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Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 10:54 am    Post subject: Inside Justin's Campaigm Reply with quote

More is revealed about Justin ...

This is a long article in the Globe. I have edited it severely. because it includes a lot of heavy breathing that makes me want to avert my eyes. It's like walking into a room where somebody is masterbating.

But it gives a lot of information, as well as revealing Trudeau's campaign techniques.

Quote:
Inside Justin Trudeau's war room

Justin Trudeau is in a black Mercedes compact SUV, on the road between a seniors’ residence in Victoriaville, Que., and a food court in Sherbrooke. At the wheel is a young organizer named Marie-Laurence Lapointe, whose dad was a major fundraiser for Mr. Trudeau’s own father.

The Liberal scion is just beginning a conference call with his senior aides, who are scattered around central Canada. On the line are his close friend and senior strategist Gerald Butts, his policy advisers Mike McNair and Robert Asselin, and his press secretary Kate Monfette.

The 41-year-old son of Canada’s 15th prime minister is still learning the finer arts of his craft. But the Liberal leadership race – in which, six weeks before the April 14 vote, he is running ahead of all seven of his rivals – offers the perfect opportunity to hone his skills and nurture an organization to bring his badly hobbled, third-place party into the next election.

His ultimate goal is to retool the machinery of power in Ottawa to respond to both the communication styles and practical needs of a new generation. But on this Friday morning he is checking in to get his team’s read on the day’s news, put out any immediate fires and prepare for what might come his way at the midday media scrum.
The mood is light: Mr. Trudeau and Mr. Butts lament the Habs’ overtime loss the previous night, while Mr. McNair revels in a Maple Leafs victory. At one point, however, Mr. Asselin urges Mr. Trudeau to stop talking about what percentages would give Quebec sovereigntists a referendum victory.

The party’s policy has long been that 50 per cent plus one would not be enough, without further specifics. But in a question-and-answer session earlier in the week, Mr. Trudeau suddenly said his threshold would be over 66 per cent, angering some Quebeckers and creating a commotion in the media.

“We are giving oxygen to this story,” says Mr. Asselin, an academic and former junior-hockey player, quietly but forcefully.

He doesn’t need to belabour his point. “They are trying to milk my comments as much as they can,” Mr. Trudeau agrees. “If I’m asked about it … I’ll say that is not what people are talking to me about on the ground – that people are focused on the future, their jobs and those issues. …”


Here we see everything highlighted -- the patrician style of the campaign, the part of the population that is targeted, and now, the techniques used to campaign. The know they have the press in their pocket. They use it to highlight issues, and always remain positive. They know if they do not respond, the issue will fade from the spotlight, and its clear, they don't want the campaign to degenerate into a squabble about policy ideas.

Quote:
The group also assesses what’s coming out of the other leadership-campaign camps.

Ms. Monfette (in French): “I guess you’ve heard Marc Garneau [the former astronaut and current Liberal contender] in the news this morning about your comments on the 66-per cent and everything that followed. Also, [Liberal MP] Joyce Murray is in the news, given that she has won the support of [scientist and TV host] David Suzuki.”
Mr. Trudeau (in French): “Listen, regarding Marc, I’ll stick to the high road. I had a small question on that this morning, and I repeated the lines about the fact we have differences of opinion, which has always been a strength of the Liberal Party, and that at the end of the day, we will be a very strong, united team to face off against Mr. Mulcair and Mr. Harper.”
(He switches to English.)

“To reinforce that, and I wanted to check with you guys, but I’m thinking, like I said yesterday, that it’s a good thing that David is supporting Joyce. What we need to do is highlight the fact that he is supporting a Liberal candidate, and that’s a positive piece of message, that he sees a space and a role for us.

“Secondly, he is highlighting the ‘supporter’ class” – the new arrangement that allows non-party-members to sign up to vote for the leadership, a key to Mr. Trudeau’s strategy – “and if we can jump on his bandwagon a bit, or at least use him as an encouragement to make sure we get more and more supporters for the Liberal Party, that’s great. So I’m thinking of tweeting out something later on that this afternoon.”
Mr. Butts: “Yeah, I agree, the key message there, and this references what you just said about Garneau, is that positive campaigns work, right? Joyce is running a positive campaign and she is attracting support because of it.”

(Ms. Murray has been advocating that the Liberals join forces with the NDP and the Green Party in the next election, and she has avoided direct attacks on other candidates.)

