Home FAQ Search Memberlist User Groups Register Login   

BloggingTories.ca Forum IndexBloggingTories.ca Forum Index
    Index     FAQ     Search     Register     Login         JOIN THE DISCUSSION - CLICK HERE      


Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next  

Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 2 of 4
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 8053
Reputation: 321.1Reputation: 321.1
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As has been discussed here for nearly a year:

Quote:
President Donald Trump is “seriously considering” seeking separate trade talks with Canada and Mexico but he doesn’t plan to withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement, White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said.

"His preference now, he asked me to convey this, is to actually negotiate with Mexico and Canada separately," Kudlow said Tuesday during an interview on Fox News. "I know this is just three countries but still, you know, oftentimes when you have to compromise with a whole bunch of countries you get the worst of the deals."

Kudlow’s comments suggest Trump is serious about the position he staked out Friday, when he floated the idea of pursuing bilateral pacts with the Nafta partners in response to questions from reporters about the status of negotiations. Canada and Mexico have said they are committed to keeping the 1994 trade agreement a trilateral accord, while Trump has punctuated the talks under way since August with regular threats to withdraw altogether.

Trump doesn’t plan to quit Nafta, Kudlow said on Tuesday.

“The president’s not going to leave Nafta. He’s not going to withdraw from Nafta,” said Kudlow. “He’s just going to try a different approach. I can’t offer timing here, but judging from what he told us yesterday, I think he’d like to start that approach rather quickly.”


https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-06-05/trump-wants-separate-nafta-talks-for-canada-mexico-kudlow-says
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you have any comments about our strategy so far, or of another strategy that would be "win-win"?
cosmostein





Joined: 04 Oct 2006
Posts: 8053
Reputation: 321.1Reputation: 321.1
votes: 21
Location: The World

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My comments are largely the same;

Its the usual bizarro world economic vortex that the Liberals like to play within.

They thumb their nose at the Americans to play to their base at home yet are virtually inactive on the trade portfolio to give Canadians an alternative for exports.

Then attempt to sell themselves as proactive and progressive on trade, while in reality if not for the actions of the last guys their trade performance has bordered on the Qwazi-Protectionism that is usually reserved for "far right" European Political Parties.

It appears that they are close to an agreement, but at the end of the day I don't believe we are viewed as the "problem" in this trade agreement. NAFTA was largely reopened to deal with the Mexico portion we just became a bonus.

Having a one to one discussion with the Americans wouldn't be a bad idea at the moment, but I am still not sold on the fact that this larger overall NAFTA 2 deal won't be sealed before the Mexican General Election in July.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another bonehead move!

Quote:
ANALYSIS
The G7 leaders plan to confront Trump on trade. So who goes first?

The other six G7 members are not as united as they might like

Evan Dyer · CBC News · Posted: Jun 08, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 3 hours ago

U.S. President Donald Trump's imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum against some of his country's closest allies has set the stage for a potentially combative G7 leaders summit this weekend. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press)

By all accounts, he'd really rather be somewhere else — preferably at home in his own bed, with his own remote control — and not in Canada being criticized by his annoyingly earnest counterparts in the G7.

But it appears U.S. President Donald Trump will make the trip to Charlevoix, Que. today after all.

That may be a small victory for Canada as the host country. It also will give world leaders a chance for face time with the president, to express their frustration over a long list of issues with his administration.

That will make for some difficult conversations. Trump's chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow predicts he will "talk tough" and will be "sticking to his guns" on the tariff dispute that has riven the first-world leaders' club.

That's been happening already. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Emmanuel Macron of France both had unpleasant conversations with the volatile U.S. president when they called him to remonstrate over the tariffs. Trudeau's exchange with Trump famously included the president pointing out that "you guys burned the White House" (or words to that effect).


Quote:
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Please tell Prime Minister Trudeau and President Macron that they are charging the U.S. massive tariffs and create non-monetary barriers. The EU trade surplus with the U.S. is $151 Billion, and Canada keeps our farmers and others out. Look forward to seeing them tomorrow.

6:04 PM - Jun 7, 2018
71.3K
40.8K people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy

The personal dynamics
It's no secret that Trump likes to be the centre of attention. He will certainly get his wish in Quebec.

