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Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:30 pm    Post subject: Defining Patrick -- the swamp strikes first Reply with quote

In Ontario, the media guns have obviously done their homework. They have done market research and focus groups and taste tests, and they have come up with a set of ads designed to define their main opponent.

Quote:
Unions using Patrick Brown's ad against him
A coalition of unions has drawn on a past Progressive Conservative ad to attack the Conservative leaders record.

By ROBERT BENZIEQueen's Park Bureau Chief
Thu., Nov. 2, 2017
A coalition of unions is using Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown own campaign commercial in a new attack ad against him.

Working Families — funded by public- and private-sector unions — released its latest TV spot Thursday, entitled “Can You Believe Patrick Brown?”

The 30-second commercial hacks Brown’s slick ad from earlier this year that was designed to showcase the Tories’ moderate direction.

“It doesn’t matter who you are; it doesn’t matter where you’re from; it doesn’t matter who you love,” says Brown, as a Working Families graphic splashes across the screen reminding viewers that “Patrick Brown Opposed Marriage Equality” as a Conservative MP in Ottawa.

“It doesn’t matter if you belong to a union,” he says, as the words “Patrick Brown Voted To Restrict Unions” are superimposed over his photograph.

“It doesn’t matter how much you make,” Brown intones, as “Patrick Brown Wants Minimum-Wage Hike Delayed” appears on screen, a reference to his concerns over the $11.60 hourly wage jumping to $14 in January and $15 in 2019.

Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown is the focus of a new attack ad launched and funded by a coalition of unions.

“It doesn’t matter where you worship,” he continues, as “Patrick Brown Supported A Burka Ban” is emblazoned across footage of him at a temple and marching with Sikhs in the Khalsa Day parade.

“You have a home in the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario,” the PC leader concludes.
https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/11/02/unions-using-patrick-browns-ad-against-him.html


It will be interesting to see how Brown and his PCs handle this. They have a budget. In hindsight, it probably would have been better to have 'spent a little money establishing Brown's identity, making Brown look like he glows in the dark, so virtuous is he.

We might look at this as the real start of the campaign. The first media buy by an obvious proxy organization.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the so called "working families coalition " is a purely partisan organization , its never once ran an ad critical of the Ontario liberals or NDP . every single election they come out with ads against the pc's and whoever there leader is . they seem to assume the new pc leader is an easy target and there easiest way to assure the liberals stay in power


none of the ads they released against Patrick brown are especially original or surprising

they also risk annoying the electorate or turning them off , as there has never really been negative advertising released this early , to have negative ads already on tv when the election might be in may , is rather unheard of in Ontario
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My thinking is this. Brown (I hope) has been working in the vineyard, getting candidates and support groups, and lining up resources for when it counts. He had kept a low profile, I think intentionally. I don't know that.

In any case, these ads ring in the election campaign in an unofficial way. This ad says that Patrick Brown is untrustworthy, that he will lie to win.

They don't have much to attack, so they do a cheap ad and use it to make their points about Brown. They will try to demonize him as the reincarnation of Mike Harris if he isn't careful. It's a consequence of his strategy. I think Brown should respond quickly, before they do too much of this kind of stuff. It probably time to come out, deflecting attention off himself and on to the premier.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
My thinking is this. Brown (I hope) has been working in the vineyard, getting candidates and support groups, and lining up resources for when it counts. He had kept a low profile, I think intentionally. I don't know that.

In any case, these ads ring in the election campaign in an unofficial way. This ad says that Patrick Brown is untrustworthy, that he will lie to win.

They don't have much to attack, so they do a cheap ad and use it to make their points about Brown. They will try to demonize him as the reincarnation of Mike Harris if he isn't careful. It's a consequence of his strategy. I think Brown should respond quickly, before they do too much of this kind of stuff. It probably time to come out, deflecting attention off himself and on to the premier.


