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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 6:53 am    Post subject: Ontario provincial election on June 7th Reply with quote

( for all news related to the Ontario election )

Campaign for June 7 election officially kicks off today

Kathleen Wynne
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne arrives at a party event to support candidate Nadia Guerrera, in Toronto on Tuesday, May 8, 2018.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young


The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, May 9, 2018 5:14AM EDT
Last Updated Wednesday, May 9, 2018 5:48AM EDT


TORONTO -- The campaign for Ontario's June 7 election officially kicks off today.

Lt. Gov. Elizabeth Dowdeswell signed a proclamation on Tuesday dissolving the province's 41st Parliament and paving the way for the vote.

Liberal Leader Kathleen Wynne starts her day with a couple of events in Toronto before attending an evening rally in Ottawa.


Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford makes an announcement this morning in Toronto, then heads to Carp, Ont., for an afternoon meet-and-greet followed by an evening rally in Renfrew, Ont.

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath spends the first day of the campaign in Toronto, with a morning appearance focused on health care followed by an afternoon campaign event.

Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner starts the day by campaigning at a Toronto subway station and is scheduled to open his Guelph, Ont., campaign office in the evening.


https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/campaign-for-june-7-election-officially-kicks-off-today-1.3921560
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

EDITORIAL: Let’s turf the Liberals and rebuild Ontario

Postmedia News


Published:
May 9, 2018


Updated:
May 9, 2018 7:37 AM EDT


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
Opinion ›
Editorials ›


Like most of our readers, we believe it’s time to end the 15-year financial death grip the Liberals have on Ontario.

Their government is old, tired, financially bankrupt and politically corrupt.

Kathleen Wynne, Canada’s most unpopular premier, is trying to eke out another election victory by bribing us with our own money.

She’s saying we can spend ourselves rich, by borrowing money from our children and grandchildren, the standard operating procedure for unpopular and dying governments that has never worked, because kicking a problem down the road doesn’t fix the problem.

Wynne seems oblivious to the day-to-day reality of Ontarians.

In Monday’s leadership debate, she boasted about how great things are in Ontario, even as patients are being treated in hospital corridors due to overcrowding, seniors on fixed incomes are having to choose between eating and lighting their homes, due to high electricity costs, and half of our Grade 6 students are failing in math.

Two independent, non-partisan officers of the legislature, Auditor General Bonnie Lysyk, and J. David West, chief economist of the Financial Accountability Office, say Wynne’s March 27 budget — which she’s running on — is a work of fiction.

One that desperately tries to hide the true state of the province’s finances, the size of its annual deficits and the enormity of its debt.

All this in a province that now holds the dubious distinction, under the Liberals, of being one of the most indebted sub-sovereign (non-national) governments on earth.

And what’s Wynne’s solution?

More spending — on “free” daycare, “free” prescription drugs and “free” college and university tuition, paid for with even more debt, to the point where this year alone, Ontario taxpayers are paying $12.5 billion — more than $1 billion a month — solely for interest on debt.

That’s $12.5 billion — and rising — that won’t lower the provincial debt of $325 billion by a penny, nor will it pay for more MRIs, or nurses, or better roads and public transit, or tax relief.

When they took power in 2003, the Liberals inherited a debt-to-Gross-Domestic-Product ratio from the previous Progressive Conservative government, a key indicator of overall economic health, of a sustainable 27%.

This year, under the Liberals it’s 37.6% and rising.

With most Ontarians disillusioned with the Liberals, the choice becomes whether to elect the PCs under Doug Ford, or the New Democrats under Andrea Horwath.

Horwath — who propped up Wynne’s government in the past — is promising the same things as Wynne, lots of “free” stuff, higher taxes, and no recognition of the fact that Ontarians now have a public sector we can’t afford.

It’s nice to pretend, as Horwath does, that replacing tax-and-spend Liberals with tax-and-spend New Democrats and “taxing the rich” — while increasing the debt — will magically make life better for Ontarains.

But that’s not how the real world works.

By contrast, Ford is the only leader talking about reining in the size of government, about making it more efficient and about helping the private sector to create jobs, rather than treating it as a cash cow to finance the latest government promise of more “free” stuff.

He’s the only leader talking about reducing deficits and debt.

