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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 3:13 pm    Post subject: McGuinty calls St. Paul's byelection for Sept. 17 Reply with quote

McGuinty calls St. Paul's byelection for Sept. 17
Updated: Wed Aug. 19 2009 6:10:04 PM

The Canadian Press

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. — A contentious plan to harmonize the provincial sales tax with the federal GST could haunt the governing Liberals in an upcoming Toronto byelection, Premier Dalton McGuinty acknowledged Wednesday.

While he's proud of his government's policies, voters in the riding of St. Paul's may not agree when they head to the polls Sept. 17, he said.

"You can never tell what's going to happen in a byelection," McGuinty said in Peterborough, Ont., after announcing funds to widen and improve a 5.6-kilometre stretch of Hwy. 7.

He then turned to local Liberal Rick Johnson -- whose upset victory over former Progressive Conservative leader John Tory in a March byelection caught even the premier by surprise -- and quipped, "Exhibit A."

"Like the leader of all the parties, you want to win all of them. You do the best that you can," McGuinty added.

"I think it's well understood that it's harder in government to win a byelection than it is in opposition."

The byelection, which was called Wednesday, will fill the provincial seat vacated in June by his former cabinet minister Michael Bryant who held the riding for a decade.

It will be the first time voters have gone to the polls since the Liberal government unveiled its controversial plan to move to a single sales tax next July.

The move, which British Columbia is also pursuing, proved to be politically toxic for some provinces when consumers ended up paying more for items that were previously exempt from the provincial levy.

The Progressive Conservatives are already planning to put the costs of tax harmonization front-and-centre during the byelection campaign.

The tax change will likely be discussed along with other pressing issues, such as Ontario's ailing economy, health care, education and the environment, McGuinty said.

But moving to a single 13 per cent tax will help the province become more competitive in the long run, he said.

"It's not the kind of thing that I expect ... would cause Ontarians to lift me onto their shoulders so that we might parade up and down the streets together," he said.

"I think what we need to ask ourselves is, 'What do we need to do?' Not just for our generation. What do we need to do for our kids? What do we need to do to ensure that we have a stronger economy?"

The Liberals hope to ease consumer pain and minimize the political fallout by offering cheques of up to $1,000 to families and individuals when the change takes effect next July.

The last cheques will be in mailboxes just a few months before the next provincial election in October 2011.

Dr. Eric Hoskins, who was an adviser to former federal cabinet minister Lloyd Axworthy, will run on the Liberal ticket.

Toronto newspaper columnist Sue-Ann Levy is expected to represent the Tories following a nomination meeting Thursday.

The NDP haven't yet chosen their candidate. Lawyer Julian Heller, former B.C. Green Party leader Stuart Parker and former provincial politician Dr. Bob Frankford are all vying to represent the party.

Realtor and community activist Chris Chopik will run for the Green Party.

Speculation has been swirling that McGuinty delayed the byelection to give his party an opportunity to find a candidate who could fill Bryant's shoes.

But McGuinty said he was just trying to give all the parties -- and voters -- enough time to prepare for the race.

"I wasn't a big fan of plunging us into one in the middle of the summer, because I think that's not fair to voters whose attention is often turned elsewhere during the holiday season," he said.

Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador harmonized their sales taxes with the federal GST more than 10 years ago. Quebec partially harmonized its sales tax system and Alberta has no provincial sales tax.

http://toronto.ctv.ca/servlet/.....ub=Toronto
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nominations moved up as St. Paul's byelection called
Updated: Thu Aug. 20 2009 2:47:52 PM

ctvtoronto.ca

The Ontario NDP in St. Paul's riding will hold a nomination meeting on Monday after Premier Dalton McGuinty announced a byelection there for Sept. 17.

"New Democrats are thrilled at the prospect of a hard-fought by-election race," Dennis Young, the party's provincial secretary, said Thursday in a news release.

"This by-election will give voters in St. Paul's a chance to tell the McGuinty government that the Liberals are out of touch with what really matters to Torontonians. ... St. Paul's should be a safe Liberal seat, but as the Premier said yesterday, you can never tell what's going to happen in a byelection."

Three candidates will be seeking the nomination, which had originally been scheduled for Sept. 9:

•Dr. Bob Frankford - MPP for Scarborough East from 1990 to 1995
•Julian Heller - lawyer and public education activist
•Stuart Parker - former leader of British Columbia's Green Party and a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto
The Progressive Conservatives are expected to acclaim Toronto journalist Sue-Anne Levy as its candidate at a meeting on Thursday evening. She had been the civic affairs columnist for the Toronto Sun newspaper.

Realtor and community activist Chris Chopik will run for the Green Party.

Dr. Eric Hoskins will be the Liberal candidate.