Brown has been very busy , I've looked at his twitter feed before and he's always attending events and visiting ridings . the media obviously hasn't showed up to these much

overall maybe its a sign the next election will actually be much more fiercely fought then expected and fought in ridings previously not

and even though the liberals have polled poorly for months if not years there still managing to attract high profile candidates in ridings they don't even hold . they managed to find a local mayor to run in Simcoe North , possibly the most safe pc riding in the province . they also found a city councillor to run against pc mpp Raymond Cho in scarborough and another local mayor to run against high profile pc mpp Todd Smith in Bay of Quinte .

as to why all these high profile municipal politicians would want to run for the liberals at a time when there polling numbers were so dismal ? I really don't know , I assume they were all promised high profile positions in cabinet if they someone manage to win and liberals still in power
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't mean to be critical of Brown. He may have been well advised to do what he has done. He's been playing it safe counting on the revulsion for this version of the Liberals -- and maybe some hard-hitting TV ads -- to carry him to victory.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Patrick Brown's clever strategy is withstanding Liberal attacks: Watt



Kathleen Davis (grand daughter of former Ontario Premier Bill Davis ) shares a laugh with Patrick Brown, leader of the Ontario PC Party at the the 2017 TVO Gala. "Brown has learned the lessons of his predecessors, and he has refused to give the Liberals an opportunity to wedge him into uncomfortable positions," writes Jaime Watt.



By Jaime Watt

Sun., Nov. 12, 2017



The Ontario Liberals have now served in government for more than 14 years. It’s an incredible accomplishment: few governments in Canada have secured so many consecutive mandates, especially in today’s turbulent political environment.

That longevity has not been a fluke. The Ontario Liberal Party has been led by leaders who have connected with Ontarians and keen political operators who move quickly and decisively to play up political advantages and minimize political threats. It’s among the most formidable Canadian political organizations in its era.

The Ontario Liberals have demonstrated an impressive ability to identify and exploit the weaknesses of their political foes. Their reward has been four consecutive governments.

It’s for that reason that this fall has been particularly interesting to watch.

When Patrick Brown was elected the leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives in 2015, many pundits thought the party had made a grave error. Indeed, many dismissed it as an accident that would have serious consequences for the party.


Brown had been a backbench Conservative Member of Parliament in Stephen Harper’s government, and had been part of a number of votes that could allow the politically savvy Liberals to define him as an unpalatable social conservative.

However, Brown has been far more politically deft in the last two years than the political class in Ontario would have guessed he’d be. He has wisely recognized that 14 years of governance eventually causes a government’s shine to wear off, no matter the party or its successes.

It is natural that in the course of governing the inevitable barnacles will attach to the ship of the government, and a party will take some scrapes and hits that begin to cause serious brand damage. Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals are struggling with that challenge.


Brown has capitalized on that by stepping away from the spotlight.

He has systematically shed positions that would alienate mainstream Ontario voters from the PC party. He hasn’t let the party’s more right-wing tendencies get the best of it.

The Liberals have a tried-and-tested formula for winning elections, including the aforementioned ability to identify and hammer away at opponents’ weaknesses. The Liberals also have a superbly organized ground game.

The Working Families Ontario coalition is a centre-left organization developed by a number of interest groups that work to develop election strategies to keep the PCs out of government. Often, the Liberals and Working Families air ads with similar messages and themes that frame their opponents as bad for Ontario.

Thus far, this has been a one-two punch that knocks out opponents. But the last two months have shown that the Liberals have struggled to find an attack on Brown that sticks.

They have tried to compare Brown to U.S. President Donald Trump, pushing the message that the PC leader will bring a new and divisive brand of politics to centrist Ontario. A Working Families coalition ad implies the same, imploring Ontarians not to bring Trump’s politics to Ontario.

Trump is an effective political cudgel. He is about as popular in Ontario as a cockroach infestation in your home.

But Brown’s effective message of political moderation has made those attacks ring a bit hollow. It’s hard to imagine the calm and measured Brown indulging in the divisive politics of Trump.

The Liberals have tried to trip up Brown on such issues as Canadian values, abortion and gay rights, to no avail. He has refused to take the bait.

It is perhaps with this in mind that the Working Families coalition has released another ad, accusing Brown of behaving like a weather vane — an opportunist who changes his views depending on the political winds.