And on that point, let’s be clear. Even under a PC government, the Ontario budget will not be balanced next year. It’s going to take years of sustained fiscal discipline to get us out of the huge financial hole the Liberals have dug us into over 15 years.

Ontario’s independent FAO, West, estimates the current Liberal government needs to massively cut annual spending by $15 billion or 8% to balance the budget by 2024, and run deficits until then.

So budget cuts are coming regardless of who wins this election.

The reality is we must start addressing our deficits and debt, which eat up more and more of our money in interest payments every year and are contributing to declining public services.

And the time to start is now.


http://torontosun.com/opinion/.....ld-ontario
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Campaign kickoff: Several tight election races to watch in Hamilton

Horwath safe bet to win, but new, redrawn ridings offer strategic choices

News 02:00 AM by Emma Reilly  The Hamilton Spectator|


Hamilton has several tight races, thanks to newly drawn riding boundaries created in 2015. - Hamilton Spectator file photo


As the four major party leaders vie for the province's top job, here in Hamilton veteran politicians, rookies and rivals are battling to be your representative at Queen's Park.

Ontario's 42nd general election campaign begins Wednesday, with Andrea Horwath's New Democrats, Mike Schreiner's Greens and Doug Ford's Progressive Conservatives trying to unseat Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne.

Locally, Hamilton has several tight races, thanks to newly drawn riding boundaries created in 2015. Two completely new ridings — Flamborough-Glanbrook and Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas — are up for grabs, while other ridings, including Hamilton Centre and Hamilton East-Stoney Creek, have been slightly redrawn to match up with federal election boundaries.


Local political watchers say the three incumbent NDP candidates are likely safe in their traditionally centre-left ridings, including Horwath in Hamilton Centre, Monique Taylor in Hamilton Mountain and Paul Miller in Hamilton East-Stoney Creek.

"If I was any one of those three incumbents I'd feel pretty good," said Henry Jacek, political science professor at McMaster University.

While Taylor and Miller have both faced allegations of harassment in the weeks leading up to the campaign, the Liberals had difficulty finding candidates to face off against them. Local lawyer Jennifer Stebbing was nominated in Hamilton East-Stoney Creek only on Saturday, and the vacant Liberal candidacy on the Hamilton Mountain is set to be filled by entrepreneur Damin Starr on Wednesday evening — late nominations that will make it difficult for the Liberals to hit the ground running during the campaign.

Horwath's personal popularity and leader status make her almost impossible to defeat in Hamilton Centre, though first-time Liberal candidate Deirdre Pike is a well-known and well-liked face on the local political scene.


Traditionally, the PC candidates in these three ridings — filled this time around by Dionne Duncan in Hamilton Centre, Esther Pauls in Hamilton Mountain, and Akash Grewal in Hamilton East-Stoney Creek — trail in third place behind the NDP and Liberals.

"I tend to think, and this is my projection, that the NDP is going to do better (provincially) than they did last time," Jacek said. "Their three incumbents should win — the Liberals are not going to do well, I'm pretty certain."


The new riding of Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas (HWAD) is arguably the tightest local race, with Liberal incumbent Ted McMeekin trying to maintain his seat at Queen's Park against NDP challenger Sandy Shaw and PC Ben Levitt.

While McMeekin, a veteran in the former riding of Hamilton-Flamborough-Ancaster-Glanbrook, remains personally popular, dissatisfaction with Wynne may drag him down. Some voters, particularly in the more conservative areas of Ancaster and some enclaves in Dundas, will be drawn to Levitt, 26, who won the PC candidacy after a protracted nomination battle, suggests McMaster political scientist Peter Graefe.

However, the new HWAD boundaries include more left-leaning areas, including Westdale and areas of Dundas, while the more right wing enclaves of Flamborough have been shaved off. That bodes well for Shaw, the NDP candidate, a well-known figure both professionally and politically (she ran for city council in Ward 1 in the 2014 municipal election). Shaw has already had the benefit of a precampaign visit from Horwath, signalling the riding is in play for the NDP.

Still, Jacek suggests that voters who lean toward the NDP may vote strategically for McMeekin to keep the seat from going to the Conservatives.