But he does not like multilateral arrangements, such as summits, and has said so. He skipped the Summit of the Americas in Peru in April, sending Vice-President Mike Pence in his stead.

There's no getting around the fact that Trump's personality can make him difficult to handle.

G7 leaders may struggle to reach consensus on Russian election interference
Ahead of G7 meeting, Trudeau dismisses Trump's War of 1812 comment as a 'quip'
He doesn't like criticism, as several former cabinet members and staffers can confirm. Indeed, if his televised cabinet meetings are any guide, Trump's idea of a meeting is to go round the table and have others compete in lavishing him with praise.

All of that raises the question of which G7 leader will take the lead in confronting him.

The cost of confrontation
In an old fable, the mice all assemble in a summit to address the question plaguing their community: the cat keeps on surprising them, pouncing and picking them off one by one. What to do?

Then one mouse has a brilliant idea: tie a bell around the cat's neck so he can't sneak up on anybody anymore.

"Brilliant!" say the other mice. Then one mouse raises an awkward question — who bells the cat?

Certainly, most of the other six leaders present this weekend want Trump to hear the message that his actions are endangering old alliances, as well as the rules-based system of international trade.

But who among them wants to take the lead and risk his ire?

Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte seems particularly ill-suited to take up the banner of free trade. He's been in office all of a week, represents a Trump-like populist coalition held together mainly by mutual hostility toward foreigners, and used his maiden speech to call for closer ties with Russia.

Trudeau might shoulder the responsibility as host of the summit. But he also leads the nation that has most to lose from a trade war with the U.S.

Macron has been cast as a Trump whisperer, after flattering the U.S. president's ego by hosting him at a Bastille Day military parade in Paris. But as he reportedly found out during a recent phone call to the Oval Office, that doesn't give him license to criticize.

Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel is the senior statesperson of the group, and is famous for her ability to be both frank and diplomatic at the same time. But Trump dislikes her and hasn't bothered to hide it.

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, like other U.K. leaders before her, is keen to preserve the mythical "special relationship" with the U.S. — so much so that she seems wary of actually using it. If she tried to, it might well turn out to be less special than the British like to think.

Japan brings its own issues
Like Macron and Trudeau, Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe worked to establish a personal rapport with the U.S. president, and appears to have been successful. Abe is of Trump's generation, unlike the youthful Frenchman and Canadian, and is a fellow conservative.

But the other leaders, watching Abe fly to Washington for private talks just a day before the G7 opened, surely will have concluded that he can't be counted on to be part of a unified front. And Abe's joint news conference with Trump made it clear that he won't be the one to challenge the tariffs.

The subject of North Korea and next week's summit with the U.S. dominated Thursday's White House press conference with U.S. President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, left. (Andrew Harnik/Associated Press)
Like Trump, Abe almost certainly considers the pending summit with North Korea's Kim Jong-Un to be more important than this one. Japan is within easy range of even the older North Korean missiles and has no deterrent of its own. And unlike the western G7 members, Japan is not a member of NATO's mutual defence pact; its security is wholly dependent on its 1960 defence pact with the U.S.

Moreover, the Japanese are less affected by the tariffs than some of the other members. Eighty per cent of its steel is sold within Asia, only 5 per cent to the U.S.

And the Japanese sell specialty steels into the U.S. market that will be difficult for U.S. buyers to source domestically. When that happens, U.S. buyers are allowed to seek a tariff exemption for that specific product. Japan is counting on those exemption requests to further reduce the harm to their producers.

And so, Japan may give Trump a chance to change the subject from trade to security.

The trouble with 'facts'
Whoever attempts to bell the cat might want to avoid some of the errors the media have made in trying to understand Trump.

Quote:
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Prime Minister Trudeau is being so indignant, bringing up the relationship that the U.S. and Canada had over the many years and all sorts of other things...but he doesn’t bring up the fact that they charge us up to 300% on dairy — hurting our Farmers, killing our Agriculture!

7:44 PM - Jun 7, 2018
78.3K
46K people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy

The trade experts journalists ask to explain Trump's trade actions are well-qualified to describe their likely effects. But to understand the motivations behind them, we might be better off speaking to a psychologist.