They are all running to replace Michael Bryant, the former economic development minister, as the MPP for the affluent mid-town riding. Bryant stepped down in May to head Invest Toronto, a new agency designed to lure investment dollars to the city.

Bryant was first elected in St. Paul's in 1999, when the riding was created following a redistribution. He won the riding in the 2007 provincial election by more than 8,000 votes.

However, the riding's components have gone Tory in the past and even had an NDP MPP during the government of Bob Rae.

The harmonized sales tax introduced by the Liberal government of Premier Dalton McGuinty in its spring budget is expected to be a key issue.

Both the NDP and Conservatives -- who are trying to label the HST the "Dalton Sales Tax" -- have been attacking the tax, which will see the provincial sales tax cover the same goods and services as the federal GST. The switch won't happen until July 1, 2010.

The federal Conservative government gave Ontario $4.3 billion to help the transition.

The change will save Ontario businesses about $100 million per year, but it will extend the tax to many goods and services currently not covered by the eight per cent sales tax.

Ontario plans to keep the harmonized rate at 13 per cent (the GST is five per cent), but has claimed that the total tax burden of Ontarians won't change, as other tax cuts will be brought in. There will also be transitional payments.

http://toronto.ctv.ca/servlet/.....ntoNewHome
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

.Wednesday, August 19, 2009 09:20 AM

Over-hyping a (provincial) by-election
Robert Silver

It started off as a test of Dalton McGuinty's government. Now, we find out the by-election in St. Paul's is a test of both Stephen Harper and Michael Ignatieff's leadership and prospects in possible a fall federal election.

"St. Paul's vote a national battlefront?" - cries today's Toronto Star headline.

"If the Progressive Conservatives, who are fielding a scrappy Toronto Sun columnist, wrest the seat from the Liberals, it would be the first Tory win in Toronto - provincially or federally - in a decade."

This is of course true. John Tory never won a thing in Toronto (well, actually, Tory has never won anything pretty much anywhere, Toronto rejecting him is thus nothing of particular note). Stephen Harper has swung and missed in every attempt in the 416. That's a fact.

The Star goes on: "[T]hat should have Prime Minister Stephen Harper watching the contest closely, observers say." Not sure who the observers are but if Stephen Harper is spending more than 10 minutes watching a provincial by-election in St. Paul's, he has too much time on his hand.

And I have a feeling Harper knows better.

He had a star former journalist run for him in a little riding called St. Paul's back in 2006. Kent, I believe was his last name. He was supposed to take out a Liberal MP and well, pretty much everything that is now being said about this Sun columnist was said about him. Strong ties to the Jewish community. Urbane. Popular. Feisty. Whatever.

He got killed. It wasn't even close.

Other than unnamed sources (mostly Liberal, to be fair), is there any reason to think St. Paul's will be anything other than Liberal after the by-election?

Premier McGuinty is at roughly 50 per cent in the polls. He is higher in the GTA than he is elsewhere in the province. He has a strong candidate who won the nomination for the Liberals after an open, competitive nomination. The party is taking the by-election seriously and is putting resources and their best people to work to win it. The NDP is nowhere right now provincially generally and in Toronto specifically. Tim Hudak is unknown at best.

In other words, while anything could happen, I wouldn't bet a quarter that St. Paul's will be anything other than a Liberal win.

The irony of the nervous-nelly hyping about how dangerous the Conservatives should be in St. Paul's is if Hudak's hand-picked candidate falls flat; if she doesn't win or at least come close to winning, this has now become an early referendum on Tim Hudak's leadership and his prospects in urban Ontario.

You see, over-hyping by-elections can swing both ways

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....le1256933/
teenagetory





Joined: 08 Dec 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I gotta agree. While I would love for a Tory to wrest away a 416 riding way from the Liberals, there is about a snowball"s chance in hell of us pulling it off.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liberals will retain it.

The Progressive Conservatives have to move off their single issue stance, the leadership election is over Tim, we get it. You HATE DST or whatever you are calling it, but you can't stop it, you won't stop, and once its in place it does more harm then good repealing it.

So move on, and define yourself.
Rick Fuschi





Joined: 21 Aug 2009
Posts: 5


PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cosmostein,

If you feel that way about this tax (wrong time, wrong place and by the wrong people) then you must like all taxes. Why don't we all become surrender monkeys and just send in our entire paycheque. Dalton will see to it that we get what we deserve, after he has hired a few more cigarette, or pit bull police.

This tax deserves to be fought to the last day for a couple of billion reasons. How are laughable projections - that it will stimulate economic activity - likely to unfold after we jack up all energy costs in Ontario by eight percent?

McGuinty's government is broke and needs our money. Nothing more about this tax, is true.
Cool Blue





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He's right. It's going through and we won't be realistically repeal is.

