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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6501
Reputation: 234.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Third-party election ad spending limits in Ontario applauded


More from Jane Stevenson



Published:
November 4, 2017


Updated:
November 4, 2017 6:34 PM EST


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
News ›
Ontario ›



Premier Kathleen Wynne defends her government in the Legislature regarding the Ontario Auditors General special report on the Fair Hydro Plan in Toronto, Ont. on Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017. The anti-Tory Working Families Coalition kicked in $2.5 million that was spent on ads to help Wynne get elected in 2014.Craig Robertson/Toronto Sun)



A University of Toronto professor says limits on third-party ad spending leading up to the next Ontario election is “good” and will have an impact, but to what extent remains to be seen.

For the first time ever, both special interest groups, known as third parties, and Ontario’s political parties will be limited on how much money they can spend on election advertising as of Nov. 9. That’s about six months before the provincial election is expected to happen on June 7.

Under the new rules, third parties can spend up to $600,000 in the six months before the election is called and $100,000 during, while political parties are restricted to $1 million in the six-month, pre-election period.

In 2014, third parties spent $8.64 million which translated to 17 per cent of all election ad spending. One of the biggest spenders was the anti-Tory Working Families Coalition, which spent $2.5 million with some of the largest unions in the province kicking in funds.

“It goes without saying it’s going to have an effect,” said U of T Marketing Professor David Soberman. “But now if you’re asking if it’s going to have an effect on the outcome, a lot of that depends upon the distribution of third-party advertising across the parties. And often there are some parties that benefit more from third-party spending than the others. Like, for example, if all the third-party advertising in Ontario was unions and nobody else spoke well then you have a certain perspective.’


Until this year , Ontario was the only province in Canada to control third-party election advertising without putting limits on it.

Knowing the restrictions were about to kick in, the Tories, Liberals and a few third parties have put out ads recently.

http://torontosun.com/news/pro.....-applauded
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4271
Reputation: 242.2
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon Nov 06, 2017 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know who the third party is? Anybody with an opinion different from the officially tolerated parties. Others will not be able to use the megaphone to broadcast their thoughts.

What do the people control, in this supposedly democratic nation?

We aren't allowed to pick our own candidates without being censored. Public funds are used to deceive us, and our 'freedom of information' is a cruel joke. The courts are granting absolution to party grunts who wipe the hard drives clear, even contrary to law. It's a farce.

We even have to be careful of what we say, including what pronouns we use. If we talk frankly about immigration, for example, we could be charged with a hate crime.

The media are hostile to conservative views, as distinct from the party that bears the name Conservative. So no group is allowed to be a gad-fly?

More and more the law is used to create and support injustice.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6501
Reputation: 234.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this group is clearly willing to claim anything no matter how bizarre that claim is , is brown like trump ? that seems a little far fetched , is the UK currently in chaos because they voted for brexit ? doesn't seem to be , but reality doesn't mean anything to these unions . the Ontario liberals also campaigned heavily on " change " in 2003 so they can hardly be upset the opposition is now using it against them )



In attack ad, Working Families union coalition likens PC’s Brown to Trump


Working Families claims Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown would bring the same “chaos” to Ontario that Donald Trump brought to the U.S. and Brexit brought to the U.K.


Working Families puts out new ad against Patrick Brown called "Change."


By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Wed., Nov. 8, 2017


Trump. Brexit. Brown?

The Working Families coalition of unions claims Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown would bring the same “chaos” to Ontario that Donald Trump’s election triggered in the U.S. and the Brexit vote brought to Britain.

In its latest attack ad aimed at Brown, the group tries to tie the world’s two most politically tumultuous events of 2016 to the June 7, 2018 provincial election.

“The United States voted for change,” opens the 30-second spot before cutting to a clip of Fox News’ Shepard Smith from Nov. 8, 2016.

“Donald Trump is the president of the United States,” intones Smith.


As ominous music plays, a warning appears on the screen: “Now they’re suffering the consequences.


Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown would bring the same “chaos” to Ontario that Donald Trump did to the U.S., the union group's ad claims.

Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown would bring the same “chaos” to Ontario that Donald Trump did to the U.S., the union group's ad claims. (Dave Chidley / THE CANADIAN PRESS file photo)


“The U.K. voted for change,” the ad continues.

The BBC’s David Dimbleby is then shown delivering the stunning news from the June 23, 2016 referendum that led to Britain beginning its withdrawal from the European Union.


“The British people have spoken and the answer is: ‘we’re out,’ ” says Dimbleby.

“Brexit is creating chaos,” the commercial notes.

“Now Patrick Brown promises change,” the ad says against the backdrop of photos of Brown.

“Patrick Brown: opposed marriage equality . . . called dishonest by his own party . . . delay minimum wage hikes . . . voted against working families . . . a bad change for Ontario.”

This part of the ad segment refers to Brown’s votes as a Conservative MP in Ottawa, problems within the PC party over candidate nominations, and his concern about Premier Kathleen Wynne’s plan to raise the $11.60 minimum wage to $15 in 2019.

Working Families has helped the Liberals win the past four Ontario elections with attack advertising blitzes on the Conservatives.

