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PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2018 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does this woman know how to do it or what? Could you imagine anyone else being as sharp as her?

"Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said on Saturday Canada will maintain a high-level campaign in the coming days to seek support from allies as it pressures China to free the two detained Canadians, who China says are suspected of endangering state security.

Freeland spoke a day after the United States joined Canada in calling on Beijing to release the pair, who were held after Canadian authorities arrested a senior Chinese executive on a U.S. extradition warrant. Britain and the European Union have also expressed support for Canada.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Beijing expressed "strong dissatisfaction and resolute opposition" to comments by Canada, the United States and others on the detained Canadians."

Best one we have had since forever.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2018 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chinese foreign ministry tells U.S., EU to take Canada to task for Meng arrest
By The Canadian Press — Dec 24 2018

OTTAWA — Western allies' support for Canada in its argument with China over the arrests of two Canadians on national-security grounds have made China "very dissatisfied," its foreign ministry said Monday.

Spokeswoman Hua Chunying said the detention of Huawei Technologies' chief financial officer is a much bigger international offence than China's own arrests of two Canadians, including a former diplomat.

After Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver on an American extradition warrant, Chinese authorities picked up researcher and analyst Michael Kovrig, who is on leave from Canada's foreign service to work for the anti-war International Crisis Group, and businessman Michael Spavor, who arranges exchanges with North Korea.

In the last few days, officials from the United States and Europe have joined Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland's complaints about the arrests. Saturday, for the first time, Freeland directly demanded that China release the two.

U.S. State Department spokesman Robert Palladino called for their freedom on Friday. British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said he was deeply concerned about a political motive for their arrests. A statement from the European Union said the national-security claim "raises concerns about legitimate research and business practices in China."

Germany and France have issued similar statements.

Hua suggested Canada's allies were being hypocrites and should turn their attention to Meng's detention.

"Where were their voices when the senior manager of the Chinese company was illegally detained by the Canadian side at the behest of the U.S. side?" Hua asked in a regular briefing at the Chinese foreign ministry, whose transcript is posted in English to the ministry website.

"It is quite obvious that the human rights they are talking about have different standards when it comes to citizens of different countries."

Sources familiar with Kovrig's situation say he is been held without access to a lawyer, in a cell with the lights on around the clock, and questioned three times a day. Hua said Kovrig and Spavor's rights are being respected in Chinese custody and Canadian diplomats have been allowed to see them, as Global Affairs Canada has confirmed.

Hua says Canada should "correct its mistakes" and free Meng.

Meng is currently out of custody on $10 million bail, staying at a house in Vancouver and not allowed to leave the country.

The U.S. wants her to face fraud charges over allegations she lied to American banks in an effort to get around Iran sanctions; law-enforcement officials asked Canada to detain her when she passed through Vancouver on her way to Mexico.

However it ends up, the extradition process could take years. [....]
https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2018/12/24/chinese-foreign-ministry-tells-u-s-eu-to-take-canada-to-task-for-meng-arrest-2/#.XCJhElxKjIW
================================================

Meng is the key to this. Only Trump can solve the problem. All of them are hostages, and there is the possibility that the arrests were ordered in order to mess up the negotiations that were going on with China.

The voices calling for the release of the victims mean nothing. Maybe favours are being repaid. It's the kind of stuff Crystia is good at -- meaningless fluff. The Americans have to back down from this step or it won't be resolved.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Inappropriate Language" Used During Top Gun Incident As China Buzzes Canadian Plane
by Tyler Durden
Wed, 12/26/2018 - 22:05

A Chinese military plane buzzed a Canadian surveillance aircraft, flying too close and using "inappropriate language," according to a Wednesday statement by Canada's top military commander.

The Canadian CP-140 Aurura, which has since returned home, was monitoring UN sanctions in international airspace off of North Korea in October when the Chinese plane harassed it as part of "a pattern of behavior that's inappropriate," revealed Canada's Chief of the Defense Staff Gen. Jonathan Vance during a year-end interview with CBC News.

