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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Multiple candidates in Sturgeon River-Parkland race


Sep 27, 2017 admin Local News, Morinville, National News, Sturgeon County 


Above: Conservative Party of Canada members selected Dane Lloyd as their candidate in the by-election on Sunday. – Morinville News file photo

by Morinville News Staff

Amid a municipal election, signs have been popping up for a different race – the by-election created when Sturgeon River-Parkland MP Rona Ambrose stepped down in the summer.

Ambrose’s party selected their victor on Sunday, and Dane Lloyd will serve as the Conservative Party of Canada’s candidate for the Oct. 23 election.

Joining Lloyd on the campaign trail is Brian Gold for the Liberals, Ernest Chauvet for the Christian Heritage Party, Shawna Gawreluck for the NDP, and Stephen Wutzke for the National Advancement Party of Canada.

Morinville News has not been able to confirm any additional candidates for the by-election.

Candidate websites and social media can be found below:

Conservatives – Dane Lloyd
http://danelloyd.ca
https://www.facebook.com/daneforMP/

Liberals – Brian Gold
https://www.liberal.ca/sturgeon-river-parkland-liberals-nominate-brian-gold-as-new-team-trudeau-candidate/
https://www.facebook.com/votebriangold/


NDP – Shawna Gawreluck
https://www.facebook.com/ShawnaGNDP/

CHP – Ernest Chauvet
https://www.chp.ca/candidates/sturgeon-river-parkland

NAPOC – Stephen Wutzke
http://www.nationaladvancement.ca
https://m.facebook.com/NationalAdvancement/


http://morinvillenews.com/2017.....land-race/
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the big crisis facing the by election might be finding poll workers ? oddly enough there seems to be a shortage )


Elections Canada scrambles to fill jobs for Edmonton-area federal byelection

By Emma Graney
First posted: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 06:14 PM MDT



A perfect political storm has left Elections Canada scrambling to find poll workers for the byelection in Rona Ambrose’s former seat.

The Sturgeon River-Parkland byelection to replace the longtime Conservative MP is set for Oct. 23.

Advance polls begin next week, but they clash with the region’s municipal election.

That has left the federal elections body desperate to fill jobs in Sturgeon River-Parkland’s 200 polling divisions.


Elections Canada spokesman John Enright said with each division needing at least two workers, there will be a spot for anyone who reaches out.

Enright isn’t panicking yet, but workers need to be trained before the advance polls.

With Thanksgiving between now and then, he said, and all attention on municipal voting, he’s concerned the federal election is flying under the radar.

Not only that, he worries most people who usually work polls have most likely signed up for shifts in the capital region municipal elections.

“We’re still on the asphalt, but the gravel is coming up quickly,” he said.

Poll workers get paid for their work and training, and can earn up to $750 during advance polls.

The elections body always manages to get it done, Enright said, but he encouraged anyone interested to reach out to the electoral officer in Stony Plain or head to the Elections Canada website.


http://www.edmontonsun.com/201.....byelection
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there also must now be a by election in Gerry Ritz's sask riding as he has officially left )

Battlefords-Lloydminster byelection required as Gerry Ritz vacates seat

Ritz announced his retirement in August

CBC News Posted: Oct 05, 2017 9:49 AM CT| Last Updated: Oct 05, 2017 9:49 AM CT

Ritz's former seat for the riding of Battlefords-Lloydminster is now vacant and a byelection will need to be called by April 2018.


A byelection will be held for the seat of former Saskatchewan MP Gerry Ritz sometime before spring.

Ritz, who held the riding of Battlefords-Lloydminster since 1997, announced his retirement at the end of August. His retirement took effect Oct. 2.

Elections Canada said a byelection must be called between Oct. 14 and April 1, 2018.


Byelection periods must last at least 36 days, which means the earliest date the byelection could be held would be Nov. 20.

The former Minister of Agriculture for the Harper government had been under fire in recent weeks after he referred to Liberal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna as "climate Barbie" on Twitter.

