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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A by-election will take place in Burnaby South Français



News provided by
Elections Canada
Sep 18, 2018, 17:13 ET




GATINEAU, QC, Sept. 18, 2018 /CNW/ -

•On Monday, September 17, 2018, the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, Stéphane Perrault, received official notice from the Speaker of the House of Commons that the seat for Burnaby South (British Columbia) is vacant. A by-election will take place to fill the vacant seat.

•The date of the by-election must be announced between September 28, 2018, and March 18, 2019. This announcement signals the start of the by-election period.

•The by-election period must last at least 36 days, and the by-election must be held on a Monday. Therefore, the earliest date that the Burnaby South by‑election can be held is Monday, November 5, 2018.

•The Canada Elections Act does not prescribe a maximum length of time for a by-election period.

•See a list of all vacant seats in the House of Commons since the 2015 general election.





Elections Canada is an independent, non-partisan agency that reports directly to Parliament.

Subscribe to our news service at elections.ca.

SOURCE Elections Canada

For further information: Elections Canada Media Relations, 1-877-877-9515, elections.ca

Related Links

http://www.elections.ca

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/a-by-election-will-take-place-in-burnaby-south-693643221.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems to me that the Liberals see Singh as the Liberal's choice for leader of the NDP. They see him as floundering. He's probably an old-school leftist and the Social Justice types know they can gobble them up like they're pistachios.

He isn't adept at the approach, particularly when it comes to gender issues. He seems uncertain and late to the scene. His party, under his leadership, is out to lunch.

This country has never been in such dire shape for leadership.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
It seems to me that the Liberals see Singh as the Liberal's choice for leader of the NDP. They see him as floundering. He's probably an old-school leftist and the Social Justice types know they can gobble them up like they're pistachios.

He isn't adept at the approach, particularly when it comes to gender issues. He seems uncertain and late to the scene. His party, under his leadership, is out to lunch.

This country has never been in such dire shape for leadership.



it will be interesting to see if the liberals run a candidate against Singh or not , the national post article seems to indicate there considering not running a candidate or at least not trying very hard in the by election if they do


if the liberals don't run a candidate , the race could turn into more of the type of race they saw in BC in 2011 elections , more of a pure ndp / cpc race . that year the cpc only lost in Burnaby Douglas by 2 %


but its unclear who the conservatives even plan to run against Singh , no candidate has been nominated or has anyone come forward to my knowledge
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2018 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( just noticed online , the conservatives nominated a candidate in Burnaby South , a Jay Shin . new candidate I'm not familiar with )



Conservative Party‏Verified account @CPC_HQ · 19m19 minutes ago


The momentum is building for our positive Conservative vision! SHARE to spread the good news and welcome Jay Shin! #cdnpoli
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NDP's Jagmeet Singh faces crucial test in Burnaby South byelection


Byelection yet to be called for B.C. riding, but some Liberals don't want to see NDP leader get a free pass


Hannah Thibedeau · CBC News · Posted: Oct 11, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: October 11


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, a former Ontario MPP, has chosen the B.C. riding of Burnaby South for his bid for a seat in the House of Commons. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)


A byelection has yet to be called for the federal riding of Burnaby South in B.C.'s Lower Mainland, but NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has already spent the better part of a month campaigning for a race that could hold the key to his future as party leader.

The stakes are high for Singh, who has yet to sit in Parliament a year after winning the leadership. Other parties are also watching the riding closely — including the Liberal government — which will ultimately choose when to call the byelection but has yet to decide whether its own party will even field a candidate.

Singh knows he will face competition from the Conservatives' nominated candidate, Jay Shin, a corporate commercial lawyer who is active in the business community.

And former Conservative leadership contender Maxime Bernier also hopes to run a candidate under his newly formed People's Party of Canada.

"We will have a candidate if we can," Bernier said last Thursday on Parliament Hill.

'Positive opportunity'

The Liberals are playing coy about whether they will extend a "leader's courtesy" to Singh, an occasional convention by which other parties decide not to field candidates in a byelection where a new federal party leader is running for a seat.

Liberal Party spokesman Braeden Caley said while no nomination meeting has been set, the party hasn't ruled out running a candidate.

"We wish Mr. Singh well ... and we're looking forward to a positive opportunity to contrast our ideas with the other parties," Caley said in an email.

"Either way, I am not concerned. It's going to be the decision of the people of Burnaby South to elect who they will," Singh said at a press conference held in the riding on Tuesday.

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May says her party will stand back and respect the leader's courtesy.