"We have been interfered with on our flights in the area and been challenged inappropriately in international airspace," said Vance. He did not elaborate on the inappropriate language.

Quote:
Vance referred questions about the specifics to National Defence officials, who were less than forthcoming.

They conceded having "contact with the Chinese Air Force operating" near North Korea and insisted that "at no time were our crews or aircraft put at risk." -CBC


Part of a pattern

Similar incidents have been reported by Japan, Australia and New Zealand, according to the CBC.

The Canadians have come across the Chinese air force on 18 occasions over 12 missions in October. Of those, four had zero interactions with the Chinese, one had a single interaction, while seven had "multiple interactions," according to a statement from Canadian National Defense.

Quote:
Some in the diplomatic community, speaking on background Wednesday, said they see the incidents as China attempting to remind the West that they're in a region that is very sensitive to them — one where they are the predominant power.

The badgering involving the Canadian patrol aircraft happened before the recent spike in tension over Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei — including the arrest in Vancouver of a top company executive, Meng Wanzhou, 46, and the detention of three Canadian citizens in China.

Canadian warship HMCS Calgary and the supply ship MV Asterix recently returned to Esquimalt, B.C. from sanction enforcement patrols in the North Korea region. -CBC


According to Vance, the Canadian crews "did not face overt interference, but it's made very clear to anybody that's in that region that you're in China." The recent sanctions-related provocations undermines the freedom of navigation from both the sea and the air, he added. [....]
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-26/inappropriate-language-used-during-top-gun-incident-china-buzzes-canadian-plane
================================================

It seems that every time China comes in contact with a Canadian, or the Canadian government, it throws its weight around. But never fear Crystia will straighten this out n no time.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sarah McIver returned to Canada after arrest in China
By David Reevely, The Canadian Press — Dec 28 2018

OTTAWA — Albertan Sarah McIver has been released from custody in China, Global Affairs Canada says.

McIver had been detained over a work-permit issue related to her teaching job.

The department didn't say when McIver was released, or when she returned to Canada.

"Global Affairs can confirm that a Canadian citizen, who was detained in China this month, has been released and has now returned to Canada," spokesman Richard Walker said Friday.

"Due to the provisions under the Privacy Act, no further information can be disclosed," he said.

McIver's arrest followed those of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, two Canadians living and working in China, on allegations they were harming China's national security.

China arrested Kovrig and Spavor separately after Canadian authorities detained a Chinese technology executive in Vancouver. Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of electronics giant Huawei Technologies, is wanted in the United States on allegations she lied to American banks as part of an effort to get around sanctions on Iran.

China and Canada insisted McIver's case was different from Kovrig's and Spavor's.

Kovrig is a Canadian diplomat on leave from the foreign service to work with the anti-war International Crisis Group, travelling through China as a researcher and analyst.

Spavor has run an organization called the Paektu Cultural Exchange, promoting business and cultural ties with North Korea. He has met North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and helped arrange retired basketball star Dennis Rodman's visit to North Korea in 2014.

Chinese officials have not quite said that Kovrig and Spavor are in custody in retaliation for Meng's arrest on the U.S. extradition request, but they have pointedly linked the cases — insisting at length that Meng's arrest was illegal and an international affront, while Kovrig and Spavor have been detained properly under Chinese law.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying has treated McIver's case much more briskly when it's come up in the ministry's daily news conferences.

"The competent Chinese authority will deal with it in accordance with the law," Hua said in answer to one question about McIver last week, in an English transcript posted to the ministry's website.

David Reevely, The Canadian Press
https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2018/12/28/sarah-mciver-returned-to-canada-after-arrest-in-china-2/#.XCeqDVxKjIV
=================================================

They aren't saying anything for fear it would breech Justin's victim ... the poor English-language teacher in China.