The tweet was later deleted and Ritz issued an apology.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4339295
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the new ndp leader campaigned in the riding , his first such visit during any election )


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh campaigns in Quebec riding ahead of federal byelection

Jagmeet Singh, Gisele Dallaire, Guy Caron
NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, centre, responds to reporters questions during a campaign visit for local candidate Gisele Dallaire, left, Tuesday, October 10, 2017 in Alma, Quebec. NDP MP Guy Caron, right, looks on. (Jacques Boissinot / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


Mylene Crete, The Canadian Press
Published Tuesday, October 10, 2017 9:13AM EDT
Last Updated Tuesday, October 10, 2017 5:25PM EDT


ALMA, Que. -- NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh says he's not interested in getting Quebecers to accept his beard or turban but is more interested in having them share his political values.

Singh, who recently won the NDP leadership, has been dogged by questions over his electability in Quebec due to his religious headwear.

A practising Sikh, Singh wears a turban in public to cover his hair.



"I don't want to convince people to accept my turban or my beard -- that's not my goal," he told reporters in Alma, about 250 kilometres north of Quebec City.

"My goal is to show that I share the same progressive, social-democratic values."

A recent poll indicated one out of two Quebecers wouldn't vote for someone who wore a turban.

Singh arrived in Alma on Monday night to support his candidate, Gisele Dallaire, in an Oct. 23 byelection in the Lac-Saint-Jean riding

The trip to the region is his first to the province outside of Montreal.

He did not go unnoticed.

"Look at the turban!" one citizen said in a restaurant as Singh strolled on the sidewalk outside, followed by a gaggle of journalists.

Singh spent Tuesday touring businesses and organizations in the region and met voters in a shopping centre.

Other federal party leaders are expected to visit the Quebec riding in the coming days: Bloc Quebecois Leader Martine Ouellet and Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer will visit the riding later this week, while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected sometime next week.

Lac-Saint-Jean was held by former Conservative Denis Lebel, who defeated Dallaire in 2015.

Voters will also go to the polls in Alberta on Oct. 23 to replace former Conservative interim leader Rona Ambrose in Sturgeon River-Parkland.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3625813
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the sense seems to be that the conservatives are vulnerable in this riding , at least that be my guess based on all the other party leaders visiting the riding suddenly after having never been there in years )


Bloc and Conservative Leaders in Lac-Saint-Jean

Posted today at 8:22 am
Updated at 9:21 am



Poster announcing the by-election
By-elections to be held on October 23 Photo: Radio-Canada


The leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, Andrew Scheer, is in Lac-Saint-Jean until Saturday, while Bloc Québécois leader Martine Ouellet will also be in the riding, but only Thursday.



The two political leaders will campaign with their respective candidates in the October 23 federal election.


The conservative leader, Andrew Scheer.

The conservative leader, Andrew Scheer. Photo: Radio-Canada / Raphaël Bouvier-Auclair

The conservative leader accompanies his candidate Rémy Leclerc who campaigned in Saint-Félicien on Thursday.


Martine Ouellet, leader of the Bloc Québécois

Martine Ouellet, leader of the Bloc Québécois Photo: La Presse canadienne / Jacques Boissinot

For her part, the Bloc leader is visiting the riding all day with his party's candidate, Marc Maltais.

She will also participate in a rally of activists in the early evening in Alma with PQ and Bloc MPs to support the Bloc candidate in this by-election.

Earlier this week, the leader of the New Democratic Party, Jagmeet Singh, was campaigning alongside


http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nou.....um=twitter
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The expectation for Lac-Saint-Jean should be a Liberal Victory.
They are still flying high in Quebec and the NDP support seems to be shifting in that direction.

It could very well be a 50%+ win for the LPC
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:


The leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, Andrew Scheer, is in Lac-Saint-Jean until Saturday, while Bloc Québécois leader Martine Ouellet will also be in the riding, but only Thursday.

The two political leaders will campaign with their respective candidates in the October 23 federal election.

For her part, the Bloc leader is visiting the riding all day with his party's candidate, Marc Maltais.

She will also participate in a rally of activists in the early evening in Alma with PQ and Bloc MPs to support the Bloc candidate in this by-election.

