ll come back another day.’’

Related: P.E.I. Green party's Hannah Bell wins District 11 byelection

Doiron was one of two Charlottetown city councillors who took a run at the District 11 seat. Hilton was the other. Both will now be returning to their council duties. Interestingly enough, civic voters go to the polls in November 2018 although neither Doiron nor Hilton were thinking that far ahead Monday night.

“I feel fine,’’ Hilton told The Guardian. “Disappointed, absolutely, but, you know, it was an incredible opportunity to run with the Conservatives, and I don’t regret a minute of it. It was an experience I’ll never forget.’’

Hilton praised her volunteers, saying they helped her to get to every door even if she didn’t get to meet every single eligible voter.

Even if she didn’t win, Hilton feels the Green victory sends a clear message to the governing Liberal party.

“I do feel a message was sent to our premier that a change is needed, and there will be a change in the next general election.’’
District 11 Progressive Conservative candidate Melissa Hilton said even though she didn’t win Monday’s byelection, it was an experience she’ll never forget. She is shown with Opposition leader James Aylward. (Dave Stewart/The Guardian)District 11 Progressive Conservative candidate Melissa Hilton said even though she didn’t win Monday’s byelection, it was an experience she’ll never forget. She is shown with Opposition leader James Aylward. (Dave Stewart/The Guardian)
Premier Wade MacLauchlan doesn’t see it that way.

“We went into this (byelection) knowing it was a tight race,’’ MacLauchlan told The Guardian. “These things are always a challenge, but it’s the nature of democracy. We went at it and worked hard and had a good candidate in Bob, and the voters spoke and, as I say, that’s the beauty of democracy.

“We’ll go back into the legislature (today) with a strong working majority, with a program that has been laid out in the speech from the throne and with the Island doing well.’’
Opposition leader James Aylward said that’s exactly what happened Monday night – voters want change.

“I’ve been saying all along that the electorate was going to send a clear message to Wade MacLauchlan and the tired Liberal government,’’ Aylward said. “Is this the message I was hoping to deliver to the government? No, it was not, but I’m very proud of the campaign that we ran; I am extremely proud of Melissa and the hard work that she and a huge core of volunteers in District 11 did.

Having two members of the Green Party in the legislature is certainly bound to change the dynamic.

“Well, the dynamic changes every day in the legislature,’’ the premier said. “That’s our job, we’re in there, we’ve got three parties represented in the legislature (and) we work together to implement and to work together to put together a program.’’

The Guardian attempted to reach Redmond for comment following the final tally of votes, but he could not be reached.

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/n.....ad-165433/
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PEI Cabinet Minister Doug Currie leaves politics

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