Home FAQ Search Memberlist User Groups Register Login   

BloggingTories.ca Forum IndexBloggingTories.ca Forum Index
    Index     FAQ     Search     Register     Login         JOIN THE DISCUSSION - CLICK HERE      


  

Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 10068
Reputation: 322.1Reputation: 322.1
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:09 pm    Post subject: John Tory won't run for mayor of Toronto Reply with quote

No John Tory to kick around anymore

Former PC leader passes on second run for mayor

By Maria Babbage - THE CANADIAN PRESS



Former Ontario PC leader John Tory listens to a question as he hosts The John Tory Show on a local radio station in Toronto Monday Oct.8, 2007. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

TORONTO — Former Ontario Progressive Conservative leader John Tory, a wealthy former executive and backroom operative for ex-prime ministers Brian Mulroney and Kim Campbell, won’t be taking another shot at becoming Toronto’s next mayor.

Tory, who now hosts a daily talk radio show after quitting provincial politics last spring, told the audience of his radio station CFRB that he won’t be seeking the city’s top job this fall.

“I am extremely gratified by the degree of support offered to me on the streets, in public opinion polls and in the committed support of a significant number of city councillors,” he said in a statement. “However I have decided that I will pursue a different course with my life and my career.”

One supporter said it’s “highly unlikely” Tory will ever return to politics, one of his lifelong passions.

“I think he’s done,” said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

“I think he views this as, ‘Thank you, all right, I’ve had enough drama with the public for awhile. They’ll be tired of me.”’


In his statement, Tory said not running will give him more time with his family, including his wife Barbara, their four adult children and two grandchildren.

He said he plans to continue his radio show and take a volunteer post at the helm of the Toronto City Summit Alliance, a job previously held by David Pecaut, who co-founded Luminato, a successful arts festival in the city.

Before his death in December, Pecaut wrote to Tory and urged him to take over the job, Tory said.

“It will give me a great opportunity not only to carry on the vital work of the TCSA and build on David Pecaut’s considerable legacy, but also to remain a very active contributor to the city I love and call home,” he added.

Tory said he will also continue with his “increased responsibilities” at the Rogers business empire since the death of his friend and mentor Ted Rogers, as well as his work on other corporate boards and charities.

Tory, who quit as party leader after a humiliating byelection defeat last spring, had been mulling another shot at leading Canada’s most populous city, despite losing to current mayor David Miller in 2003.

Experts predicted Tory would have to overcome being labelled an electoral loser after his disastrous 2007 provincial campaign, which fuelled an internal party revolt when Tory failed to win a seat in the legislature.

After more than a year of wandering in the political wilderness, Tory was finally given a shot to run in the rural central Ontario riding of Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock last March. He lost to Liberal rookie Rick Johnston and resigned the leadership soon after.

That painful period was “definitely a factor” in Tory’s decision not to seek public office again, but so was his desire to enjoy his new life outside politics, said the Tory supporter.

“Having gone through what he did last year in terms of losing and everything, there was a very good chance that he would win, but there’s also a chance you’re going to lose,” the source said.

“And I think he thought to himself, ‘I don’t need this.’ And you know what? I think at the end of the day, it’s not much more complicated than that.”

Tory made his decision after talking it over with his family during a holiday in Florida, the source said.

The race for mayor, which officially began Monday, has attracted some high-profile candidates, such as Rocco Rossi, the former national director of the federal Liberals.

George Smitherman, the former deputy premier of Ontario who gave up his provincial seat Sunday to pave the way for his bid to become mayor, is expected to officially declare his candidacy this week.

City councillor Giorgio Mammoliti filed his nomination on Tuesday and may be joined by another city councillor, Adam Giambrone. There are nine other candidates registered in the race so far.

Candidates have until Sept. 10 to file the necessary paperwork for the Oct. 25 election.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Po.....6-qmi.html
kwlafayette





Joined: 03 Sep 2006
Posts: 6155
Reputation: 156.2Reputation: 156.2
votes: 28
Location: Saskatoon Saskatchewan

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a positive note, that is one defeat he will be unable to add to his already impressive collection.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
Reputation: 104
votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kwlafayette wrote:
On a positive note, that is one defeat he will be unable to add to his already impressive collection.

You beat me to it. Everything I've read indicates John Tory is a fine gentleman but as a politician, he's a complete maladroit.

-Mac
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 8195
Reputation: 328.9Reputation: 328.9
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He wasn't going to win,
He should stick to what he is good at.
marklar





Joined: 03 Oct 2007
Posts: 186
Reputation: 38.5Reputation: 38.5Reputation: 38.5Reputation: 38.5
votes: 1
Location: Toronto, Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
He should stick to what he is good at.