"It's not easy to be a voter in this riding," he said "They have a strong Liberal incumbent who is on the progressive side, but how are they going to make up their mind between the local candidate and the leader?"

Local political watchers will be keeping a close eye on the race in Flamborough-Glanbrook, where city council colleagues Judi Partridge and Donna Skelly are jockeying for the same seat (Partridge for the Liberals, Skelly for the Conservatives) — a faceoff that makes for "natural drama," says Graefe.

The riding is one of the most right-leaning areas in Hamilton. It's held federally by Conservative David Sweet. And despite Partridge's personal popularity as the area's ward candidate, Graefe says Skelly's chances of taking the area are high.

The NDP have yet to nominate a candidate in Flamborough-Glanbrook.

"It's arguably the most winnable for the Conservatives," said Graefe.

Regardless of riding, political affiliation or experience, Hamilton's local candidates will face four tough weeks of door-knocking, debates, attacks, tough questions and, ultimately, either the road home or a path to Queen's Park.

Three local issues to watch


Supervised injection sites

As Hamilton struggles to find a permanent home for a provincially funded safe injection site, the outcome of the election looms large.

• Kathleen Wynne's Liberal government has committed to funding supervised injection sites and temporary overdose prevention sites amid an opioid crisis in Ontario.

• NDP Leader Andrea Horwath said she "unequivocally" supports supervised injection sites. "They save lives; end of story."

• PC Leader Doug Ford has said he is "dead against" the idea, though has also started to suggest that he'll study the issue with community representatives.

• Mike Schreiner's Green Party has called for support for both "government-sanctioned" and community-run "pop-up" sites for supervised, safe drug use.

Jobs and poverty

The increasing strain on low- and middle-income households hits especially hard in Hamilton, where almost 50,000 people rely on either Ontario Works or the Ontario Disability Support Program, and the poverty rate hovers around 16 per cent.

• The Liberals have promised to increase minimum wage, introduce rent control, turn tuition loan programs into grants for low-income students, and provide free prescription drugs to children and youth.

• The NDP is promising universal dental care and pharmacare, a $12 per day child-care plan, cutting hydro bills by 30 per cent and to buy back Hydro One, and increase tax rates for high income earners and successful corporations

• The PCs have promised to end the Liberals minimum wage hike from $14 to $15 next year, waive income taxes for anyone making less than $28,000 a year, and end cap-and-trade to reduce the cost of gas and home heating.

• The Greens have called for a basic income guarantee, community benefits agreements for large infrastructure projects, a focus on innovation, retraining and building a greener economy.

LRT

Hamilton's light rail transit project is an evergreen election issue because of the $1 billion in attached provincial funding — and a never-ending stream of alternative spending suggestions.

• The Liberal government promised to pay capital building costs of a 14-kilometre LRT line from McMaster University to Eastgate Square. But the $1 billion is not transferable to other projects, officials have said.

• The NDP supports Hamilton's LRT project, but criticized the plan to hand over public transit operations to a private consortium. It has offered to fund half of LRT operation costs.

• New PC Leader Doug Ford first said he supported LRT because it will "create jobs, countless new jobs," but days later suggested if council abandons the project it can use the $1 billion for other priorities.

• The Green party supports Hamilton's LRT project.


https://www.thespec.com/news-story/8596971-campaign-kickoff-several-tight-election-races-to-watch-in-hamilton/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( saw a post of twitter which says the liberals are going to release another secret recording of Ford today ( can't post the tweet but its from Ottawa Citizen reporter David Reevely ) this one is supposedly about health care . its clear they either had a rat secretly filming ford during the leadership race or someone from the Brown or Mulorney/Elliott side of things is leaking tapes to them , otherwise how else did they acquire them ? )







David Reevely‏Verified account @davidreevely · 53m53 minutes ago

Whee!
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am sure there will be endless secret recordings;
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne started the liberal campaign with a visit to etobicoke lakeshore a riding the liberals are polling behind in according to mainstreet poll , it appears much of Toronto will be a battle and races in ridings where there hasn't been one for years )



Wynne takes her campaign to Doug Ford’s home turf as election kicks off

By Canadian Press. Published on May 9, 2018 10:30am


Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne arrives at a party event to support candidate Nadia Guerrera, in Toronto on Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Wynne kicked off her campaign with an event in Etobicoke on May 9.
THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young


