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Do you think BC Carbon Tax is a Good Idea?
Yes (and I live in BC)
9%
 9%  [ 1 ]
Yes (and I don't live in BC)
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
No (and I live in BC)
45%
 45%  [ 5 ]
No (and I don't live in BC)
45%
 45%  [ 5 ]
Total Votes : 11

Author Message
joshuabrown





Joined: 31 Dec 1969
Posts: 13
Reputation: 13.4

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure I agree with everything Campbell does, but I do know one thing, that we need upgraded/more roads and extended public transit. There's been nothing done for years and years and this is just the spending we need to get the job done. Roads and highways are clogged and public transit doesn't stretch far enough to get commuters off the roads.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
Reputation: 104
votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agreed. Getting around here (in specified hours) is horrible.

A while back, Mike Harcourt (former mayor of Vancouver and former NDP premier of BC) was interviewed on squawk radio and boasted how he was visionary for keeping highways out of Vancouver. Amazing how deluded Dippers can be.

-Mac
FF_Canuck





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 3360
Reputation: 73.4
votes: 17
Location: Southern Alberta

PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This seems relevant here:

Miller, Watson reject call for municipal sales tax

Quote:
With one voice yesterday, Toronto Mayor David Miller and Ontario Municipal Affairs Minister Jim Watson rejected a new report calling for a municipal sales tax, instead turning up the heat on the federal government to share its wealth with cities.

"We're not going down that road," Mr. Watson said of a report yesterday by the Conference Board of Canada that urges municipalities be given the power to levy up to one percentage point of provincial sales tax.

...

Ottawa's Jan. 1 move to cut its GST to 5 per cent from 6 per cent opens "a window of opportunity" for provinces to help fix the revenue shortfall facing cities, said board president Anne Golden.

Her think tank agrees that cities are underfunded but disagrees with municipal leaders' assertion that the federal government should simply transfer GST funds - in Toronto's case worth $400-million a year.

"The cities that want to do this would be responsible for levying the tax rate" on the principle of accountability to voters asked to pay the tax, Ms. Golden said.

Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty has rejected calls for Ottawa to share GST revenue with cities.

"... It's not going to happen," he said last November. "The Government of Canada is not in the business of raising tax dollars for the purpose of funding the budgets of other jurisdictions."


At least Campbell has the courage to raise his own taxes, folly though it may be.
palomino_pony





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 539
Reputation: 93.9Reputation: 93.9
votes: 3
Location: Lower Mainland, BC

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 2:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mac wrote:
Agreed. Getting around here (in specified hours) is horrible.

A while back, Mike Harcourt (former mayor of Vancouver and former NDP premier of BC) was interviewed on squawk radio and boasted how he was visionary for keeping highways out of Vancouver. Amazing how deluded Dippers can be.

-Mac


Keeping freeways out of downtown was visionary, but only partly so. Just look at Seattle where the I5 cuts the city in half and where the city is separated from the waterfront with the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Ugh.

The lack of vision was not building an alternative to the freeways. It was freeways or nothing, and we are paying, literally, for going with door number two.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
Reputation: 104
votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2008 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

palomino_pony wrote:
The lack of vision was not building an alternative to the freeways. It was freeways or nothing, and we are paying, literally, for going with door number two.

Actually, there are alternative policies which could easily be put in place that would expedite traffic flow but City Hall won't entertain them.

The easiest one would be to designate a number of streets as throughways. What's a throughway? A higher volume roadway designated as such, not to increase speeds, rather to allow volume of vehicles without interruption. As such, no parking is allowed on throughways and no left turns unless there is a designated lane & light to do so. If it's a designed-from-scratch throughway, there are no left turns since left turns always represent a hindrance.

Have you ever come up Oak Street in the morning before the parking restriction come into effect at 7 AM? Each vehicle parked causes a bottleneck as people in that outside lane try to squeeze into the middle lane. Remove the parking; remove the problem.

Likewise with left turns at intersections with no dedicated lane for such. Need to turn left? Either turn at a designated lane before or after your destination then work your way through the side streets OR turn right at the first street past a major intersection, then circle back and cross at the light then make your way to your destination.

The inconvenience for the few drivers is more than made up for by the many plus both concepts will cut down on collisions. Another way to make a major difference would be to restrict the size of trucks allowed in certain areas of the city, either during certain hours or altogether. There's no reason to see a tractor-trailer (especially a B train) making it's way through town during rush hours but I see it all the time.

-Mac
palomino_pony





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 539
Reputation: 93.9Reputation: 93.9
votes: 3
Location: Lower Mainland, BC

PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is my point. Instead of doing something proactive when they decided not to build freeways, the government(s) of the day did nothing. They could have done any number of things to help with traffic flows and they sat on their hands.