Mr. Trudeau: “Do I want to be that pointed, to talk about positive campaigns? Because in this context, people might see this as a dig at Marc [Garneau, who has been critical of Mr. Trudeau’s lack of experience], and I don’t necessarily want to highlight that. I don’t want to necessarily even engage – I don’t think I need to.” (....)


He handles criticisms by ignoring them, batting his eyelashes, smiling, and tilting his head. It seems to work. Clearly, he has been schooled, and is a willing pupil. He himself refers to the 'lines' he has rehearsed. This is the part of politics that Pierre himself never bothered with. This new Liberal team is taking its lead from the Obama campaign -- which means keeping the mainstream press at arms length and using the 'alternative media' to craft messages specifically designed for particular parts of those on their email lists. (Exactly the techniques that left the Republicans "ten years behind", according to Newt Gingrich.)

He hopes to rise to power as the spokesperson for Gen X and the Millennials, a prospect that makes me shudder, but which is inevitable.

Quote:

Brand Gen X wants no squabbles

Mr. Trudeau has distanced himself from the fights that undermined the Liberal Party over the past decade. His campaign team is basically stripped of veterans of the Jean Chrétien-Paul Martin wars, including Liberal stalwarts who had wanted to be front and centre.

Instead, its core are people in their 30s and 40s whom Mr. Trudeau touts as friends, chief among them Mr. Butts and his campaign organizer, Katie Telford. It’s not a coincidence that they both got their political grooming not in Ottawa but at Queen’s Park in Ontario. (....)


Yikes! So, we can see that Trudeau promises a generational take-over and re-making of the Liberal Party. In fact, it is more than a promise -- it is the embodiment of that promise, itself. The campaign has little connection to other parts of whatever is left of the old Jean Chretien party. They learned it at the knee of the biggest liar in all of Canadian politics ever ... Dalton McGoof ... supplemented by the experience in marginal positions in the Dion and Gerrard Kennedy campaigns -- the left wing of the olde Liberal Party.

I have edited out a long part about Trudeau campaigning, going from Food Courts to Seniors Residences ... giving the proles a chance to be next to royalty, to have a picture taken, to engage in nostalgia ... We pick up on the part that happens outside of the spotlight.

Quote:
Reaching beyond his pedigree

Mr. Trudeau’s plan to hook Canadians back into the political process combines personal contact with heavy use of social media. They have an army of 7,000 volunteers and data on tens of thousands of supporters.

“This is them, this is us – this is what we are a part of in our democracy,” he says.
This democratic populism can be a bit of an awkward fit with his pedigree.

(....)

Wherever he goes, Mr. Trudeau is followed by volunteers who carry clipboards and registration forms to sign up supporters from outside the party. If he speaks to someone in a restaurant or on the street, the workers follow up with an invitation to endorse his campaign.

Mr. Trudeau feels that the approach can open a whole new chapter in Liberal history. “There is no ‘Big Red Machine’ any more,” he says, “and it couldn’t have happened at a better time, because we are in a moment in the lives of our democracies across the world where we do have to renew, we have to think very differently about representative democracy and what it looks like in the 21st century.”

He says that the Internet generation forces him to engage in “old-fashioned politics” – town halls and public meetings – while television, a medium mastered by the Conservative Party, is quickly getting outmoded.

“We’re moving away from TV, which is a broadcast and a one-way medium, into the Internet, which is multi-nodal and about two-way conversations.”

The key is the thousands of names, addresses, birth dates and e-mails being amassed on those clipboards and on the Justin.ca website. For the Liberal Party, “that gives us the bare bones of the rebuilding effort,” he says.

The other aim is to find candidates to run under the Liberal banner in 338 ridings in the next election. His campaign is gathering resumés and seeking organizers adapted to the Trudeau campaigning mode.

“It’s a big testing ground for a new way of doing politics.”

He answers criticisms about the vagueness of his platform by saying that he wants to wait for a general election before putting out all his policy planks, after having received more input from party supporters. (He reminds a crowd at Dawson College in Montreal that the Liberal Party’s famous Red Book came out for the 1993 general election, not during Jean Chrétien’s 1990 leadership campaign.)

What he will be specific about are his plans to change the rules of the political game in Ottawa. The basic concept has been bandied about by many parties in the past – decentralizing power away from the Prime Minister’s Office and back into the hands of MPs.