TORONTO — Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne ventured into Doug Ford’s turf for her first event of Ontario’s election campaign. Wynne has framed the election as a stark choice between her plan and that of the Progressive Conservative leader. Her first campaign stop, while not in the riding Ford is running in, was in the west-end



https://ipolitics.ca/2018/05/09/wynne-takes-her-campaign-to-doug-fords-home-turf-as-election-kicks-off/
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

74% of voters wish there were different leaders.
https://931freshradio.ca/news/4196280/ontario-election-different-leader-poll/

And that is the gist of my conundrum. Horvath is probably, to me, the most likeable but the least want, by me, to be elected as Premier.

It says a lot.

For one, it could well mean Ford is one and done. For him to be re-elected , and I concede he will win this June, he will have to make drastic changes personally.

The Libs will have to get another leader and if someone is lurking in the bushes that is likeable then the next election could well be theirs.

IF....if the economy is booming and changes in govt are there for the liking then all this changes, but I do not expect that.

But I suspect that those who didnt follow the horrendous ford saga that was municipal politics and the BS we were served will soon learn.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
74% of voters wish there were different leaders.
https://931freshradio.ca/news/4196280/ontario-election-different-leader-poll/


It may just be that I have a case of the Wednesday's
But looking in the details tables of the Ipsos Poll:

https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Global-News-Ontario-Vote-May-8-2018

(They are at the bottom)

I can't seem to find that question or which responses they took to generate that statistic?

As I said, I may be completely missing it in the tables or there may be a separate poll for that specific question but I can't seem to make that math work?

The polling totals also don't match which may mean a different poll? but I can't seem to find the raw data anywhere for that question.

I am really interested in the breakdown of that answer by region.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ontario using electronic voting machines in June 7 election

vote machine
Ontario's Chief Electoral Officer Greg Essensa holds up a printout of a mocked up vote result from a vote tabulator as he demonstrates an electronic voting machine during a media availability in Toronto on Wednesday May 9 , 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young


Liam Casey, The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, May 9, 2018 12:27PM EDT
Last Updated Wednesday, May 9, 2018 2:14PM EDT


TORONTO -- For the first time in a provincial election in Ontario, voters will use electronic voting machines when they head to the polls on June 7.

The voters' paper lists will also be a thing of past in most ridings, replaced by an electronic version called e-Poll Book.

Elections Ontario says the new technology should help speed up both the voting and ballot-counting process.

vote tabulator
A vote tabulator (left) sits next to a voting screen as Ontario's Chief Electoral Officer Greg Essensa explains an electronic voting machine during a media availability in Toronto on Wednesday, May 9, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

When voters show up at a polling station, a machine will scan their notice of registration card, a process similar to scanning food at a grocery store.

Then the voters will receive their ballot from an official, fill it out and hand it back to the official who will put it through the tabulating machine.

A spokeswoman for Elections Ontario says the new technology was tested at two byelections in 2016, and was also used in a variety of municipal elections.

"We're hoping this will be much more efficient for the voter," said Cara Des Granges. "Getting results should be faster and the technology is proven to be more reliable than tabulating votes by hand."

In the Feb. 11, 2016 byelection in the Whitby-Oshawa riding, it took only 30 minutes to count the ballots using the new machines, compared to the 90 minutes it took officials to count them by hand, according to an Elections Ontario report that examined the byelection.

The report also said the new technology would help with another election issue: staffing.

"Elections Ontario is increasingly unable to find the required number of polling officials," wrote Greg Essensa, the province's Chief Electoral Officer in the byelection report, titled "Proposal for a technology-enabled staffing model for Ontario provincial elections."

It's not an easy job, he wrote, with election officials working 14- to 16-hour days with the meticulous vote-counting coming at the very end of the day.

In 2014, there were 76,000 polling officials working on election day. As the population grows, and with 17 new electoral districts added to the election map -- Elections Ontario estimates it would have needed 100,000 polling officials if the voting system remained the same.

Instead, only 55,000 polling officials will be working on election day, Des Granges said.

The report also said the agency had looked at internet voting, but to date it had not found a networked voting solution that would protect the integrity of the electoral process.

The new technology, however, is not perfect, noted the report.