"It may sound antiquated but I love anything that reduces the hyperpartisan toxicity [in politics]," May said. "I want to welcome the leader of the NDP to a place in the House before the election, because I think Canadians have a right to know and be more acquainted with the leaders of all the parties in the House before going to the polls."

Singh's stumbles

The riding of Burnaby South was created in 2015, when boundaries were adjusted to add 30 new seats across the country. Kennedy Stewart won the seat for the NDP by just 547 votes over the Liberals, but vacated it last month to seek the Vancouver mayor's chair.

Singh is seen as needing to win this riding to emerge from the sidelines of Parliament's comings and goings since he was first elected as leader over a year ago. Quebec MP Guy Caron has been the voice of the NDP in the House of Commons' daily question period.

There have been divisions around Singh's leadership because of poor fundraising numbers and dropping support in the polls, as well as some policy stumbles and his handling of allegations of harassment within his caucus.


Some Liberals have openly mused that having Singh around more frequently on Parliament Hill wouldn't be a bad thing, to contrast Singh with their own leader.

But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is under pressure from some B.C. Liberals who want the party to win the seat.

Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson, a B.C. MP, is one of them.

"You know, I would like to see a Liberal who is elected in every riding in this country," Wilkinson said with a laugh.

Wilkinson said it could be a problem that Singh was helicoptered into the riding.

"I think ultimately people are very committed to the idea that they have somebody who speaks with authenticity to the local issues. I know in my riding in North Vancouver, the fact that I've lived there for over 20 years and my kids were born there and I've been invested in the community was a really important thing. So I think that's a challenge that Mr Singh will have to overcome," Wilkinson told CBC News.


Singh has been campaigning in Burnaby South for more than a month. A byelection is expected to be called for the riding following the resignation of former NDP MP Kennedy Stewart. (Hannah Thibedeau/CBC)

Singh — who represented a provincial riding in Brampton, Ont. before jumping to the federal scene — isn't from Burnaby and hasn't even rented an apartment in the area yet. But he says he isn't worried about his low profile.

"I'm more concerned in raising the profile of the problems that we're facing. I really want people to take in how serious the problems people are faced with when it comes to housing and homelessness," Singh said.

"I am working with community groups to talk about what people are are facing," Singh said. "I am committed to making sure that I am that voice that hears the concerns people are raising and brings those to Ottawa."

Randeep Sarai, Liberal MP for the neighbouring riding of Surrey Centre, says there are a lot of Liberals interested in running in the riding.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/burnaby-south-byelection-jagmeet-singh-1.4857251
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2018 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let's hope he wins the seat and has a long tenure as leader ...
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CHANTAL HEBERT: Timing not on Singh’s side to win a federal seat


Chantal Hebert (comments@cbpost.com)

Published: 1 hour ago
Updated: 1 hour ago



Horgan’s gain is NDP leader’s loss.


Jagmeet Singh just can’t catch a break.

With the call of a byelection in the Vancouver-area riding the rookie NDP leader is hoping to soon represent in Parliament only days away, he is losing yet another MP - in this instance to British Columbia’s provincial arena.


"Politics is a blood sport."

— Chantal Hebert, National Affairs


At the same time, he may have more of a fight on his hands to secure a ticket to the House of Commons than he would have liked.

On Wednesday, B.C. premier John Horgan announced that Nanaimo-Ladysmith MP Sheila Malcolmson will be running under the provincial NDP banner in a byelection soon to be held on Vancouver Island.

Freshly elected as mayor of Nanaimo last weekend, New Democrat MLA Leonard Krog is leaving the provincial legislature.


Horgan’s minority government already hangs by little more than a thread. He needs to fill the vacancy in time for B.C.’s February budget and the confidence vote that will attend its presentation or else possibly face a general election.

Malcolmson - who has only been in the Commons since 2015 - is the second B.C. New Democrat to leave the federal caucus to pursue more promising political opportunities.
Former MP Kennedy Stewart whose Burnaby South seat Singh is vying for was elected mayor of Vancouver last weekend.

A date to fill the Ontario seat left vacant by the sudden death of Conservative MP Gordon Brown last spring must be set by next Tuesday. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to call the Burnaby South vote at the same time.
The timing of Malcolmson’s departure is less than perfect for momentum-deprived Singh.

Her decision to switch to provincial politics, coming as it does on the heels of Stewart’s successful entry in the mayoral arena, highlights the fact that while the NDP brand is in good shape at the provincial and municipal levels in B.C., Singh’s personal brand is not.

