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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

whats also interesting is when I looked thru the advance poll results years ago I uncovered numbers which indicated the ndp would of held 13 seats that went liberal and 5 that went bloc had the election been held the same day as the advance polls


the ndp would of kept - Surrey Centre , Burnaby North Seymour BC ,

Davenport , Hamilton East Stoney Creek , Parkdale High Park , Niagara Centre , Ottawa Centre , Toronto Danforth . Ontario

St Johns East , Newfoundland

Chicoutimi Je Fjord , Gaspe Isle Madeline , Rivere du Nord , Quebec , Riviere de Mile Iles , La Pointe le Isle , Pierre Boucher , Mirabel , Joliette - Quebec



so the ndp collapse came very sudden in the final week and there were a lot of ndp votes cast during the advance polls which might not of been a week later . so they've faced an uphill battle post 2015 to win these voters back and seem to be failing miserably at doing so
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( kind of article that must drive ndp strategists nuts , who could be the next mp for Brampton East ? except Jagmeet Singh is not on the list . even though he said for years he wanted to represent this riding .

is there anyone on this list that Singh could not beat if he were running in this riding ? a municipal councillor , a former Ontario liberal candidate and a former mayor . well all are known in Brampton , they'd all have a touch time beating Singh in my view

he reminds me of the person who waited for years for that special something to come available could be a girl or a job etc . but then as soon as it came open they decided to go for something else , a less realistic option they have even less chance of actually getting , well the thing they wanted all along goes to someone else )



Who Could Be Possible Candidates for MP in Brampton East?

by Alan Kan on December 26, 2018

in News,
Opinion,
Politics


As the new year dawns on us, one thing is clear: there will be a federal election in 2019.

Brampton citizens will be electing five people to be their Members of Parliament in Ottawa, as will many communities across the country. The Liberals currently hold all the seats in Brampton.

That is they did, until incumbent Raj Grewal's personal problems forced him to step aside from the Liberal caucus to sit as an independent. The 33 year old lawyer turned politician said he will take time over the holidays to decide on his political future.


As for Grewal's riding of Brampton East, one Twitter user noted rather interesting developments on the political front:Grewal was previously nominated to run for reelection in his riding for the 2019 election, but with his current status as the candidate in doubt, it's not clear if he would still be the Liberal candidate in Brampton East.

Based on this observational tweet, it's time for some idle speculation as to who could run in Brampton East in Grewal's place for the Liberal Party:

Linda Jeffrey

Even though her name was considered in the running for the Peel Regional chair slot, perhaps wiser counsel advised the former mayor that she would have a better shot of becoming a federal MP. Jeffrey never really was in favour of the chair being appointed after all.

With her prior cabinet experience as well as her time as mayor, she would be a star candidate for Justin Trudeau if she became the candidate.


Martin Medeiros

First elected to Brampton city council in 2014, Medeiros was a former public administration official in various governments before jumping into local politics. During the last term, he was seen as a staunch ally of Jeffrey, going along with her initiatives such as the LRT to downtown Brampton.

Medeiros seemed more willing to back Jeffrey's agenda with the then-mayor leading the charge, but with a new mayor along with emboldened councillors such as Rowena Santos and Gurpreet Dhillon around the table moving with a 'progressive agenda', perhaps Medeiros is feeling the time to try his hand in another political arena.


Gurpreet Dhillon

The current regional councillor for Wards 9 and 10 was elected to that spot after just one term as a city councillor, so staying comfortably in one place doesn't sound like Dhillon's modus operandi. He was also another staunch Jeffrey ally during the last term.

Dhillon actually once ran as a provincial NDP candidate in 2014, and while not successful he found more success at the local level, having won 55 per cent of the vote in this year’s election. The councillor recently made some minor waves during the first meeting of the new council term, such as pushing through a motion to put the downtown route on the LRT back on the table and looking into hiring more staff for councillors.

With that kind of a start, the conventional view is that Dhillon is looking to make himself more of a player during this term of council now that Jeffrey is no longer around, thus giving other progressive councillors the chance to establish their own profiles. But if the Liberals were looking to recruit a local candidate for MP in Brampton East with some traction, they might be looking at Dhillon.


