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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 8:44 am    Post subject: Ontario pc Leadership , whats next ? Reply with quote

( Patrick Brown has resigned after shocking allegations which have never been proven in court came forward last night , there is now the question of leadership ? and whats next for the party )


Patrick Brown resigns as Ontario PC leader after sexual misconduct allegations

Resignation announcement comes mere hours after Brown denied the allegations


Mike Crawley · Provincial Affairs Reporter · CBC News
7 Minutes Ago


Brown Allegations 20180123
Patrick Brown speaks at a news conference at Queen's Park in Toronto on Wednesday. He stepped down as Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Leader hours later. (Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Canadian Press)



4.2k shares


Patrick Brown stepped down as leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario early Thursday, only hours after denying allegations of sexual misconduct.

"These allegations are false and have been difficult to hear," said Brown in a statement issued just before 1:30 a.m. ET.

"However, defeating [Ontario Premier] Kathleen Wynne in 2018 is more important than one individual. For this reason, after consulting with caucus, friends and family I have decided to step down as Leader of the Ontario PC Party. I will remain on as a MPP while I definitively clear my name from these false allegations."
Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown denies sexual misconduct allegations

Ontario PCs try to grab political centre, build trust in Patrick Brown


The allegations and the resignation leave the Ontario PCs in turmoil and without a leader, with the provincial election scheduled for June 7.

Brown called a snap news conference at the provincial legislature on Wednesday night to deny the allegations, calling them "categorically untrue."

The conference came just ahead of a CTV News report detailing allegations by two women dating back to when Brown was a federal MP.

CBC News has not independently confirmed the allegations.

In an appearance only about a minute long, a visibly distressed Brown said he had learned about the allegations a couple of hours earlier.
.

Patrick Brown denies allegations 1:27

"I want to say: These allegations are false. Every one of them," he said. "I will defend myself as hard as I can, with all the means at my disposal.

"I know that the court of public opinion moves fast. I have instructed my attorneys to ensure that these allegations are addressed where they should be: in a court of law."

Brown stood alone at a podium during the news conference, walked briskly away without taking questions and left in a waiting vehicle.

The pressure on Brown to resign ramped up immediately. His top three campaign staff quit, saying they had urged Brown to step down, but he had refused. Then his caucus members held a conference call, during which MPPs demanded Brown resign.

Brown Allegations 20180123
Patrick Brown left Queen's Park immediately after making his statement and refused to take questions. (Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Canadian Press)

"In the interest of the Ontario PC Party we unanimously agree that Mr. Brown cannot continue serving as the Leader," said a statement from the caucus, issued by deputy leaders Sylvia Jones and Steve Clark.

"Mr. Brown is entitled to a legal defence and due process, but he cannot lead us into an election as a result of these allegations."
.

Patrick Brown chased by media as he flees Queen's Park 1:15

Brown won the PC leadership race in 2015. He had served as a Conservative MP on Stephen Harper's backbenches for nine years, and was seen by many as a long-shot candidate. But he built a strong organization and signed up thousands of new members to the party from communities in the Greater Toronto Area that had shown little support for the PCs.

The PCs then enjoyed a wide lead over Wynne's Liberals in nearly all opinion polls throughout 2016 and 2017, while his party out-fundraised the Liberals and the Ontario NDP combined.

Brown launched his campaign platform in November, trying to position the PCs as a centrist party, ready to end 14 years of Liberal reign in Ontario but pledging not to reverse most of the Wynne government's key programs.

People's Guarantee - Ontario PC
The Ontario Progressive Conservative platform for the 2018 election features Patrick Brown prominently on the cover. (Mike Crawley/CBC)

With Brown's face splashed on the cover of the platform, and the election campaign due to begin in early May, the party will be scrambling to get back on track.

It is unclear who will replace Brown and how the new leader will be chosen. The statement issued by the deputy leaders said "caucus will immediately consult with party officials and members on best way to move forward."

The party constitution says when a leader resigns, the caucus must select an interim leader to serve until a leadership convention can be held. Diverting resources toward a snap leadership convention is likely to be the last thing the PCs want to do with an election campaign around the corner.

Some of the names being floated already as potential replacements for Brown include MPPs Lisa MacLeod and Vic Fedeli, who both sought the leadership in 2015, as well as the two deputy leaders, Clark and Jones.

