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cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:


Asked if if the new government would considering lowering the threshold of official party status in the House from eight to seven to allow the Liberals to receive research funding and be allowed to ask daily questions in the Legislature, Ford was non-committal.

“We’ll be able to discuss that in the days and weeks to come,” he said, adding he had spoken to Premier Kathleen Wynne.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2018/06/08/premier-elect-ford-names-transition-team.html


I am sure this opinion will be wildly unpopular here;
However I am think the PCs should extend party status not only to the Liberals but to the Greens as well.

The Liberals refusing to offer the NDP party status in 2003 was so petty;
I had such a world of respect for PC MPP Bill Murdoch who offered to cross the floor to join the NDP so they could participate as an official party (even though he would never vote with them.) it showed a respect to the voters.

If the PCs want to be the party of change;
Leave the petty to the Liberals.

They maintain the balance of power by 28 seats,
There is no threat from across the aisle party status or not, the PCs can pass what they want, shut down debate when they want, and essentially push through their agenda without any major roadblocks.

The Premier Elect said last night he wanted to work hard to win over the voters that didn't vote for him.

Extending party status is a classy move with virtually no effect on his ability to govern.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Patrick Brown just pointed out the pc's also elected the first Tamil mpp's to the legislature , something I didn't know yet )



Patrick Brown‏Verified account @brownbarrie · 59m59 minutes ago

Congratulations to my great friends @LoganKanapathi and @vijaythani on being elected last night to the provincial legislature. They are Ontario’s first two Tamil-Canadian MPPs. They worked extremely hard to get to the finish line. They will be great. Way to go! #onpoli
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

June 8, 2018 11:52 am Updated: June 8, 2018 3:11 pm

Ontario Premier-designate Doug Ford takes office on June 29


By Shawn Jeffords The Canadian Press


News: Doug Ford could take weeks to build PC cabinet
x


Newly elected Ontario Premier-designate Doug Ford said the toughest challenge he is expected to face during his transition period into Queen's Park will be compiling a cabinet to form his government.



TORONTO – Doug Ford said Friday he’s working with Ontario’s outgoing Liberals to ensure a smooth transition to power – a process he said would take three weeks, involve the help of those who’ve worked at the federal level and see the formation of a strong Progressive Conservative cabinet.


The premier-designate, who secured a majority a day earlier with a slew of populist promises, said his first order of business would be to scrutinize the province’s books.

“We have to see the financial situation that’s been left behind, and over the next couple days and weeks you’re going to hear from us, but the most important thing is getting our fiscal house in order,” Ford said.

“Immediately, we’ll be out looking for an auditing firm to go into the province to go line item by line item. I always believe in third party validation.”


Once the audit is complete, Ford said he planned to address many of the promises he made during the election campaign, including lowering taxes, cutting hydro rates, and eliminating the cap-and-trade system.


“After a hard-fought campaign, we know the hard work has just begun,” he said. “But we intend to act fast. We will have much more to share with the people of Ontario in the coming days and weeks.”

Ford’s transition team, which will help him segue into power over 21 days, includes former Conservative MP John Baird, a past chief of staff in former prime minister Stephen Harper’s government, and an executive at the Ford family business.

“We have already hit the ground running,” Ford said. “We have begun work right away on setting up the premier’s office, establishing a cabinet and implementing the machinery of a new government.”

Ontario’s lieutenant-governor met with Ford on Friday afternoon, inviting him to form government.

The Tories secured 76 ridings, the NDP got 40 and the Liberals were reduced to seven seats. Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner captured the party’s first-ever seat in Ontario.

The NDP’s position as the Official Opposition marks a turnaround for the party consistently stuck in third place since Bob Rae’s New Democratic government was defeated in 1995. Party leader Andrea Horwath said Friday that Ontarians have chosen her New Democrats to keep Ford accountable.


“Our ideas are quite different and Mr. Ford’s plan to cut all those taxes for the richest people in Ontario is going to put a big hole in our finances here in this province,” she said. “I’m hopeful that Mr. Ford understands that we need revenues in our province to pay for the kinds of things that people expect a government to provide.”

Ford was frequently accused during the election campaign of failing to be transparent by dodging calls to release a fully costed platform. The party eventually published a list of promises and their price tags, but didn’t indicate how they would pay for them, what size of deficits they would run or for exactly how long.