How does this happen, bureaucratically? There she is, in the holding cell. What is to happen to her, she wonders? The administrators make a decision. She is already charged with a paperwork mistake. Is it a serious attempt to defraud? Probably not, but this isn't what this is about. They must be deciding whether to proceed with the charge or to drop it.

All we know now is that she's out of the country, coming back home.

Do we imagine that this just happens? If they dropped the charge, she would go back to teaching, perhaps. Or she would make plans to leave the country in a more orderly way. This looks like someone jumping bail. What's the bet that there was some kind of bond put up, and everyone involved knows that the best solution (for everybody) is to get out of the country. As fast as possible.

That's the way Canada should have handled the Meng case. Let her go on her own recognizance, and find some white male to blame when she slips out of the country. That's enough. Meng knows she can no longer travel to the West. Other top Chinese industrialists know it as well.

Just speculations, of course ...
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beijing Has Detained 13 Canadians Since Arrest Of Huawei CFO
by Tyler Durden
Fri, 01/04/2019 - 08:06

When the US published its latest travel advisory warning its citizens about the "arbitrary law enforcement" risks they could face in China (and offering a list of recommended precautions for those obstinate enough to ignore the government's warnings), some wondered, why now? With trade negotiations set to begin in earnest next week, one would think that the US wouldn't want to kick the hornet's nest (though, in fairness, the DOJ's steady stream of indictments against Chinese government-sponsored hackers have continued, as has the prosecution of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou).

Well, Canada's Globe and Mail might have just answered that question by confirming that the Beijing's suspected retaliation against Ottawa over Meng's arrest has been even more severe than previously believed. According to the paper, 13 Canadians have been detained in China since Dec. 1 - the day Meng was arrested by Canadian authorities after landing in Vancouver.

Until now, the arrests of only three Canadians - those of businessman Michael Spavor, former diplomat Michael Kovrig and teacher Sarah McIver (who has been deported) - had been publicly known.

Fortunately, eight of the 13 detainees have been released. And the Canadian government has so far refused to confirm the identities of the other 10.

But still, the report begs the question: Why has Justin Trudeau's government been so reluctant to issue a travel advisory of its own, as conservative lawmakers have been urging him to do?

Global Affairs Canada spokesman Guillaume Bérubé said in a statement to The Globe and Mail that the government is aware that 13 Canadians have been detained in China, excluding Hong Kong, since Dec. 1, 2018. Previously, only Michael Kovrig, Michael Spavor and Sarah McIver were publicly known to have been detained in China since Canada arrested Ms. Meng, chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. They were taken into custody after China promised retaliation for Ms. Meng’s arrest.

Mr. Bérubé said in the statement that at least eight of the 13 have been released. Global Affairs Canada did not disclose the identities of the other 10 Canadians.

Meanwhile, a top Chinese prosecutor said this week that Spavor and Kovrig had "without a doubt" violated laws pertaining to national security - though some suspect that this is merely a ruse to hold them in custody, since Chinese law offers broad latitude to authorities when it comes to issues of national security. McIver has been released and returned to Canada, but that's all that is known about the releases.

All told, some 200 Canadians are involved in some form of legal proceedings in China for a variety of alleged crimes and infractions - including one man who has been accused of smuggling "an enormous amount" of drugs into the country. Many are out on bail or on probation. Over the years, the number of Canadians detained in China has remained relatively constant (by comparison, some 900 Canadians are being held in US jails).

But that doesn't mean the recent spike in arrests isn't troubling.

As Tory lawmakers push for Canada to issue a travel advisor of its own, some report hearing anecdotal evidence about a spike in detentions of westerners in China.

The Conservatives are urging the government to issue a new travel warning for China in light of the detentions on Dec. 10 of Mr. Kovrig, an analyst for the non-profit organization International Crisis Group, and Mr. Spavor, who owns an organization that brings visitors to North Korea.