Earlier this week, the leader of the New Democratic Party, Jagmeet Singh, was campaigning alongside
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nou.....um=twitter


Where's Bernier? Just consider how things could change in Quebec if he were the leader! Or the deputy leader? (He's the key for Conservatives in Quebec!)

Why isn't Scheer campaigning arm in arm with Bernier? Stopping the Liberals from ever again capturing Quebec as an electoral fortress, as it was from 1945 through 1980, should be priority one for all the other parties.

Low energy Andrew seems to think he's exciting enough by himself. But he's not. Maybe he'll show us something soon, but otherwise ... he should face up to the fact that he needs all the help that he can get. It's a big job.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am still of the opinion that Bernier is the roadblock here.

Its not logical for Scheer to not want him involved and in the inner circle;
At a minimum to keep him busy and close to Scheer and his team
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree. it isn't logical, but that doesn't foreclose the possibility that Scheer could be motivated by personal pique. Maybe he even has a point.

But it's up the Scheer to make it work.

Look at his situation. He's always had it easy in his political career. He was a surprise winner of his seat in the first place, and shortly after he became speaker -- all on the basis of French Immersion. I don't know if the speaker's post is a place where you learn the nitty-gritty of backroom politics but I don't think he's dealt with the favours politicians swap, for example. Hes never been fighting for budget and agenda space, for example.

He ran for the leadership and only narrowly edged out Bernier, who led for the whole race. Scheer is as much 'the creature of the weird voting system they brought in as the will of the membership. He has the comfort of knowing that he's the 13th favourite choice of more people than his nearest rival (by less than 1% of the points that votes turned into).

What that did was cut out all the deal-making and working towards a common platform that the membership support.

Ask yourself -- should the party have this kind of leadership voting system again?

====================================

Under the circumstances, Scheer should take the initiative.

When I make these points about a joint-leadership of the party, it's for the good of the party, not just now, but down the road. I am convinced that, for this country to work, we need a political party that is organized in such a way to make that happen. PCs don't like to hear this but the Liberal Party that Lester Pearson turned over to Pierre was a helluva political party, and it worked to solve Canada's problems through a conscription crisis. a world war and a depression, and keep it together.

That party not only rotated leadership, but gave near veto-power to a deputy leader of the other linguistic group. They were founded as an explicit partnership of two different elites, one in English-speaking Canada, and the other in French-speaking Canada. Right from the start, the Liberal Party was a conversation between two elite groups, very conscious of the fact that their electoral success required each group to respect their partners.

Look at the sequence ... King had LaPointe, then the leadership rotated to
St. Laurent, who's deputy was CD Howe ... then it rotated to Pearson, and one of his problems was he could not recruit a lieutenant. Separatism had started, for one thing, and Diefenbaker picked his recruits off, one by one. Guy Favreau resigned because he had bought some furniture and never been billed for it. A gift or a bribe? But, by the standards of the day, Favreau couldn't be Finance Minister.

Then came Trudeau, and he killed the collaboration of two peoples theme. Why? Because probably the thing he was most excellent at was speaking both English and French like a native. He thought he didn't need an Anglo deputy. In fact within a short time, all the old Liberal Angos of heft had left the party. Even Turner, the one being groomed to replace Trudeau under the old system.

Ever since, all the political parties have restricted their leadership search to residents of Quebec, or the graduates of French immersion programs!

It was like politics were hijacked. My thesis is that French Canada felt cut off from the set of political relations that were embodied in the pre-Trudeau Liberal Party. Only now are they coming out from using the Bloc as their way of not being Liberal, and to keep the federal government at arm's length (as much as possible).

Now's the time. Quebec is a political orphan at the moment, and we are not mobilizing Bernier. I think you are wrong about Bernier, btw. I don't know, but I think he understands, as Scheer may not, that power in Quebec is littered on the ground, only waiting for a true ... I say, TRUE guardian to negotiate honestly ... and pick it up.