The premier-designate said Friday that he planned to live up to his promises, including to repeal the Liberals’ updated sex-ed curriculum.


“What we say we’re going to do, we’re going to do. We aren’t going to flip-flop,” he said. “We want to make sure over the next four years that our mandate gets fulfilled based on the people voting us in.”

He declined, however, to discuss specifics when asked about the timing of that, as well as when and how he would scrap the Liberals’ cap-and-trade program, or if he will introduce back-to-work legislation to end a months-long strike at York University in Toronto.

Ford also emphasized ties with the federal government Friday, saying he had spoken with Justin Trudeau and told the prime minister he stood with him in a trade dispute with the United States.


Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump have exchanged tough words after the U.S. imposed hefty tariffs on steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and Europe. Canada has countered with a plan to impose tariffs of its own on U.S. metals and other consumer goods.

Ford was asked what he thinks of how Trump is handling trade issues.

“I talked to the prime minister yesterday,” he said. “I said we’ll stand united against our neighbours to the south and I’m very sincere when I say that. United we stand as a country and I’ll work hand in hand with the prime minister.”

Meanwhile, Ford would not say if he will lower the legislature’s threshold for official party status to accommodate the Liberals, who were decimated at the polls. The bar is currently eight seats.



https://globalnews.ca/news/4262471/ontario-premier-designate-doug-ford/
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


Asked if if the new government would considering lowering the threshold of official party status in the House from eight to seven to allow the Liberals to receive research funding and be allowed to ask daily questions in the Legislature, Ford was non-committal.

“We’ll be able to discuss that in the days and weeks to come,” he said, adding he had spoken to Premier Kathleen Wynne.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2018/06/08/premier-elect-ford-names-transition-team.html


I am sure this opinion will be wildly unpopular here;
However I am think the PCs should extend party status not only to the Liberals but to the Greens as well.

The Liberals refusing to offer the NDP party status in 2003 was so petty;
I had such a world of respect for PC MPP Bill Murdoch who offered to cross the floor to join the NDP so they could participate as an official party (even though he would never vote with them.) it showed a respect to the voters.

If the PCs want to be the party of change;
Leave the petty to the Liberals.

They maintain the balance of power by 28 seats,
There is no threat from across the aisle party status or not, the PCs can pass what they want, shut down debate when they want, and essentially push through their agenda without any major roadblocks.

The Premier Elect said last night he wanted to work hard to win over the voters that didn't vote for him.

Extending party status is a classy move with virtually no effect on his ability to govern.



its a tough decision , but I agree Mike Schneider should be allowed to ask questions or participate somehow , but he's there by himself so essentially an independent mpp


don't really know why the liberals wouldn't give the ndp official party status in 2003 , its obvious they felt it was in there best interest if they didn't have it


but for the pc's it might be in there best interest for there to be more than 1 active opposition party going into the next election , when you look at some of the ridings they won thru vote splits
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

its a tough decision , but I agree Mike Schneider should be allowed to ask questions or participate somehow , but he's there by himself so essentially an independent mpp

don't really know why the liberals wouldn't give the ndp official party status in 2003 , its obvious they felt it was in there best interest if they didn't have it

but for the pc's it might be in there best interest for there to be more than 1 active opposition party going into the next election , when you look at some of the ridings they won thru vote splits


The Liberals made a political choice which was within their best interests;
They had a 41 seat balance of power and still opted to shut down the opposition because it was within the best interest of the party and not the province.

Nearly 20% of the Province voted for the Liberals, and most of them have an expectation that Ford is going to be a bully and an asshole.

Why not head that off with an act of non-partisan mercy?
It makes no significant different on how the PCs can govern and it certainly heads off the Ford narrative right from the start.

He wants accountable government and transparency?
Part of that is accountability from across the aisle, the OLP wanted to shut as much of that down as possible in 2003 but Ford should welcome it.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


Asked if if the new government would considering lowering the threshold of official party status in the House from eight to seven to allow the Liberals to receive research funding and be allowed to ask daily questions in the Legislature, Ford was non-committal.

“We’ll be able to discuss that in the days and weeks to come,” he said, adding he had spoken to Premier Kathleen Wynne.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2018/06/08/premier-elect-ford-names-transition-team.html


I am sure this opinion will be wildly unpopular here;
However I am think the PCs should extend party status not only to the Liberals but to the Greens as well.