Kingsway is another bad stretch of road with no left turn bays and cars parked on the outside lanes. First Avenue works well as one of the through-ways. There is that median (where streetcars used to roam) that can be used to make a left turn. And there is no parking at anytime of the day.
kwlafayette





Joined: 03 Sep 2006
Posts: 6155
Reputation: 156.2Reputation: 156.2
votes: 28
Location: Saskatoon Saskatchewan

PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

palomino_pony wrote:
Mac wrote:
Agreed. Getting around here (in specified hours) is horrible.

A while back, Mike Harcourt (former mayor of Vancouver and former NDP premier of BC) was interviewed on squawk radio and boasted how he was visionary for keeping highways out of Vancouver. Amazing how deluded Dippers can be.

-Mac


Keeping freeways out of downtown was visionary, but only partly so. Just look at Seattle where the I5 cuts the city in half and where the city is separated from the waterfront with the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Ugh.

The lack of vision was not building an alternative to the freeways. It was freeways or nothing, and we are paying, literally, for going with door number two.
It is not visionary in any way, cities need freeways like a body needs arteries. What would have been visionary, is to follow the lead of some US cities, and move the freeways underground.

Without cars, cities don't exist.
palomino_pony





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 539
Reputation: 93.9Reputation: 93.9
votes: 3
Location: Lower Mainland, BC

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kwlafayette wrote:
It is not visionary in any way, cities need freeways like a body needs arteries. What would have been visionary, is to follow the lead of some US cities, and move the freeways underground.


The freeways that they are putting in underground are to replace the ones that they foolishly put above ground in the first place. When freeways were built, they went on the ground or in the air. They did not go underground. Again, look at Seattle. There is a proposal to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct with an underground alternative, years after the original was built.

kwlafayette wrote:
Without cars, cities don't exist.


:? Considering that cities have existed for centuries before cars were even invented, I find this statement kind of silly. Cars are not a prerequiste for a city.

The West End of Vancouver is the densest urban population in North America outside of Manhattan. This was dones without freeways.
kwlafayette





Joined: 03 Sep 2006
Posts: 6155
Reputation: 156.2Reputation: 156.2
votes: 28
Location: Saskatoon Saskatchewan

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cities are centers for trade and commerce. Anything that makes it easier for goods and people to move around makes a city better. Anything that does the opposite makes it worse. Today, the car and other vehicles are what move goods and people around. In Roman times, it was ox carts. The constant is the road. The Romans built better roads, and had a supreme advantage over all other civilizations for quite a long time.

Where do cities spring up? At cross roads and natural harbors, along major trade routes. Why do they spring up in these places? Well, that answer should be obvious. Cities need freeways just like the Roman empire needed the Appian Way.
palomino_pony





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 539
Reputation: 93.9Reputation: 93.9
votes: 3
Location: Lower Mainland, BC

PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kwlafayette wrote:
Cities are centers for trade and commerce. Anything that makes it easier for goods and people to move around makes a city better. Anything that does the opposite makes it worse. Today, the car and other vehicles are what move goods and people around. In Roman times, it was ox carts. The constant is the road. The Romans built better roads, and had a supreme advantage over all other civilizations for quite a long time.

Where do cities spring up? At cross roads and natural harbors, along major trade routes. Why do they spring up in these places? Well, that answer should be obvious. Cities need freeways just like the Roman empire needed the Appian Way.


Yes cities need transportation, but it doesn't have to be only cars. Cities work the best when there are transportation options. Countless cities in Europe don't have major freeways dissecting their landscapes and they seem to functioning fine. Granted the population density is different than in North America and their history has been longer.

Venice seems to be doing OK with Gondolas. :wink:
palomino_pony





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 539
Reputation: 93.9Reputation: 93.9
votes: 3
Location: Lower Mainland, BC

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Added a poll question to this old thread. I just want to see if where one lived made a difference or not on how people thought of this.

Sorry that there are two of these threads - I wonder if there is a way to merge them. This one was here first :P.

And Mac, who is your conservative alternative for BC? Perhaps a new thread is needed?
kwlafayette





Joined: 03 Sep 2006
Posts: 6155
Reputation: 156.2Reputation: 156.2
votes: 28
Location: Saskatoon Saskatchewan

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BC is in the grip of socialists, and this is a long term trend. Like Saskatchewan, they need a good several decades to wreck the place and chase the young people out before they get a clue.

Also, Sask has not turned any corners yet, this current government is just a flirtation before we get back on the road to long term socialist decline.
Mac





Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5500
Reputation: 104
votes: 35
Location: John Baird's riding...

PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

palomino_pony wrote:
And Mac, who is your conservative alternative for BC? Perhaps a new thread is needed?

This is who I voted for at the last provincial election...

http://www.conservativesbc.com/

I talked with my local candidate (sorry... lousy with names) and he easily won my vote.

-Mac
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