This means the coalition is saying that Brown is an operator who wants to bring divisive Trump-like politics to Ontario at the same time it’s arguing that he takes his political positions based on political wind direction.

Not only is it not a coherent message — it’s downright contradictory.

Brown has learned the lessons of his predecessors, and he has refused to give the Liberals an opportunity to wedge him into uncomfortable positions.

By doing so, he is focusing political scrutiny on a Liberal government that is increasingly under duress. Only eight months before an election campaign, a number of government veterans have announced they are retiring, the media has grown more critical, and the Liberals’ messages to voters don’t seem to be getting through.

Meanwhile, Brown is showing Ontarians that his leadership victory may well not be a mistake after all.

Jaime Watt is the executive chairman of Navigator Ltd. and a Conservative strategist.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2017/11/12/patrick-browns-clever-strategy-is-withstanding-liberal-attacks-watt.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does this article make any sense? It seems to me that, more than anything else, the media is impatient for Mr. Patrick Brown to come out of the shadows and present himself in the media arena.

Perhaps they want a political person to express an oplnion on the Court's attitude because the journalist doesn't want to do it himself. Even if he is an opinion journalist. After all. it takes some balls to say ... Hey, what's going on here? when they start throwing charges out.

After all, who amongst the citizens is allowed to call the Court into account, no matter what they do? How can there not be something wrong when civil servants have to change the rules in order to get people to wipe some hard drives clean ... they even needed short lessons in how to do it, and special passwords because it isn't a one-step process.

Why would they be ordered to do it at that moment in time, on those files, and only on those computers? Why, if not to avoid accepting responsibility for terrible decisions?

It has to be a figure like the Leader of the Opposition to raise an eyebrow at the judicial clunkers we have come to expect. Ordinary citizens are just grumblers, and their views don't count. This is how the game is supposed to be played. If the Leader of the Oppositions says it, it's legitimate news for journalists.

They want Brown to say something like that. I think he should say something that zeros in on the point of greatest dubiousness ... something stingingly funny would be ideal. And then continue to ignore her.

I hope this is the picture. Is Brown humble enough to know his limitations? It's no small thing. I described Wynne as a scorpion. I mean that she has a stinger, and can be expected to lash back when irritated. Women can get away with more aggression than would be tolerated in men, and she is very aggressive and venomous. He's kind of plodding by comparison.

I am wondering if he is 'doing a Mike Harris' in a different way. That is, Hudak tried to replicate Harris' approach by announcing, right off the hop, his intention to cut tens of thousands of civil service jobs. That plays to a small audience. He lost when he should have won.

But what Harris did as well was to have a low profile, and work in the hinterland, talking to local groups and getting a good read on how people felt about the big issues. When the campaign came out, they had hard-hitting commercials giving their promises.

Maybe Brown is working from the same playbook.

I wait to see if his strategy will work. Do these attacks succeed in defining him? The real Patrick Brown isn't exposed, so he's a small target. Wynne's surrogate, the Working Families gang, have created a straw man to attack. It's Brown as a Trump populist.

Does anyone see that in Patrick Brown?

In the meantime, I like Brown's discipline and his humility. He doesn't need to protect his ego. He seems to know his limitations and have benchmarks and goals. And surely, surely he is right -- government in Ontario is simply so-oo bad that Wynne's Liberals have to go.

.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I don't mean to be critical of Brown. He may have been well advised to do what he has done. He's been playing it safe counting on the revulsion for this version of the Liberals -- and maybe some hard-hitting TV ads -- to carry him to victory.


I felt the ads prior to limits coming in place were both hard hitting and worked to define him to the voters

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4313397
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My reaction ... they are good. They present Brown as a responsible middle class 'everyman' who's practical rather than ideological. He seems like a realistic, proportioned person.

They also assume the watcher knows enough about what is going on. It isn't petty. It's about fundamentals, like wasting money. This is probably about as dead-center Ontario as you could get.

Good work.

Their shortcoming -- they lack impact. Not entirely. They are easy to look at. I'd say they are intended for repetition. I'd say they are meant to serve effectively to create a bedrock narrative. They don't stir emotions much.