Parminder Singh

Singh was the Ontario Liberals' candidate in Brampton East for the provincial election. A healthcare professional and has worked as a sports and health commentator for Omni TV, the CBC, 680News and Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment, he was the founding host and play-by-play commentator for Hockey Night in Canada in Punjabi, and founded the Toronto Raptors Punjabi Broadcast.

Although he ended up in third place, as did many provincial Liberals during election night, that result was more indicative of the toxicity of the Liberal provincial brand at the time under Kathleen Wynne rather than anything that Singh was responsible for personally. His Facebook page is still active, and besides Dhillon he's the only other possible candidate on this list that has specifically run in Brampton East.


It's most likely that if Jeffrey decides to go for the Brampton East nomination, Medeiros and Dhillon would bow out rather than having to face their former mayor in a nomination contest.

But then again, how strong is Jeffrey politically still at this point after losing a mayoral race that was hers to win?

The Conservatives have nominated entrepreneur Ramona Singh as their candidate, with the election scheduled for October 2019.

Do you think the Liberals will pick a new candidate…or stick with Grewal?


https://www.inbrampton.com/who-could-be-possible-candidates-for-mp-in-brampton-east
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is only 2 candidates for the liberal nomination which will be decided later today , neither are especially high profile for such a high profile by election )


Scientist, business owner seeking Liberal nomination to take on NDP's Singh


The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, December 29, 2018 7:35AM EST



BURNABY, B.C. - A scientist and a small business owner are vying for the Liberal nomination in the riding of Burnaby South, where the winner will go on to challenge NDP leader Jagmeet Singh in a federal byelection.

Liberal spokesman Braeden Caley says biotechnology scientist Cyrus Eduljee and Karen Wang, who operates several daycare centres in Burnaby, will be on the ballot at the party's nomination meeting today.

Wang ran for the BC Liberals in Burnaby-Deer Lake in the 2017 provincial election, while Caley says Eduljee has long been involved with local electoral district associations.


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has not yet set a date for the byelection in Burnaby South, which was vacated by former New Democrat MP Kennedy Stewart, now Vancouver's mayor.

Corporate lawyer Jay Shin is running for the Conservatives, while Green party leader Elizabeth May has said the Greens won't run a candidate and Maxime Bernier's People's Party of Canada has not named one.

The byelection, expected for February, marks Singh's biggest political test to date while he also tries to calm party fears about fundraising, slumping polls and a growing list of veteran MPs who say they won't run in 2019.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/scientist-business-owner-seeking-liberal-nomination-to-take-on-ndp-s-singh-1.4234432
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the liberals have finally selected a candidate for the by election , Karen Wang , somewhat new to politics but actually from the riding )


Daycare operator Karen Wang wins Liberal nomination in Burnaby South

karen wang
The federal Liberal party has selected the Karen Wang as its challenger against NDP leader Jagmeet Singh in an upcoming byelection.


Amy Smart, The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, December 29, 2018 4:44PM PST



BURNABY, B.C. - The federal Liberal party has selected the owner of a daycare business as its challenger against NDP leader Jagmeet Singh in an upcoming byelection in British Columbia.

Karen Wang, who owns Angels Playhouse and previously ran in the 2017 provincial election with the B.C. Liberals, was named the Liberal candidate at a nomination meeting in the riding on Saturday.

She defeated biotechnology scientist Cyrus Eduljee, who is product manager for Stemcell Technologies, after 123 members cast ballots.

“I'm so excited and I am so honoured to be selected by you here,” Wang said, before reading a poem she said was written by a Chinese poet.

“My eyes are full of tears because I love this land so deeply,” the poem began.

Wang told reporters she believes she has what it takes to take on Singh, because she has lived in the riding for 20 years and has strong connections in the community.

“He's not from our local community. He cannot represent you, represent us,” she said.

“I believe we will have a good chance to win in Burnaby South as I believe right now I'm very familiar with our community. I'm one of the people here.”

Wang said her top three priorities would be improving housing affordability by increasing supply, creating more jobs and improving public transit.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has not yet set a date for the byelection in Burnaby South, which was vacated by former New Democrat MP Kennedy Stewart, now Vancouver's mayor. Trudeau is expected to call byelections for the Burnaby South, Outremont, Que., and York-Simcoe, Ont., ridings early in the new year.

