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Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Petty politics is the NDP's speciality, don't you think?

Look at this, where the NDP joins the de-platforming efforts of the mob. And this isn't even Amerika, and yet Trump is "causing division in our country', according to Charlie Angus ...
=================================================

NDP calls for cancellation of Steve Bannon debate
Appearance by 'extreme' commentator inappropriate in wake of Pittsburgh shooting, MP says
Louis Blouin · CBC News · Posted: Oct 30, 2018 5:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 4 hours ago

The federal NDP is calling on organizers of a Toronto debate series to cancel an event which is set to include U.S. President Donald Trump's former strategist Steve Bannon.

The party said having Bannon participate in the Munk Debates is inappropriate after the death of 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue this past weekend.

"I ask the Munk Foundation to cancel its invitation out of respect for the victims in Pittsburgh," NDP MP Charlie Angus told CBC News, in French.

"It isn't acceptable to give provocateurs like Mr. Bannon the opportunity to present their extreme views," he said.

An NDP spokesperson later confirmed Angus' views reflect those of the party.

Bannon is scheduled to debate conservative commentator David Frum at Toronto's Roy Thomson Hall about "the rise of populism."

Bannon will be arguing in favour of the resolution: "The future of Western politics is populist not liberal." Frum will argue against. The event was announced in early September.

Steve Bannon to debate populism on Toronto stage after being dropped by New Yorker
Angus said Bannon "feed[s] divisions in our society," contributing to a climate where Muslim and Jewish communities are been attacked.

Fellow NDP MP Nathan Cullen would not say if he's against Bannon's appearance, but noted it raises the difficult issue of protecting freedom of speech while mitigating the possible impact of harmful speech.

New Yorker drops Steve Bannon from prestigious festival after growing backlash
"We've seen so tragically the effects of those in politics, in public discourse, when they spread hate that others pick up that language and turn it into actions," Cullen said.

Critics have attacked Bannon for stoking racial divisions and advocating for far-right ideas, both inside the White House and during his time heading the Breitbart News Network.

Bannon once described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right." But while admitting the website attracts racists, homophobes and anti-Semites, he has vowed he doesn't hold those views.

Liberal MP Adam Vaughan, who represents that area of Toronto, said he would have preferred if Bannon hadn't been invited, but added it's not for politicians to decide who can speak at events.

Vaughan said offering Bannon a platform won't help people understand populism, rather it "inflames problems and exaggerates issues."

"He's intentionally provocative. We've seen that dangerous people don't need much provocation to do some pretty serious damage," said Vaughan. "The attacks against religious institutions even in Toronto are intensifying."

Former George W. Bush speechwriter slams Trump administration in Calgary speech
Maxime Bernier, leader of the new People's Party of Canada, sided with freedom of expression.

"It's part of our democracy," he said in French. "People who we don't share the same opinion are nonetheless welcome to have a debate."

Bernier said he doesn't share all of Bannon's ideas and that the timing of the event is not very good in light of the events in Pittsburgh.

The interim leader of the Bloc Québécois, Mario Beaulieu, said freedom of expression should be given precedence — though there should be no invitation to hatred or violence.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/steve-bannon-munk-debate-1.4883327
==================================================

Maybe our favourite leftard can explain to us how de-platforming Bannon does anything at all to heal 'divisions' amongst any groups of Canadians. When it comes to meaningless gestures, it's hard to beat the NDP ...

Why is the Left so frightened?
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the opposition leaders have joined forces and asking trudeau to call all the by elections at the same time )


Opposition leaders pressure PM to call byelections

By Canadian Press. Published on Oct 30, 2018 2:37pm


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is under fire from four opposition leaders over not calling byelections. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick


OTTAWA — Opposition party leaders have joined forces to pressure Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to call byelections in all four vacant federal ridings.

Four leaders — the Conservatives’ Andrew Scheer, New Democrats’ Jagmeet Singh, Greens’ Elizabeth May and the Bloc Quebecois’ Mario Beaulieu — have sent a joint letter to Trudeau decrying his decision to call a byelection in just one of the four ridings.

They say his decision denies representation for more than 330,000 Canadians in the British Columbia riding of Burnaby South — where Singh plans to run — the Montreal riding of Outremont and York-Simcoe in Ontario.

They call on Trudeau to do what’s best for constituents in those ridings and immediately call byelections.

On Sunday, Trudeau called a byelection for Dec. 3 in the eastern Ontario riding of Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, which has been vacant almost six months since the death of Conservative MP Gordon Brown.