Tory foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole said he is concerned China is also using "administrative harassment" of Canadians, such as Ms. McIver, as retaliation. He said he is hearing from parents who are anxious about adult children teaching in China.

"In one case, there was a mother speaking to me about her son who had seen some other Western-looking teachers picked up by authorities on the street. Now, I have no idea if those were Canadians, but this was a son telling his mother, 'I’m a little concerned about what I see to be a bit more of a security interest in westerners,'" Mr. O’Toole said.

And rightfully so. China has likened Meng's detention to a kidnapping and has warned Ottawa to "prepare for escalation."

In its travel advisory, the US warned about Beijing's tendency to issue "exit bans" for foreigners without informing the target - sometimes they don't learn of the ban until they try to leave China and are stopped at airports or the border.

It's just the latest reason why any Westerners living or traveling on the mainland might want to considering getting out of Dodge.
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-01-04/beijing-has-detained-13-canadians-arrest-huawei-cfo
================================================

But don't worry, Crystia Freeland is on the job ... thankfully, she tells us, the detainees
(so far) have been white males, the very group her goverment is treating as "disposable", so ... no worries, so far.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Canadian parliamentarians push China to immediately free two detained Canadians
ROBERT FIFE OTTAWA BUREAU CHIEF
MICHELLE ZILIO PARLIAMENTARY AFFAIRS REPORTER
OTTAWA, OTTAWA BUREAU CHIEF
PUBLISHED JANUARY 7, 2019

A delegation of Canadian parliamentarians pressed Chinese officials on Monday to immediately release two jailed Canadians, warning the continued detentions have caused a “major chill” in relations between both countries.

Conservative MP Michael Cooper, one of the six lawmakers visiting China, said the delegation protested the treatment of former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor. The two men were arrested on Dec. 10 – nine days after Canada detained Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou at the request of U.S. law enforcement agencies, sparking angry protests from China and threats of reprisals.

Ms. Meng was later granted bail and is now waiting court proceedings while the two Canadians remain in jail and stand accused of engaging in activities that endanger China’s national security.

“We made it clear that from the standpoint of advancing important bilateral relations between Canada and China, that this represents a major chill,” Mr. Cooper said in a telephone interview from Shanghai. “Frankly, it is completely unacceptable that they are more or less denied access to consular services, they have been denied access to a lawyer, the detention conditions in which they are under are completely unacceptable. All of those points were raised.”

Mr. Kovrig’s employer, the International Crisis Group, says it has not heard anything directly from him since he was detained and does not know where he is being held. Canada’s ambassador to China, John McCallum, met with Mr. Kovrig on Dec. 14 but the detainee has not been visited by Canadian officials since. The group said they expect another consular visit to happen soon.

Karim Lebhour, a spokesperson for the International Crisis Group, said he believes Mr. Kovrig is likely facing the same treatment Canadians Julia and Kevin Garratt did when they were detained in China in 2014. Mr. Garratt spent 750 days in Chinese detention and was sentenced to eight years in prison for espionage before being deported. Ms. Garratt was detained for six months.

“We are not in a position to share any specific information about the conditions of his detention, but others in similar situations, like the Garratts, have described their condition of detention after having been released. They speak of intensive questioning several times a day, the lights in their room never switched off,” Mr. Lebhour said.

“There is no reason to believe that it is otherwise for Michael.”

In another case of a detained foreigner, Swedish human rights worker Peter Dahlin was forced to confess on Chinese TV to endangering “state security” in 2016 after he was arrested and subjected to intensive interrogation and solitary confinement.