The byelection, expected for February, marks Singh's biggest political test to date, while he also tries to calm party fears about fundraising, slumping polls and a growing list of veteran MPs who say they won't run in 2019.

Singh has said he plans to focus on campaigning in the riding over the next month, so he can check “elected” off his to-do list for the critical campaign year ahead.

In the 2015 federal election, the NDP won Burnaby South by just over 500 votes.

A party leader who can't win a seat customarily steps aside, although that hasn't happened in a byelection since the 1940s. Singh won't say what he'll do if he loses.

Corporate lawyer Jay Shin is running for the Conservatives in the byelection, while Green party leader Elizabeth May has said the Greens won't field a candidate.

Maxime Bernier's People's Party of Canada plans to name a candidate in the next two weeks, spokesman Martin Masse said. Because the party is so new and only recently established electoral district associations in the riding, the candidate won't be selected through a typical nomination voting process.

“Essentially, the leader will choose the candidate in each byelection,” Masse said.

Ahead of the nomination vote Saturday, Eduljee told a crowd of about 100 party members gathered at a banquet hall in Burnaby that the “whole country” will be watching the vote in Burnaby South's byelection.


https://bc.ctvnews.ca/daycare-operator-karen-wang-wins-liberal-nomination-in-burnaby-south-1.4234843
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Winning Burnaby-South by-election a critical challenge for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh: researcher


by Lauren Boothby and Taran Parmar
Posted Dec 30, 2018 8:38 pm PST


Burnaby-South is considered an NDP stronghold but a political researcher says it will be a tough race for Jagmeet Singh


Singh will face criticism for 'parachuting' in to the riding from out of province



BURNABY (NEWS 1130) — Despite being the leader of the federal NDP, a political researcher says winning Burnaby South will be no easy feat for Jagmeet Singh.

The riding vacated by former MP and now-Mayor of Vancouver Kennedy Stewart, has long been a stronghold for the NDP, but political researcher Megan Dias says it’s not going to be an easy race for Singh to win.


She says that’s because a lot of voters aren’t keen on the idea of Singh ‘parachuting’ into Burnaby to run, although he does have name recognition on his side, she says.

She sees this race as a chance for the federal leader to prove himself.

“It’s going to be a very important and symbolic in a lot of ways,” she says. “The stakes for Jagmeet are obviously the highest. I think it’s going to be a very bad situation if he doesn’t win this riding.”

She points out that if he isn’t able to win a federal riding it could be a serious problem for him and his party.

“Him not being able to win a riding in the house he has never actually sat in, and now saying he wants to run to be the Prime Minister of Canada, that wouldn’t be good optics,” she says. “I think the stakes are very high for him.”

She expects Burnaby residents to start seeing a lot of campaign posters as the race for the seat takes off. The winning candidate will have to get a lot of support early to make it in this race.

The federal government hasn’t officially called for a by-election in the riding.

https://www.citynews1130.com/2018/12/30/winning-burnaby-south-by-election-a-critical-challenge-for-ndp-leader-jagmeet-singh-researcher/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is also news of a People's Party candidate but she comes with some baggage and has ran and lost in the riding before )


It looks like this anti-SOGI activist is running in Burnaby South


Chris Campbell / Burnaby Now
December 29, 2018 05:15 PM



Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson

Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson

Photograph By Contributed


Chris Campbell

It looks like former Christian TV host and outspoken critic of the province’s sexual orientation and gender identity resource for schools is running federally in the Burnaby South byelection.

Laura-Lynn Tyler Thompson, a Christian blogger, author and former co-host of The 700 Club Canada – known for her vehement opposition to the province’s SOGI 123 program – was announced in a tweet as running for the People’s Party of Canada. She has been tweeting a lot about the party in recent weeks.



The party is new to Canadian politics, having been formed during the past few months by Maxime Bernier after his departure from the Conservative Party of Canada.

A tweet by the Burnaby North-Seymour PPC account named Tyler Thompson as its candidate and asked members to rally around her.