The prime minister must call a byelection within six months of an MP leaving a seat open.

Trudeau has said the other three ridings have been vacant for “mere weeks” and that he’ll call byelections for them in due course. Two of those remaining seats were formerly held by New Democrats and one by a Conservative.


https://ipolitics.ca/2018/10/30/opposition-leaders-pressure-pm-to-call-byelections/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( as mentioned Trudeau would show that he has class and respects the opposition by calling the by elections but I don't think that he does . his advisors would rather play games and feel there is some benefit for the liberals if they wait longer )



By not calling byelections, Trudeau breaks a convention of courtesy

By L. Ian MacDonald. Published on Oct 30, 2018 3:39pm



'In 1990, when Chrétien won the Liberal leadership four years after resigning his hometown seat of Manicouagan, Mulroney quickly called a byelection in the New Brunswick seat of Beauséjour, and the Conservatives did not oppose him.'



There’s been other parliamentary news this week with the question of byelections to fill four vacancies in the House. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has called one of them, in the eastern Ontario riding of Leeds —Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes. The vacancy was created with the death of popular Conservative MP Gord Brown on May 2.

In calling the byelection for Dec. 3, Trudeau is sending local voters to the polls almost six months to the day after Brown’s passing. The PM must call byelections within six months of a vacancy being created by death or resignation.

And Trudeau is no apparent hurry to call the others: in Outremont, where former NDP leader Tom Mulcair resigned at the beginning of August; in the Ontario riding of York—Simcoe, where onetime Tory House leader Peter Van Loan stepped down on Sept. 30; and, most significant, in the Vancouver riding of Burnaby South, where former NDP Kennedy Stewart announced his intention to run for mayor of Vancouver this month.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh announced months ago he would be running in Burnaby South to secure a seat in the House. Singh’s problem is that Stewart held onto his seat during his successful mayoralty campaign, which also raised the question of what he was doing drawing an MP’s salary while running for municipal office.

This lets Trudeau wait nearly six months before calling that byelection, with five months in York—Simcoe, and more than three months in Outremont. (The Liberals are expected to regain Outremont, a stronghold of les rouges for decades before Mulcair’s arrival in a 2007 byelection, while the blue team should easily hold the two Ontario seats.)

Singh’s other problem is that Burnaby South is no sure thing for the NDP; Stewart defeated his Liberal challenger by only a single point, 35 to 34 per cent, in 2015. One thing Singh has going for him is opposition on the Lower Mainland to expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline.

Under heated questioning from the NDP on Monday, Trudeau told the House repeatedly that the byelections would be called under the usual delays.

There is no doubt he’s within constitutional convention for that, and it’s not the sort of prerogative any PM is likely to hand over to, say, the chief electoral officer.

But there’s another convention of courtesy Trudeau is breaking, and that’s offering to expedite the leader of a recognized party’s arrival in the House, in the event he or she doesn’t have a seat.

Such was the case with Mulroney on becoming Conservative leader in 1983, when Elmer MacKay resigned his seat of Central Nova in Nova Scotia. Pierre Trudeau immediately called a byelection for Aug. 29. Mulroney was not unopposed (his opponent was named Alvin Sinclair). And the Liberals sent in a parade of cabinet ministers, including Jean Chrétien, to the riding that summer, but Mulroney won by 11,000 votes.

In 1990, when Chrétien won the Liberal leadership four years after resigning his hometown Shawinigan seat of Manicouagan, Mulroney quickly called a byelection in the New Brunswick seat of Beauséjour, and the Conservatives did not oppose him.

That would be the elegant thing for Trudeau to do here — to show a sense of occasion, and a touch of class.


https://ipolitics.ca/2018/10/30/by-not-calling-byelections-trudeau-breaks-a-convention-of-courtesy/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its interesting cause when Harper was PM , the liberals often accused him of abusing PMO power . but now they feel tis ok if they do the same thing , real change ? )


Trudeau is lowering the fairness bar

PM has the right to delay Burnaby byelection, but doing so for partisan reasons is the opposite of statesmanlike, Chantal Hebert writes

Opinion 08:26 PM by Chantal Hébert  Toronto Star|



MONTREAL — By sitting on a byelection call for the B.C. riding of Burnaby South, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is deliberately stalling NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh's bid to enter the House of Commons.

In doing so, the prime minister is merely using his prerogative to wait up to six months after a vacancy occurs to set a date to fill it. Technically, he has until mid-March to call a vote in Burnaby South.

