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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6510
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:11 am    Post subject: fixing Phoenix pay system could cost $1 billion Reply with quote

( news that it could cost a $billion dollars to fix the troubled phoenix pay system in Ottawa )


Minister: Fixing Phoenix pay system could cost $1B



Rachel Aiello, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@rachaiello
.
Published Sunday, November 12, 2017 7:00AM EST


OTTAWA – The minister responsible for the problem-plagued Phoenix pay system can't guarantee that the tab to get things under control won’t hit a billion dollars.

Public Services and Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough says she can’t promise that taxpayers won’t be on the hook for a sky high bill to tame the payroll program that’s been smouldering for years.

On CTV's Question Period, host Evan Solomon asked Qualtrough if the cost to fix the public service pay system could hit a billion dollars. Her response was: "I hope not."





Phoenix pay protest
Public servants protest over problems with the Phoenix pay system outside the Office of the Prime Minister and Privy Council in Ottawa on Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017. (Justin Tang/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

"I can’t guarantee that, no," she continued.

The Phoenix system, initiated by the previous Conservative government in 2009, was meant to streamline the payroll of public servants and save more than $70-million annually. Already, the government has planned to spend $400-million trying to fix it, including hiring more staff and setting up satellite pay centres in Gatineau, Montreal, Winnipeg, and Shawinigan, to try to chip away at the pile of remaining cases. It cost $309.5 million to implement the system.

The initial promise from the department was to have the backlog of problematic pay cases resolved by Oct. 31, 2016.

As of Oct. 18, there were 265,000 cases of employee pay issues left to be resolved, and the department says more than half of public servants who get paid through the system are still experiencing "some form of pay issue."

Qualtrough couldn’t say when the system—created by IBM—will be paying public servants correctly and on time, though she anticipates the number of cases left to be triaged will go down in the New Year.

"I just feel horribly that we’re not able to pay our public servants promptly and accurately every two weeks, and it keeps me awake at night to tell you the truth," the minister said.

'There was really no choice'

Though the previous government got the ball rolling on the new pay program, the Liberal government has taken considerable heat from the opposition and the public service unions for making the call to forge ahead with its rollout, even though an independent consulting group’s report found that concerns about the success of rollout were ignored.

Qualtrough said, when it came time for her government to make the call on whether to give the go-ahead, "there was really no choice," but refuted that they knowingly implemented a system that would cause so much suffering for thousands of federal workers.

"The choice wasn’t between the new system and an old system, the choice was between the new system and no system. We didn’t have pay compensation advisers, they had all been fired. The Conservatives had de-commissioned the old system… at that point the choice had been made. We had to keep going. We had to pay people," she said.

Qualtrough said the system as it is does have "bugs" and highlighted the complexity of customizing the software for the intricacies of federal pay, but said they’re working it out.

"It’s just taking too long," she said.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3672663
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6510
Reputation: 234.7
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A year after Phoenix was to be fixed, more than half of public servants still having pay problems




Rachel Aiello, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@rachaiello
.
Published Wednesday, November 1, 2017 3:23PM EDT
Last Updated Wednesday, November 1, 2017 4:13PM EDT

OTTAWA – The number of backlogged public servant pay cases due to issues with the Phoenix pay system has grown from last month, with 265,000 pay transactions now past due.

Yesterday marked the one year anniversary of when the federal government promised to have Phoenix system fixed. The government now says more than half of public servants are still experiencing “some form of pay issue.”

Wednesday’s update to Public Services “pay dashboard,” which is tracking the progress on fixing the problem-plagued payroll system for federal workers, shows an increase of 8,000 cases from September.



Phoenix Pay
As of Sept. 20, there were 257,000 cases of employee pay issues left to be resolved.

The initial promise from the department was to have the backlog of problematic pay cases resolved by Oct. 31, 2016.

The government says the increase is the result of continuing to deal with the influx of collective agreements, which has been "more complex and time consuming than initially anticipated,” the update on the website reads.

“It’s not going to be resolved overnight,” Public Services and Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough told reporters Wednesday after question period. “We have to stabilize this system. I’m very hopeful that in the new year the numbers will go down,” she said.

The Phoenix system, initiated by the previous Conservative government in 2009, was meant to streamline the payroll of public servants and save more than $70-million annually. Already, the government has planned to spend $400-million over two years trying to fix it, including setting up hiring more staff and setting up satellite pay centres to try to chip away at the pile of remaining cases.

Qualtrough said she is “absolutely committed” to the Phoenix pay system, and still believes the problems within it are fixable.

“It’s not like there’s another option waiting out there…There will come a time in the future where people will be paid promptly, accurately, and on time.”

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3659222
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 4273
Reputation: 242.3
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How can these things happen, and there not be an execution or two? Or at least some high profile firings, where the former office-holder is dragged through the public humiliation of a perp walk, cameras rolling?

Is this reminiscent of how the Mcguinty's gang handled the problem of gas-fired power plants that turned out to be too near the fine homes of the squires of Oakville?

A $billion here, a $billion there ... it happens.

Be forewarned. You might ask -- if the whole civil service were paid by cheques, hand written by old priests with quill pens, would it cost $billion dollars to issue them? Just musing ...
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fixing Phoenix pay system could cost $1 billion

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