He has yet to become a household name in the Vancouver-area riding he has elected to make his
permanent federal home base and he is hobbled by the lacklustre performance of the federal NDP in the polls.

Anecdotal evidence suggests there may by now be more Liberals wishing Singh well in his bid to enter the Commons than New Democrats. It is certainly not difficult on a visit to Vancouver to find party sympathizers who celebrated his first ballot victory a year ago and who now wish him gone.

Even if Singh does make it to the floor of the Commons via Burnaby South later this fall, he will have a hard time retooling for next year’s general election with recruits of the same high calibre as that of the MPs who are electing to leave.
The NDP won the Burnaby South seat in 2015 by less than 1,000 votes; a score that suggests Singh cannot take victory for granted.

There had been talk of the Liberals taking a pass on running a candidate - a courtesy to an incoming leader that would have had the advantage, from Trudeau’s perspective, of sparing his own party an early test in a riding that is at ground zero of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

But the idea elicited pushback from local Liberals and the expectation is that Trudeau’s party is more likely to be on the byelection ballot than not.
Singh may be spared another potentially morale-depleting test this fall for Trudeau could wait until after
the New Year to call a vote in Outremont, the Montreal seat left vacant by Thomas Mulcair.
The Liberals have a good shot at winning back Outremont from the NDP whether the byelection takes place this fall or next winter. But they could see some side benefits to waiting a while longer to call the vote.

Beauce MP Maxime Bernier has just applied to register his People’s Party with Elections Canada. He has to wait 60 days from that application to run a candidate in a byelection. If Trudeau were to hold off until next year to call the Outremont vote, it would pave the way for Bernier’s party to make the riding the scene of its Quebec maiden run.

One does not need to have a particularly devious mind to think the Liberals would love to start the election year by scoring a hit on the NDP in Outremont and watching Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives scramble to make it to the finish line ahead of Bernier’s candidate.

Politics is a blood sport.


https://www.capebretonpost.com/opinion/editorials/chantal-hebert-timing-not-on-singhs-side-to-win-a-federal-seat-253825/
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think there's another explanation. The provincial BC government is a coalition of the NDP and Green, and its margin is knife-edge thin. The provincial government needs to keep that seat or the government will lose power ... if not on the next vote, soon.

These musical chairs move don't necessarily prove that Singh is the problem. There are other issues at stake.

I think that the NDP realizes it is about to relapse to pre-Jack levels of popularity. It hasn't got much money, and Mulcair has left the party in a mess.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think there's another explanation. The provincial BC government is a coalition of the NDP and Green, and its margin is knife-edge thin. The provincial government needs to keep that seat or the government will lose power ... if not on the next vote, soon.

These musical chairs move don't necessarily prove that Singh is the problem. There are other issues at stake.

I think that the NDP realizes it is about to relapse to pre-Jack levels of popularity. It hasn't got much money, and Mulcair has left the party in a mess.



I agree the federal ndp has a number of problems , not all of which are Singh but since he is the leader people will blame him for the mess


also think the ndp is facing an identity crisis , they no longer feel there a government in waiting like they did in 2015 . but there no longer a relevant opposition either

( as they seem to support everything trudeau is doing and lack any major policy ideas of there own ) , there lacking a clear identity or purpose in Ottawa at the moment


its no wonder some of there mp's realise the time to leave is now , as its not going to get any better for a while . however things will get better for them but that might be a couple elections and a couple leaders down the road
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Singh launches campaign as by-election call expected shortly


Greens have said they won't run a candidate against NDP leader Jagmeet Singh in Burnaby South.


Maria Rantanen / Burnaby Now
October 27, 2018 02:53 PM



Jagmeet singh

Jagmeet Singh will launch his by-election campaign on Sunday for Burnaby South.

Photograph By Lauren Boothby




A federal by-election is expected to be called shortly for Burnaby South, vacated since Kennedy Stewart left his post in September, and the NDP is launching its campaign on Sunday to elect Jagmeet Singh, leader of the federal NDP party to the riding.

Because of commitments in Toronto, however, the NDP leader himself won’t be at the launch in Burnaby.

Campaign manager Amber Keane said because no one has known the date of when the writ would drop, as national leader, Singh has commitments elsewhere as well.

“Once we know for certain, he’ll be making his way to Burnaby,” she said.


The Green Party of Canada has announced it won’t run a candidate, and the federal Liberal party has not announced a candidate, or whether they will run one against the NDP leader. The Conservative Party chose their candidate, Jay Shin, for Burnaby South in September and he will be running in the by-election.