But by forcing Singh to cool his heels for no reason other than because he can, Trudeau is lowering the bar on what had until now been considered byelection fair play on the part of a prime minister.


The longer this goes on, the harder it will be for Trudeau to continue to claim the high ground for his Liberals.

But first, some background.

On the weekend, a byelection was called for Dec. 3 in the riding of Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands Rideau Bay. Voters there will choose a replacement for Conservative MP Gordon Brown, who passed away last spring.

Trudeau had until Tuesday to call the Ontario byelection, and was widely expected to set the same date for a vote in Burnaby South.

It has been almost three months since Singh announced he would run for that seat, which was left vacant when NDP MP Kennedy Stewart resigned to run, successfully, for mayor of Vancouver. If all went well in the byelection, the New Democrats believed Singh would enter the House before year's end.

After all, it had been the practice of Trudeau's predecessors to extend the courtesy of a swift byelection call to seatless opposition leaders.

Brian Mulroney, Jean Chrétien, Stockwell Day and Stephen Harper all benefited from the practice. So did Joe Clark, even as — in contrast with the others — he was not taking over the leadership of the official opposition. In his second incarnation as Tory leader, Clark re-entered the Commons to lead the fourth party.


On the weekend, a Liberal spokesperson justified the decision to make the NDP leader wait by pointing out he had declined to run in any of the byelections that have taken place over his first year as leader.

But that response is disingenuous, as is the contention that it would have been irresponsible to hold a federal vote in Burnaby while B.C. is holding its electoral reform referendum.

Beggars — or, in this case, third- and fourth-party leaders — cannot be choosers, but there is no rule that stipulates a rookie leader should be politically suicidal.


The unavailability of a reasonably safe seat and a reluctance to ask a sitting MP to step down were two reasons why Clark waited almost two years — taking a pass on half-a-dozen byelections over that period — before he re-entered the Commons in 2000. Those same reasons apply to Singh.

And if Trudeau felt it was important to put some distance between B.C.'s mail-in vote that ends on Nov. 30 and a federal byelection, he could have selected a date later in December.

In other circumstances, one might accuse the prime minister of trying to keep down a rival for fear of empowering him in the lead-up to the general election.

But Singh's brief honeymoon is long behind him and many New Democrats have soured on his leadership. There is no guarantee a debut in the House of Commons would improve matters.

A byelection defeat could sound the death knell of Singh's leadership. The last thing the Liberals want is for the NDP to find a potentially more effective leader before next fall's campaign.

The extent to which they are willing to go to achieve that end speaks to fear of another kind.

In 2015, Trudeau handily defeated two rivals — Stephen Harper and Thomas Mulcair — who to this day continue to be seen as more formidable than either of their successors.

And yet it seems the prime minister feels he will need all the help he can get — starting with a weak NDP leader — to keep the Conservatives at bay.

Trudeau's byelection move has the New Democrats crying foul. It should give pause to those among Liberal supporters who are not rabid partisans.

Every prime minister I covered came to the office promising to stick to the high road.

Instead, when it came to using prime ministerial powers for partisan advantage, each and every one of them ended up pushing the envelope. Trudeau is turning out to be no exception.

https://www.thespec.com/opinion-story/8996625-trudeau-is-lowering-the-fairness-bar/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to play a political game of "If, Than"

If Singh runs in Burnaby South and the Liberals opt to give him a pass; (or they don't)
And he loses.

Than does he need to step down as leader?

Because if that is the case, I am not a little surprised that the Liberals are not rushing down this road.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its been speculated one of the reasons trudeau is waiting , is so Bernier's party can run a candidate , see online the local riding association is desperate to get started and offering free memberships , its twitter page only has 9 followers )



PPC Burnaby South Official riding‏ @PpcSouthburnaby · 4h4 hours ago


Happy Halloween Burnaby and to all of our great party members of PPC! 🎃 Last day of free memberships, anyone wants to get involved just sign up at http://ppeoplespartyofcanada.ca !
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Just to play a political game of "If, Than"

If Singh runs in Burnaby South and the Liberals opt to give him a pass; (or they don't)
And he loses.

Than does he need to step down as leader?

Because if that is the case, I am not a little surprised that the Liberals are not rushing down this road.