The Liberals refusing to offer the NDP party status in 2003 was so petty;
I had such a world of respect for PC MPP Bill Murdoch who offered to cross the floor to join the NDP so they could participate as an official party (even though he would never vote with them.) it showed a respect to the voters.

If the PCs want to be the party of change;
Leave the petty to the Liberals.

They maintain the balance of power by 28 seats,
There is no threat from across the aisle party status or not, the PCs can pass what they want, shut down debate when they want, and essentially push through their agenda without any major roadblocks.

The Premier Elect said last night he wanted to work hard to win over the voters that didn't vote for him.

Extending party status is a classy move with virtually no effect on his ability to govern.



its a tough decision , but I agree Mike Schneider should be allowed to ask questions or participate somehow , but he's there by himself so essentially an independent mpp


don't really know why the liberals wouldn't give the ndp official party status in 2003 , its obvious they felt it was in there best interest if they didn't have it


but for the pc's it might be in there best interest for there to be more than 1 active opposition party going into the next election , when you look at some of the ridings they won thru vote splits


A little taste of victory, and there you go, getting classy!

Curb that sentiment. It isn't as if they have three different opinions! They all have the same opinion on almost everything. It's like when Elizabeth May was rubbing herself on Stefan Dion. She got into the debates, along with the Bloc, so there were five ... Four against Harper.

Our man Doug is not fast on his feet in verbal jousts. The Liberals shouldn't be a party either, the precedent may have been painful, but it should stand -- or else, what are the rules all about? The people rejected the Liberals, and we should respect that. It isn't as if they'll bring anything to the debate.

I would rather see Ford adapt policy to solve valid complaints than give all of these clowns a platform. I'd rather he negotiated with them a bit over legislation.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GOLDSTEIN: Limits on union attack ads key to Ford’s victory



Lorrie Goldstein




Published:
June 8, 2018


Updated:
June 8, 2018 7:29 PM EDT


Filed Under:

Toronto SUN ›
News ›
Ontario ›


One of the obvious reasons for the big victory of Doug Ford and the Progressive Conservatives Thursday night was completely overlooked during the just-completed election campaign.

It was a new law in Ontario that for the first time restricted third-party advertising during the campaign to $100,000, and to $600,000 for the six months prior to the election.

That eliminated a huge advantage the Ontario Liberals enjoyed in the 2007, 2011 and 2014 elections, where there were no limits on third-party advertising and public and private sector unions spent millions of dollars relentlessly attacking whoever the PC leader happened to be at the time.



That benefitted the Ontario Liberals — who won all three elections — because they were able to use all of their advertising budgets to run positive ads about their leaders (Dalton McGuinty in 2007 and 2011, Kathleen Wynne in 2014), the negative ones against the PC leaders having been created, and paid for, by the labour unions.

The amounts of money involved were staggering and, according to Ontario Chief Electoral Officer Greg Essensa, who had been warning about the problem for years, risked creating “an uneven playing field,” influencing election outcomes.


Given that Thursday’s election of Ford and a PC majority government was the first time the PCs have won an Ontario election since 1999, and the first time limits were placed on third-party advertising, it would appear Essensa was right.


While elections are influenced by many factors and people like to say they aren’t influenced by negative advertising, the fact is, negative ads works, particularly if they are repeated relentlessly.

If they didn’t work, political organizations wouldn’t spend millions of dollars running them.

In the 2007, 2011 and 2014 elections, labour unions in Ontario, according to the Globe and Mail, spent $15.4 million on third-party advertising, much of it attacking PC leader John Tory in 2007 and Tim Hudak in 2011 and 2014.



Tim Hudak, a former PC leader and current OREA president. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

That was 94% of all third-party advertising during these elections, compared to corporate ads of only $641,000 in total, plus $409,000 by other advocacy groups.

In the 2014 election alone, third parties spent $8.7 million on election advertising, higher than any of the political parities and an increase of almost 400% from 2007.



Hudak and the PCs repeatedly argued that the lack of any limits on third-party advertising reduced them to having to campaign election after election with one hand tied behind their backs, giving the Liberals a huge advantage every time out.

They tried to prove through the courts that umbrella labour organizations like the so-called Working Families Coalition — an alliance of teacher, nursing and construction unions — were actually Liberal front groups, but were unsuccessful.

Ironically, it was Wynne’s Liberal government that eventually tightened campaign financing laws after her victory in the 2014 election, where the Liberals again benefited from the lack of any limits on third-party advertising.