The group has three commercials in circulation now.

While the first two are being broadcast on TV, this latest Trump-Brexit spot is designed for Facebook and other social media platforms.

Working Families’ Patrick Dillon, business manager and secretary treasurer of the Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario, said the ads are paid for by public- and private-sector unions, including Unifor.

Earlier spots portrayed Brown as a shifting cartoon weathervane, whose views on key issues are constantly changing and as someone who cannot be trusted.

The Conservatives, who aired their own pre-election ads blasting Wynne’s Liberals as “politically corrupt,” have shrugged off the unions’ attacks.

While the Tories have long accused Working Families of being a Liberal front group, the Ontario Court of Appeal rejected that claim in 2012

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/11/08/in-attack-ad-working-families-union-coalition-likens-pcs-brown-to-trump.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6501
Reputation: 234.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the poll is claiming the attack ads hurt the pc's although there numbers from this month to last month are virtually the same , the liberals also didn't go up and stayed the same % , only party to go up was greens oddly )


Poll suggests union attack ads on Brown are taking a toll


An onslaught of union-funded attack ads aimed at Patrick Brown appears to be hurting the Progressive Conservatives with female voters, a new poll suggests.


Ontario Conservative Leader Patrick Brown has a higher approval rating than Premier Kathleen Wynne, a new poll finds. NDP Leader Andrea Horwath had the highest rating of the three party leaders. (Peter Power / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Fri., Nov. 10, 2017



An onslaught of union-funded attack ads aimed at Patrick Brown appears to be hurting the Progressive Conservatives with female voters, a new poll suggests.

The blitz of negative commercials from public- and private-sector unions seems to have tightened an already close race in the June 7, 2018 election.

The Campaign Research survey shows Brown’s PCs at 35 per cent, Premier Kathleen Wynne’s Liberals at 32 per cent, Andrea Horwath’s New Democrats at 23 per cent, and the Greens led by Mike Schreiner at 9 per cent.

“The ‘third-party’ ads are all targetted toward women and it appears to be having a strong effect on (female) voters,” Campaign Research CEO Eli Yufest said Thursday.

Using an online panel of 1,263 Ontario voters, Campaign Research polled between Monday and Thursday. A probability sample of that size would have a margin of error of plus or minus 2.8 percentage points, 19 out of 20 times.


In last month’s tracking poll, the Tories were at 36 per cent, the Liberals 32 per cent, the NDP 25 per cent, and the Greens at 7 per cent.

Yufest said the “most significant” change in the November survey is the effect of the attack advertising on Brown’s personal approval ratings.

The spots are by Working Ontario Women (WOW), bankrolled by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and Working Families, a coalition of public- and private-sector unions that includes Unifor.



Working Families puts out new ad against Patrick Brown called "Change."




They blast the rookie PC leader for his “pro-life” voting record as an MP in former prime minister Stephen Harper’s Conservative government between 2006 and 2015 and question his claim of now being “pro-choice.”

This month’s poll found Brown has a 21 per cent approval, 29 per cent disapproval, with 50 per cent having no opinion.

In September, he had 25 per cent approval, 25 per cent disapproval, and 50 per cent didn’t know.

But among female voters, Brown’s approval rating has dropped to 15 per cent from 22 per cent a month ago and to 27 per cent from 28 per cent among males.

Wynne’s personal approval ratings remain the lowest of the three major party leaders. She has a rock-bottom 16 per cent approval rating, 65 per cent disapproval, and 19 per cent weren’t sure.

The premier is at 16 per cent approval among women and 16 per cent among men. Last month, she had 16 per cent approval among female voters and 23 per cent among males. In total, she was at 19 per cent approval, 64 per cent disapproval, and 17 per cent didn’t know.

Yufest said even with that dramatic drop among male voters, Wynne’s flat-lining 65 per cent disapproval rating suggests Tory attack ads —accusing her of leading a “politically corrupt” Liberal party — had relatively little overall impact.

Horwath was at 31 per cent approval, 17 per cent disapproval, and 52 per cent weren’t sure. She boasts a 33 per cent approval among male voters and 28 per cent among females. That compares to 35 per cent for men and 35 per cent for women last month.

In October, she had a 35 per cent approval, 17 per cent disapproval, and 48 per cent had no opinion.

The Conservatives are concerned about the potentially corrosive effect of the unions’ assault against Brown.

On Thursday, Tory Deputy Leader Steve Clark and two other PC MPPs held a Queen’s Park press conference to complain about the “cozy ties” between the SEIU, which is paying for the WOW ads, and the Liberals.

“We knew all along that taking down a politically corrupt party would get ugly,” said Clark, noting the SEIU would benefit from the government’s quietly announced new “secret agency” to deliver home-care services.

But WOW’s Megan Lorius said the Tory leader cannot run from his votes on Parliament Hill.

“As a career politician, he has a long-record of voting against women and families,” said Lorius, adding Brown “is against us.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/11/10/poll-suggests-union-attack-ads-on-brown-are-taking-a-toll.html
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6501
Reputation: 234.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New provincial election advertising rules now in effect

Third parties can spend $600,000 in months leading up to campaign, $100,000 during it

CBC News Posted: Nov 14, 2017 6:01 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 14, 2017 6:01 AM ET

The next provincial election isn't for another 285 days, but new rules are now in place for election advertising spending.