Mr. Cooper said the delegation that includes senators Joseph Day and Victor Oh and Liberal MPs Geng Tan, Majid Jowhari and Chandra Arya, met with Zhang Daogen, president of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences and Sha Hailin, deputy-director general of the Shanghai People’s Congress. The MPs and senators belong to the Canada-China Legislative Association, which is funded by Parliament to promote relations between the countries. On trips to China, they usually engage with legislators and other officials. [....]
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-canadian-parliamentarians-push-china-to-immediately-free-two-canadians/
=================================================

Prediction: they will never be able to make their point to the decision-makers because they won't get close to meeting them. This is putting the best face on a bunch of Parlementarians slurping up the gravy before the election ...
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau enlists Trump to seek release of Canadians detained by China
By TONDA MACCHARLESOttawa Bureau
Mon., Jan. 7, 2019

OTTAWA—Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s office says U.S. President Donald Trump has agreed to “continue” to seek the release of two Canadians believed to be arbitrarily detained in China.

According to his office, Trudeau spoke to Trump Monday about a handful of bilateral issues including steel and aluminum tariffs, the closure of GM plants in both countries, and Canada’s arrest of a Huawei executive in response to a U.S. extradition request that enraged China.

President Donald Trump touches the shoulder of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as they prepare to sign a new trade agreement that replaced the NAFTA trade deal on Nov. 30, 2018. The two leaders talked on Jan. 7.
President Donald Trump touches the shoulder of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as they prepare to sign a new trade agreement that replaced the NAFTA trade deal on Nov. 30, 2018. The two leaders talked on Jan. 7. (MARTIN MEJIA / AP)

The Dec. 1 arrest in Vancouver of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, wanted on fraud-related charges tied to Iran sanctions, was followed days later by China’s arrest of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor on unspecified national security allegations.

A more-detailed-than-usual PMO readout of the Trudeau-Trump phone call suggests Trudeau made a case to Trump of the necessity of refraining from public comments that cast the Huawei case in a political framework.

It said the two leaders discussed “an extradition request made of Canada by the United States.”

“They reaffirmed the importance of respecting judicial independence and the rule of law,” said the PMO release.

It went on to say Trudeau thanked Trump “for the strong statements of support by the United States in response to the arbitrary detention of two Canadians in China.”

To date, Trump has not personally made any statement calling for the release of the Canadians.

Only Trump’s Secretary of State Mike Pompeo lent his voice to Canada’s concerns last month.

A senior government official speaking on background said Trudeau initiated the call to Trump Monday afternoon, and was pleased to be able to “count on the U.S. for their help.

“It’s helpful to have a commitment from the president to be on the same page” when it comes to seeking the men’s release,” the official said. While public statements of support for the detained Canadians by Canada’s allies are important, he said, “a lot of work happens behind the scenes.”

Governments in France, Australia, Britain and the European Union have backed Canada’s concern the men’s detention is in retaliation for the arrest of the Huawei executive.

In contrast, Trump told Reuters news agency he would intervene to block the extradition request of Meng if he thought it would help strike a better deal with China.

Now, Trudeau’s office says the release of the two detained Canadians is a shared goal: “The two leaders agreed to continue to seek their release.”

It is not clear if Trump did in fact agree to make the release of the Canadians a priority. Trump made no mention of it in two exchanges with reporters on Monday.

The Canada-U.S. call comes as talks to resolve the ongoing bitter trade dispute and tariff war between the U.S. and China got underway Monday in Beijing.

However, Trump told reporters Sunday he believed the Chinese “want to make a deal” with his administration because “their economy is not doing well.”

Trump said the U.S. tariffs he imposed on Chinese imports “have absolutely hurt China very badly” while the U.S. is taking in “a lot of money through tariffs.”

“My relationship with President Xi is as good as any relationship that a president here has had with a president or leader in China. And I think good things are going to happen.”

Conservative foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole said in an interview the PMO release is a clear attempt to show that Canada was obliged under extradition law to act on the U.S. request, and to suggest the comments by Trump were damaging and unfortunate.

“I think a call with the president on all these things is always good,” said O’Toole. “But the fact that he hasn’t made that leader-to-leader call with the Chinese president (Xi Jinping) causes concern, because we’ve been asking for that since mid-December.”