But do you want "hard-hitting" at this point? Those are hard to watch, as they get repeated. They could have a negative effect if they're over-used.

These are good as a backdrop to action perhaps in the news. Is it plausible that Patrick could make a comment about these trials and provoke her into threats of another lawsuit or better, get her to savage him for being sexually normal?

Then the PCs could run that footage, and just ignore her.

It gets a little absurd, but what would really totally box her in, scorn-wise, would be for Brown to enter the circus as a spokesman for eunuch rights. And play the edge where the reporters don't really know whether he's pulling their legs or not.

(If it were me, I would confess to reporters to have a frustrated lesbian trapped in my drab male body. That would give me the right to just 'carry on', hitting and missing sexually like always, without telling anybody. And then, in the shocked pause that would follow, I'd look into the camera, audibly chuckling, and wink.)

Perhaps that's why I am not the creative director at Deloitte Digital ...

That aside, these are very good ads that are meant for high repetition. Repetition works.

It's a very positive step. I like what I am seeing in Patrick Brown.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FUREY: A big test looms for lacklustre Ont. PC Leader Patrick Brown


Anthony Furey


Published:
November 18, 2017


Updated:
November 18, 2017 5:17 PM EST


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
Opinion ›
Columnists ›


Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown. (Bob Tymczyszyn/Postmedia Network)



Next weekend Ontario Progressive Conservative members will gather for their last big event before next year’s provincial election, the one where they hope to finally emerge victorious after 15 years of scandal-plagued Liberal rule.

While talking together in the halls or huddled at social functions, both insiders and grassroots members will complain about one politician in particular – one who they fear goes along with the green agenda and won’t stand up for the small government principles that draw attendees to such an event in the first place.

No, I’m not referring to Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne. But their own leader, Patrick Brown.

While my inbox used to be full of readers and activists complaining about the Liberal premier, many have now shifted to critiquing the Progressive Conservative opposition leader. They get that Wynne is being Wynne. They just don’t get why Brown in their estimation is also being Wynne.

But while the extent of their frustrations have reached new heights, the basic refrain isn’t new. Brown and those closest to him have heard these criticisms ever since he won the leadership in 2015. While this year’s federal Conservative leadership featured healthy debate of conservative political philosophy, the last Ontario PC bid did not. Brown never had to duke it out to prove his credentials.

The real crisis though came at last year’s convention when Brown shocked the crowd by announcing his support for carbon pricing. More broadly, there’s been the widely held problem of Brown not articulating a strong conservative philosophy, whether it be smaller government, self-reliance, fiscal conservatism and so on.

Many conservatives say they were inspired to get politically involved by the likes of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan or the fiery common sense revolution approach of Mike Harris. Whereas Brown has said that Canada’s 1991 acid rain treaty inspired him to enter politics. A rather odd entry point to say the least.

Next weekend is Brown’s chance to turn this around, where he’s scheduled to give the keynote speech on the Saturday. This is his last big chance to rally the despondent troops and really give them a cause to focus on these next six months.

Yet, when I recently surveyed a number of insiders and activists on this issue, nobody believes he’ll do it. Inspiration isn’t a word that crops up. They’re expecting more of the same. More lacklustre.

I’m told Brown will soon propose a provincial version of the federal accountability act that first helped bring Stephen Harper to victory. It sounds like good public policy. But will it inspire members and the broader public?

And the convention agenda doesn’t allow for much public airing of grievances. The schedule is made up mostly of social events and campaign prep sessions. There’s only 30 minutes assigned to policy talk.

The leader’s office’s strategy, everyone is told, is to present Brown as an inoffensive alternative to the unpopular Wynne, whose recent approval numbers have been as low as 12%. Their main goal is to avoid the self-inflicted wounds that have damaged previous leaders. They’re determined to not let the Liberals and their media allies frame them as intolerant ogres.

It could be a winning strategy. Liberal operatives are master campaigners. All they need is one wedge issue to exploit during the election and that could destroy the lead the Ontario PCs now enjoy. But if they can’t play that card, Wynne will be left to defend a troubled 15-year record. That’s what sinks the incumbent government.

