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Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Maccallum should be fired.

Pure and simple. How he could have got this so wrong is bizarre.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think he's doing what diplomats are supposed to do ... to schmooze up to an ethnic audience with inside dope on what's really going on. McCallum is looking for some middle ground.

Quote:
... people in China have found support for that position in an unexpected place: Canada’s own ambassador to China, John McCallum, who in a conversation with Chinese-language media in Markham, Ont,. this week said Ms. Meng has “some strong arguments that she can make” to fight extradition, among them “political involvement” in the case by U.S. President Donald Trump.

Mr. McCallum also said it’s possible Ms. Meng could be freed through a deal between Washington and Beijing – a potential outcome that suggests the U.S. case against Ms. Meng is subject to both political interference and a political solution.

That aligns closely with the arguments Chinese authorities have made, and, on Thursday, Mr. McCallum’s remarks found a welcome audience in China.

“It’s obvious that Canada is taking a pro-China stance on Meng’s case at this time,” said Lin Hongyu, Dean of the College of International Relations at Huaqiao University.

With reporting by Alexandra
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-ambassador-mccallum-raises-eyebrows-in-canada-but-finds-welcome/


I think that's why McCallum got this plum posting -- he's an old Liberal. It's because he has more common sense than all the rest of them, drunk or sober. The current crop lured him out of cabinet with the ambassadorship to China. His wife is Chinese. It's a good appointment.

================================================

I have done a quick scan of 'the coverage, and I have to say -- it's alarmist. Trudeau is reacting with some aplomb. I give him credit, it's like he quit looking in the mirror. This is probably progress.

The mistake is in using it as election fodder and disclosing it to a group of Chinese Canadian hustlers. But that might have had the OK of head office too.

Now the key player is the US and, of course, Trump.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ambassador John McCallum says it would be ‘great for Canada’ if U.S. drops extradition request for Huawei’s Meng Wanzhou
By JOANNA CHIUStarMetro Vancouver
WANYEE LIStarMetro Vancouver
MICHAEL MUIStarMetro Vancouver
Fri., Jan. 25, 2019

VANCOUVER—After his earlier comments on Meng Wanzhou drew calls for his firing, Canada’s ambassador to China is now arguing it would be “great” if the United States relinquishes its attempt to extradite Huawei’s chief financial officer.

“From Canada’s point of view, if (the U.S.) drops the extradition request, that would be great for Canada,” John McCallum told the Star on Friday.

The Star’s reporter, speaking to McCallum at a charity lunch in downtown Vancouver, identified herself as a journalist at the beginning of the conversation and held out a recorder while they spoke.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Wednesday he is standing by the ambassador, in spite of Conservative calls for McCallum to be fired for saying Huawei’s Meng has “strong arguments” to fight extradition to the United States.

In a series of surprisingly frank comments earlier this week, McCallum also revealed new details about the strain on Canada-China relations and the pressure Canada faces from allies to ban Huawei.

McCallum apologized late Thursday for several of his remarks, saying he “misspoke” when he said Meng had strong arguments to fight extradition, but he did not reference or walk back all his comments. [....]
https://www.thestar.com/vancouver/2019/01/25/it-would-be-great-for-canada-if-us-drops-extradition-request-for-huaweis-meng-wanzhou-ambassador-says.html
==================================================

McCallum didn't misspeak -- he was just caught being realistic, which is not without its risks. He's actually trying to find a way out of this mess.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

McCallum firing leaves Canada's China strategy in disarray


The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, January 26, 2019 2:46PM EST
Last Updated Sunday, January 27, 2019 7:51AM EST


OTTAWA -- Canada's strategy for navigating growing tensions with China is in disarray after Justin Trudeau fired his ambassador to Beijing.

The prime minister's office announced Saturday that ambassador John McCallum had been told to hand in his resignation -- just hours after he weighed in on a high-stakes extradition case for the second time in less than a week.

McCallum was quoted in a Vancouver newspaper as saying it would be "great for Canada" if the United States dropped its extradition request for Meng Wanzhou, the Huawei executive who was detained in Vancouver last month.