The way to actually make it happen this time around, according to Mr. Trudeau, is to ensure that all Liberal candidates in the next election are chosen through open nomination contests.

Then, if he wins the election, Mr. Trudeau vows to give all of his MPs the ability to vote freely according to the wishes of their constituents, except on confidence measures.
“I want to set things up right away so that, regardless of what I might want to do once I attain power … like everyone else, I have bound my hands by bringing in a group of people who are deeply responsible and responsive to people in their ridings, and freer to disagree with the executive branch of government as legislators.” (....)


As if ... Trudeau acts as if the problem with TV is that it's a one-way means of communicating. As if these email epistles to come are two-way ... what they do seem to be is more personal, stress on the word seem. It also allows the black arts of the opinion-engineers ample room to play.

As for the content ... it's the Reform Party all over again! That part ... the public participation in a party that the member took ownership of ... the part that Stephen Harper took in the alley and guzzled ... the part that old PCs detest ... the smell of the common (wo)man being offered a chance of participation ... Particularly the women ...

What is new, what comes from Dalton, is the offers a turn for all those who have suffered under the domination of that most despicable of creatures, the white male. This is, no doubt, where the Dalton McGuinty experience comes in.

Now we get a chance, for the first time, to look at the resumés of the Trudeau team.

Quote:
THE TRUDEAU TEAM

Gerald Butts
Position: Senior strategist
Past job: Former principal secretary to ex-Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty, former president of WWF-Canada
Tasks: Develops policy, prepares debates and speeches, oversees daily briefings

Katie Telford
Position: Campaign manager
Past job: Senior official in the offices of former Ontario minister Gerard Kennedy and former federal Liberal leader Stéphane Dion
Tasks: Oversees the entire campaign organization, including schedules, tours and volunteers

Mike McNair
Position: Policy adviser
Past job: Senior adviser to former Liberal leaders Stéphane Dion and Michael Ignatieff
Tasks: Policy adviser, conducts daily briefings with an emphasis on English-language media

Robert Asselin
Position: Strategist and policy adviser
Past job: Senior official in the offices of former prime minister Paul Martin and various Liberal ministers
Tasks: Debate preparation, policy development, conducts daily media briefings and writes French-language speeches
http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....le9242414/


There you have it. This confirms my early suspicions that this is a new kind of threat to the Conservative party's dominance. It exploits the Conservatives distance from the public, and its divorce from populism very skillfully. It appears to be putting together an Obama-like client-patron relationship with individual voters that TV ads won't be able to touch. It has every reasonable prospect of crushing the NDP in Quebec, and probably whipping its ass in the rest of Canada too. It's a new kind of competitor.

Well, that's my feeling about it. What about yours?
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Trudeau is actually doing things almost perfectly and do believe he has been underestimated.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2013 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Me too. He has a name that attracts some attention, certainly, but he has cashed in on that in a surprisingly efficient way.

His electoral strategy is very advanced, and he has people around him that seem very competent. He has raised a lot of money, which is a key indicator. People with deep pockets see potential in him.

He keeps his cards close to his vest, and while he isn't a policy wonk, there's every reason to think his instincts are right.

This is a new kind of challenge.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2013 11:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just another little shocker ...

Quote:
Justin Trudeau campaign draws 150,000 supporters to Liberal party
Justin Trudeau’s campaign for the Liberal leadership has drawn a staggering 150,000 supporters to the party, according to tallies provided to the Toronto Star

Justin Trudeau’s campaign for the Liberal leadership has drawn a staggering 150,000 supporters to the party, according to tallies provided to the Toronto Star at the sign-up deadline on Sunday night.

That’s 20,000 more than the New Democratic Party had in total memberships during its leadership campaign last year and a roughly 150 per cent increase in the number of people who were signed up as backers of the federal Liberals only a few months ago.

It also doesn’t include all the new supporters and members gathered up by the other seven leadership campaigns — a total the Liberal Party plans to release Monday.

Trudeau told the Star Sunday evening that this explosion of interest means that he’s finding an eager audience for what he calls an “open, positive” campaign.

“People are hungry for change,” he said. “People want to be part of a movement.”

Nearly three-quarters of these new Trudeau backers are also new to the Liberal party, testing the party out by signing up in a new class called “supporters” — not full, card-carrying members of the party, but eligible to vote in the leadership contest that will be settled April 14. [....]
http://www.thestar.com/news/ca.....party.html
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2013 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite impressive.