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/ca.....-1.4503040
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Patrick Brown's exit could actually leave the PCs better positioned to take on Wynne: Robyn Urback

Out of an awful situation, the party has an opening to equip itself with a stronger, more likable candidate


Robyn Urback · Columnist · CBC News
1 Hour Ago


Ont Islamophobia 20170221
Brown was always an odd pick for Ontario PC leader: a relatively unremarkable backbencher in Stephen Harper's government who managed to snag the provincial leadership from front-runner Christine Elliott. (Peter Power/Canadian Press)


145 shares

805 comments


It was never really a question of whether the Ontario PCs would screw up the election this time around, but how.


A toddler always manages to find the one uncovered electrical outlet in the house. Your tire practically seeks out that little rusty nail lying imperceptibly on a five-lane highway. And the leader of the Ontario PC party will, ahead of a totally winnable election, score in his own net by promising to fund all religious schools or vowing to fire 100,000 public-sector workers.


Many will see now-former Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown's score-in-his-own-net moment as occurring sometime Wednesday evening, when he literally fled from reporters after making a few trembling remarks denying reports of serious sexual misconduct. But the PCs arguably bungled this one way earlier, before reporters would chase the Opposition leader down the steps at Queen's Park.


Almost immediately after he left the podium, Brown's senior staff released a statement announcing their own resignations, noting that they had asked him to step down but that he had refused. The premier, the leader of the Ontario NDP and members of Brown's own caucus would all join the fray, turning the situation into a full-blown crisis within hours. In the early hours of Thursday morning, Brown finally announced his resignation.


There was certainly no way Brown could've survived this, but we should resist the urge to see this particular incident as Brown's own patented PC-screw-up-moment. For one, sexual misconduct is not the same thing as an ill-conceived campaign flub: it is sinister, malignant, and reflects a fundamental deficiency as a person, not simply a politician.


Granted, these allegations have not been proven and Brown vehemently denies their veracity. Surely many Ontarians will believe him, and some will go so far as to think this is all a sinister scheme concocted by Premier Kathleen Wynne's team to win the election. For what it's worth, though, I personally believe these reports, based partly on the knowledge that multiple news organizations were investigating these claims, and partly on the credibility of the journalists who felt their stories had been substantiated enough to print.



In any case, it would be shortsighted to see Wednesday evening as the Ontario Conservatives' boomerang torpedo moment; that process actually began nearly two years ago, when the party first elected Brown as its leader. It's just that the explosion only happened now.


Brown was always an odd pick for Ontario PC leader: a relatively unremarkable backbencher in Stephen Harper's government who managed to snag the provincial leadership from front-runner Christine Elliott, in part by signing up a whack of new members. He came off as a bit uncomfortable from the moment he accepted the victory, with both arms raised in the air, and continued to impress that sort of reluctant-man-on-the-dance-floor vibe as he navigated the first few challenges of his tenure.
Patrick Brown resigns as Ontario PC leader after sexual misconduct allegations
Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown denies sexual misconduct allegations


There was his ham-fisted handling of Ontario's new sex-education curriculum, which he spoke against at a rally during the leadership campaign, then vowed to repeal in a letter sent to residents ahead of a 2016 east Toronto byelection. Brown subsequently did a complete about-face, saying he was actually strongly in support of the new curriculum and claimed that the letter had been sent out without his consent.


We still don't know what actually happened, but that doesn't matter: the debacle managed to alienate both social conservatives who saw a different Patrick Brown during the leadership campaign, and moderates, who were wary of Brown's socially conservative voting record.


His attempt to sell carbon pricing to his party was similarly clumsy: an effort to ram through a complete policy reversal without much of an explanation as to why. Meanwhile, questions started brewing about the fairness of the party's nomination process. And more recently, Brown introduced a host of new spending promises that would alienate the fiscal conservatives in his party, along with the already estranged social conservatives.

Ont PC Convention 20171125
Brown has always been the wrong guy to get the PCs their victory against Kathleen Wynne's Liberals in the upcoming June provincial election. (Chris Young/THE CANADIAN PRESS)


To be fair, there is logic in trying to create a big-tent conservative party in Ontario, which has proven again and again that it has little appetite for the austere type of governance the PCs routinely try to sell. Indeed, polling has shown Ontarians generally like the Liberals' policies — they just don't care much for Kathleen Wynne — which explains why Brown would try to adopt Liberal ideas and make them his own.