Four federal seats are now vacant and normally the prime minister calls elections for all empty ones at the same time.

Peter Julian, MP for New Westminster, said it would be “unprecedented” if the prime minister didn’t call the election for Burnaby South at the same time.

“It would be pretty outrageous if Mr. Trudeau did that,” he said.

Julian has been door-knocking for Singh’s campaign over the past few weeks and said he’s heard a lot of support for the NDP leader as well as opposition to Trudeau’s decision to buy the Trans Mountain Pipeline. Other issues he’s heard concerns about are housing and climate change.

Julian said on Saturday the by-election is expected to be called on Sunday, or if not then, within days.

The party is planning a “Burma shave” with volunteers in front of the campaign office on Royal Oak on Sunday as the campaign gets off the ground.

Once the prime minister announces the by-election, an election period of a minimum of 36 days will begin.

With the federal general election one year away, Julian said he is planning to run for re-election in his riding of New Westminster-Burnaby.


https://www.burnabynow.com/news/singh-launches-campaign-as-by-election-call-expected-shortly-1.23478503
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberals oddly did not call the Burnaby South by election and its unclear when trudeau will call it , the liberals are now saying its his own fault not there's)




Braeden Caley 🇨🇦‏ @braedencaley


Follow Follow @braedencaley


Braeden Caley 🇨🇦 Retweeted chantal hébert

There have already been 4 by-elections since Jagmeet Singh became leader of the NDP - 6 since his federal leadership campaign began. He could have run in any one of those, but he decided not to. #cdnpoli
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the sort of petty politics that even the NDP should be able to capitalize on.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
This is the sort of petty politics that even the NDP should be able to capitalize on.





the optics will start to look bad for the liberals if this drags on for long


one also has to wonder why Singh allowed Kennedy Stewart the ridings former mp to delay his actual departure so long , he announced on May 10th he was running for mayor but did not officially resign his seat until September , had he left sooner , the by election would of had to have been called sooner


but were into uncharted territory as one can't recall a government in the past who delayed a by election for a party leader , no one can recall anything similar , most were always called very early and the government often wouldn't even run a candidate


the optics start to look bad on the liberals if they cannot justify a good reason for delaying these 3 by elections and a reason why Singh cannot face the voters in Burnaby South ,

I'm also shocked they'd want to delay the Outremont vote , a riding they have a good chance of picking up , why delay that by election for months ? it doesn't make much sense at all . I always assumed at the very least Leeds Grenville and Outremont would happen this fall
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Delaying Singh's byelection might be calculated, but it isn't unprecedented


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh will have to wait a little longer to get a shot at a seat in Parliament


Éric Grenier · CBC News · Posted: Oct 30, 2018 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 5 hours ago


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said he thinks the Liberals aren't respecting voters by delaying byelection calls in the ridings of Burnaby South, York–Simcoe and Outremont. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)


104 comments


The NDP claims that the Liberals have taken an unprecedented step by delaying a byelection call in Burnaby South, frustrating party leader Jagmeet Singh's plan to soon secure a seat in the House of Commons.

But it isn't unprecedented. It isn't even unusual. Mostly, it's just politics.


There are four vacancies in the House of Commons. On Sunday, the Liberals announced they would be filling only one of them for the time being.

One of the ridings that will remain without an MP for the foreseeable future is Burnaby South — the riding that Singh has selected as his route to a seat in Parliament.

The Liberals set Dec. 3 as the date for a byelection in the eastern Ontario riding of Leeds–Grenville–Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes. B.C. NDP MP Peter Julian called the decision to leave Burnaby South in limbo "unprecedented ... petty and manipulative," arguing the government could have simultaneously set dates for votes in Burnaby South, the Ontario riding of York–Simcoe and the Quebec riding of Outremont.

Speaking in French to a reporter Monday morning in Ottawa, Prime Minster Justin Trudeau said that "it has only been a few weeks that this seat has been vacant and we are taking the usual time."

Trudeau, Harper have delayed byelection calls before

Singh said on Monday that calling one byelection while delaying others "has never been done ... in recent history." But Trudeau has done it once already while in office. Former prime minister Stephen Harper did it twice when he was in power.

The circumstances of the vacancy in Leeds–Grenville–Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes might be a factor. The byelection in that riding was forced by the death of Conservative MP Gord Brown in the spring. By law, the government had until Oct. 30 to set the date for the byelection. It is not uncommon for governments to wait the full six months to fill a seat vacated by a deceased MP.