They did so amid growing controversy about their own fundraising practices, including selling access to Liberal cabinet ministers, going so far as to set up individual fundraising quotas for them of up to $500,000.

As a result of such criticism, the government tightened election financing rules for this election, the first one they’ve lost in Ontario since 1999, followed by victories in the 2003, 2007, 2011 and 2014 elections, until Thursday night.

You could even say the Liberals contributed to their own demise.


http://torontosun.com/news/pro.....ds-victory
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exit poll suggests Wynne's early concession speech may have saved Liberal seats

It could have been even worse for the Liberals, according to data collected by One Persuasion, a Tory-connected firm



Brian Platt
Brian Platt


June 8, 2018
10:36 PM EDT

Filed under
Canadian Politics




TORONTO — An exit poll of 5,703 Ontario voters suggests Premier Kathleen Wynne’s surprising move to concede the election five days early may have indeed paid off, saving a handful of seats for her party.

The Liberals were still nearly wiped out in Thursday’s election, reduced from 55 seats to just seven. The PCs won a strong majority with 76 seats, while the NDP won 40 and the Green Party picked up one.

But it could have been even worse for the Liberals, according to data collected by ONE, a Tory-connected firm.

The poll shows that among people who voted Liberal, 46 per cent said they were more likely to vote Liberal because of Wynne’s June 2 announcement, where she conceded the election and urged people to vote for their local candidate to stop a PC or NDP majority. A further 50 per cent said it had no effect on their vote, while just 4 per cent said it made them less likely.

Among those who considered voting Liberal but didn’t, 15 per cent said the concession made them more likely to vote Liberal, 23 per cent said it made them less likely, and 61 per cent said it had no effect.

The resulting boost for the Liberals was likely around two to four per cent, said Hamish Marshall, a research partner at the firm.



“If you go and look at the seats that they won, if they were two per cent lower or three per cent lower, they’d be looking at maybe two or three seats,” he said.

Wynne, for example, won her own Don Valley West riding by just 181 votes, or less than one per cent. Michael Coteau won Don Valley East by 1,027 votes, or about three per cent, while Mitzie Hunter won Scarborough—Guildwood by a razor-thin 81 votes.

When asked why they voted the way they did, a sky-high 32.3 per cent of Liberal voters said it was because of their local candidate, compared to 17 per cent of PC voters and 10 per cent of NDP voters.

“I’ve done a survey like this for years, and I’ve never seen that local candidate number come anywhere that high,” Marshall said.

The 5,703 poll answers were all collected on election day, using a representative online market research panel through Maru Voice Canada. A random sample of this size would have a margin of error of 1.3 per cent, 19 times out of 20. It was conducted by ONE, which has staff who advised former PC leader Patrick Brown but which did not work on the Ford campaign. (Marshall managed Andrew Scheer’s successful campaign last year for the leadership of the federal Conservative Party, and is that party’s campaign chair for the 2019 general election.)

The poll shows 47 per cent of men and 33 per cent of women voted PC, compared to 38 per cent of women and 33 per cent of men voting NDP.

Among those aged 18 to 24, 53 per cent voted NDP, 31 per cent voted PC, and 10 per cent voted Liberal. For those aged 25 to 34, 48 per cent voted NDP, 24 per cent voted PC, and 16 per cent voted Liberal.

The NDP steadily lost ground as the age brackets increased. The party was even with the PCs among those aged 45 to 54, but got only 32 per cent of voters aged 55 to 65 (compared to 42 per cent for the PCs) and 28 per cent of those aged 65 and older (compared to 45 per cent for the PCs).

Asked when they made up their minds, 41 per cent of respondents said it was before the campaign started, 27 per cent said it was in the first three weeks of the campaign, and 11 per cent said it was on election day.

The NDP picked up most of their voters throughout the middle of the campaign, according to the poll. But the PCs entered the campaign with a huge advantage (25.3 per cent of voters compared to 8.1 per cent for the NDP), and picked up roughly as many voters on election day as the NDP did.

Roughly a third of respondents watched some of the debates live, another third saw clips of them, and the rest didn’t see any of the debates. Ford fared very poorly among those who watched the debates or saw clips, while Horwath did best. But Marshall said his view of the data is the debates didn’t play a large role in changing votes.

“Most of the people who were turned off by Ford in the debates were people who were already not voting for him,” he said.