It's not that Trump hasn't heard the facts. He surely heard them from his former economic adviser Gary Cohn, a strong advocate of free trade. He has heard them from Larry Kudlow, the free-trader who replaced Cohn.

Having foreign leaders repeat the same lines he has heard from his own people is unlikely to produce a breakthrough.

And if Donald Trump believes America has been pushed around in "terrible" trade deals, and wants to show his base that he is now standing up for the country, will he allow himself to be publicly turned from his course by a group of pushy foreign leaders ganging up on him?
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4696898


This is a losing line for Trudeau. He will only stess his lack of heft, and his arrogance in this exchange. We should be looking for a quick deal on the basis that we're not the offenders. Swap supply management for somethig else, like softwood lumber.

Instead, Trudeau thinks he can muster the forces of world indignation and bring it to bear on the recalcitrant Trump. He doesn't understand who has the power.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
As G-7 Fractures In Canada, Putin Meets Xi In China
by Tyler Durden
Fri, 06/08/2018

While President Trump insults his erstwhile foreign partners in a colorful twitter tirade ahead of a G-7 (or rather, G-6+1) summit in Quebec, exposing the very real fragmentation of longtime western partnerships as the US cracks down on unfair foreign trade practices, a productive meeting between China's "Emperor for Life" Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin has been completely overshadowed, as Bloomberg points out.

The two leaders held their first meeting this year on Thursday ahead of the June 9 Shanghai Cooperation Organization meeting - an eight-member group led by China and Russia - which will be held in the port city of Qingdao.


Quote:
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Please tell Prime Minister Trudeau and President Macron that they are charging the U.S. massive tariffs and create non-monetary barriers. The EU trade surplus with the U.S. is $151 Billion, and Canada keeps our farmers and others out. Look forward to seeing them tomorrow.

6:04 PM - Jun 7, 2018
79.4K
44.4K people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy


Quote:
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Prime Minister Trudeau is being so indignant, bringing up the relationship that the U.S. and Canada had over the many years and all sorts of other things...but he doesn’t bring up the fact that they charge us up to 300% on dairy — hurting our Farmers, killing our Agriculture!

7:44 PM - Jun 7, 2018
89.8K
51.7K people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy

But the west is ignoring the burgeoning partnership between the two countries - both permanent members of the UN Security Council - at its own peril. Because Putin and Xi are playing an ever-expanding role in resolving global disputes like, for example, the dispute between the US and North Korea. For example, both leaders support North Korea's demands that any denuclearization agreement stipulate that the process happen in stages - something that the Pentagon initially opposed, though Trump has more recently said he'd be open to it.

Quote:
"China and Russia have common interests in regards to the resolution of the Korean crisis," said Alexey Muraviev, a Russia strategic and defense affairs specialist at Curtin University in Perth, Australia. "Their pragmatism is driven by the belief that it is better to have the regime that is in place rather than hope for another one."


Indeed, the final shape of a North Korea denuclearization deal (assuming one is reached) will likely need the blessing of Beijing, if not both Beijing and Moscow, before it becomes a reality. Because ultimately both countries want to ensure that hostilities don't break out on their borders with the North, and that US and NATO troops remain as far from their borders as possible. Already Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has assured his North Korean counterpart that any deal "must involve the lifting of sanctions" - pushing back against the US's insistence that sanctions won't be lifted until North Korea is nearing full denuclearization.

China and Russia have been pushing for a deal between the US and North Korea since early last year, when tensions between the two geopolitical adversaries were still high. And it's worth noting that the deal that is taking shape already resembles a compromise plan that the two countries jointly proposed back then: That the North agrees to halt its nuclear program while the US and South Korea cease military exercises. Of course, the latter's unwillingness to stop its threatening military drills almost scuttled the meeting last month.

It's understandable that North Korea wants security guarantees, given what happened to the former leaders of Libya and Iraq after they gave up their weapons, Putin said in an interview with China Media Group that was published Wednesday.

Quote:
"Today it is difficult to say what these guarantees may look like or when they will come into effect," he said.


The two leaders also called the US's decision to leave the Iranian nuclear deal "disappointing" and said it was of "fundamental importance" to protect trade relations with the Islamic Republic. China is Iran's trading partner, and both countries have said they will find a way to preserve Iranian trade to help preserve the deal without the US's involvement.