Tyler Thompson ran unsuccessfully for Burnaby school board, garnering 15,622 votes. She was a controversial candidate for her views, but still managed to win a lot of votes. But I don't see how someone who lost running for school trustee will be able to win a federal riding.

“I think the most important issue facing schools is that parents are highly alarmed and very upset that children are being taught gender-fluid ideology. It has no place in school,” she told the NOW during the civic election campaign.At rallies and on social media, Tyler Thompson has spoken against SOGI 123, a resource developed a couple years ago to help B.C. schools support gay, lesbian and transgender students and make schools more inclusive for them.

“A teacher is not trained, nor do they have the education to help a child dealing with gender identity,” she said.

The PPC founded an electoral district association (EDA) for Burnaby South in early October, according to Al Rawdah, the EDA’s president.

To address issues in Burnaby South, like poverty and housing, Rawdah said the party believes in small government and lower regulations for businesses. The party also believes in “controlled immigration” that works for everyone he added, criticizing the prime minister for putting refugees in hotels.

“We’re conservatives, we respect Canadians’ taxpayer money – it should be set up as controlled immigration policy,” he said, but added the party is not against refugees.

The People’s Party of Canada also plans to set up associations in New Westminster and Burnaby North-Seymour, according to Rawdah.

https://www.burnabynow.com/opinion/blogs/it-looks-like-this-anti-sogi-activist-is-running-in-burnaby-south-1.23566277
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

She looks like a good candidate to me, considering it's the launch of the new party, and doesn't offer much in the way of a career. She has some name recognition, and she is connected to the underground issues that move a big part of the public.

It also catches Singh at his weakest point -- standing up for gender rights!
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
She looks like a good candidate to me, considering it's the launch of the new party, and doesn't offer much in the way of a career. She has some name recognition, and she is connected to the underground issues that move a big part of the public.

It also catches Singh at his weakest point -- standing up for gender rights!




the Burnaby South by election is highly unpredictable with at least a couple realistic outcomes and highly likely the ultimate winner , wins by only a couple %

( 1- Singh / ndp narrowly win as normally the case in Burnaby , 2 - liberals win by small margin even though they normally don't win the riding , 3 - conservatives win by small margin by expanding support among Chinese voters as ndp and liberals split the progressive vote )

somewhat it will depend on how much of a backlash there is over the fact Singh is not from BC , not necessary unheard of for Ontario politicians or former residents to run in BC but it can still sometimes go over badly


I'm not sure how her entry into the race effects it , she'll likely get more than 2 % , the average polling numbers for the people's party , look at all the votes she got in the school board election and hardly anyone even votes in those races . I personally have not heard of her before or that familiar with her
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're not looking at the benefits. She is running in a riidng that will get some national attention because Singh's destiny will be (partially) decided by it. She's been through the mill. She knows how to campaign. All she has to do is be credible, to sound as reasonable as the other candidates, and yet challenge them.

There should be a lot of footage on YouTube for example. and the link sent around on Twitter as much as possible. The impact has the potential to be national if she can manage to be in the pack during the campaign. This could be a valuable first step in legimiazing the People's Party as an alternative.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Macleans wrote an entire article about the by election but failed to even mention the other candidates and tried to frame it as a strictly ndp / liberal race . even though the conservatives typically have done well there and there are other candidates in the by election


Erin O'Toole‏Verified account @ErinOTooleMP · 2h2 hours ago

Erin O'Toole Retweeted Maclean's Magazine

Curious that @macleans didn't even mention the most qualified candidate in this race - @CPC_HQ candidate Jay Shin - who has a great shot of winning. )




Karen Wang, Jagmeet Singh’s newest big problem

The Liberal newcomer doesn't have the name recognition of the NDP leader, but when they face off in B.C.'s Burnaby South, don't count her out
by Aaron Hutchins

Jan 4, 2019


Karen Wang shakes hands with Liberal supporters in Burnaby on Dec. 29, 2018. (Jennifer Gauthier)

Karen Wang is a relative unknown in politics. She’s never held office at any level. She’s no local celebrity. And the only time her name was on a ballot was last year in her failed run for the provincial legislature with the B.C. Liberals.

Jagmeet Singh, on the other hand, was a standout MPP for the Ontario NDP. His popularity spurred him to win the federal NDP leadership on the first ballot. And his aspirations are to become prime minister.