For starters, the feds gave Ontario like $2 billion to harmonize the taxes. If we "de-harmonize" you can bet that the feds will ask for that money back.

What I expect will happen is that sooner or later Hudak will change his strategy and promise to lower it instead.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
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votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rick Fuschi wrote:
Cosmostein,

If you feel that way about this tax (wrong time, wrong place and by the wrong people) then you must like all taxes. Why don't we all become surrender monkeys and just send in our entire paycheque. Dalton will see to it that we get what we deserve, after he has hired a few more cigarette, or pit bull police.

This tax deserves to be fought to the last day for a couple of billion reasons. How are laughable projections - that it will stimulate economic activity - likely to unfold after we jack up all energy costs in Ontario by eight percent?

McGuinty's government is broke and needs our money. Nothing more about this tax, is true.

Rick, welcome to the Blogging Tories Forum.

We get that you hate the HST but your attack on Cosmostein is unwarranted. Try to make your points without the personal attacks, please!

-Mac
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6510
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Liberals will retain it.

The Progressive Conservatives have to move off their single issue stance, the leadership election is over Tim, we get it. You HATE DST or whatever you are calling it, but you can't stop it, you won't stop, and once its in place it does more harm then good repealing it.

So move on, and define yourself.


i wouldn't say that the riding is totally hopeless and even if they only come close like in vancouver quadra in 2008 federally it could still provide a significant boost to the pc's chances in the 416 area in future elections .
i'm not going to deny the liberals are the favorites there but if the ndp run stronger than usual and sue ann levy makes a strong run it could get much closer than the last provicnial vote there was .
Cardiac





Joined: 27 Apr 2009
Posts: 130
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Location: Mississauga

PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good point RCO,
And Mac, I don't see an attack, just some friendly verbal sparring :lol:
Rick Fuschi





Joined: 21 Aug 2009
Posts: 5


PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My apologies. No personal context was meant by my post. However, I will respond in kind to anyone who approaches such an important topic with such limp, passive attitude. This is the way the majority of Ontario is slowly being overwhelmed by policies which will hurt all in the long run. Once this tax is in place, neither heaven nor hell will remove it regardless of the pain it inflicts. (What did the health tax do for us other than initiate an Ontario slide which has yet to reach bottom?)
Mac





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Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rick Fuschi wrote:
My apologies. No personal context was meant by my post. However, I will respond in kind to anyone who approaches such an important topic with such limp, passive attitude. This is the way the majority of Ontario is slowly being overwhelmed by policies which will hurt all in the long run. Once this tax is in place, neither heaven nor hell will remove it regardless of the pain it inflicts. (What did the health tax do for us other than initiate an Ontario slide which has yet to reach bottom?)

Sorry if I over-reacted but when someone arrives and their first post is suggesting one of our regulars loves all taxes... I was expecting things to do downhill...

As strange as it might sound, I'm glad the Liberals are harmonizing the taxes. They're pounding nails into their own coffin.

-Mac
Rick Fuschi





Joined: 21 Aug 2009
Posts: 5


PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mac

I might almost be willing to shoulder my part of the burden, just to watch McGuinty sink. But, as I mentioned on my most recent blog post on this topic- http://voterick.com/wordpress/ - there is a distinct danger that Harper's government will be found guilty by association, by angry Ontario taxpayers.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
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Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rick Fuschi wrote:
Mac

I might almost be willing to shoulder my part of the burden, just to watch McGuinty sink. But, as I mentioned on my most recent blog post on this topic- http://voterick.com/wordpress/ - there is a distinct danger that Harper's government will be found guilty by association, by angry Ontario taxpayers.

You've got a point... although it would only be the case in the short term, not the long. A tax which increases the already hefty burden is guaranteed to be unpopular, particularly with a premier who once promised "no new taxes" and while the halo effect might singe the Fed-Conservatives while the rage is hot, the reality is the feds don't gain anything by harmonizing.

I'm torn when it comes to HST. The idea of removing a layer of provincial bureaucracy appeals to me. More items being subject to tax doesn't appeal... especially since the Prov-Liberals have been disinclined to program or spending cuts. Since the HST would be broader-based, the prov govt could lower the percentage but that's even less likely than the program or spending cuts...

I know Hudak figures this is the defining battle for the next election but there are other issues just as important... It all comes down to what resonates with the voters...

-Mac
Rick Fuschi





Joined: 21 Aug 2009
Posts: 5


PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mac

To put it as simply as possible, the increased energy costs alone would top $2 billion. How on earth can that possibly help an already economically beaten province? And, as for the Conservatives, if the tax happens anytime before the next federal election, - which I believe must happen no later than next year- the singing could be fatal.
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McGuinty calls St. Paul's byelection for Sept. 17

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