But Brown has always been the wrong guy to finally get the PCs their victory: he's a bit too awkward, far too enigmatic and he's never really given the impression that he will govern by conviction, instead of convenience. Say what you will about Wynne, she appears to genuinely believe in the things she's doing. Brown rarely gave off the same impression.


The irony in this epic implosion is that with Brown now out of the leadership, the PCs might actually be better positioned to take on Wynne's Liberals in the June provincial election. No doubt it will be an enormous task, but there is an opportunity here for the party to equip itself with a stronger, more credible and, frankly, more likable candidate. Dare I say, there might actually be an opening for the Ontario PCs to score on the opposing net for a change.

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/op.....-1.4503051
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ontario Tories have little time to make sense of what Patrick Brown left behind


Adam Radwanski


Published January 25, 2018

Updated 1 hour ago



The decision, for members of the Ontario Progressive Conservative caucus, was not a difficult one.

From the moment Patrick Brown stood before reporters on Wednesday night to deny emerging allegations of sexual misconduct involving teenagers – fighting back tears, running away from the cameras without taking questions – it was obvious he would have to be forced out if he did not go willingly. The immediate exodus of his top staff said as much; so did even momentary consideration of what it would now be like to go into an election campaign in the #MeToo era with him as their leader.

So twice, on conference calls just before and just after midnight, MPPs rebuffed pleas from Mr. Brown for a little more time to get his side of the story out. The second time, they told him that even waiting until dawn to resign was not an option, if he wanted to do so before they all released a statement of their own calling for him to go.


That's not to be cavalier. No doubt, the MPPs and others in their party were sickened by what they heard that night, on a human level beyond just a political one. The few PC insiders answering their phones sounded as shaken as you would expect.

But at least they were able to take quick, decisive action, to be unified in doing the right thing. What comes next – well, it will need to be quick too, but what it needs to be exactly is a whole lot less clear. Having Mr. Brown gone by morning was one thing; figuring out how to replace him in time for this spring's provincial campaign is quite another.

As of Wednesday morning, the Tories were the odds-on favourites to replace an unpopular Liberal government in its 15th year, and they seemed to be on a low-risk path toward presenting themselves as a passable option. Now they are going to have to throw away any kind of normal playbook, just to be ready to compete.


A big part of their problem is logistical. A typical leadership contest of the sort that elected Mr. Brown in 2015, in which all party members get a vote, would have to be so compressed that it could prove disastrously chaotic. But the most obvious alternative, to leave the leadership choice to caucus, would risk alienating the grassroots. Presuming that caucus would choose from within its own ranks, it would also limit the field – ruling out the likes of Caroline Mulroney and Rod Phillips, recent recruits as star riding-level candidates, not to mention Christine Elliott, the former MPP who was runner-up to Mr. Brown last time around.

But even if the Tories manage to land on a reasonably smooth process, and even if it selects someone who under the right circumstances could win Ontarians over, that leader will have a very short amount of time in which to make sense of a party recently been rebuilt according to Mr. Brown's vision for it.

Mr. Brown was not beloved: Many provincial Tories considered him an interloper after he leapt from life as a federal Conservative backbencher to lead their party, and more than a few plainly considered him an intellectual lightweight. But he worked enormously hard, energizing the party and filling its coffers as he hustled his way around the province. That, and strong polling numbers that had more to do with the Liberals' unpopularity, were enough to give him leeway with a PC Party that just wanted to win an election for the first time this millennium.

Mr. Brown used that leeway to re-embrace Red Toryism not seen in Ontario since the Bill Davis era ended more than three decades ago. Embracing social spending and some manner of carbon pricing, declining even to go too hard against government policies such as a rapid increase of the province's minimum wage, he seemed to be trying to convey to Ontarians that they could get a fresh face without a dramatic shift from the Liberals' values.

That was not the way many other would-be PC leaders would have run, at the helm of a party with a more conservative caucus and support base, and it may be deeply uncomfortable for whoever is chosen as his replacement. But it also happens to have been enshrined as the party's 2018 platform, copies of which – with Mr. Brown's face plastered on the cover – have already been distributed around the province. Trying to lurch back toward whatever brand of conservatism the next leader prefers could make for a nasty case of whiplash among Tories trying to figure out what exactly it is they're trying to sell.

Meanwhile, the machine supposed to deliver that sales job has been almost entirely constructed by Mr. Brown, for Mr. Brown. After taking over a shell of a party, organizationally, he loaded up its highest levels with trusted allies. The membership ranks, which have increased dramatically since he took over, are now filled largely with members of immigrant communities to which he had strong personal ties. He had a strong hand in candidate recruitment, and some of the party's nominees are his personal friends.