The problem with all of this is it’s reactive. It’s not proactive. Brown is letting himself be defined by others. And leaders don’t follow. Leaders lead. Whatever one thinks of Wynne’s record, she’s a natural leader. It’s folly to underestimate her.

The other problem is if Brown never presents as a genuine conservative now or during campaign season then he has no mandate to govern as a conservative. The public will expect him to continue something resembling a Liberal legacy, just without Wynne in the driver’s seat.

This could cause a crisis in the Ontario PC ranks worse than what we’re now seeing — turning the party into something resembling what the Alberta PCs were just before the Wildrose split.

Given all of this, can Brown win? Certainly, if only because the numbers are now so in their favour (albeit peaking a little early). All of this grumbling in the ranks will be forgotten a year from now if Brown becomes premier.

Justin Trudeau, at first, made many enemies within the Liberal family. Lawsuits were filed over nomination battles. Former bigwigs in the Chretien / Martin years were left out in the cold. Liberal senators were caught off-guard when they were unceremoniously dumped from caucus.

Then, Trudeau won a landslide majority victory. And everyone loves a winner.

Whatever happens at next weekend’s convention will have little bearing on the sentiments of the electorate, which could all change on a dime over one candidate gaffe or debate exchange six months from now. Brown’s performance will though be a big test that tells us what if any inspiring convictions he plans to offer and whether he can rally the troops.

http://torontosun.com/opinion/.....rick-brown
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The newest instalment ...

Quote:
Who is Patrick Brown? The Ontario PC leader opens up about life, love and his new haircut as a June election looms
He's honed a public image as a hockey fanatic and happy political warrior on the clock from 7 a.m. to midnight many days since winning the job in May 2015. He also has a home full of art from his travels, unwinds with Stranger Things and Veep, doesn’t touch alcohol and loves doting on his nephews.

“You don’t need an image consultant when you have very active sisters and a mother in your life,” says Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown.


By ROB FERGUSONQueen's Park Bureau
Sat., Nov. 25, 2017

When the man who could be Ontario’s next premier needs to escape politics, he heads for his favourite restaurant and sports bar.

But Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown never orders a pint of beer or a cocktail.

Brown stops by because he bought Hooligans in downtown Barrie — which claims the biggest TV screen north of Toronto at 6 metres (20 feet) tall — three years ago with a group of friends when he was the city’s Conservative MP.

“I drive our Diet Coke bill up,” he says with a laugh, given that he’s a lifelong teetotaller — a habit that dates to a Grade 9 promise to his mom.

In a life consumed by politics since he was a teen, more than half his 39 years, the single Brown likes that his pals aren’t interested in the rough and tumble game that pays his annual salary of $180,886.

“In this job you’re so busy it’s nice to be able to force yourself to find time to catch up with good friends who will treat you exactly the same way and don’t want to talk about politics.”

“They want to talk about everything else,” adds Brown, who hosts a PC policy convention Saturday at the Toronto Congress Centre in preparation for the June 7 provincial election.

While he’s the party boss setting a more centrist course to better challenge Premier Kathleen Wynne — an effort not without stumbles — the MPP for Simcoe North is a self-described “small and silent partner” at Hooligans, where the motto is Eat. Drink. Cheer.
https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/11/25/who-is-patrick-brown-the-ontario-pc-leader-opens-up-about-life-love-and-his-new-haircut-as-a-june-election-looms.html


Personally, I detest this side of politics, you understand. But this Patrick Brown is a clever fellow. The reporter imports an air of mockery to the article, because Goody-Goody Two Shoes is just so-oo square.

But what comes through is a hard-working hen-pecked small-town suburban husband who is in, up to his ears, embedded in his family, in both the narrow nuclear sense, but also the wider sense.

This is the kind of man/slave that a woman could really dig the spurs into. It's a devious move for the woman's vote. He doesn't drink but he's still a fun guy around the house. It's a note-perfect play for the woman's vote -- giving the girls that idea that he's a eunuch domestically and a pit bull with the world outside the hearth.