“And he (Trudeau) is treating this as a consular case when it isn’t a consular situation at all. This is a state-to-state dispute. It’s clearly not going well and if he called President Trump on it, he should call President Xi as well.”

In addition to speaking about the detained Canadians and the arrest of Meng, the PMO said Trudeau and Trump discussed “the importance of trade and jobs, building upon the successful renegotiation of the new North American Free Trade Agreement. They reaffirmed their support for workers affected by the closure of General Motors plants in Canada and the United States, and discussed next steps in addressing steel and aluminum tariffs.”

But there was no clear indication that the U.S. tariffs that were imposed in June on Canadian steel and aluminum tariffs — which Trump has slapped on global imports including China’s — would be lifted anytime soon.

Meanwhile, a Canadian delegation of senators and MPs was in China Monday on a business and education trip. Conservative MP Michael Cooper told CBC the delegation made clear to their counterparts there can be no business as usual in Canada-China relations as long as the two Canadians remain detained.
https://www.thestar.com/politics/federal/2019/01/07/trudeau-enlists-trump-to-seek-release-of-canadians-detained-by-china.html
=================================================

This must be humiliating for Justin, after insulting him on his departure from the G8 meeting. One wonders -- what is the price? One also wonders what priority that Trump will give it. It must also mean that Crystia's charm is limited to ... southern Ontario?
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOL! Such revisionist hogswallow.

The orange idiot caused this mess of course he is being asked to make it right.

If orange dude hadnt spoken this may well have taken a better turn for us.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chrystia Freeland is doing stellar work huh bugs?

Australia, UK, USA, and the EU are all in asking China to release the Canucks.

Gosh, it must just butter your chops to get all those countries disagreeing with you.

Relax, another one will come along to trip you up.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 12:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a stellar job? A stellar job would be avoiding these pitfalls in the first place.

It just keeps escalating. I wonder how many more Canadians are in a jail in China?
=================================================

China’s ambassador: why the double standard on justice for Canadians, Chinese?
By CHINESE AMBASSADOR LU SHAYE JAN. 9, 2019
It seems that, to some people, only Canadian citizens should be treated in a humanitarian manner and their freedom deemed valuable, while Chinese people do not deserve that.

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, pictured at a 2014 investment forum in Russia, was arrested at the Vancouver International Airport last month and is awaiting potential extradition to the United States. Photograph courtesy of the Kremlin
Recently, China’s competent authorities took compulsory measures in accordance with the law against two Canadian nationals who are suspected of engaging in activities that endanger China’s national security. Some Canadians and some in the Canadian news media, in disregard of China’s judicial sovereignty, accused China of arbitrary detention and demanded their immediate release.

However, on the prior groundless detention of Chinese citizen Meng Wanzhou by Canada at the behest of the United States, these same people made utterly different comments. They insisted that Canada’s detention of a Chinese citizen who was transferring planes at the airport was “acting in accordance with law,” though Meng has not been charged with any violation of Canadian law.

It’s understandable that these Canadians are concerned about their own citizens. But have they shown any concern or sympathy for Meng after she was illegally detained and deprived of freedom?

Without violating any Canadian law, Meng was arrested last month and put in handcuffs just as she was changing planes at the Vancouver International Airport. It seems that, to some people, only Canadian citizens shall be treated in a humanitarian manner and their freedom deemed valuable, while Chinese people do not deserve that.

When China called on the Canadian side to release Meng and ensure her legal and legitimate rights and interests, those elites claimed in the media that Canada is a country of rule of law and has an independent judiciary, and therefore it must comply with the judicial proceeding. However, in the case of detention of Canadian citizens in China who violated China’s law, those elites completely dismissed China’s law and presumptuously urged China to immediately release their citizens. It seems that, to those people, the laws of Canada or other Western countries are laws and must be observed, while China’s laws are not and shouldn’t be respected.