It's anyone's guess how many of the people Mr. Brown brought into the tent will now choose to exit it. So with a couple of months at most to prepare for the election and introduce himself or herself to Ontarians, his successor will either have to start virtually from scratch, or work with an apparatus custom-built for a leader last seen literally fleeing the building.

Possibly it will prove a good fit, and the PCs will reach heights Mr. Brown could not have led them to even without the allegations that felled him. But it's uncharted territory the Tories are headed into, and it's unlikely they'll be as unified figuring out how to navigate it as they were in tossing Mr. Brown overboard


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/ontario-tories-have-little-time-to-make-sense-of-what-patrick-brown-left-behind/article37728032/
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( apparently a new leader is coming sooner rather than later )




Anthony Furey‏Verified account @anthonyfurey · 1h1 hour ago


I'm told the Ontario PC caucus will be selecting a new leader tomorrow at 9am. #onpoli
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its my belief that an intern leader or a temporary leader is likely or almost has to come from the current caucus so who among these mpp's could lead the party )


X Sylvia Jones - Dufferin Caledon ( seems like an unlikely option )

X Sam Oosterhoff - Niagara West ( too young , a rookie mpp )

? Jim Wilson - Simcoe Grey ( already was intern leader ? but not likely seen as future of party )

X Gila Martow - Thornhill ( low profile mpp from Toronto seems unlikely )

X Lorne Coe - Whitby ( rookie mpp )

X Raymond Cho - scarborough rogue river ( older rookie mpp and unlikely choice )

? Laurie Scott - Haliburton Kawatha Lakes ( possible option , long time respected mpp )

? Todd Smith - Bay of quinte ( possible option for intern leader but apparently doesn't want the job )

X Randy Hillier - Lanark Frontenac ( wouldn't even be considered by fellow mpp's )

? Steve Clark - Leeds Grenville ( possible option respected longtime mpp )

? Lisa Mcleod - Nepean ( most talked about option , longtime mpp well liked )

X john Yakabuski - Renfrew nipissing Pembroke ( possible candidate for a temporary intern leader but not a good fit for general election )

X Jim Mcdonell - Stormont dundas glengarry ( low profile mpp no ones heard of )

X Bill walker - grey bruce owen sound ( low profile rural mpp )

X Rick Nichols - chatham kent ( wouldn't be considered an option by caucus )

X Jeff yurek - elgin Middlesex London ( possible candidate for a temp intern leader but unlikely for election )

X Toby Barrett - haldimand Norfolk ( older rural mpp nearing retirement anyways )

? Lisa Thompson - huron bruce ( possible option as intern leader but not well known )

X Michael Harris - Kitchener conestoga ( if he had a different name maybe an option )

X Monte McNaughton - Lambton kent Middlesex ( too rural , might want the job but caucus would never give it to him )

X Ernie Hardeman - oxford ( older rural mpp nearing retirement )

X Randy Pettapiece - perth wellington ( rural low profile mpp )

X Bob Bailey - sarnia Lambton ( low profile mpp not an option )

? Ted Arnott - Wellington Halton Hills ( long time mpp , possible option but not well known in urban areas )

? Vic Fedeli - Nipissing ( talked about as a possible option although might be better suited for finance critic than leader )

? Norm Miller - parry sound muskoka ( son of a former leader , might be a possible option for a temp intern leader but less of a fit for an election )

X Ross Romano - sault ste marie ( rookie mpp from the north )


so there seems to be maybe 7 or 8 possible options for a temporary intern leader , I don't think it be that hard to select an intern leader for the time being . the harder part is finding someone who could campaign as leader in the election


of those the most promising options in my view are Lisa Mcleod , Laurie Scott and Steve Clark . but I think wynne would have a harder time going up against a female leader .


also what becomes of the current pc campaign ? all the campaign literature is covered in pictures of Patrick Brown . it will all have to be thrown away , just the cost of replacing it all is a rather difficult expense for the party . and what about the social media accounts , Brown's picture is everywhere ? all the current candidates pages contain pictures of them with Brown , it will be a difficult task to make the new leader the face of the party
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some mpp's are saying the party may rewrite the rules for choosing a new leader )