In a move that will likely only further infuriate his European and North American peers, Trump is planning to leave the G-7 summit early, departing at 10:30 am on Saturday, and leave Everett Eissenstat, his deputy assistant for international economic affairs, in charge of the US's delegation for the remainder of the summit. This gives Trump only about 24 hours to smooth over trade tensions with Emmanuel Macron and Justin Trudeau, Bloomberg reports. Trump has also warned he won't sign the traditional concluding joint statement unless there's progress on tariffs and trade issues. The EU, for what it's worth, has said it has "low expectations" for a positive outcome. Tensions have been most evident between Canadian President Justin Trudeau and Trump, who on Thursday accused the Canadian leader of "being so indignant" given how Canada chooses t protect its dairy sector with high tariffs at the expense of US exports. The two leaders are set to meet face to face at 5 pm on Friday. Meanwhile, Putin has invited Kim to visit Russia after the US summit - though the North Korean leader has not yet accepted (Trump has also suggested that inviting Kim to Washington could be his next move after the June 12 Singapore summit).

As the meeting puts the fraying western relations on display, China and Russia are poised to present an image of fraternity and stability that no longer exists in the West. This will have long-ranging diplomatic implications for years to come.
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-08/g-7-fractures-canada-putin-meets-xi-china
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And then,this ....

Quote:
Trudeau and Trump discuss speeding up NAFTA talks in meeting at G7
Leaders strike a more positive tone one week after cross-border tiff over tariffs

David Cochrane · CBC News · Posted: Jun 08, 2018 7:53 PM ET | Last Updated: an hour ago

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump discussed accelerating NAFTA talks during a bilateral meeting at the G7 summit of Friday.

"The prime minister and the president had a very positive, productive meeting and it lasted longer than originally scheduled,"​ a senior government official, speaking on background, told reporters assembled at the G7 summit Friday.

"They did discuss NAFTA at length and they discussed the future of NAFTA, and I would say they also talked about accelerating the talks."

The reportedly positive tone of the leaders' one-on-one meeting stood in stark contrast to a week of increasingly testy public statements by Trump, following Canada's announcement last week that it would impose $16.6 billion in tariffs against U.S. products on July 1 in retaliation for U.S. tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum.

But two sources with direct knowledge of the situation told CBC News that Canada has heard this kind of positive rhetoric from Trump before — without seeing results at the NAFTA negotiating table.

One source described Friday's meeting as a "frank" airing of grievances in a "non-emotional setting," adding that Trump appeared surprised that Canada had responded so vehemently to the U.S. tariffs.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4699214


As I read the tea-leaves. Trump would like a quick victory on trade. What does he have to do? He's virtually telling Trudeau that there can be a quick settlement if it looks like a victory for him. We give him "supply management" if he'll let in "softwood lumber" -- or something else that we want from them. We simply figure out what makes it work for us too.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just as I was having a glimmer of hope ...

In my mind, this is as bad as the India trip. This is political tone-deafness at an epic level.

You should understand -- the tradition is that the home nation sets the agenda.

Quote:
Trump arrives late and will leave early, as G7 leaders talk gender, oceans and climate
After summit's trade-heavy start, Trudeau will shift conversation to other global issues
John Paul Tasker · CBC News · Posted: Jun 09, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: a minute ago

After an opening day dominated by trade talk, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will shift the G7 conversation to other pressing global issues on Saturday — climate change and empowering women — but at least one leader has opted to skip part of the day's meetings.

U.S. President Donald Trump will leave La Malbaie, Que., early Saturday before G7 leaders are scheduled to have a working session on protecting the world's oceans and redoubling efforts to stave off catastrophic climate change.

But Trump caused a stir even before his early departure by arriving late for the gender-focused breakfast session, billed by Canadian officials as a chance for leaders to draft "concrete actions for the G7 to advance gender equality and women's empowerment."

Trudeau had welcomed everyone to the session and Isabelle Hudon, Canada's ambassador to France, was making opening remarks when Trump walked into the room with his officials and members of his press pool.