I don't know , he's be into uncharted territory if he were to not win a seat , as its been mentioned before generally these sort of by elections are not contested and the government does not run a candidate . so its a given the party leader would win

but trudeau has already broken all the rules when it comes to by elections , PM's used to never campaign in them but he's been to everyone since 2015 I believe


the last time I can recall a leader losing there seat but still staying on . was John Tory provincially in 2007 , he lost in Don Valley west but stayed on and fought a by election in Lindsay area but still lost and then quit

also remember Christy Clark lost her seat once but liberals still won BC election and she had to run in Kelowna to get a seat after the election


we can only speculate what would happen to Singh if he lost , also the possibility of a close result , what if he wins by under 5 % or less is that good enough for a party leader to stay on
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With respect RCO, you aren't looking at the bigger picture. First of all, they are broke. Secondly, there are no exciting leadership prospects available. Who do you go for, after Singh? Charlie Angus? They had a few contenders -- Like Nathan Cullen -- but they weren't willing to spend a decade on the rubber chicken circuit, uttering platitudes upon platitudes to the party faithful, with no realistic prospect of power.

Third, their moment seems to have passed. They are declining in popularity in Quebec, and with the loss of those seats,'the party will have to look at its options ...
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

B.C. MLAs urge Trudeau to call byelection immediately in Burnaby-South
.


The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, November 14, 2018 10:05AM EST



OTTAWA -- Four NDP provincial politicians from British Columbia are urging Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to call a byelection in the federal riding of Burnaby South, where federal New Democrat leader Jagmeet Singh wants to run for Parliament.

The letter, by Anne Kang, Katrina Chen, Raj Chouhan and Janet Routledge, who all represent Burnaby districts, says the politicians are disappointed that Trudeau has yet to call a race in the riding vacated by former B.C. NDP MP Kennedy Stewart.

Stewart is now the mayor of Vancouver.


"Canadians deserve strong representation at all three levels of government," the letter, dated Nov. 9, says. "In that regard, we are disappointed with your decision in delaying the call of the federal byelection in Burnaby South, leaving constituents we represented without a voice in Ottawa."

In late October, opposition leaders also joined forces to press Trudeau to call byelections in all four vacant federal ridings in the House of Commons.

Four leaders -- the Conservatives' Andrew Scheer, New Democrats' Jagmeet Singh, Greens' Elizabeth May and the Bloc Quebecois' Mario Beaulieu -- sent a letter to Trudeau objecting to his decision to call a byelection in just one of the four ridings.

Earlier in the month, Trudeau called a byelection for Dec. 3 in the eastern Ontario riding of Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, which had been vacant almost six months following the death Conservative MP Gordon Brown.

The prime minister said the other three ridings had been vacant for "mere weeks" and will call the byelections in due course. He must call a byelection within six months of an MP leaving a seat open.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/b-c-mlas-urge-trudeau-to-call-byelection-immediately-in-burnaby-south-1.4176647
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a riding specific poll for Burnaby South has the ndp in third although they did not poll for specific candidates as the liberals have yet to say if they will run one . the conservatives are also doing surprisingly well there at close to 30% in second

also unclear what will happen to the green vote , the poll has them at 6 % but there not running a candidate , if a lot of that went ndp they could get closer but still looks like Singh is in deep trouble in that riding if the liberals find a strong candidate )



Nanaimo By-Election A Dead Heat; Singh And Bernier In Trouble In Their Ridings

November 19, 2018|Mainstreet Research|British Columbia, Featured, Public Polling, Québec


19 November 2018 (Ottawa ON) – The BC NDP and the BC Liberals find themselves in a statistical tie in the upcoming provincial by-election in Nanaimo.

Also, Jagmeet Singh and Maxime Bernier would lose in their respective ridings if an election were held today.

Those are the findings from three polls in the federal ridings of Beauce and Burnaby South and the provincial riding of Nanaimo.

“The upcoming by-election in Nanaimo is important for both parties as it could let the Liberals take the lead in the seat count in the BC legislature,” said Quito Maggi, President and CEO of Mainstreet Research. “When asking Nanaimo residents what party they would vote for, the NDP lead by eight, but they are virtually tied when Nanaimo residents were asked about what candidate they would vote for.”

Among decided and leaning voters, Sheila Malcolmson of the NDP has 39.8%, while Tony Harris of the BC Liberals has 38.2%.

In Beauce, recently nominated candidate Richard Lehoux of the Conservatives has 37.9% support, while Bernier has 34.7% support among decided and leaning voters.

“Bernier narrows the gap when we ask Beauce residents which candidates they would vote for,” continued Maggi. “But there is no mistake that Bernier would be in trouble if the election were held today.

Finally, 35.9% of decided and leaning voters in Burnaby South said that they would vote Liberal in the upcoming by-election, while 29.3% said that they would vote Conservative. 27.2% said that they would vote NDP.

