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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 2:43 pm    Post subject: Has Greg Weston sun columist gone liberal ? Reply with quote

( another hugely biased and negative article against stephen harper and the conservatives from no other than Greg Weston , this being the 20 or 30 article of the same theme from him this year at least , my question is has this guy gone liberal and why doesn't he just admit it if he has instead of play this silly game where he tries to claim that he is not by writing for the sun ? )

Greg WestonSun, April 12, 2009

Woo whoops

PM's plan to seduce voters flops. Is an exit strategy next?
By GREG WESTON



As the Conservative government continues its relentless campaign to woo voters with their own money and many press releases, recent opinion polls suggest increasing numbers of ungrateful Canadians are instead giving Prime Minister Stephen Harper the cold shoulder.

This being the parliamentary Easter break that follows the pre-Easter break and precedes the post-Easter break, Conservative ministers and MPs have once again fanned out across the country, armed with millions of dollars of new federal funding announcements and lots of recycled old ones.

What the heck? It worked for the Liberals for decades.

But something is changing in the kingdom, and even the smell of pork doesn't seem to be attracting voters to the Harper cause.

The latest Strategic Counsel poll reports the Liberals are continuing their slow but steady climb in popularity across the country, surpassing the Conservatives for the first time since the last election.

But the real story is in seat-rich Ontario where Harper's government is getting clobbered at 31%, while the Liberals have soared eight points to become the choice of 45% of decided voters.

If an election were held today, the Conservatives would be in deep trouble.

They know it. For the first time since Harper became PM in 2006, many of his MPs and senior party operatives are privately talking about defeat.

Ontario isn't their only headache.

WASTELAND IN QUEBEC

Quebec has also returned to its more conventional political topography as a Conservative wasteland.

The province that held the key to a Harper majority in the last election likely wouldn't yield a half-dozen seats to his party today.

While the Conservatives continue to dominate the West with 46% support of decided voters, it is worth remembering that Quebec's 75 seats are roughly the equivalent of winning B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan combined.

The big problem facing Harper is there may be neither the means nor the time to turn things around before the next federal election.

The shrinking Conservative popularity in Ontario, for instance, is in part due to the economic massacre of the manufacturing sector in that province.

In response, the Harper government is pumping over $60 billion into infrastructure projects and other economic stimulus programs across the country, and a special mega-bailout of the auto sector is in the works.

But it is not clear how much any of that is gaining traction for the Tories.

Polls show a majority of Canadians are against an auto bailout, and you can be sure a majority of them vote Conservative.

Similarly, much of Harper's cherished core support is distraught at the country's returning to massive deficits, and by the unprecedented government spending on everything from bridges to fishing derbies.

Unfortunately for Harper, the situation is likely to get even worse.

Other than the PM and a few of his loyal pompom shakers, few Canadians in the know continue to pretend the economy is going to reverse its current death spiral anytime soon.

That means an endless stream of bad news overwhelming all else.

Who remembers what the prime minister did at the G-20 and NATO meetings abroad, when 60,000 jobs were lost at home the same month?

SPENDING SPREE

By fall, even Canadians who support the stimulus spending spree will be starting to wonder whether it is achieving anything, why the economy keeps tanking and Canadians are still losing jobs.

It is the same story with the war in Afghanistan -- hard to imagine anything there that is going to enhance this government's popularity.

Indeed, the recent furor over new Afghan laws allowing rape and general repression of women suggests the longer Canada remains in the war, the more Canadians will blame whatever government is keeping us there.

At home, the Conservatives are in trouble even on their traditionally safe files such as law and order.

Perhaps the clearest sign of desperation is the bill to kill the rifle registry, recently introduced in the Senate.

While the move is a direct sop to the Conservative core, it is a sure-fire vote-loser in the cities where the Liberals are gaining ground.

And therein lies what may be Harper's biggest problem of all.

Ever since Michael Ignatieff became Liberal leader in the infamous bloodless coup before Christmas, the Harper braintrust has been waiting for the Grits to screw up.

Instead, Ignatieff has wisely spent his time bringing money, talent and discipline to his party, keeping a relatively low profile, and leaving Harper and Co. to get run over by the economy.