The problem of Canada is that it needs a party where the people of 10 provinces work it out as two founding peoples. That's the political challenge of the country, and it takes a particular kind of party to provide secure and stable government. Which is enough.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A guide to the upcoming byelections that have Scheer, Singh out campaigning

Jagmeet Singh and Andrew Scheer



Rachel Aiello, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@rachaiello
.
Published Friday, October 13, 2017 10:37AM EDT


OTTAWA – The Conservative and New Democrat party leaders have been out on the hustings, with two federal byelections around the corner.

New MPs are set to be named in the Sturgeon River-Parkland, Alta., and Lac-Saint-Jean, Que., ridings when constituents head to the polls on Oct. 23.

Parliament has been on pause this week, with MPs in their ridings for a thanksgiving break, and that’s given Conservative leader Andrew Scheer some time to hit the campaign trail. NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, though not impacted by the House of Commons sitting schedule, as he doesn’t have a seat, has also been campaigning this week.


Scheer was in Alberta on Tuesday where he participated in an event in the riding where the Conservatives are running Dane Lloyd as their candidate. He then travelled to Quebec where he campaigned for the Conservative candidate Rémy Leclerc.

Singh was in the Quebec riding on Tuesday where he campaigned with NDP candidate Gisele Dallaire. The NDP say though Singh is about to launch his national tour where he will visit Alberta, it’s not expected he will make it there ahead of the byelection.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, has been in in Mexico City and Washington, D.C., this week. His office was unable to confirm if he has plans to visit either riding in the weeks ahead.


Here is a look at the upcoming Oct. 23 elections:


Sturgeon River-Parkland, Alberta:

This byelection is being held to fill Rona Ambrose’s seat. She formally resigned as a Conservative MP in July.

There are four candidates running to replace her:

Liberal candidate Brian Gold: Gold is a businessman and university instructor. He ran for the Liberals in the 2015 federal election in a different Alberta riding.

Conservative candidate Dane Lloyd: Lloyd was a Hill staffer before being nominated in this race. He has had to answer for previous controversial social media comments he’s made.

New Democrat candidate Shawna Gawreluck: Gawreluck is a small business owner and medical laboratory technologist. She was acclaimed as the NDP candidate.

Christian Heritage candidate Ernest Chauvet: Chauvet is described on the party’s website as an educator, entrepreneur, and activist, among other things. He ran for the party in the riding in 2015.

In the 2015 election Ambrose won with 70 per cent of the vote. The Liberals came in a far second with 15.6 per cent; the NDP in third with 10 per cent of the vote; the Green Party ran a candidate that garnered 3.1 per cent of the vote; and the Christian Heritage Party got 1.1 per cent of the vote.



Jagmeet Singh

Lac-Saint-Jean, Quebec:

This byelection is being held to fill Denis Lebel’s seat. He formally resigned as a Conservative MP in August.

There are five candidates running to replace him:

Liberal candidate Richard Hébert: Hébert is a former mayor of northern Quebec town Dolbeau-Mistassini and is described on the Liberal Party website as a community advocate.

Conservative candidate Rémy Leclerc: Leclerc used to work for Lebel, and his background is in social work. His son works in Scheer’s office.

New Democrat candidate Gisèle Dallaire: Dallaire is a psychologist. She ran for the NDP in this riding in 2015 and came in a close second.

Bloc Québécois candidate Marc Maltais: Maltais is a trade unionist and a former regional councilor. He has been described by Quebec media as active in the local independence movement.

Green candidate Yves Laporte: Laporte is a pianist and member of Greenpeace. He has been active in the federal and provincial Green parties for nearly a decade.

In the 2015 election Lebel won with 33.3 per cent of the vote. The NDP came second with 28.5 per cent; the Liberals and the Bloc Québécois tied for third with 18.4 per cent of the vote; and the Green candidate received 1.5 per cent of the vote.