Some people in Canada, without any evidence, have been hyping the idea that Huawei is controlled by the Chinese government and poses security threats to Canada and other Western countries, and that Chinese law requires China’s enterprises to collaborate with the government in espionage activities. However, these same people have conveniently ignored the PRISM Program, Equation Group, and Echelon—global spying networks operated by some countries that have been engaging in large-scale and organized cyber stealing, and spying and surveillance activities on foreign governments, enterprises, and individuals. These people also took a laissez-faire attitude toward a country that infringes on its citizens’ privacy rights through the Patriot Act. They shouted for a ban by the Five Eyes alliance countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States) on the use of Huawei equipment by these countries’ own enterprises, which is literally a government-controlled action.

When making laws for national security and intelligence, China has drawn references from the relevant laws of the U.S., Canada, and other Western countries. Something is considered as “safeguarding national security” when it is done by Western countries. But it is termed “conducting espionage” when done by China. What’s the logic?

Canada, pulling a few individual countries such as the U.S. and the U.K. on its side, pressed China in the name of “the international community” to release its citizens. Do a handful of Western countries really represent the whole international community? To those would-be representatives of the international community, non-Western countries are not members of the international community and only their countries can call the shots on international affairs.

I have recently heard a word repeatedly pronounced by some Canadians: bullying. They said that by arresting two Canadian citizens as retaliation for Canada’s detention of Meng, China was bullying Canada. To those people, China’s self-defence is an offence to Canada. If someone slaps you on your left cheek, give him your right cheek, they told us. But I have never seen them doing as they said.

The reason why some people are used to arrogantly adopting double standards is due to Western egotism and white supremacy. In such a context, the rule of law is nothing but a tool for their political ends and a fig leaf for their practising hegemony in the international arena. What they have been doing is not showing respect for the rule of law, but mocking and trampling the rule of law.

Lu Shaye is the Chinese ambassador to Canada.
https://www.hilltimes.com/2019/01/09/double-standard-justice-canadians-chinese/182367
================================================
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lu Shaye is the Chinese ambassador to Canada.

LOL!

Next up , 'Meal Preps " by Jeffery Dahmer.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But Justin did start off a cycle of hostage-taking to suck up to the Americans who he had offended so stupidly.

Or maybe it was Crystia's dumb move.

Worst bit of Canadian diplomacy ever!
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
But Justin did start off a cycle of hostage-taking to suck up to the Americans who he had offended so stupidly.

Or maybe it was Crystia's dumb move.

Worst bit of Canadian diplomacy ever!


I see by this post that you have no understanding about law and treaties. Thats too bad.

Perhaps you could go learn about them and then come back? I know I know, better to post about your feels than debate about how being a signatory to something means you have to act persuant to the regs.


Stay SOS or not. Your choice.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In this I am joined by a bunch of people in various world capitals who are shaking their heads at how Canada could so foolishly put its own citizens in peril like this when it was so easy to let her escape.

They also screwed up with Saudi Arabia and have irked the Americans enough that they put tariffs on our most important exports.

Masterful performance.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
In this I am joined by a bunch of people in various world capitals who are shaking their heads at how Canada could so foolishly put its own citizens in peril like this when it was so easy to let her escape.


Oops...some one is getting the news based on feels again. You really shouldnt but I know its hard when the exact opposite is out there to prove you wrong.

UK, Aus, NZ, USA are all asking the same on our behalf.
Quote:


They also screwed up with Saudi Arabia and have irked the Americans enough that they put tariffs on our most important exports.

Masterful performance.


Its funny watching you pound your keyboard with pomposity in light of the exact opposite being the reality.

Saudi Arabia, especially in light of Kashoggi death, is and has looked horrible on the world stage.
Every first world country thought the response of SA was waaaaay out of proportion to the slight.

Funny how that works huh? Reading comprehension 101....you fail.
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The Huawei Arrest & what it means

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