He told StarMetro Vancouver on Friday that if the U.S. and China reach an agreement on Meng's case, the deal should include the release of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, two Canadians currently detained in China for what many analysts say is revenge for the detention of Meng.

"We have to make sure that if the U.S. does such a deal, it also includes the release of our two people. And the U.S. is highly aware of that," McCallum told the Star.

That comment followed a statement McCallum issued Thursday, saying he misspoke earlier in the week when he discussed Meng's case with a group of Chinese-language journalists in Toronto, listing several arguments he thought could help her legal fight against extradition.

At first, Trudeau stood by his former minister. But McCallum's statements put the Liberal government in a touchy position. Trudeau has spent considerable effort and political capital over the past month telling world leaders that because of Canada's inherent respect for the rule of law, Canadian authorities had no choice but to detain Meng, and that the extradition process was not political.

McCallum's dismissal was too little too late for Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, who had called on Trudeau to fire the ambassador as early as Wednesday, on the grounds that McCallum's remarks raised concerns about the politicization of the Meng case.

"Justin Trudeau should have fired his ambassador the moment he interfered in this case. Instead, he did nothing and allowed more damage to be done. More weakness and more indecision from Trudeau on China," Scheer tweeted Saturday.

"It should never have come to this."

Paul Evans, a China expert at the University of British Columbia, said this is the "most difficult and emotional moment in Canada-China relations in 30 years" -- since the Tiananmen Square aftermath.

The arrest of Meng may have been the immediate trigger but damage to Canada was almost inevitable because the country was already at the mercy of two much larger global forces: The clash between Chinese president Xi Jinping's growing authoritarianism and U.S. President Donald Trump's aggressive America First agenda.

"We're going deeper into the rabbit hole of Canada-China interactions. We are at a moment when we really don't know how deep that hole will get," Evan said in an interview the day before McCallum was fired.

Trust and respect have been thrown into question, and there's no more benefit of the doubt between Canada and China, he said.


By appointing McCallum to the Beijing post in the cabinet shuffle in 2017 Trudeau appeared to have the right person in place to push Canada's trade agenda with China even further.

Already an experienced cabinet minister, his biggest achievement was in the immigration portfolio in delivering on Trudeau's promise to bring tens of thousands of Syrian refugees into Canada.

McCallum also had strong personal ties to China. His wife has Chinese ethnicity and his three sons have Chinese spouses, something McCallum was fond of pointing out.

He also had a large Chinese constituency in his former federal riding in Markham, Ont.

Now that political investment is gone.

"In this hypersensitive era, we're all hyperventilating. Every twist and turn in this story, every comment just seems to put a little more salt in a wound that is getting deeper and not healing," Evans said.

In a brief scrum in Ottawa, Scheer accused the prime minister of damaging not only Canada's international reputation, but its chances of securing the release of Kovrig and Spavor.

He said McCallum's initial comments raised the spectre of political interference in the Meng case, and that by failing to act immediately, Trudeau undercut his own assurances that the case would be handled independently by the courts.

"This is, I think, part of a bigger problem. And that is Justin Trudeau's approach to diplomacy, where he thought he could conduct image-over-substance foreign affairs. And now Canadians are paying for his mistakes," Scheer said.

"Canadians' treatment in China is being affected by this."

The PMO declined to comment on exactly what led to the prime minister's change of heart about McCallum's fate.

In a news release announcing the ambassador's resignation, Trudeau thanked McCallum for nearly two decades of service. He noted that McCallum served as minister of immigration and refugees between 2015 and 2017, during the height of Canada's effort to resettle Syrian refugees.

In the wake of McCallum's resignation, Jim Nickel, deputy head of mission at the Embassy of Canada in Beijing, will represent the country in China as charge d'affaires effective immediately, the prime minister said.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/mccallum-firing-leaves-canada-s-china-strategy-in-disarray-1.4270477
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another blunder. Just when I was going to give the Liberals a little credit for having some practical common sense, too!

Diplomats are supposed to do exactly what McCallum was doing -- finding the middle ground, communicating the 'real' messages between governments (from behind the official positions). They get to nose around, to do what might be considered 'spying' even ... But they are supposed to keep it all quiet. That's McCallum's sin, forgivable if you ask me.