Based on their political CVs, it would appear a political mismatch in a head-to-head race. And yet, as the two prepare to face off in an upcoming federal by-election in B.C.’s Burnaby South riding, “this is no slam dunk [for Singh],” says former NDP press secretary Farouk Karim.

Singh has failed to gain traction nationally for his party without a seat of his own in the House of Commons, which might explain him running for a seat located four provinces away from the last place he was elected, Brampton, Ont.

In the last federal election, the NDP won the riding by fewer than 500 votes over the Liberals. After NDP MP Kennedy Stewart vacated the seat last summer in his successful run for Vancouver mayor, a Mainstreet Research survey found the NDP had fallen to third place in Burnaby South, polling at 27 per cent—compared to 36 per cent for the Liberals. Granted, the poll was done without any candidate’s names, just the party names.

All of which to say, as Singh talks of leading the NDP into the 2019 federal election, his first true test will be defeating Wang, a daycare operator from Burnaby, on her home turf.

Wang was born in 1975, growing up in a village near Shiyan, China. Her mother was a farmer who never went to school, while her father only studied until high school. “During the 1960s, my father’s family was punished during the cultural revolution because my [paternal] grandmother was a women’s leader in the town,” Wang says. Both her parents prioritized education for Wang, in addition to learning Chinese opera, a family passion for generations.

While studying at a foreign language university in China, Wang worked weekends at the provincial history museum as an English tour guide. After getting married at 21, she moved to Beijing with her husband who found work in the capital.

“I had no contacts in Beijing,” Wang remembers. “[My husband] gave me a newspaper and there was a company looking for English teachers for children. That’s how I got into early childhood education. I started to teach in elementary schools and daycares.” Soon after, her husband mentioned an opportunity for them move to Canada under a work program. The entire immigration process took less than a year.

The couple arrived to B.C. in 1999, where Wang was once again in a new city and looking for work. She heard early childhood educators were in great demand, so she enrolled at Burnaby College. After giving birth to two children—with two trips back to school after each maternity leave—Wang opened her own child care centre in 2009, Angels Playhouse, named after her daughter.

While she doesn’t have the national fame that Singh does, she says she has a leg up locally, having knocked on more than 7,500 doors in the provincial election for the B.C. Liberals. She finished second place behind the NDP candidate and three-term Burnaby city councillor, Anne Kang.

Now, as a federal candidate, she says her campaign priorities will be job creation, support for small business and investment in affordable housing. Her strategy, it would appear, is also to attach herself to Justin Trudeau, not the Liberals.

In Wang’s Twitter bio she calls herself the “#TeamTrudeau candidate for Burnaby South”—not the Liberal candidate. With the Liberals’ best showing in decades in B.C. for the 2015 election—thanks in large part to Trudeau’s popularity—Wang was also introduced by the Liberals as part of “Team Trudeau.”

“We didn’t see a lot of Team Ignatieff or Team Dion descriptions here in B.C.,” says Mario Canseco, president of the Vancouver-based polling firm Research Co. “I think they’re trying to distance themselves from the B.C. Liberals who lost the last [provincial] election, so it’s easier to say Team Trudeau. There’s no confusion with the brand. This is the candidate who’s running for the prime minister.”

In Wang, the Liberals have “somebody who’s a small business owner, which appeals to the Conservative mindset of the Liberal Party,” adds Canseco. “She’s a woman, a Chinese-Canadian, and spends a lot of time in daycares, which is a huge issue in urban B.C. where the waiting lists are huge.”

When Singh announced his plans to run in Burnaby South, there was talk in Ottawa about the Liberals extending the “leader’s courtesy,” as the concept is known, in which rival parties let newly elected party leaders run unopposed in by-elections to join the House of Commons. The Liberals have since been criticized for not affording Singh this opportunity.

And while the tradition is longstanding, it is most commonly used for leaders of the official opposition and not third party leaders. Meanwhile, the last time a new leader of the official opposition ran in a by-election, in 2002, the NDP ran a candidate against then-Canadian Alliance leader Stephen Harper in his Calgary riding. (The Liberals of the day did not run a candidate.)