One big takeaway Marshall pointed to in the poll: the NDP’s failure to seal the deal with their potential voters. Though 49.5 per cent of respondents said they considered voting NDP, just 34.1 per cent ultimately did. Of the 45.9 per cent who considered voting PC, 40.2 per cent did.


http://nationalpost.com/news/p.....eral-seats
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

It was a new law in Ontario that for the first time restricted third-party advertising during the campaign to $100,000, and to $600,000 for the six months prior to the election.

That eliminated a huge advantage the Ontario Liberals enjoyed in the 2007, 2011 and 2014 elections, where there were no limits on third-party advertising and public and private sector unions spent millions of dollars relentlessly attacking whoever the PC leader happened to be at the time.

That benefitted the Ontario Liberals — who won all three elections — because they were able to use all of their advertising budgets to run positive ads about their leaders (Dalton McGuinty in 2007 and 2011, Kathleen Wynne in 2014), the negative ones against the PC leaders having been created, and paid for, by the labour unions.

The amounts of money involved were staggering and, according to Ontario Chief Electoral Officer Greg Essensa, who had been warning about the problem for years, risked creating “an uneven playing field,” influencing election outcomes.


Given that Thursday’s election of Ford and a PC majority government was the first time the PCs have won an Ontario election since 1999, and the first time limits were placed on third-party advertising, it would appear Essensa was right.


While elections are influenced by many factors and people like to say they aren’t influenced by negative advertising, the fact is, negative ads works, particularly if they are repeated relentlessly.

If they didn’t work, political organizations wouldn’t spend millions of dollars running them.

In the 2007, 2011 and 2014 elections, labour unions in Ontario, according to the Globe and Mail, spent $15.4 million on third-party advertising, much of it attacking PC leader John Tory in 2007 and Tim Hudak in 2011 and 2014. [....]

That was 94% of all third-party advertising during these elections, compared to corporate ads of only $641,000 in total, plus $409,000 by other advocacy groups.

In the 2014 election alone, third parties spent $8.7 million on election advertising, higher than any of the political parities and an increase of almost 400% from 2007.

http://torontosun.com/news/pro.....ds-victory


The funds were union dues. Remember that before Harper's last election, he had required the unions to post their financial records on their websites ... amongst the first things that were cancelled, along with a similar requirement for Aboriginal tribes.

This is how "the Left" is funded.
Willg





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was slightly surprised that the Liberals won Orleans. This was a riding that was Conservative under the Harper gov't and I just figured that it'd switch provincially as well. The fact that the PCPO did not win Ottawa-Vanier and Ottawa South isn't a significant surprise.

SW Ontario was very interesting--the urban centres with NDP (or Green) while anything in the rural areas went PCPO. The PC's won 15 seats in SW Ontario compared to 8 for the NDP (my definition of SW Ontario is from electionprediction.org FWIW) and despite what the polls said the PCPO did win the popular vote.

I haven't crunched the #'s for Eastern Ontario, 905 or Toronto yet, but winning those outer 416 ridings was obviously key. Peel Region didn't quite come through for the NDP as I suspect some of their supporters were hoping. People were expecting a Brampton sweep and while they did win 3/5 seats the rest of the seats in Peel went PCPO.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Willg wrote:
I was slightly surprised that the Liberals won Orleans. This was a riding that was Conservative under the Harper gov't and I just figured that it'd switch provincially as well. The fact that the PCPO did not win Ottawa-Vanier and Ottawa South isn't a significant surprise.

SW Ontario was very interesting--the urban centres with NDP (or Green) while anything in the rural areas went PCPO. The PC's won 15 seats in SW Ontario compared to 8 for the NDP (my definition of SW Ontario is from electionprediction.org FWIW) and despite what the polls said the PCPO did win the popular vote.