Alan Carter‏Verified account @ACarterglobal · 6m6 minutes ago


this is surreal says @ToddSmithPC on @lornebrooker radio show saying PC party may rewrite rules for choosing new leader. rules himself out as possible leader
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rachel Aiello‏Verified account
@rachaiello

Updated w more reaction: http://ctv.news/kUXWb2g of note re, next steps: Ont PC constitution says if a leader dies, retires, or resigns, caucus can elect an interim leader pending a ldrship elxn, if unable, a joint meeting of the caucus and the executive will make the selection.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tories looking for new leader after Patrick Brown sex scandal


The Progressive Conservatives are scrambling to find a new leader in the wake of Patrick Brown’s sudden resignation after a sexual impropriety scandal just four months before the Ontario election.


Patrick Brown said the allegations against him are “false” but he stepped down at 1:25 a.m. Thursday following a tense conference call with Tory MPPs. His departure came after the resignation of six key aides.



By Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief
Kristin RushowyQueen's Park Bureau
Robert Benzie Rob FergusonQueen’s Park Bureau

Thu., Jan. 25, 2018



The Progressive Conservatives are scrambling to find a new leader in the wake of Patrick Brown’s sudden resignation after a sexual impropriety scandal just four months before the Ontario election.

CTV News reported Wednesday night that two women allege when Brown was a Conservative MP — and they were teenagers — he got them drunk and made unwanted sexual advances.



His departure came after the resignation of six key aides.

“Defeating Kathleen Wynne in 2018 is more important than one individual,” said Brown.

“For this reason, after consulting with caucus, friends and family I have decided to step down as leader of the Ontario PC Party. I will remain on as an MPP while I definitively clear my name from these false allegations.”

In an email to caucus obtained by the Star, Tory president Rick Dykstra said the party is moving quickly to find a new leader.

“I have requested that the Ontario PC caucus elects an interim leader. They have agreed and have informed me that they will be meeting Friday morning,” wrote Dykstra.

“I’ve also requested that one of the deputy leaders (MPPs Sylvia Jones and Steve Clark) attend the executive meeting that will take place Thursday evening,” the president continued.

“The election of an interim leader is in accordance with article 23.1 of the PC party constitution, who will serve as interim leader until a new leader is elected in a leadership election conducted pursuant to article 25 of the constitution,” he said.

“A leadership election will take place at such time as the PC party shall determine in its discretion.”

The jockeying to replace Brown is already at a fever pitch.

Supporters of star PC candidates Caroline Mulroney, a lawyer who is running in York-Simcoe, and Rod Phillips, the former head of CivicAction and the party’s candidate in Ajax, are already touting them.

“We must make sure these injustices are never tolerated,” Mulroney, whose father is former prime minister Brian Mulroney, wrote in support of the two women.

“We are living in a powerful moment where woman and girls across Ontario, Canada, and around the world are ending their silence — and their stories of sexual harassment are being heard,” she wrote.

Other names being mentioned as a possible leader include former foreign affairs minister John Baird, who was also a provincial cabinet minister, and MPPs Vic Fedeli and Lisa MacLeod.

Both Fedeli and MacLeod ran for leader against Brown, but dropped out before the leadership election in May 2015.

The runner-up in that contest, Christine Elliott, was appointed Ontario’s patient ombudsman by Wynne.

Before Brown stepped down, his chief of staff, Alykhan Velshi, his campaign manager, Andrew Boddington, his advertising guru, Dan Robertson, and his press secretary Nicholas Bergamini resigned en masse.

Following their departures prominent campaign strategists Joshua Workman and Ken Boessenkool also quit.

Their resignations came as the Tories have been gearing up for a June 7 election in which they had high hopes of toppling Wynne’s Liberals.

Meanwhile, Barrie Police said they are “not involved in any investigation involving Patrick Brown” after the women’s allegations.

“In the event that a complaint comes forward, the Barrie Police Service will ensure that all measures are taken to ensure a frank and impartial investigation,” said spokesperson Nicole Rodgers.

“The Barrie Police Service takes all allegations of sexual assault and intimate partner violence very seriously and when reported they are investigated thoroughly and comprehensively.”


https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2018/01/25/tories-looking-for-new-leader-after-patrick-brown-sex-scandal.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the caucus may even be meeting today to select an intern leader )


Ontario PCs to meet to select interim leader

News 09:55 AM


TORONTO — Ontario's Progressive Conservative caucus is meeting today to elect an interim leader to replace Patrick Brown, who stepped down amid allegations of sexual misconduct.