Losing elections?
DavidK





Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 1520
Reputation: 68.5
votes: 5
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

marklar wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
He should stick to what he is good at.


Losing elections?


He did well at Rogers and the CFL, IMO. The man does has skills...Plus, it was close between him and Miller the first time around, don't forget.
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 8195
Reputation: 328.9Reputation: 328.9
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

marklar wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
He should stick to what he is good at.


Losing elections?


I will admit, he is not a bad drive home talk show host.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 10068
Reputation: 322.1Reputation: 322.1
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smitherman leads mayoral race

Former deputy premier aided by Tory's decision to quit, poll findsComment on this story »
Vanessa Lu
city hall bureau chief Published On Thu Jan 14 2010EmailPrintRepublishAdd to Favourites Report an errorShare Share ArticlePhotos (1)Comments (2)
George Smitherman goes for a photo-op skate after officially joining Toronto's mayoral race Jan. 8, 2010. The former Ontario deputy premier took to the ice at Nathan Phillips Square for 15 minutes and showed he can stay on his feet. Smitherman has joined Liberal party strategist Rocco Rossi, Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti and several other mayoral hopefuls who have declared their candidacy.

VINCE TALOTTA/TORONTO STAR
Ads by Google
Toronto To Reykjavik?

Enjoy Iceland's Magnificent Nature.
Cheap Fares to Iceland!
icelandair.ca/Iceland-Packages
George Smitherman is the clear front-runner in the race to be the next mayor of Toronto, according to an Angus Reid-Toronto Star poll, the first conducted since John Tory dropped out last week.

The former deputy premier enjoys a sizeable lead among decided voters, at 44 per cent, followed by Councillor Adam Giambrone at 17 per cent and Liberal party strategist Rocco Rossi at 15 per cent.

Deputy Mayor Joe Pantalone trails at 5 per cent, followed by Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti with 4 per cent. Budget chief Shelley Carroll, who announced Tuesday she wouldn't run, got 5 per cent.

Fifty-eight per cent of those surveyed were undecided.

"It's still anybody's game," said Jodi Shanoff, senior vice-president at Angus Reid. "I think the John Tory decision was a game-changer in this election, and there are still opportunities for those kinds of changes."

Those polled were evenly split on whether they would have voted for Tory, with 40 per cent saying they would have backed the former Progressive Conservative leader, while 37 per cent said they wouldn't have.

Tory's departure from the race seems to benefit Smitherman and Rossi, Shanoff said.

"Of the voters who would have supported John Tory, 38 per cent are now leaning to George Smitherman and 20 per cent are leaning to Rocco Rossi," she said, adding Giambrone would get 10 per cent.

However, none of the support has gelled, so there is "room for a centre-right candidate, who could again reshuffle the deck," she said.

With the Oct. 25 election to replace David Miller still more than nine months away, 58 per cent of those surveyed are undecided. That's not unusual. While Shanoff said much of the response at this stage is based on name recognition, "come election time, a lot is name recognition as well."

The main issues of concern are leadership at 19 per cent, municipal financing and powers at 19 per cent and public transportation at 18 per cent. Unemployment is fourth, at 11 per cent; crime and public safety at 7 per cent; then homelessness and environment, each at 3 per cent.

Respondents are unhappy with the current state of the city. Some 54 per cent said they believe "things are worse now than they were this time last year"; 39 per cent said things are about the same; and only 7 per cent reported an improvement. "I think `change' is a word that Torontonians will be looking to hear," Shanoff said.

Even though Smitherman's lead is important for momentum, Shanoff cautions that these are early days.

"In Toronto, history tells us it's not a guarantee, and we saw Barbara Hall back in '03 who was polling even better, and we know how that turned out." Early polls had Hall far ahead, but Miller ultimately won.

Questioned about their impression of the candidates, 42 per cent of respondents had a favourable view of Smitherman, while 33 per cent had an unfavourable view. Rossi, who is not well-known among the public, had a 24 per cent favourable rating, compared with 22 per cent unfavourable and 54 per cent saying they don't know.

Giambrone had a higher unfavourable rating, at 40 per cent, and a 32 per cent favourable rating. Pantalone had 39 per cent unfavourable, 18 per cent favourable.

The online poll of 503 adults, conducted from Jan. 8 to Jan. 11, has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.4 percentage points, considered accurate 19 times out of 20.


http://www.thestar.com/news/gt.....-race?bn=1
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 1 of 1

  


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum


John Tory won't run for mayor of Toronto

phpBBCopyright 2001, 2005 phpBB