More races to come:

There are four other federal byelections on the horizon that Elections Canada has yet to issue writs for.
• Scarborough-Agincourt, Ontario, where the seat was vacated because Liberal MP Arnold Chan died.
• South Surrey-White Rock, B.C., where the seat was vacated because Dianne Watts stepped down as a Conservative MP to pursue provincial political aspirations.
• Bonavista-Burin-Trinity, Nfld., where the seat was vacated by Judy Foote, who stepped down as a Liberal MP for family health reasons.
• Battlefords-Lloydminster, Sask., where the seat was vacated because Gerry Ritz resigned as a Conservative MP.

Speaker of the House of Commons Geoff Regan has informed the Chief Electoral Officer of these vacancies, but there is still a considerable window of time still left before the byelections have to be called. Once they are, the earliest election day could come in these ridings is 36 days after the writ is issued.

There have already been six federal byelections since the general election in 2015. In all six, the successful candidate was a member of the party that held the seat prior to the byelection.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....sc=S1eezeV
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2017 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The expectation for Lac-Saint-Jean should be a Liberal Victory.
They are still flying high in Quebec and the NDP support seems to be shifting in that direction.

It could very well be a 50%+ win for the LPC




still the ndp vote in a riding like Lac Saint Jean if it goes down could just as easily return to the Bloc Quebecois

I just don't see the liberal vote going from 18% to 50% in an unheld riding in rural quebec a riding they haven't even held since the early 80's , but its possible it could go up as there past results were rather low

but I also don't see the CPC vote going up and they only got 30% last time and new candidate isn't anywhere near as high profile as Lebel was . so there facing an uphill fight to keep the riding
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NDP candidate looking to break conservative trend




By Jesse Cole, Spruce Grove Examiner/Stony Plain Reporter

Thursday, October 12, 2017 11:45:10 MDT AM



Federal NDP candidate Shawna Gawreluck.



In less than two weeks, Sturgeon River — Parkland will have a new Member of Parliament after longtime MP Rona Ambrose stepped away from the position earlier this year. With a decades long history of Conservative or Reform Party rule in the riding, New Democrat Shawna Gawreluck is looking to turn blue into orange on Oct. 23.



A 10-year resident of Sturgeon County, Gawreluck first joined the NDP in 2014, saying that she was motivated to do more to create the change she wanted to see.

“I’ve always been a very politically aware voter,” she said. “I was one of those people who held the stance that if you wanted to have an opinion, you needed to vote. Someone eventually said to me that the next step to that is wanting to make change and to do that you need to be a part of forming that policy.”

Gawreluck said she wants to represent the riding in Ottawa because she loves the community and knows the communities it represents.

“I would provide someone who legitimately wants to represent Sturgeon River — Parkland,” Gawreluck said. “I’m not someone who has been living in Ottawa for the last four years and working for various MPs. I have my family here, I grocery shop here and my kids go to school here. We moved here 10 years ago and it’s the community I intend on staying in for the next 50. I think Sturgeon River — Parkland needs a voice that speaks to the issues that are right here rather than going to Ottawa and forgetting.”

The NDP candidate outlined a number of those issues including access to daycare, senior care, the federal carbon tax and newly proposed tax changes from the governing Liberal government.

“We have a lot of young families and they’re concerned with making sure that their children have access to good quality daycare and I also think that parents are concerned about the future of the public healthcare system,” Gawreluck said. “The proposed tax changes are an issue. I find it fascinating that the Liberal Government is very focused on small-business and farmers and yet both they and the Conservatives are completely ignoring the giant loopholes that allow the large businesses and extremely wealthy Canadians to offshore their money in places like Panama. They ignore the big fish and pick on the little fish.”

“We have farmers who are seriously and understandably worried about the proposed tax changes and how those will affect them and their businesses and of course oil and the economy are on everyone’s mind as a concern to make sure that Alberta continues to prosper,” she added.

On the issue of the federal carbon tax, as well as the announcement to close a coal-fired power plants in Parkland County, Gawreluck said that the federal government needs to do a better job of providing alternative employment and training opportunities to those who are affected by the closures and environmental regulation changes.

“I think that the riding really needs to federal government to step up and start providing the jobs they’re staying are coming. As part of the carbon tax, that’s the other side of it, the federal government has to be willing to provide training, opportunities and provide jobs that they keep saying are coming. I’m not really seeing a whole lot on that side of the program,” she said.