Some of the e-Poll Books had connectivity issues that forced staff to revert to the paper lists, some of the scanners didn't work and staff had trouble resolving the issues.

The machines won't be everywhere on election day, however. They'll be in about 50 per cent of the voting locations, but will serve 90 per cent of the electorate.

Another reason to switch to machines is driven by the times, the agency said.

"The public has an expectation as a modern society to expect modern services and this is what we're trying to do," Des Granges said.


https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ontario-election-2018/ontario-using-electronic-voting-machines-in-june-7-election-1.3922135
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ford says he would spend $5B on subways in Toronto


The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, May 9, 2018 11:27AM EDT
Last Updated Wednesday, May 9, 2018 2:32PM EDT


TORONTO -- Doug Ford highlighted a transit spending pledge for his first announcement in the provincial election campaign.

The Progressive Conservative leader says he would spend $5 billion, above what has already been committed, on subways in Toronto.

Ford is also promising to upload responsibility to the province for the Toronto Transit Commission's subway infrastructure, but the city would still be responsible for day-to-day operations and keep the revenue.

Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford
Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Doug Ford holds a media availability in Toronto on Wednesday, May 9, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

He says a Tory government would also prioritize underground transit, which is reminiscent of the "subways, subways, subways" mantra of his late brother, former Toronto mayor Rob Ford.

Outside of Toronto, Doug Ford says he would support two-way, all-day GO Transit service to Niagara and Phase 2 of the Ottawa LRT, as well as regional transit projects in Mississauga, Brampton, Hamilton, London and Kitchener-Waterloo.

Ford says he would build "a truly regional transit system."


https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ontario-election-2018/ford-says-he-would-spend-5b-on-subways-in-toronto-1.3921995
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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:

It may just be that I have a case of the Wednesday's
But looking in the details tables of the Ipsos Poll:


I am really interested in the breakdown of that answer by region.

No problem, but does the video at my link give you enough? It shows the sample size (1200) which, correct me if wrong, isnt all that many (obvious) and the +/- of 3.2%

If more needed I will try and find. Originally it was on my flipboard feed on my phone.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am fine with Subways;
But where?

A North / South Subway between Pearson and lets say Sherway as the terminus with connections to an extended Bloor Line would have been ambitious but with the UP and the choice to make Eglinton Streetcars rather than Subways you lost that opportunity to connect like systems.

Connecting Sheppard to the new Scarborough line? or across the city to Sheppard West?

I am pro the concept but I would be interested to see the larger idea presented.
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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am wondering .....

Is John Tory silent on this election (or so it would appear to me) because he wouldnt mind the $B from Ford, someone I am sure he loathes privately, or does he stay this way out of respect?
He doesnt appear on the stump for Ford in any way. Leftover shite from Muni stuff?
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
cosmostein wrote:

It may just be that I have a case of the Wednesday's
But looking in the details tables of the Ipsos Poll:


I am really interested in the breakdown of that answer by region.

No problem, but does the video at my link give you enough? It shows the sample size (1200) which, correct me if wrong, isnt all that many (obvious) and the +/- of 3.2%

If more needed I will try and find. Originally it was on my flipboard feed on my phone.


It showed the sample size which led me to conclude it was likely the poll I linked above, I just couldn't find that number within it.

The video was all well and good, it just didn't drill down.
It presents the favourability of the three candidates then somehow transforms that into the 74% number.

I was just curious is that was a question that was asked

"Would you rather vote for an option outside these three"
Or did they take a series of questions and use the data to extract the result

Either works, I am just really interested in the regional breakdown of the data that led to the result.


Last edited by cosmostein on Wed May 09, 2018 2:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
I am wondering .....

Is John Tory silent on this election (or so it would appear to me) because he wouldnt mind the $B from Ford, someone I am sure he loathes privately, or does he stay this way out of respect?
He doesnt appear on the stump for Ford in any way. Leftover shite from Muni stuff?


I think that if you are the mayor of a city that usually gets the bums rush on funding and that usually tends to vote en mass for a party that isn't the PCs, I think his plan is likely not to dive too deep into the swamp.

The last thing he needs is to go both barrels against Ford to then have him become the Premier.
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Ontario provincial election on June 7th

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