In an email to the party's legislators sent last night, PC Party President Rick Dykstra says he has requested, and MPPs have agreed, to select an interim leader.

Dykstra says that interim leader will serve until a new leader is picked in a leadership election, according to the party's constitution.

It's not clear from Dykstra's message when that leadership election will take place.

Sources tell The Canadian Press that PC deputy leaders Sylvia Jones and Steve Clark are expected to hold a press conference later today.

Brown announced his decision to resign in a statement issued early Thursday morning, following a hastily-called news conference in which he "categorically" denied what he called "troubling allegations" about his conduct and his character.

By The Canadian Press


https://www.simcoe.com/news-story/8091692-ontario-pcs-to-meet-to-select-interim-leader/
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Ontario PCs just lost my vote.

You know what I notice? There seems to be little coverage of the actual allegations. There are some allusions to fumbled sexual advances, but they won't tell us the who, when and where stuff about the incident. These are unsourced charges with precious little evidence to support them.

There is certainly nothing beyond a solicitation for sex. even though the professional journalists throw the term "alleged assault" around as if making an assumption of sex with a woman who came to his house after meeting him in a bar was "inappropriate".

There's nothing here.

Who are these party people who fired Brown, and where do they get the authority?

This is a cowardly capitulation to the worst aspects of democracy.

From what I can see, nobody in this party will even discuss the issue, mostly for fear. They can's seem to talk about economics either. All they can do is pretend they are on some search committee assessing royal jelly. It's bootless.

These social engineering efforts are the most urgent issues in the culture and yet not a single Conservative seems to be able to resist, even when their children are being turned into genderless targets for queers.

No loyalty, no mutual protection, just capitulation before the social justice warriors. I can't express the contempt I feel for the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario tor turning their back on their leader on the basis of this.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Without drilling into the timing and the speed in which all this occurred;
The PCs need to pivot fast but still have a wealth of time before June.

Brown largely got a job that no one wanted with a party that was underwater in debt and largely divided.

The parties finances are in order and most of the nominations are in place.
The worst thing they could do is reward a career backbencher in the existing caucus when they have the potential to attract someone strong externally.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( wynne has said that she won't call a snap election , giving the pc's some time to figure this mess out but not a lot of time )


'This is not about politics': Wynne won't call snap election after Brown resignation




The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, January 25, 2018 10:09AM EST
Last Updated Thursday, January 25, 2018 11:58AM EST


TORONTO -- Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says she will not seek a snap election before the scheduled June vote following the Opposition leader's decision to step down amid allegations of sexual misconduct.

Wynne says it's too early to know what impact Patrick Brown's resignation as Progressive Conservative leader will have on the province's political landscape.

The premier would not comment specifically on the allegations levelled against Brown but broadly denounced sexual assault and harassment.


Patrick Brown's office door
A security guard stands near Patrick Brown's office door is shown at Queen's Park after he stepped down as leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative party in Toronto on Thursday Jan. 25, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn)

When asked if she would consider changing the date of the provincial election, she said: "No. This is not about politics."

Brown announced he was stepping down in a statement issued early Thursday morning, following a hastily called news conference in which he "categorically" denied what he called "troubling allegations" about his conduct and his character.

The Progressive Conservative caucus, meanwhile, is meeting today to elect an interim leader to replace him.

In an email to the party's legislators sent last night, Tory party president Rick Dykstra says he has requested, and legislators have agreed, to select an interim leader.

Dykstra says that interim leader will serve until a new leader is picked in a leadership election, according to the party's constitution.

It's not clear from Dykstra's message when that leadership election will take place.

Party deputy leaders Sylvia Jones and Steve Clark are expected to hold a news conference at noon.


https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/this-is-not-about-politics-wynne-won-t-call-snap-election-after-brown-resignation-1.3775155
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
The Ontario PCs just lost my vote.

You know what I notice? There seems to be little coverage of the actual allegations. There are some allusions to fumbled sexual advances, but they won't tell us the who, when and where stuff about the incident. These are unsourced charges with precious little evidence to support them.

There is certainly nothing beyond a solicitation for sex. even though the professional journalists throw the term "alleged assault" around as if making an assumption of sex with a woman who came to his house after meeting him in a bar was "inappropriate".

There's nothing here.

Who are these party people who fired Brown, and where do they get the authority?