The next provincial election isn't until six months from now, but new advertising rules have already taken effect.

They restrict how much unions, corporations and other groups that aren't political parties can spend on ads between now and the vote in June.

The new limits cap advertising spending at $600,000 between now and the election, and $100,000 during the campaign.

During the 2015 Sudbury byelection, the United Steelworkers Union spent $24,000 on ads, including an attack radio spot targeted at NDP MP turned Liberal candidate Glenn Thibeault.

Mark Rowlandson, assistant to the national director for USW, says the union hasn't decided how it will approach the 2018 election.

But he adds USW welcomes the new restrictions, which also ban any donations to parties from unions or corporations.

"Elections should be publicly supported and limits on union and corrupt and institutional donations are a good thing," he said.

The Working Families Coalition spent $2.5 million on ads during the 2014 election. The Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation was one of several unions to contribute to the coalition.

James Clyke
James Clyke, is the local Sudbury president of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation. (Jenifer Norwell/CBC)

President of Sudbury-based District 3 James Clyke says the new rules will force unions to focus more on engaging their members.

"The less financial contribution you can make, the more actual feet on the ground you actually need," he said.

"That gets more people educated about the issues and I think that would be helpful."

Brock University labour studies professor Larry Savage says the new limits will make TV ads virtually impossible and says most groups will likely target your Facebook feed instead.

He says one ironic thing is that the Liberal government that is now restricting union advertising has benefited the most from spots that were generally pointed at Progressive Conservative candidates.

"Usually the public considers politicians do things in their own self interest and it looks like this might have been a self-inflicted wound, but we won't know until the election."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4398059
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4271
Reputation: 242.2
votes: 8

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's hard for me to believe that this government, as desperate as it is to win the next election, would bring in election rules that would level the playing field.

It makes me hesitate, waiting for the punch-line to this joke. Maybe not.

It seems like one of the effect will be to cap pre-campaign advertising. They see it, no doubt, as a part of the campaign that benefits Brown. I don't know how it limits unions. My suspicion is that the NDP isn't too happy either.

Question: Does that mean I am going to have to register to get an oar in on anything that is happening in the whole period between election campaigns?

The key part of the McGuinty coalition is the civil service unions. The school teachers are big contributors. You watch -- they will involve their students in their campaigns. They obviously involve them in their propaganda already.

But there are others unions as well, and their contributions may be small in terms of their direct contributions to the Liberal party -- who have been shown to have been patsies at the negotiating table. But they will be huge in terms of what they contribute to the Working Families Coalition.

What do the old-line trade unions do? The civil service unions have ways to cash in on their contributions. But the industrial unions don't seem to have much heft. And Liberals don't seem to care about industry or they'd have been smarter about their electrical power decisions.

This is the thing. Rules draw clear lines between acceptable and proscribed behaviour. Slime simply oozes towards the lowest point. So rules aren't a very effective way to control a slime problem. Particularly when it's the slime that's enforcing the rules.

I suspect they have something up their sleeves.

(It's just a metaphor, TC. Why don't you ooze outta here?)
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6501
Reputation: 234.5
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
It's hard for me to believe that this government, as desperate as it is to win the next election, would bring in election rules that would level the playing field.

It makes me hesitate, waiting for the punch-line to this joke. Maybe not.

It seems like one of the effect will be to cap pre-campaign advertising. They see it, no doubt, as a part of the campaign that benefits Brown. I don't know how it limits unions. My suspicion is that the NDP isn't too happy either.

Question: Does that mean I am going to have to register to get an oar in on anything that is happening in the whole period between election campaigns?

The key part of the McGuinty coalition is the civil service unions. The school teachers are big contributors. You watch -- they will involve their students in their campaigns. They obviously involve them in their propaganda already.

But there are others unions as well, and their contributions may be small in terms of their direct contributions to the Liberal party -- who have been shown to have been patsies at the negotiating table. But they will be huge in terms of what they contribute to the Working Families Coalition.

What do the old-line trade unions do? The civil service unions have ways to cash in on their contributions. But the industrial unions don't seem to have much heft. And Liberals don't seem to care about industry or they'd have been smarter about their electrical power decisions.

This is the thing. Rules draw clear lines between acceptable and proscribed behaviour. Slime simply oozes towards the lowest point. So rules aren't a very effective way to control a slime problem. Particularly when it's the slime that's enforcing the rules.

I suspect they have something up their sleeves.

(It's just a metaphor, TC. Why don't you ooze outta here?)



the rules changes were brought in after the liberals were accused of questionable fundraising tactics and perhaps they felt a need at the time to crack down on others seen as using the rules to there advantage


they may gave also feared anti wynne/liberals 3rd party groups would appear in 2018 and run ads against her ? so they figured best way to prevent that from happening would be smaller limits on 3rd parties


but the $100,000 limit during the actual election means they won't likely be able to run tv ads this election and forced to use facebook or cheaper radio ads instead
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Union funded group plans to run ads in Ontario

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