I haven't crunched the #'s for Eastern Ontario, 905 or Toronto yet, but winning those outer 416 ridings was obviously key. Peel Region didn't quite come through for the NDP as I suspect some of their supporters were hoping. People were expecting a Brampton sweep and while they did win 3/5 seats the rest of the seats in Peel went PCPO.



the Orleans riding has only been pc once provincially in recent memory , in 99 Brian Coburn won the riding as a pc candidate but he was defeated in 2003 . the riding did not vote pc in 1995 even as most other ridings in Ontario did

federally it was conservative from 2006-2011 but always a close race and Royal Galipeau was francophone , Cameron Montgomery not having a French name may have cost him some votes , the riding is also home to many federal civil servants not really a great demographic for the conservatives



the pc's did better than expected in the South West , the ndp had high hopes in a number of ridings such as Brantford , Sarnia Lambton , Cambridge and Chatham but they all went pc on election day


its still a major breakthrough for the ndp in Brampton to win 3 of 5 seats , considering the party had never won a seat in peel until 2011 when Jagmeet Singh won ,

Brampton had never been considered possible ndp territory until now , it had always been pc or liberal , in 1999 the ndp came in 4th with 5.9 % of the vote in Bramalea Gore Malton , to be winning that riding now with large margins is a major shift politically in that city
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
About that Doug Ford victory

... You will hear that voters held their noses and cast a ballot for the Ford led PCs but the numbers don’t bear that out. Advance poll voting was up, total voting was up and the PC share of the vote count was up.

If you hear messages like that, or that the PCs have a thin mandate, ignore it as media spin.

A strong majority
Doug Ford’s majority is stronger than Justin Trudeau’s in a couple ways. Firstly, at 40.4% of the popular vote, Ford hit a higher mark than Trudeau did in 2015 when he scored 39.47% of the popular vote. Of course Trudeau was also lower than Stephen Harper’s 2011 win where he scored 39.62% of the vote. [....]
http://brianlilley.com/about-t.....d-victory/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doug Ford's transition team to meet at Queen's Park today to discuss 'machinery' of new PC government



Ontario premier-designate's team will help him segue into power over next 19 days


Amara McLaughlin · CBC News · Posted: Jun 10, 2018 9:43 AM ET | Last Updated: 32 minutes ago



Ontario premier-designate Doug Ford will meet with his transition team on Sunday at Queen's Park to start implementing 'the machinery' of a Progressive Conservative government. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)


Ontario premier-designate Doug Ford is expected to meet with his transition team Sunday afternoon to help him segue into power at Queen's Park.

Ford, whose Progressive Conservatives stormed to a majority victory in Thursday's provincial election, is set to join his team shortly before noon for a "working meeting" in the Ontario legislature.

The group of top political personalities, many of whom have worked at the federal level, are charged with determining the makeup of a strong Ford government during the swift three-week handover of power.

The team will be led by veteran political consultant Chris Froggatt, who served in Stephen Harper's government, and includes Conservative MP John Baird, Canada's former foreign affairs minister during Harper's time and an executive at the Ford family business.

The four others who round out Ford's team of senior advisors include:

•Mike Coates, a PC stalwart who chaired Kevin O'Leary's failed federal Tory leadership bid last year.


•Simone Daniels, who is an executive at the Ford family business, Deco Labels, and served as his former office assistant during his time on city council.


•​Reuben Devlin, who served as a senior advisor to Ford's campaign and is the former president and CEO of Humber River Hospital.


•Dean French, longtime ally and Ford's campaign chair, was recently appointed as his chief of staff in the premier's office.


"We have already hit the ground running," Ford told a news conference in Etobicoke on Friday.

"We have begun work right away on setting up the premier's office, establishing a cabinet and implementing the machinery of a new government."


Ontario's Lieutenant-Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell met with Ford on Friday afternoon and invited him to form government as the province's 26th premier.


Ford has signaled he plans to take swift action on some of his campaign promises immediately after he and his cabinet are sworn in on June 29. This includes lowering taxes, cutting hydro rates and eliminating the cap-and-trade system.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4700034
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the green leader now says he's open to talks with the liberals about somehow joining forces so they'd each get official party status , not sure how this would work as he is the green party leader and not a liberal )


Mark Towhey‏Verified account @towhey


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BREAKING: @OntarioGreens leader @MikeSchreiner says he is "open to talks with @OntLiberal Party" about joining forces (1 + 7) to achieve Official Party Status in Queen's Park. Expects conversation to happen this week. @NEWSTALK1010 #onpoli #onelxn



11:59 AM - 10 Jun 2018
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the green leader is now denying reports of a coalition with the liberals to get official party status )


Lorrie Goldstein‏Verified account @sunlorrie · 10h10 hours ago


Green party leader Mark Schreiner denies report of forming coalition with Liberals http://torontosun.com/opinion/.....-coalition … #onpoli
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Ontario provincial election on June 7th

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