This is a cowardly capitulation to the worst aspects of democracy.

From what I can see, nobody in this party will even discuss the issue, mostly for fear. They can's seem to talk about economics either. All they can do is pretend they are on some search committee assessing royal jelly. It's bootless.

These social engineering efforts are the most urgent issues in the culture and yet not a single Conservative seems to be able to resist, even when their children are being turned into genderless targets for queers.

No loyalty, no mutual protection, just capitulation before the social justice warriors. I can't express the contempt I feel for the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario tor turning their back on their leader on the basis of this.



we had a deer killed by a small pack of wolves near where we live earlier this week , this situation reminds me a lot of what happened to brown .


the media were like the " wolves " and viciously went after Brown and decided they were going to ruin his political career and there was nothing anyone could do to prevent that .


the pc caucus is like the other " deer " all they could do was run for there lives and was nothing they could do to save brown , this was clearly a survival strategy that the pc's took . there safe for now but the "wolves " are still out there , as far as the media is concerned its open season on any conservative politicians they don't like and can find something bad on
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( somehow I don't see Christine Elliott coming back and being the next leader , she doesn't have a seat anymore and has been silent on provincial issues lately . Caroline Mulroney is not yet an mpp and seen as a more elitist option , not sure how that would go over . I personally like Lisa Mcleod the most out of the 3 , wouldn't have any issue with her as leader , think she'd be a difficult candidate for wynne and the unions to go after )



Who could replace Patrick Brown? A look at potential candidates


The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, January 25, 2018 11:36AM EST
Last Updated Thursday, January 25, 2018 12:21PM EST


The abrupt resignation of Ontario's Opposition leader amid allegations of sexual misconduct has many speculating on who could take Patrick Brown's place and guide the Progressive Conservatives through an upcoming provincial election. Here is a glance at some potential successors.

CHRISTINE ELLIOTT

The woman who mounted the most formidable challenge to Brown as he sought the party leadership in the first place is seen by many as a logical choice to take his place. Elliott came in second during the 2015 leadership convention that saw Brown become leader. At the time, Elliott had served as an Ontario legislator for nine years for the riding of Whitby-Oshawa, the same riding previously held by her late husband Jim Flaherty before he went on to become federal finance minister.


Since July 1, 2016, Elliott has served as Ontario's first patient ombudsman fielding complaints about people's experience with the provinces' health care system. Elliott has not issued any statements about the Brown scandal or her future plans since his resignation was announced.

LISA MACLEOD

The long-time Ontario politician has emerged over the years as a high-profile Progressive Conservative. MacLeod was first elected to the Ontario legislature in 2006 in the riding of Nepean-Carleton, a position she has held ever since. She mounted a bid for the PC party leadership, but withdrew a few months before the convention and threw her support behind Elliott.

MacLeod was one of the first party members to issue a statement when allegations against Brown first surfaced. "Every citizen of Ontario deserves respect," she said in a statement. "Everyone has the right to be free from unwelcome behaviour or advances. I do not and will not tolerate abuse or harassment, and I will do everything in my power to fight against it. My heart goes out to the women who have been impacted by this behaviour. It takes courage to come forward and make these claims. These women deserve our support and thanks."

CAROLINE MULRONEY

Her political career may be in its early stages, but Mulroney has had exposure to high public office since childhood. The daughter of former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney recently announced a desire to enter politics when she secured the PC nomination to run in the riding of York-Simcoe. She had hoped to secure her first seat in the legislature during the June election. Prior to announcing her political plans, Caroline Mulroney served as vice-president of Toronto-based BloombergSen Investment Partners, and used to work at a venture debt fund. She also co-founded the Shoebox Project for Shelters, which collects and distributes gifts to women who are homeless or at risk.

Mulroney did not announce intentions to seek the party leadership, but issued a brief statement following Brown's resignation.

"We are living in a powerful moment where woman and girls across Ontario, Canada and around the world are ending their silence - and their stories of sexual harassment are being heard. This is a sad day," she said.

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/who-could-replace-patrick-brown-a-look-at-potential-candidates-1.3775291
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Vic Fedeli is interested in the job , although might be other candidates )


Mike Crawley‏Verified account @CBCQueensPark · 12m12 minutes ago

Vic Fedeli officially throws his hat in the ring to lead the Ontario PCs “into the upcoming election” #onpoli #pcpo
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Ontario pc Leadership , whats next ?

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