As Harper looks at what lies ahead this Easter, he may be wishing he could hippity-hop down the bunny trail and right out of Dodge.

http://www.ottawasun.com/News/.....1-sun.html
Forward





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gone Liberal? The real question is when has he ever been conservative?

He - like every other urinalist in canukistan supports the Liberals by selectively attacking the conservatives and giving the Liberals a free pass.

The formula for "objective" joural-jism in canukistan is this:

1) Negative story about the Liberals = 35 negative stories about the conservatives. As long as you're printing 1 mildly negative, nonharmful story about Liberals for every 35 negative, politically harmful stories you write about conservatives - Then you're being fair.

Weston is a weasel.
teabag





Joined: 30 Nov 2008
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votes: 6
Location: Mississauga Ontario

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I subscribe to both The Sun and The Star. The Star I expect this bias reporting but I too noticed Greg Weston's liberal bias articles these past weeks. I guess I just didn't bother to count up how many there were. What is going on? I thought that the Sun was at least part way impartial. This is really destroying any residue of respect I had left for Journalism. At the same time I find Tom Clark of CTV News refreshing and I did notice even Craig Oliver and Fife were treating the PM with some respect. Is there anything that can be done to get impartial reporting?
Forward





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you subscribe to them then you are subsidizing their bias. Stop doing that.
Zephyr





Joined: 10 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the last election, almost every single major newspaper in Canada endorsed the Conservatives. There is no reason to believe that the media is unfair to the party.
SFrank85





Joined: 03 Mar 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harper needs to shut the National Media out. Talk to local reporters more often. They should continue with that strategy, then maybe the news networks will realise that they donít need those nation reporters who they themselves are trying to become the media story. We all know they all invite each other to their political TV shows.
teabag





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forward,

I live in Toronto and if it was up to me alone I would cancel my Star subscription but there are others in the household that read the sports section and do the puzzles who would object.....lol

I do enjoy a lot of the Toronto Sun articles and in the last election they supported Stephen Harper. Enjoy Lorrie Goldstein and Michael Coren. Here is one of Michael Coren's editorials......doesn't sound too left wing to me:

http://www.torontosun.com/comm.....1-sun.html

You would have to grow old enough to be drooling pablum in a nursing home to see the Star print anything like that.
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

teabag wrote:
I subscribe to both The Sun and The Star. The Star I expect this bias reporting but I too noticed Greg Weston's liberal bias articles these past weeks. I guess I just didn't bother to count up how many there were. What is going on? I thought that the Sun was at least part way impartial. This is really destroying any residue of respect I had left for Journalism. At the same time I find Tom Clark of CTV News refreshing and I did notice even Craig Oliver and Fife were treating the PM with some respect. Is there anything that can be done to get impartial reporting?


well i actually haven't been counting them all but there has been alot of biased articles coming from him in recent months not from the other writers at the sun in general but more from him specifically . not exactly sure what his problem with the cpc is , i'm really somewhat stumped by that one as he was not seen as someone who was every this anti -cpc before . but he now see's stephen harper and the conservative party as his greatest enemy and frequently attacks us in his colums .

i don't know but maybe we should start complaining to the sun about these biased colums , a few letters can at times have an impact with papers who are concerned about there image and reputation . the last thing the sun wants to be know as is the next toronto star .
SFrank85





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Location: Toronto - Scarborough Southwest

PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="RCO"]
teabag wrote:

i don't know but maybe we should start complaining to the sun about these biased colums , a few letters can at times have an impact with papers who are concerned about there image and reputation . the last thing the sun wants to be know as is the next toronto star .


Nothing works like a good letter!
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( here is another one of his colums , that got alot of press , where he muses about a post harper world and a whole bunch of other non-sense scenario's like Charest leading the party , at the moment he really seems to dislike harper personally for whatever reason )

Post-Harper world awaits

When prime minister quits, watch for a leadership race that could revive old tribal lines
By GREG WESTON


Three times in recent weeks, for no apparent reason, we have been pleasantly entertained by senior Conservatives who, one suspects, would otherwise wish us no ill that wasn't slow, painful and terminal.

This suggests that either spring delirium has come early to the nation's capital, or Stephen Harper's party of the bound and gagged is starting to break loose for reasons worth risking the boss's wrath.