As Trump quietly took his place between Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, and Lt.-Gen. Christine Whitecross, the Canadian head of the NATO college in Rome, Trudeau restated his welcome and Hudon repeated her remarks.

Trudeau appointed the Gender Equality Advisory Council — co-chaired by Hudon and Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — to advise him on recommendations to make at Saturday's meeting with other world leaders.

The council suggested, among other things, funding for "developing and conflict-affected countries" to improve access to a minimum of 12 years of free, safe and quality "gender-responsive education." ...
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.4699374


This was probably all planned as an 'educational session' for Donald Trump. Surely Trudeau doesn't think Merkel needs to be brought up to speed, or Christine May either ... and the Japanese are inscrutable on the matter.

Donald probably saw that and said to himself ... warm up the jets.

Let's face it folks, our country's fate is in the hands of a goof.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trump's departing remarks from the G-7 meeting

Quote:
"We had productive discussion on having fair and reciprocal" trade and market access.

"We're linked in the great effort to create a more just and prosperous world. And from the standpoint of trade and creating more prosperous countries, I think they are starting to be committed to more fair trade. We as a nation lost $870 billion on trade...I blame our leaders and I congratulate leaders of other countries for taking advantage of our leaders."

"If they retaliate they're making a tremendous mistake because you see we have a tremendous trade imbalance...the numbers are so much against them, we win that war 1000 times out of a 1000."

"We're negotiating very hard, tariffs and barriers...the European Union is brutal to the United States....the gig is up...there's nothing they can say."

"We're like the piggy bank that everybody's robbing."

"I would say the level of relationship is a ten - Angela, Emmanuel and Justin - we have a very good relationship. I won't blame these people, unless they don't smarten up and make the trades fair."


We should make a quick deal. Trust me, the EU, or Mexico, isn't going to pass up a deal for Canada! Trump wants a win-win if he can. What it means for Canada is further integration with the American economy -- but this day was implicit back when we signed on to the original Free Trade Agreement. We are the Scotland to America's England, and there's nothing much we can do about it.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Other Argument refuted

The first four minutes of this video explains the economic facts. In a sense, it's an answer to the argument put forward by TC -- and a lot of other people It's that we can teach the Americans a lesson!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpAkT5YnpEA

If you watch no further than that, you will realize the futility of resistance for the US's biggest trading partner.

If you watch the first four minutes, you will probably watch further, to your profit.

The point is that the scale of the American economy is bigger than the next four economies put together. Bigger than China, Germany, Japan and the UK. All of these countries have a negative trade balance with the USA, and depend upon that trade balance for their standard of living. Why? Because the American dollar is essential in world trade. If you want to buy oil, you can only do it in American dollars.

I don't pretend to know what it all means, but you don't have to be a wizard to know when you're getting int a fight you can't win.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
U.S., Canadian officials respond to Trudeau ‘backstabbing’ amid G7 summit turmoil
ROBERT FIFE
PUBLISHED JUNE 10, 2018

Donald Trump’s top economic adviser lashed out at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Sunday accusing him of backstabbing the President and seeking to undermine his historic summit with North Korea Leader Kim Jong-Un.

Larry Kudlow said the President was furious after he left the G7 summit early on Saturday to learn that Mr. Trudeau had told a wrap-up news conference that Canada would not be “pushed around” by Mr. Trump and would retaliate if the U.S. doesn’t lift its steel and aluminum tariffs.

“He really kinda of stabbed us in the back,” Mr. Kudlow told CNN, referring to Mr. Trudeau. Mr. Kudlow also accused the Prime Minister of trying to make Mr. Trump look weak in front of North Korea’s dictator at Tuesday’s denuclearization talks in Singapore.

Mr. Trump “is not going to let a Canadian prime minister push him around…He is not going to permit any show of weakness on a trip to negotiate with North Korea,” he said. “Kim must not see American weakness.”

Mr. Kudlow also said that Mr. Trudeau, who strongly endorsed Mr. Trump’s talks with North Korea, had endangered NAFTA negotiations by talking tough about retaliation with Canadian tariffs set to kick in on July 1.

“How many times has the President said, ‘If you hit me, I will hit you back,’ and this is a case where, I don’t know, Trudeau poured collateral damage on this whole Korean trip,” Mr. Kudlow said.