“Given these numbers, it is surprising to see the NDP clamour for a by-election”, concluded Maggi.

In ridings were parties have not nominated candidates for the next election, respondents were asked about the candidates that were fielded in the previous election. In the case of Burnaby South, no question about local candidates was asked as Singh is so far the only nominated candidate in the upcoming by-election.

The sample sizes and margins of error, in all cases, accurate 19 times out of 20, for each survey are as follows: Beauce: n=616, +/- 3.95%, Burnaby South: n=366, +/- 5.12%, Nanaimo: n=594, +/- 4.02%.

https://www.mainstreetresearch.ca/nanaimo-by-election-a-dead-heat-singh-and-bernier-in-trouble-in-their-ridings/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why are they dragging Bernier into this? If someone asked me who I was going to vote for eleven months before the election, I might not even have thought about it. In addition, the Conservatives are trying desperately to deprive Bernier of his seat in Parliament.

But people in Burnaby are certainly closer to a real decision. And I wonder how seriously the Liberals -- or Conservatives, either, for that matter -- are taking beating Singh. He seems to be unable to energize the party, which the Liberals would like. I can feel his uncertainty, sympathetically. He is a stranger to the gender politics that are waged within the NDP, as well as against the other parties. This is a party that weaponized sex in the person of Ms Moore ... which probably leaves the private Jagmeet shocked.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Why are they dragging Bernier into this? If someone asked me who I was going to vote for eleven months before the election, I might not even have thought about it. In addition, the Conservatives are trying desperately to deprive Bernier of his seat in Parliament.

But people in Burnaby are certainly closer to a real decision. And I wonder how seriously the Liberals -- or Conservatives, either, for that matter -- are taking beating Singh. He seems to be unable to energize the party, which the Liberals would like. I can feel his uncertainty, sympathetically. He is a stranger to the gender politics that are waged within the NDP, as well as against the other parties. This is a party that weaponized sex in the person of Ms Moore ... which probably leaves the private Jagmeet shocked.



I'm not sure why they polled Beauce at the same time , it doesn't have anything to do with the NDP in BC , maybe it just made the poll more interesting and sellable to the media ?

The Burnaby South by election could happen at any time in the next few months , it could of already been happening if trudeau had called it .


I personally have already mentioned that I though Hamilton Centre made more sense , the ndp mp is retiring and its Horwath's riding provincially and she supports Singh . why he didn't just run there and have the mp retire early made little sense to me


why is he running in a BC riding that he has no connection to , that's always been won by very small margins , after he had been saying for so long he wanted to run in Brampton because he had a strong connection to the city


this by election uncertainty helps to explain everything that is wrong with Singh's leadership ,( confused , unclear priorities , uncertain about what he is doing )

at this point I would be hard pressed to list any of his priorities or why he wants to come to Ottawa to begin with , I think voters are starting to sense the same thing , a man who wants to be leader but unable to explain to voters why , leading a political party with no real priorities at the moment
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you will recall, he was highly touted on here -- not without reason -- for his performance in the Ontario NDP. He wasn't courting the leadership at that time. He was felt to be charismatic ...

They have a problem in the sense that the bench was cleared. Mulcair has left the party in a confused state and in debt. On top of that, you can hear the hissing as the air goes out of their balloon in Quebec. Alas, the passing of Jack ...
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this article seems to indicate all 3 by elections will be called in Jan with votes in February , but the liberals won't give Singh a free pass and will run a candidate )


Trudeau to call remaining byelections in January, to take place in February: feds

By Emily Haws Nov. 21, 2018


That includes Burnaby South, B.C, where NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is running.


After banding together with other opposition leaders to push the prime minister to hold a byelection in Burnaby South, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, who’s running for his party in the riding, will get his wish in February, according to a government source. The Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to call three byelections—including a highly anticipated contest in Burnaby South, B.C.—in early January for the following month, The Hill Times has learned.

“We will be calling all three byelections, all three remaining ones, in January—early, early new year—for them to all take place in February,” said a senior government source today who asked not to be named because the announcement hasn’t been made officially.

The three ridings are: Burnaby South, B.C., which was vacated by former NDP MP Kennedy Stewart when he left to run and eventually win Vancouver’s mayoral race, which took place in October; Outremont, Que., which former NDP leader Tom Mulcair left; and York-Simcoe, Ont., which was vacated by retiring Conservative MP Peter Van Loan on Sept. 30.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is running in Burnaby with hopes of winning a seat in the House of Commons ahead of the 2019 general election.