I decided to sign up as a supporter and mistakenly did so on the party's website, not realizing that this meant I could be spammed by all the candidates by email. I noticed over the last few dys that MHF and Garneau were sending out emails everyday, or twice a day, to tell supporters to get people signed up only X number of dys left, with other candidates doing the same. However, Trudeau has not done this at all. Which now is not surprising to learn given that 3 times as many people signed up to support him then are members of the Liberal Party.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2013 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brilliant! I mean, signing up. It's a terrific way of understanding the campaign.

I went to some site to learn more about the Obama campaign, back when I was pulling for Obama to beat Hillary -- oh, what a mistake! -- and ever since, I've gotten email solicitations from all the Obama back room organizers, Michelle Obama, and the One himself, often with videos made specially for these emails distribution. Often enough Obama makes very dubious statements that aren't exposed to public airing.

That's how I got tipped to how he campaigns, and why he doesn't need the political press.

Of course, I am only seeing the general output. I am sure there's special material for hispanics and blacks, and my bet is it gets too inflammatory for the general public to see.

You can bet Trudeau has hundreds of thousands on his lists, and the thing about social software is that he can put his message into social networks that are many times larger than the number on his list.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
Quite impressive.

I decided to sign up as a supporter and mistakenly did so on the party's website, not realizing that this meant I could be spammed by all the candidates by email. I noticed over the last few dys that MHF and Garneau were sending out emails everyday, or twice a day, to tell supporters to get people signed up only X number of dys left, with other candidates doing the same. However, Trudeau has not done this at all. Which now is not surprising to learn given that 3 times as many people signed up to support him then are members of the Liberal Party.


Yeah I am in the same boat;
I get more Liberal email then I do actual honest to goodness spam!
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
I think Trudeau is actually doing things almost perfectly and do believe he has been underestimated.


He has done everything a frontrunner should be doing.
He has shut-up, He has smiled, and he has done nothing to give the folks miles behind him anything to get a foothold into.

As for underestimated; I think that is largely part of the narrative.

I would compare this to the narrative of the 2011 Ontario Election Leadership Debate, the bar was set sooooo low for McGunity and so high for Hudak and Horwath short of not falling off the stage McGunity would have walked out of that debate as the "not loser".

Its the same thing with Justin, the guy is not a moron and even if he is he has some very smart people making sure he does nothing wrong.

In the context of a leadership election I think he has been spot on and I don't think anyone really expected him to go this long without a gaffe, well a big gaffe.

However I would hardly say he has been brilliant.
He walked in as the frontrunner, he remained the frontrunner by being safe.

Where I am really interested to see his ability to lead is once this 1st ballot selection process is over and he has to deal with the leadership candidates who had the stones to attack him.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He has definitely played the frontrunner, but he has also shown that he does understand issues. He has basically contradicted the thought that he was a hardcore lefty Liberal who could easily belong in the NDP. As well while he has been criticized but some for this, I think he has been exactly right when it comes to not releasing detailed policy ideas. He has commented on current issues, which is good, and has released some ideas. I think he's correct in saying the members should have more say in policy, which is something I've been saying is wrong with the Liberals.

However, I do not think he has been able to tell people why he should be leader and why he is qualified to be Prime Minister. However, I don't think anyone has given a good reason to why they should be leader.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
He has definitely played the frontrunner, but he has also shown that he does understand issues. He has basically contradicted the thought that he was a hardcore lefty Liberal who could easily belong in the NDP. As well while he has been criticized but some for this, I think he has been exactly right when it comes to not releasing detailed policy ideas. He has commented on current issues, which is good, and has released some ideas. I think he's correct in saying the members should have more say in policy, which is something I've been saying is wrong with the Liberals.


I agree to an extent;
He understands the issues of today to as much of a degree as it required for him to pull back wherever the topic of discussion has gone to one of his core talking points.

The guy isn't some sort of dullard; he has clearly read a book or two which really goes more toward my earlier comment of the expectations for him being far lower then they should have been.

He hasn't quite contradicted the fact that he could belong in the NDP; he has simply been one of the few leadership Candidates that is embracing the fact that the NDP wants nothing to do with an LPC merger, understands he will likely sap all the support from the NDP in Quebec regardless of his platform, and may as well skirt the middle in a hope to win back some of Ontario.

He hasn't released any detailed policy because he doesn't have to.
The beauty of being so far ahead is you can speak in general terms, members should have more of a say in policy, okay! Neat! How will it be done? Online voting?