As an example, in this case, McCallum' would start by saying Meng's arrest was a treaty obligation, and the Chinese would be saying Meng has committed no crime, and McCallum would be pouring him some tea, and giving assurances about the independence of the Canadian judiciary, and the Chinese guy would go into a coughing spell. he snorting a fine mist of tea out of his nostrils ... and when he recovered, he says That was a good one' ... I haven't laughed that hard since Obama got put over the barrel by Iran. Or something like that. And McCallum might offer something else to drink, to soothe the throat. They might pour another drink, this time stronger stuff, and at the end of the night, McCallum (privately) would admit the American case was dubious, and the Chinese guy would agree (privately) that they were running the American blockade of Iran, and the Americans had to do something. And they ask each other (privately) What can be done about it?

Trudeau has signalled (by firing his Ambassador) that he is closing down this line of negotiations. The Chinese will take it that way -- we don't want a solution. They will see it as a hardening of 'the lines', and that Canada has stepped back to their official position.

These idiots, for all their low cunning when it comes to the carbon tax, can't help themselves -- they just keep compounding their errors. And the media, mindful of that $500,000,000.00 'slush fund' the Liberals have, will all applaud.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Canadian man, 61, arrested in China on fraud charges: local media
By The Canadian Press — Jan 27 2019

A Canadian man has reportedly been detained in China on allegations of fraud.

The South China Morning Post, citing local media, says the 61-year-old Canadian is accused of trying to defraud an unnamed entertainment company out of C$375 million.

The newspaper says the man, whose full name is not given, allegedly tried to use fake papers to transfer the money from the company's account to an account in Hong Kong.

Global Affairs Canada did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the matter, but the latest arrest comes in the midst of testy diplomatic relations between the two countries. [....]
https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2019/01/27/canadian-man-61-arrested-in-china-on-fraud-charges-local-media/#.XE5J1FxKjIW
=================================================

I would imagine that, right about now, Robert Lloyd Schellenberg is cursing his damned luck ... Schellenberg is part of a drug ring who was recently sentenced to death in China.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We see that the public humiliation of McCallum has only made things worse. How do you think that Mr. McCallum's replacement will be received?
=================================================

McCallum’s firing draws anger in China as Trudeau turns to career diplomat for Beijing post
ROBERT FIFE OTTAWA BUREAU CHIEF
STEVEN CHASE
BILL CURRY
NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE ASIA CORRESPONDENT
OTTAWA AND BEIJING
PUBLISHED JANUARY 27, 2019

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s weekend firing of Canada’s ambassador to China, John McCallum, is drawing anger in Beijing from those who saw the former Liberal cabinet minister as a connected, co-operative figure and promoter of a “great new era” between the two countries.

Mr. McCallum was removed from his job Saturday after twice wading into the legal case surrounding Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who was detained in Vancouver on an extradition request from the U.S. government.

Mr. McCallum’s departure is another twist in the continuing diplomatic row between Ottawa and Beijing that began with Ms. Meng’s arrest on Dec. 1 and the subsequent detention of former diplomat Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor. Chinese authorities have loudly demanded Ms. Meng’s immediate release, calling the case against her a political attempt by the United States and Canada to constrain Huawei, a Chinese technological powerhouse. Prosecutors in the United States accuse Ms. Meng of fraud related to the violation of sanctions against Iran, and have sought her extradition, and officials in both Canada and the United States have said that the case against her is purely a legal one.

A senior government official said Mr. McCallum has undermined Canada’s efforts to build an international coalition of countries to press Beijing to respect the rule of law and release the two Canadian detainees. The official was granted anonymity by The Globe and Mail because they were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. [....]
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-trudeau-set-to-face-grilling-on-mccallum-firing-when-parliament/
=================================================
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

McCallum made a huge blunder and has now paid for it.

Good.

As a lifelong politician he knew he should never have waded into the waters concerning judicial concerns in light of the sensitivity of the charge Meng faces.