Buzz is starting in the backrooms and chatrooms that Conservatives looking down the road are seeing the next election and life after Harper coming sooner rather than later.

If that's true, odds are the recent outbreak of uncommon congeniality between Conservatives and columnists is all about toes testing the water for various potential leadership camps.

Speculation on Harper's demise should come as no surprise.

Last fall's federal election was his third kick at the electoral can that failed to produce a majority Conservative government.

There is also an understandable fear among the senior ranks of the party that if Harper couldn't win a majority against a political weakling such as Stephane Dion, the Conservatives will be lucky to eke out even a minority against the far more formidable Michael Ignatieff.

Current polls show the Conservatives leading the Liberals by only a small margin nationally, while the popularity of Harper and his party in seat-rich Quebec have gone into the toilet.

HARPER'S LOSS

If Harper loses the next election, serious political bettors agree the question is not whether he would step down, but how quickly.

Then what?

There is one body of thought that with Harper's iron grip relaxed, the battle to succeed him will become a divisive and bloody clash between the two old factions of the merged party -- the right-wingers from the Reform-turned-Alliance days versus the more moderate Progressive Conservatives.

While that doesn't mean the party is about to split in two again, leadership voting may well follow tribal lines.

On the other hand, there are smart minds in the party who disagree, arguing that the past five years of marriage between the two factions has blurred their divisions.

As one senior party operative said recently: "It's too easy to assume we would all go back to our former parties and use a leadership race to duke it out again."

There is, of course, absolutely nothing happening now.

It is pure coincidence, for example, that while we were breaking bread recently with a couple of Conservative MPs who would back Immigration Minister Jason Kenney in a leadership contest, he has suddenly been more in the news lately than the prime minister.

One day the hard-right Alberta MP is decrying Canada's long-broken refugee system; the next he is thinking all newcomers should have to speak English or French.

Kenney's biggest challenge could come from a resurrected Stockwell Day since both would be fishing in the same pond of former Alliance votes.

FRONTRUNNER

At the other end of the spectrum, Calgary MP Jim Prentice is already regarded as the middle-road frontrunner in a leadership race.

The environment minister is seen as a moderate, and is definitely one of the best and brightest on the Tory front benches.

While Defence Minister Peter MacKay represents the same Red Tory lineage as Prentice, the former head of the PC party is regarded as a longshot for a return engagement.

But like so much of Canadian politics, the outcome of a race to replace Harper may well come down to one province -- Quebec.

The voting for the next Conservative leader will be weighted to give every riding across the country an equal say in the outcome.

That means the sparse population of Conservatives in Quebec will have almost the same vote as all the party's supporters in all of the ridings in B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan combined.

Bernard Lord, the Quebec-born former premier of bilingual New Brunswick, was long considered a leading federal leadership contender until he lost a fluke election in his home province.

That leaves only one obvious Conservative campaign spoiler from Quebec -- the current Liberal premier and former federal PC party leader, Jean Charest.

Sources close to Charest say he is not giving any thought to anything but running his province "for now," in part because his government is getting killed in the polls by the separatist Parti Quebecois.

But all that could change in a year.

Still only 50, Charest is into a record third term as premier, and likely wouldn't risk going for a fourth.

Charest versus Iggy for the keys to 24 Sussex -- now that would be a fun election.


http://www.ottawasun.com/News/.....6-sun.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( another one of his colums , from reading it sounds like its rate out of the liberal play book , this guy is just going so biased its almost sickening and clearly has a personal hatred for stephen harper , which seems to be the theme of many of his articles i have been looking thru )

Controlling PM favours secrecy

By GREG WESTON



In spite of Barack Obama's having the weight of the world's problems on his shoulders, one of his first executive orders was to declare an all-out assault on government secrecy.

"For a long time now, there has been too much secrecy in this city," Obama told reporters the day after he moved into the White House.

"Starting today, every agency and department should know that this administration stands on the side not of those who seek to withhold information, but those who seek to make it known."

Obama demanded his administration respect both the letter and spirit of freedom-of- information laws.

Those laws, he declared, "are perhaps the most powerful instrument we have for making our government honest and transparent, and of holding it accountable."

Three years ago, Stephen Harper rode into office waving a similar sword, introducing the much-touted Accountability Act as the Conservative government's first order of business in Parliament.