Gawreluck pointed to some of her party’s policy planks as methods to address concerns in the riding.

“We’ve proposed a national pharmacare program, and as someone who works in medicine I can tell you that we see a lot of patients who are admitted because they haven’t been taking their medications properly,” she said. “The vast majority of time that’s because you have a senior who is trying to decide between buying dinner or taking their heart medication.”

In a timely comment, given those Canadian’s affected by the Las Vegas massacre earlier this month, Gawreluck said travel insurance needs to be talked about on a federal level.

“Travel medical insurance is an issue that hasn’t truly been brought up federally. As Canadians we travel a lot and buy insurance thinking that we’re covered and we go to the United States or elsewhere and an illness or injury occurs and then those providers then find reasons to no longer cover. When you speak to people like the snowbirds who go down annually, it’s a huge issue and it’s not talked about,” she said.

In keeping with prior comments, Gawreluck said she believes she’s the fittest person to hold the position given her community involvement and her connectedness with the average voter in the area.

I represent the average person in this riding. I’m the daughter of a veteran, I’m a parent and I speak to wanting to solve the policy questions in manners that not just sound-bites,” Gawreluck said. “I believe that politics is a discussion and it isn’t this team versus that team … I own a business, I volunteer and sit on community boards and non-profits. I believe a good citizen is adding to their community. We need more politicians to be concerned about adding to their community rather than pandering.”

Gawreluck will run against Liberal candidate Brian Gold, Conservative Candidate Dane Lloyd and Christian Heritage Party candidate Ernest Chauvet during the Oct. 23 election.

http://www.sprucegroveexaminer.....tive-trend
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green Party hopes to surprise in Lac-St-Jean by-election

Green Party of Canada Logo


The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, October 15, 2017 9:15AM EDT



Though realistic of his chances in the upcoming federal by-election in Lac-St-Jean, Green Party deputy chief Daniel Green said he’s still intent on spending time campaigning in the riding.

Green will be in the riding with candidate Yves Laporte until Tuesday.

In an interview, Green admitted his party is “the little green mouse of political parties,” but that the team can surprise pundits. He pointed to a by-election in St-Laurent in which his party finished third, ahead of candidates from the Bloc Quebecois and NDP.




Laporte has focused his campaign on issues surrounding forestry and mining issues.

The party will face an uphill challenge to seriously contend in the by-election, with the four larger parties all running candidates in a bid to succeed Conservative MP Denis Lebel.

http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/gre.....-1.3632992
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Federal parties make their pitch in Lac-St-Jean by-election


Mylene Crete, The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, October 14, 2017 2:26PM EDT



Voters in the Quebec riding of Lac-Saint-Jean will have no shortage of options when they choose their next MP in a federal byelection on Oct. 23.

The four major parties are making a strong push as they look to fill the seat left vacant by former Conservative minister Denis Lebel, and their efforts have not gone unnoticed in the riding some 250 kilometres north of Quebec City.

"There are four good candidates, it's tough (to pick one)," said dairy farmer Michel Frigon.

For Frigon, choosing a candidate who will defend the supply management system that protects Canadian dairy, eggs and poultry is of utmost importance as the United States seeks greater access for its products in ongoing free trade talks.

"I would have liked to see the end of the NAFTA (negotiations) to see what the Liberal team is worth," he said. "Is it just talk, is it just a smokescreen what they're doing?"

The Liberal are hoping to pull off an upset victory in the longtime Conservative and Bloc Quebecois riding. The Grits haven't won it since 1980, when it was known as Roberval.

NAFTA's impact is a major concern in the region, where the forestry industry has already been hit with the countervailing duties imposed in April by the U.S. administration.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who visited the riding earlier this year, is expected to make a second visit to support his party's candidate, Richard Hebert.

Hebert is counting on his four years of experience as the mayor of Dolbeau-Mistassini to help persuade voters to switch allegiances.

"A good MP who can speak for the middle class and families here, I think that's what it takes," he said, adding he believes people care more about the candidates than the party they represent.