He is an ambassador and that means he needs tact and savvy. NOT giving the chinese any false hope or trying to impress the chinese on how to beat this thing. His ridiculous assertions only hurt his country .

So he paid.

Other ambassadors will not be as loose in the future.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Still, you would have to say that firing McCallum has only put a settlement further away, would you not?

In which case, the government has compounded the original blunder with its own blunder. Or .. baby going out with the bathwater, you know. That's fair, wouldn't you say?
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Still, you would have to say that firing McCallum has only put a settlement further away, would you not?

Our settlement is with the US.

They either charge her (and they are/have) within the time frame or we release her.

She will be going stateside soon enough.
Quote:

In which case, the government has compounded the original blunder with its own blunder. Or .. baby going out with the bathwater, you know. That's fair, wouldn't you say?

What blunder ?

They had to do what they had to do. They saved face giving her home arrest. It makes it appear as no hardship imposed.

The govt doesnt run the judiciary as much as Harper tried , and learned he cannot, and must let things run its course.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is why you understand so little about politics.

Canada ought to have fumbled its way out of this mess, rather than fumbled its way into it.

They could have let the Mexicans hash it out with the Americans. (She was transferring to a flight to Mexico).

Instead, we fumbled our way into a mess that's leading to our drug dealers being executed. (Ask Justin if a Canadian is a Canadian if the person involved in a white cis-gendered male drug dealer?

The Charter is full of things they have to do -- the fundamental things they must do as part of the social contract -- for instance, make sure the Courts build in the right to a speedy trial -- which the Anointed Ones ignore with impunity. They don't do it, though they must.

Our "freedom of speech" now has so many holes in it that it's in tatters.

Why should these people honour a dubious treaty obligation when they freely ignore our own Constitution when it suits them?
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
This is why you understand so little about politics.

Snicker...
Quote:

Canada ought to have fumbled its way out of this mess, rather than fumbled its way into it.

And here you would be shitting on Canada for ignoring a legal American request.
Quote:

They could have let the Mexicans hash it out with the Americans. (She was transferring to a flight to Mexico).

See, legalities I am confident I know about.

The US specifically asked us. As a friend and ally, we answer the call. So we did.
Quote:

Instead, we fumbled our way into a mess that's leading to our drug dealers being executed.

Who has been executed? No one? Oh okay then. Thanks for playing.
Quote:


Our "freedom of speech" now has so many holes in it that it's in tatters.

And what does this have to do with anything?

Nothing? Oh ok, just filler for uneducated folk. Cool story bro.
Quote:

Why should these people honour a dubious treaty obligation when they freely ignore our own Constitution when it suits them?

Aww poor widdle buggsy has another tantrum about something he knows nothing about.

Uneducated folk are the worst.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The poor soul ... he has to defend the we had no choice argument.

There was no need for the monster bail, and the ankle bracelet. Trust me, there are big interests in the USA that would like to see Meng taken out of the trade issue. That could well include Donald Trump himself.

And if she fled back to China, why is the world a worse place?
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
The poor soul ... he has to defend the we had no choice argument.

What you see as 'we had no choice" , I see as respecting what we signed on to. In this case it is very clear.

In spite of my dislike for the ornage idiot, I do not share that w the rest of the US and as such want my govt to honour its commitments .
Quote:

There was no need for the monster bail, and the ankle bracelet.

I dont know why Meng suggested them before the court did.
Quote:

Trust me,

Uh oh...theres that word again. Anytime I see it means there will be some ill suited or wishy washy feels emanating from your depths.
Always seen with no evidence of truth. Just feels.
Quote:

And if she fled back to China, why is the world a worse place?


Simpleton thinking.

Im willing to bet if you were the CEO of HSBC and facing huge losses in liability payments you would not say the same.

Expand your thinking.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why don't you care about the commitments the government made with the Charter? Why not start there? Your priorities are ass-backwards.

The way I look at it is if the government isn't keeping its commitments to its own citizens, what right has it to put its citizens' interests at risk because of less serious obligations to foreign states against whom that government has actively campaigned?

You can do this "Ready, aye ready" stuff if you like, but not me.
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The Huawei Arrest & what it means

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