When Mr. Trudeau (Papineau, Que.) called a byelection for only one of four open House seats on Oct. 28, Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, Ont., opposition party leaders wrote to him asking him to call the other three too.

“Your decision to delay the other three byelections denies hundreds of thousands of Canadians their simple democratic right to be represented in Parliament and have their voices heard,” said the letter signed by the leaders of the NDP, Conservatives, Bloc Québécois, and Green Party.

Some commentators have suggested the Liberals have delayed the Burnaby contest to help themselves. It’s in the Liberals’ best interest to put off the Burnaby South byelection as long as possible, they suggested, as a weak NDP is good news for the Liberals, who may draw upon the same well of voters. Having Mr. Singh in the House of Commons would likely boost the NDP’s morale and mean it has clips of Mr. Singh showing leadership in Question Period, for example. By putting off the election, he stays occupied locally in B.C., instead of nationally.

Mr. Singh was elected the NDP leader in October 2017 and has spent the last year touring the country, trying to build up name recognition.


The government source didn’t have exact dates, and didn’t indicate whether the contests would be in early or late February. January would signal a fresh start to the new year, they said, and it doesn’t make sense to have campaigns knocking on doors during the holiday season. They suggested a February byelection could help to increase voter turnout, which tends to be low during byelections.

“We don’t want a low turnout and people to be knocking on doors bothering people during the holidays,” the source said.

That timing would also help the new People’s Party of Canada, led by former Conservative cabinet minister and MP Maxime Bernier (Beauce, Que.). A Nov. 20 party press release said Elections Canada had accepted its application and recognized the party as “eligible for registration” a few days earlier. But for the party to finally be registered, it must run a candidate in one of the upcoming byelections.

“This must take place 60 days after our application was made, which means after December 10,” said the release. “We are of course planning to run candidates in the three byelections that must be called in the coming months.”


After some speculation in the summer about parties not running a candidate against Mr. Singh as a courtesy to him as a party leader trying to gain a seat, the government source said the Liberals plan to run candidates in all ridings. The grassroots level of the party feels it should be running candidates in all of the ridings up for grabs, including in Burnaby South, said the source.

As of Nov. 16, the Liberals have 39.4 per cent of the vote nationally, while the Conservatives have 28.75 and the NDP are at 17.24 per cent, according to polling by Nanos Research. The Greens are at 7.25, and the People’s Party has 1.1 per cent. The results reflect the latest four weeks of a rolling weekly telephone poll, representing a total of 1,000 respondents, and are considered accurate within 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

The CBC Poll Tracker, which is an aggregate of public opinion polls, has the Liberals at 37.8 per cent support, while the Conservatives are at 32.2 per cent and the NDP is at 15.8 per cent. The Greens are at 7.5 per cent, while the People’s Party is at 1.5 per cent.

Corporate lawyer Jay Shin is the Conservative candidate for Burnaby South, while Green Party Leader Elizabeth May (Saanich-Gulf Islands, B.C.) said in August she wouldn’t run a candidate in the byelection as a “leader’s courtesy” to Mr. Singh. The courtesy is a tradition in the House of Commons to help a newly elected leader’s entry.


In Outremont, the NDP has nominated Julia Sanchez, the former head of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation in Ottawa, while the Liberals have yet to hold a nomination meeting though there are several interested candidates, and the Conservatives are putting forward Jasmine Louras.

Businessman Scot Davidson is the Conservative candidate for York-Simcoe. Jessa McLean is the only candidate approved to run for the NDP, though a nomination meeting date has yet to be set. The Liberals don’t appear to have nominated a candidate yet.

The prime minister has six months from the time a seat is vacated to call a byelection, according to election rules. The byelection for Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Island and Rideau Lakes, Ont., which was held by the late Conservative MP Gord Brown, will take place on Dec. 3. Mr. Brown died of a heart attack in May.

https://www.hilltimes.com/2018/11/21/exclusive-trudeau-will-call-remaining-elections-january-taking-place-february/177203
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the hill times article reveals some information about the by elections that had previously not been mentioned


- the conservatives have candidates nominated in all 3 ridings

- the ndp have candidates in 2 ( Burnaby South and Outremont )

- the Green's , People's Party and liberals do not have any candidates nominated , was under the impression the liberals had a candidate in Outremont but maybe not

- the liberals plan to run a candidate in Burnaby South although unclear who


these by elections will also be the first time a People's Party candidate has run for public office .
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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