That was reasoning behind Trudeau's previous decision to set one byelection date while holding off on others. After the passing of Conservative MP Jim Hillyer in March 2016, the Liberals waited until September to call the byelection in the riding. At the time, both Calgary Heritage and Ottawa–Vanier were vacant following Harper's resignation and the death of Liberal MP Mauril Bélanger.

Byelections in these two ridings were not called until 2017.

The Conservatives did the same thing after the death of former cabinet minister Jim Flaherty in 2014, leaving his Whitby–Oshawa seat vacant when byelections were called in four other ridings.

And in the summer of 2007, byelections were called in three ridings — including Outremont, which Tom Mulcair would win for the NDP in a stunning upset — when three other seats had been already vacant for a few weeks. Those byelections were not held until the following year.

Petty game, or typical delay?

So the Liberals are well within the political norm (and their legal rights) in choosing not to fill all the vacancies at once.

York–Simcoe, vacated by the resignation of Conservative MP Peter Van Loan on Oct. 1, has been without an MP for only 29 days. Official notice of NDP MP Kennedy Stewart's resignation in Burnaby South was received 43 days ago — though he announced he would be resigning to run for the mayor's office in Vancouver back in May.

That gap of four to six weeks is relatively short for a byelection. Only in a few instances under Harper and Trudeau have byelections been called within four weeks of a vacancy; the average delay in cases not involving the death of an MP has been 91 days since 2007. So the Liberals do have a case for claiming that delaying the call in Burnaby South and York–Simcoe is not unusual.

But Mulcair officially resigned his Outremont seat 88 days ago — after signalling last December that he would be stepping aside. That's a far longer delay than was seen in other cases of a vacancy being passed over for a byelection date.

The longest previous delay under either Harper or Trudeau was 40 days in 2007: Toronto Centre was vacated on July 2 but had not been awarded a byelection by the time a vote in Roberval–Lac-Saint-Jean was announced on Aug. 11, 2007.

Without the call in Leeds–Grenville–Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, the delay in Outremont at this stage wouldn't be unusual. But it complicates the calendar. If the Outremont byelection is to be bundled with byelections in York–Simcoe and Burnaby South and not called while the campaign is underway in Brown's former seat, then all three byelections might be pushed into early 2019 — to the very limit of what the law allows.

Politics still at play

Of course, the reason we're all paying extra-special attention to these three ridings now is Singh's planned candidacy in Burnaby South. The NDP claims that the Liberals are dragging their feet in order to keep Singh from getting a seat.

The Liberals counter that if Stewart had resigned when he announced his decision to run for municipal office in the spring, the byelection in Burnaby South would have been called already. And if the issue is Singh getting a seat of his own, he's had multiple opportunities to put his name forward in byelections held over the last year.

The Liberals, after all, are not obliged to do favours for the NDP. And the New Democrats have a history of ignoring the "leader's courtesy" that the Liberals and Conservatives often have extended to each other in the past — the courtesy of not running a candidate against a rival party leader seeking a seat in the Commons for the first time.

But Singh's question to the Liberals — why not call these byelections all at once? — is harder to answer without a political calculation being part of it. Though the Liberals have not yet set nomination dates for candidates in the three vacant ridings still lacking byelection dates, they have known the vacancies were coming for months (in the case of Outremont, for nearly a year) and so had ample time to find a candidate. They haven't done so.

The New Democrats have struggled in the polls and in fundraising under Singh. The Liberals might believe they have a good chance against him in next year's federal election and that a Singh defeat in Burnaby South — by no means an impossibility — would result in him being replaced. Not all Liberals want to see that happen.

This could be why Liberals seem to be divided on whether to run a candidate against Singh. And if they were to defeat him, sending the NDP into turmoil in early 2019, rather than in late 2018, might fit the Liberals' electoral calendar better.

So what the Liberals have chosen not to do this past weekend isn't unusual. But the byelection at the centre of the controversy certainly is. Singh has had to wait over a year to get a seat in the House of Commons. It looks like he'll have to wait a little longer.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/grenier-byelection-call-1.4882280
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( trudeau has only replied that they'll be called in due course ? although we know there won't be Christmas by elections so that would mean sometime in early 2019 )



October 29 2018 2:26pm



NDP demands PM Trudeau to call byelection in B.C.



During Monday’s Question Period, New Democratic MP Peter Julian demanded Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to call a byelection in B.C. immediately. Trudeau responded that the seats were only recently vacated and the byelection would be called ‘in due course.’


https://globalnews.ca/video/4608035/ndp-demands-pm-trudeau-to-call-byelection-in-b-c
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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