Andrew's version fails by comparison because he doesn't have an ounce of pit bull in his production. It's more "couch potato".

I wonder if we're ready to deal with the fact that men hold up half the sky? Actually, more than half.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

AGAR: Brown's plan to beat Wynne? Be Wynne

Jerry Agar
Jerry Agar



Published:
November 27, 2017


Updated:
November 27, 2017 7:44 PM EST


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
Opinion ›
Columnists ›


AGAR: Brown's plan to beat Wynne? Be Wynne

​​

Premier Kathleen Wynne addresses questions from the public during a town hall meeting in Toronto on Nov. 20. THE CANADIAN PRESS



Over the weekend, Patrick Brown, leader of the PC Party of Ontario, came up with a promise for everybody.

There were 147 promises, to be exact.

You get a promise and you get a promise and you get a promise.

All I wanted was for Brown to come out on stage, point to a picture of Premier Kathleen Wynne and say, “I’m not her.”

But instead, he was sort of her.

By which I mean he promised to lower hydro bills even more, institute a carbon pricing scheme, run a deficit, pay for child care without getting rid of all-day kindergarten babysitting, and go along with increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Brown seems to be trying hard not to look like Mike Harris or Stephen Harper – the real conservatives.

Why make 147 promises? Even when we get married, we basically promise to be good and faithful.


Two promises. That’s it. Not complicated.

But it seems the way to get elected in Ontario is to promise everybody everything.

Fiscal conservatism, sensible prioritizing and paying down debt (significantly) are just not salable concepts in Ontario.

To be fair, Brown did highlight five main promises. Let’s review them.
22.5% lower income taxes for the middle class. That’s good, as the middle class pays a lot in tax, but mostly fails to qualify for assistance to pay for the things they need with what they have after tax.2. 75% refund of child care expenses. Fine, but what about all day kindergarten, which is paid day care for rich people as well as poor? If low-income people are getting day care paid for, they don’t need both, and rich people don’t need either. Besides, the Liberals are already subsidizing day care providers to make up for minimum wage increases. Brown’s policy is just vote buying.3. 12% more off your hydro bill. Brown says he can do that by working our way out of the Green Energy Act and by getting out of contracts where possible, which is an improvement over Wynne. But what about his carbon pricing scheme? He says it will be revenue neutral, but he means to government. Good luck having that work out for you.
4. Largest provincial mental health care commitment in Canadian history. We desperately need better health care in all areas. Wait times are among the worst in the world. But it will cost a lot. That is as good a reason as any to find serious savings elsewhere, but I don’t see Brown doing that. We need priorities set, but like Wynne, Brown is promising the sky. Lah, dee dah, tomorrow’s another day and we’ll pay for it then.

5. First-ever Trust, Integrity, and Accountability Act. Well, that

would be a change.


But then, as James Wallace wrote in the Toronto Sun, “the Liberals are a party that has wallowed in scandal, wasted billions canceling gas plants for political gain, billions more overpaying for self-serving green schemes, been embroiled in corruption proceedings, whose premier refers to broken promises as stretch goals and has, like no government in recent history, left ruin and hardship in its wake.”

So even if Brown’s policies are Wynne-like, a decade and a half of the Liberals is more than enough.

It is just sad to see that no one seems to believe fiscal conservatism can win in Ontario.

What can Brown do for you?

http://torontosun.com/opinion/.....e-be-wynne
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More on the media coverage.

Andrew Coyne is not impressed.

http://nationalpost.com/opinio.....ntario-pcs

He ignores the fact that the party tried staring hard-nosed austerity in the face in the last election, and got burned. That has to be factored in. Realism seems to say to me that Brown has to cut government expenditures, and make the province an attractive place to invest.

These public debts are never paid off. They become bearable if you can get a certain level of growth in the economy for a decade or so. Then the proportion of the debt to the provincial product will improve, and we can borrow again.

To me, it means lowering taxes in important ways, and trying (even though failing) to cut government expenditures by a matching amount. There are major changes, perhaps going back to class sizes of 36+, as we did back when kids learned how to spell and didn't need a calculator to tell you what 7 x 8 was.