What's to prevent people like me who will be voting in the LPC leadership race from having an influence on policy when I am clearly not an LPC supporter? Seeing that there are thousands of us doing the exact same thing?

Its like saying that Sunshine and warm breezes are good things, its hard to disagree.

JT should coast to an easy election as leader, where the real challenge begins is when he has to sell to a less friendly audience.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is an example of the kind of emails that Obama's enablers send me almost daily.

Quote:
[My first name]

Let's put this into perspective. What programs could we help fund by closing the tax breaks for millionaires and billionaires? Take a look at this graphic from the Center for American Progress -- then pass it along:

[I can't get the graphic to reproduce. In the 'hole' that appears when you try to reproduce the email, is a bar graph, with lots of pictures. The email is not sent from anything that identifies itself with Obama, but rather, Organizing for Action. It spreads their side of the sequester cut issue. I will just report the stats they use to illustrate Romney's point -- which is that tax increases aren't needed because the same revenues could be raised by closing loopholes. But they wouldn't want to bring that to anybody's attention.]

Homeless Assistance (for 100,000 formerly homeless people ........ $97 million
Women grants (600,000 pregnant women and children) ............... $353 million
Head Start (70,000 children and 14,000 teachers & staff) ............ $424 million
Special Education (7,400 teachers & staff) .................................. $650 million+
Title I (1,000,000 disadvantaged kids & 10,500 teachers) ............ $750 million+
Housing & Vouchers (125,000 families) ...................................... $951 million
TOTAL ................................................................................... $3,175 million
=================================================

Corporate Jet loopholes (over 10 years) ................................... $3,200 million

Republicans chose to help millionaires and billionaires over the middle class.


Then, the recipient is exhorted to pass the images on.

Every day ... repetition is the secret of advertising. Or propaganda. None of it is even noticed, let alone 'vetted' by the lapdog press. In fact, it is probably reported in the media, and gives credence to the emails. And these emails grow virally.

Just sayin' ...
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a day later, and another illustrative example of my personal little note from Obama ... or someone representing him ... ]

Quote:
Stephanie Cutter, BarackObama.com <info@barackobama.com>

2:02 PM (41 minutes ago)

[my first name] --

Thanks to Republican obstructionism in Congress, the nation was forced into the sequester last Friday -- a series of automatic and destructive budgets cuts that you and your neighbors are just beginning to feel.

In the face of these devastating cuts, House Speaker John Boehner went on TV and said, "I don't know whether it's going to hurt the economy or not ... I don't think anyone quite understands how the sequester is really going to work."

Really? We're not talking about some abstract numbers on a piece of paper -- this is real.

The sequester will cut 10,000 teaching jobs, 70,000 spots for preschoolers in Head Start, $43 million for food programs for seniors, $35 million for local fire departments, and access to nutrition assistance for over half a million women and their families.

And the reason congressional Republicans let these cuts go into effect is because they simply wouldn't support closing tax loopholes for millionaires and billionaires -- for things like yachts and corporate jets. I wish I were kidding.

More than 340,000 OFA supporters have added their names to support President Obama's balanced plan and call on congressional Republicans to take action to stop the sequester budget cuts right now.

Add your name, [my first name], and join them:

http://my.barackobama.com/Tell-the-GOP-to-Act

Thanks, and keep it up.

Stephanie


Notice -- they want their backers to write the Republican congressmen! They repeat their no doubt bogus numbers. But the content, which is part of American politics, doesn't concern us here. Note that repetition is a major secret of advertising, and that they rattle off the same old numbers repeatedly.

During the election, they raffled off seats at dinners to supporters, at $3 a ticket. The point is to get the readers to have some 'skin in the game', another technique that strengthens ties.

Expect Trudeau's gang to be developing this kind of intimate contact with supporters, one that gets around the public scrutiny of the lamestream media, directly to the low-information voters (the most valuable in this kind of campaign) out there.

In the US, they have orchestrated a count-down to sequester, even while not negotiating with the Republicans, and blaming them for the logjam. Dumbest politics of our lifetimes, and they are making it work -- because it gets to the low-information voter. Why else would you campaign in food courts?
chilipepper





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

and here. If there's any doubt that voters are shallow and will vote for a name not policy, here it is.
http://news.nationalpost.com/2.....deau-poll/
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Inside Justin's Campaigm

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