Harper promised it would usher in a whole new era of government openness and accountability.

It has certainly done that.

In a special report to Parliament last week, Information Commissioner Robert Marleau, once criticized as more lapdog than attack-mutt, bared his teeth and went for the government's jugular.

Marleau's office investigated 10 federal departments to assess how well the government is responding to public requests under the Access to Information Act.

The wonder is only six of them flunked miserably, including the PM's own bureaucracy.

Marleau found requests for federal files routinely take months, sometimes years, often until long after the information has lost its relevance.

Rarely since the introduction of the Access to Information Act a quarter-century ago has full and timely access to federal information been more important.

The Harper government is currently embarking on an economic stimulus program that requires bureaucracy to shovel $64 billion of taxpayers' money out the door as fast as it can sign cheques.

As Obama observed in the U.S., access to information laws that allow public scrutiny of every dime of federal spending are the best guarantee of government prudence and honesty.

But as Marleau noted, information on the $64-billion spending spree may be of dubious value if it takes the government years to release it.

Aside from holding the feds to account for its spending, timely government information is also more essential than ever for Canadian businesses that are the biggest users of the access system.

Marleau's predecessor, John Reid, railed at previous Liberal governments for what he saw as a deliberate erosion of transparency.

When the Conservatives came to office promising better, Reid was the first to blow the whistle on the Harper government's Accountability Act as a bid to legislate even more secrecy by stealth.

But the law is not the biggest problem.

The culprit, in Marleau's words, is "a lack of leadership at the highest levels of government."

The former clerk of the Commons may be too polite to say it, but a big part of the problem is an iron-fisted prime minister obsessed with message control who has the entire bureaucracy gagged and in fear for their jobs.

There are literally thousands of PR types on the federal payroll who are no longer allowed to communicate. Open mouth, change jobs.

The result is an overload of requests clogging the access-to-information system.

In the U.S., it remains to be seen if Obama can successfully transform the bureaucratic culture of secrecy into a government that errs on the side of openness and accountability.

Here in Canada, the Harper government isn't even trying.

Instead, it killed live television coverage of Marleau's press conference by suddenly unveiling the government's crime-fighting initiatives at the same time. Now that's transparent.

http://www.londonfreepress.ca/.....1-sun.html
SFrank85





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You all should read this!!! :lol:

http://plattytalk.blogspot.com.....art-2.html
Dan





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

His columns are opinion. He can write whatever he wants. His job is NOT to make sure he doesn't offend a certain demographic on a right wing message board with delicate sensibilities.

Ugh... such a silly thread... as if every decision news media makes can be boiled down to a liberal bias. And what the hell do we even mean by liberal. Are we talking big-L liberal, or the way liberal is used in the United States?

No shit most people in the media do not agree with a Conservative movement based mostly in rural Canada, Calgary, and with Mike Harris Conservatives.
FF_Canuck





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dan wrote:
No shit most people in the media do not agree with a Conservative movement based mostly in rural, suburban, and urban Canada; Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Oshawa, Kitchener, Barrie, Quebec City, Fredericton and Moncton, and with Mike Harris Conservatives, Manning Reformers, McKay PCs, libertarian and social conservatives, and new Canadians.
Fixed that for ya.

Anyone who reads the Sun on a regular basis, particularly out West, will know that Weston has always been very much against Harper and conservatism in general. The link that SFrank85 provided lays out pretty much exactly how all of his columns proceed, especially now that he can no longer rail against Bushitler McChimphaliburton and the Eeeevil Neocons.
SFrank85





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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dan wrote:
His columns are opinion. He can write whatever he wants. His job is NOT to make sure he doesn't offend a certain demographic on a right wing message board with delicate sensibilities.

Ugh... such a silly thread... as if every decision news media makes can be boiled down to a liberal bias. And what the hell do we even mean by liberal. Are we talking big-L liberal, or the way liberal is used in the United States?

No shit most people in the media do not agree with a Conservative movement based mostly in rural Canada, Calgary, and with Mike Harris Conservatives.


Opinion, yes, but that does not preclude him from getting his facts right before he puts them down on paper, and releases it for the whole world to see. He only makes assumptions. Where is the substance?
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Has Greg Weston sun columist gone liberal ?

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