I just pull that example out of the air. That's the kind of cost-cutting changes we need to contemplate, and the truth is, they're probably impossible until we are in a crisis.

From the media coverage angle, Coyne is as negative as possible with this column, and all he's really accusing Brown of is being bland. Jayzuz, compared to the woolly-haired lesbian hag he opposes, bland is like vaseline. It's good when you need it.

That part lets Brown's team shine. They have made him a hard guy to besmirch. It may be entirely imagery, but they have managed to make bland look pretty good. Every strong commitment is hedged, limited, kept 'reasonable'. It's all written anticipating a line of counter-attack. That's where it departs from the Common Sense Revolution, which was on newsprint, and had numbers.

Coyne seems to be a bit fussy and cranky, like it's his job to find out what's wrong with policies. He is treating the platform like it's a business plan. Fair enough. But it's really a sales brochure. It may look like something you'd get about a timeshare in Cozumel.

I share his concern about where the money is going to come from. I am actually hoping whatever he says is a lie. But what his platform, and the document, does say to the electorate is: Don't worry, I won't do what Hudak was going to do! And Andrew is helping him to make him seem like a diminished threat. Andrew wants us to pull on a hair shirt.

Real conservatives have to understand the 905 type of ridings have a lot of people in them who benefit from the government's racial and gender policies. How many visible minority couples with a couple of kids have a mom working in some government service or government-regulated part of the economy? ... while hubby goes to work with a lunch bag and has his name sewn on to his blue shirt along with the company logo?

Good for them. They should take advantage of their opportunities. But it means real conservatives have to be careful about cutting back the size of government if they want to win. It's a thing to do as gradually as you can. And it's probably prudent not to mention it. It's just a fact.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2017 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EDITORIAL: Nov. 29 — No hidden agenda, Brown's a Red Tory


More from Lorrie Goldstein



Published:
November 28, 2017


Updated:
November 28, 2017 6:33 PM EST


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
Opinion ›
Editorials ›


Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown.

Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown’s “People’s Guarantee” election platform is a strategic political document that helps him in two key ways.

First, by releasing it seven months before the vote, Brown has kept his promise that Ontarians would have plenty of advance notice about what a government under his leadership would do.

Second, Brown has defined himself before his opponents could — as a red Tory in the tradition of former Ontario premier Bill Davis, not a “common sense revolutionary” like former premier Mike Harris.

This has effectively blunted attempts by Wynne and her union allies to portray him as a Canadian Donald Trump with a “hidden agenda.”

On issues ranging from tax cuts for the middle class, to financial help for young families, to lowering hydro bills, to almost non-existent debt reduction, Brown’s platform could have been written by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

It could almost have been written by Wynne.

Not only will Brown keep Wynne’s 25% reduction in electricity rates — which he denounced when it was passed as fiscal flimflammery based on massive borrowing — he’s promising to reduce them 12% more.

Nowhere in Brown’s 147 promises is there anything for social conservatives.

For example, no mention of reforming Wynne’s sex-ed curriculum, which Brown floated when he was running for PC leader.


To his credit, Brown has tackled the third rail of politics for Conservatives — man-made climate change — saying he will cancel Wynne’s $6 billion cap-and-trade political slush fund and replace it with a revenue neutral carbon tax, verified by the auditor general, based on Trudeau’s compulsory carbon prices.

Brown’s promise to quit after four years if he hasn’t fulfilled five key promises is unnecessarily gimmicky. What if he wins a minority and the Liberals and NDP combine forces to stop him, for example?

We don’t think Brown is being forthright enough with voters about the economic pain Ontarians will have to endure to undo the economic damage caused by 14 years of Liberal rule, that has left the province as the world’s most indebted sub-sovereign borrower.

That said, Brown is clearly preferable to the politically corrupt Liberals, who drove us into that ditch by repeatedly doubling down on fiscally reckless, billion-dollar boondoggles like their green energy disaster.

http://torontosun.com/opinion/.....a-red-tory
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Selling Brown as a Red Tory is an interesting approach.
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Defining Patrick -- the swamp strikes first

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