Meanwhile, White House trade adviser Peter Navarro also weighed in on Fox News, saying there “was a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy with Donald J. Trump and then tries to stab him in the back on the way out of the door and that is what Justin Trudeau did with that stunt press conference.”

An angry Mr. Trump threatened to hit Canadian and European automobile exports to the U.S. with stiff tariffs after Mr. Trudeau criticized him for his steel and aluminum levies.

On Air Force One en route to Singapore, the U.S. President fired off two testy tweets at Mr. Trudeau, the G7 summit host, and announced he had withdrawn the U.S. signature from the final G7 communique that spoke about the need for fair and balanced trade.

“Based on Justin’s false statements at his news conference, and the fact that Canada is charging massive tariffs to our U.S. farmers, workers and companies, I have instructed our U.S. Reps not to endorse the [G7] communique as we look at tariffs on automobiles flooding into the U.S. market,” Mr. Trump said.

The U.S. President also tweeted that Mr. Trudeau “acted so meek and mild” during the G7 meetings only to attack him after he departed.

“Very dishonest and weak,” Mr. Trump tweeted.


Quote:
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
Based on Justin’s false statements at his news conference, and the fact that Canada is charging massive Tariffs to our U.S. farmers, workers and companies, I have instructed our U.S. Reps not to endorse the Communique as we look at Tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!

7:03 PM - Jun 9, 2018
108K
57.8K people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy

Mr. Trudeau’s spokesman Ahmad Cameron responded, saying, “The Prime Minister said nothing he hasn’t said before — both in public, and in private conversations with the President.” Mr. Trudeau’s office said they had no further comment on the Trump trade threats or on Mr. Kudlow’s broadsides.

Mr. Trump’s decision to order U.S. officials not to endorse the G7 communique drew stinging criticism from the office of French President Emmanuel Macron and Germany’s Foreign Minister Heiko Maas.

“International co-operation cannot be dictated by fits of anger and throwaway remarks,” Mr. Macron’s office said, while Mr. Maas tweeted: “You can destroy an incredible amount of trust very quickly in a tweet.

“That makes it all the more important that Europe stands together and defends its interests even more offensively.”

Here in Canada, Mr. Trudeau won support from political opponents and from senior political figures in the United States.

Jason Kenney, leader of Alberta’s United Conservative Party, said he was “ in complete agreement” with Mr. Trudeau that “Canada will not be bullied, and that we will retaliate if the U.S. Administration does not end its attack on our steel exports.”

NDP MP Charlie Angus called Mr. Trump a “small-minded man not fit for public office. Canada will not be pushed around by his circus thug bluster.”

Republican Senator John McCain said the President’s behaviour toward his G7 allies was wrong, saying most Americans “remain pro-free trade, pro-globalization and supportive of our alliances.”

The President departed the two-day summit hours before it officially concluded without making any trade concessions to fellow leaders who were angry over the imposition of U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs.

“We are like the piggy bank that everyone is robbing and that ends,” Mr. Trump told reporters. “It is going to stop or we are going to stop trading with them.”

At his news conference, Mr. Trudeau condemned the President’s protectionist actions as destructive and even illegal. He vowed that Canada and Europe would hit back with reciprocal tariffs on July 1 if the U.S. levies are not rescinded.

“It is something we absolutely will do because as Canadians we are polite and reasonable but we will absolutely not be pushed around,” Mr. Trudeau said. “I will do that without flinching. That is what I explained to the president.”

Those comments appeared to anger the President who is known to respond rashly when personally criticized.

“PM Justin Trudeau of Canada acted so meek and mild during our @G7 meetings only to give a news conference after I left saying that, “US Tariffs were kind of insulting” and he “will not be pushed around.” Mr. Trump tweeted.


Quote:
Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump
PM Justin Trudeau of Canada acted so meek and mild during our @G7 meetings only to give a news conference after I left saying that, “US Tariffs were kind of insulting” and he “will not be pushed around.” Very dishonest & weak. Our Tariffs are in response to his of 270% on dairy!