"People voted for Denis because Denis Lebel was a guy from here, and people knew him."

Trudeau could face questions on the legalization of marijuana from voters like Yves Boudreault, who says it's an issue that has him hesitant about where to park his vote.

"I'm not in favour of (legalisation), not for a minute," said Boudreault, a construction worker. "It's putting young people in trouble."

The byelection is also a chance for the NDP and the Conservatives to test the popularity of their new leaders.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer has made three visits to the riding, where Lebel won in 2015 with only 33 per cent of the vote

Tory candidate Remy Leclerc, who worked in the field of addictions, has made his opposition to marijuana legalisation a cornerstone of his campaign.

"Dependence arrives quickly," Leclerc said. "The products are powerful, and it's not (legalization) that will rein in organized crime."

An NDP victory would be a coup for leader Jagmeet Singh, and a sign the religious symbols he wears won't be an obstacle for his party in a province that prides itself on being secular.

Gisele Dallaire, his party's candidate, gave the Conservatives a hard time in the 2015 general election.

She had the support of the unions, who did not want the Harper government returned to power, and only lost to Lebel by about 2,600 votes.

As for the Bloc Quebecois, it has recruited Marc Maltais, a trade unionist who defended workers during a lockout at the Rio Tinto Alcan plant in Alma in 2012.

Regaining a riding that was once the Bloc's heartland would give the party an 11th member in the Commons, only one short of official party status.

Singh, however, also appeared to be angling for part of the sovereigntist vote during a recent visit.

"I respect the right to self-determination, completely, without fail, without exception," he said, adding he hopes "to create a climate that would encourage people to stay in Canada."

Like the Bloc, the NDP proposes to protect supply management and to be the watchdog for workers in the NAFTA negotiations.

http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/fed.....-1.3632490
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lac-St-Jean byelection: Scheer, Ouellet pitch their parties to voters


Jagmeet Singh visited the riding vacated by Denis Lebel earlier this week. Justin Trudeau is expected next week.

Presse Canadienne Presse Canadienne

Published on: October 12, 2017 | Last Updated: October 12, 2017 7:13 PM EDT


ST-FELICIEN – Federal Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer wants Lac-Saint-Jean voters to send a clear message to Justin Trudeau: “We do not agree with the legalization of marijuana, we do not agree with new taxes on small businesses, we do not agree with illegal border crossings, we do not agree with much bigger deficits than what the Liberals promised,” Scheer said at a news conference Thursday.

It was the first day of a three-day visit to the region to support Conservative candidate Rémy Leclerc, who is trying to maintain the seat held by ex-minister Denis Lebel, for whom he worked. A byelection to replace Lebel will be held Oct. 23.

“What I’m hearing on the ground is a lot of grumbling toward the government,” Leclerc said.

If elected, Leclerc, who as an outreach worker for many years saw the consequences of drug addiction, will try to make the Trudeau government backtrack on the legalization of recreational cannabis, which the Conservatives believe is strongly opposed in the region.

“We sense a reversal coming on the Morneau tax reform, he reversed his stance on electoral reform and as far as the legalization of marijuana is concerned, we will put up strong opposition in the House and with senators,” he said in an interview.


The Lac-Saint-Jean riding was left vacant after Lebel stepped down in June. The Conservatives are trying hard to hold on to the seat while the Liberals, NDP and Bloc Québécois all believe they have a chance of winning the byelection.

Bloc Québécois Leader Martine Ouellet was also in the region to support her candidate, Marc Maltais, a union leader known in Alma for his defence of Rio Tinto Alcan workers during the 2012 lockout.

The electoral campaign intensified this week with the visit of three out of four party leaders, starting with NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to visit the riding sometime next week to buttress the campaign of Liberal candidate Richard Hébert.

In the 2015 federal election, the Bloc Québécois and Liberal Party each received 18.4 per cent of votes in the riding, well behind Lebel’s 33.3 per cent and NDP challenger Gisèle Dallaire’s 28.5 per cent of the vote.

http://montrealgazette.com/new.....-to-voters
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2 Federal by elections on October 23

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