7:04 PM - Jun 9, 2018
99.8K
83.1K people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy

The prospect of a full-scale trade war now looms as the President is threatening to impose tariffs on automobile imports. Before he departed the summit he had warned against reciprocal tariffs aimed at U.S. goods and services.

“If they retaliate they are making a mistake because…they do so much more business with us than we do with them that we can’t lose that. We can’t lose it,” Mr. Trump said.

On the stalled North American free-trade agreement negotiations, Mr. Trudeau flatly denied the President’s assertion that Canada and Mexico were close to a deal on a sunset clause that would reopen the trade deal within five years.

“A trade deal with a sunset clause is not a trade deal and therefore we will not accept a sunset clause of five, 10 or whatever duration that is proposed by the President,” Mr. Trudeau said.

The Prime Minster had also rejected Mr. Trump’s proposal to cut Mexico out of trilateral talks and pursue a bilateral free trade deal. Finance Minister Bill Morneau said it would be difficult for NAFTA talks to proceed as long as the steel and aluminum tariffs remained in place.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-trumps-top-economic-adviser-accuses-trudeau-of-back-stabbing-after-g/


A major bone-headed move. Why is Canada banding with the EU against Trump? Why with Mexico? Trump is almost asking Canada to come up with a 'win-win' for a quick deal.

If Trudeau thinks for a moment that the EU would band together to protect Canada, he ought to have his brain examined to see if it's functioning.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harper on the Trade Mess

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja5OVXcqFvo&t=373s

Starting at 26:00 Stephen Harper's very diplomatic comments on the trade issues. It lasts 10 minutes. It only underlines the present PM's lack of understanding of trade politics.

Example: Trump gets away with calling the dairy tariffs "unfair", but they were specifically negotiated. There are similar to those imposed on us -- softwood lumber, for example.

Example: Our economies are so integrated that it's like having a trade war with Minnesota. The companies who will be most hurt will invariably be American companies. Our economies are integrated. We protect our farmers. Big deal. If you start a trade war with us, your own 401(k)s will suffer.

Example: We don't import American jobs. Mexico does that. Japan imposes non-cash barriers to trade to the max. China too. We are not the problem. We are just the ones who can least afford a trade war.

Don't think I am an expert. But that's how off-course these asses are. Trudeau can't stifle his narcissism long enough stop strutting, to realize what the smart path is.

Trudeau is getting a taste of cultural power. He thinks he's a celebrity, Hah! The whole world is snickering about him and his sagging eyebrow. Another bit of the lustre will disappear. Even so, he could redeem himself by giving Trump a quick 'victory' that is (in fact) a win-win. The obvious target is supply management. Give it up, what the hell?

OK, what do we "lose' (if we 'lose') when we 'lose' supply management? We replace a price-fixing cartel with a set of competitive mega-corporations. But we also can expect big drops in prices or poultry and dairy products. Like maybe to half the present prices. And perhaps more innovative products.

What has the milk marketing board done to our dairy products? All I know is that they won't let a traditional industry of cheesemaking happen anymore. Now what they slice up and call "cheddar" is Velveeta ... which is, I think, closer to a plastic than a real food.

It's not a big price to pay for economic stability for the next generation.

But we have to go for something in return. This is what shows the Liberals lack of depth on this subject. They don't have an "ask" to come back with.

I can sputter with contempt. but it's hard to simply blame Trudeau. He has a whole ministry that is supposed to keep the country on-track. Surely they don't pander to Trudeau?
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This isn't me -- this is Reuters. Mexico's strategy is to use its pressure on the US border to blackmail the Americans into giving them MORE jobs! And Canada is supporting them!

Quote:
Mexico leftist's pitch to Trump: growth, not walls to fix migration
Dave Graham
7 MIN READ

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The politician leading the race to be Mexico’s next leader said on Sunday he wants to broker a deal with U.S. President Donald Trump to stem illegal immigration through jobs and development rather than a border wall.

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the favorite to win Mexico’s July 1 presidential election, said he hoped to craft a deal with Trump similar to the “Alliance for Progress”, an aid plan launched in 1961 by then-president John F. Kennedy to help Latin America.

“Our dream, which we’ll achieve regardless of whether Trump accepts or not, is that the Mexican can work and be happy where he was born,” Lopez Obrador said during a campaign event in the southern border city of Tapachula.

Aides to Lopez Obrador, a leftist former mayor of Mexico City, say he thinks he can find common ground with Trump over migration, which has fueled tensions between the two countries.

For months the Mexican candidate has been working on his plan to improve wages and create better conditions for Mexican workers. It must also raise living standards in Central America and create more job opportunities there, said Lopez Obrador, 64.
[....]
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-election/mexico-leftists-pitch-to-trump-growth-not-walls-to-fix-migration-idUSKBN1J611I


Harper had an excellent point -- that Canada helped with the bailout of the auto industry, and now they are moving jobs into Mexico. Canada and the US ought to be on the same side on that one.

Nothing says "incompetence" like Justin Trudeau!
Toronto Centre





Joined: 12 Feb 2011
Posts: 1097
Reputation: 116.4
votes: 4
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As we can see from the worlds headlines, they are all saying that Trudeau was right to say what he did.

He did what any other leader would , and has, said. He should be commended for his stature on this issue. He could have mouthed off but he didnt.

We can see from the response in the US that many, on both sides of the aisle , see this leadership from tRump as confusing and not in any ones best interests.

Kudlow associates describe his diatribe as no only wrong but everything that Kudlow stood for prior to his moronic outburst.

As if Canada should shut up to not make tRump look weak, he is weak and the other countries know it. (not the country of course, just tRump )
Weak is signing off on trades pacts/getting agreements and then leave only to denounce them from afar.

No one, not even in the inner circles of Washington think the summit with Un will deliver a damn thing . It is all about tRump , as with most anything its Me Me Me .

And now Kelly is looking to get out.

One not need to look at anything other than the parade of people who signed up and then left the White House, it says everything.

And in a nod to Fox News, this is entirely false and one wonders how and why it is made. But then again, this threads latest posts are not backed up by any other pundit in any media.

Quote:
The point is that the scale of the American economy is bigger than the next four economies put together.


1 United States 20,412,870
— European Union[n 1][19] 19,669,743
2 China[n 2] 14,092,514
3 Japan 5,167,051
4 Germany 4,211,635

As one can see , 19.669 + 14.092 + 5.167 + 4.211 = $43.139.000. M

last I looked , 43 was more than double 20.

The advisors for Trudeau best be on their toes but so far they have been spot on.

Good job !


Last edited by Toronto Centre on Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
Toronto Centre





Joined: 12 Feb 2011
Posts: 1097
Reputation: 116.4
votes: 4
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Further, any link to softwood lumber shows lacking in keeping relevant.

The softwood lumber debate ahs been done to death, Canada won at the WTO

Even the US' own rules, Canada does not subsidize lumber since none of it is for specific industries. (which is how they determine if it is a subsidy)

On dairy, we do restrict trade however the US farmers are losing money due to their own oversupply of milk. This is the gist of their anger, they want to dump it to re-coup their costs. Naw.....no thanks.
Dairy farmers earn well over average and most do quite well. Although that makes for some issues on our prices, being too expensive, it is preferred to having our dairy farmers go bankrupt and leave only the mega-dairy as an option.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5717
Reputation: 282.4
votes: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The World's headlines??? They are? What I am seeing on the electronic media is the world having another snicker at Trudeau's expense. He plays the role of Prime Minister the same way Peter Sellers would. Let's face it, it's pure farce.

They are even ridiculing his droopy eyebrow.

This is a disaster of sorts. Out a $650 billion flow of goods, it's $18 billion out of whack. And for that, Trudeau is showing us he doesn't understand how it works. He seems to think that Trump is being rude.

NAFTA is probably over, in favour of another kind of deal. All I am saying is we should face up to the "loss" of supply management, and try to dissociate ourselves from the countries that are genuinely 'cheating' and to whom the US is exporting jobs.

Instead, the boy PM seems to think that he can rally the world and make Trump back down. He thinks the plaudits of EU leaders, for example, will solve the problem. He just doesn't understand how trade law works.

And, of course, that there is no other road to redemption for our dim-witted PM.
Post new topic   Reply to topic Page 2 of 4

Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next  


 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


NAFTA negotiations set-back

phpBBCopyright 2001, 2005 phpBB