Not only are the Liberals running against Singh in Burnaby, but they waited months until officially calling this by-election, preventing Singh from potentially joining Parliament last year.

“I think it was a bit of pettiness to wait until the deadline to launch the by-election,” says Karim, the NDP insider. “Usually, with a new party leader, the courtesy is not only not running somebody [against them in a by-election] but it should be to launch the by-election as soon as you can. This seat was vacated in August. The election could have happened anytime in the fall. Surely it was for a political reason.”

Singh will have the advantage of the Green Party of Canada not running a candidate in Burnaby South—as part of the leader’s courtesy—a decision that could offer Singh a vital boost. “Not having the Greens present a candidate, the anti-pipeline vote will coalesce around the NDP,” Karim says.

As the months went by to end 2018, the stream of positive news coverage for Singh faded. Canadians were no longer talking about Singh as the hip new NDP leader, his fashion sense, or his skill at recruiting new members. With the honeymoon period long over, Canseco adds, Singh’s by-election campaign will prove all the more difficult.

“It’s essentially trying to establish yourself as a national leader by running in a place where you’re not that well known,” Canseco says. “It’s a tough undertaking. It’s not easy like he’s running in a friendly riding.”

And if Wang proves victorious, Karim adds, “It would be a rough spring for the NDP.”

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/karen-wang-jagmeet-singhs-newest-big-problem/
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Scheer has released a statement calling for Trudeau to soon call all 4 of the by elections , even though the cpc would likely only win York Simcoe and be lucky to finish better than second in even 1 of the other 3 )


POLITICS
01/04/2019 13:56 EST | Updated 01/04/2019 14:02 EST


Andrew Scheer Calls On Trudeau To 'Do The Right Thing,' Immediately Call 4 Byelections

The Tory leader is also noting how a Quebec riding will be without an MP until the fall.



By Ryan Maloney


Federal Conservatives are again goading Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to call byelections, while highlighting how a Liberal Quebec riding is on the cusp of having no representation in the House of Commons for nine months.

Tory Leader Andrew Scheer made his push in a statement Friday, accusing Trudeau of playing "political games" last fall by only calling one byelection in Ontario, despite the fact that three other seats — Quebec's Outremont, British Columbia's Burnaby South, and Ontario's York-Simcoe — are also vacant.

In December, Tories easily kept the riding of Leeds-Grenville-Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes that was left open after the death of respected Tory MP Gord Brown.

"As 2019 begins, Justin Trudeau is once again putting his own partisan interests ahead of Canadians who deserve to have their voices heard in Parliament," Scheer said in the release. "Four seats are currently vacant, but Trudeau refuses to commit to calling all four by-elections."

A fourth seat opened up this week when Sheila Malcolmson, who won the B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith for New Democrats in 2015, resigned to run for the provincial NDP in a critically important byelection.

While Trudeau can wait up to six months to call a byelection after a seat is vacated, the political calculus has changed because of a recently passed Liberal omnibus bill to reform Canada's election laws. Bill C-76 changed the rules to prohibit calling a byelection within nine months of a fixed federal election, such as the one set for Oct. 21.

This means that if Trudeau does not call a byelection in Nanaimo-Ladysmith by Jan. 20, the riding will be without an MP until after the fall vote. When asked if a decision will come this month, Chantal Gagnon, a spokeswoman for the prime minister, told HuffPost Canada via email that a byelection "will be called in due course."

According to his public itinerary, the prime minister is currently taking personal time in Whistler, B.C.

Meanwhile, the riding of Saint-Léonard-Saint-Michel is guaranteed to have no representation in the months ahead because Liberal MP Nicola Di Iorio, who was mockingly dubbed "missing" due to his lengthy time away from Parliament Hill last fall, will quit on Jan. 22. Di Iorio's decision to leave at that time ensures there cannot be a byelection to replace him before the federal election.


"Having imposed this new deadline through Bill C-76, Justin Trudeau will leave voters in Saint-Léonard-Saint-Michel without representation until the fall," Scheer said.

"With Canadians increasingly fed up with Justin Trudeau's failures, voters in these vacant seats deserve the chance to have their voices heard. Justin Trudeau needs to do the right thing, and immediately call by-elections in all vacant seats."

Suspicious timing, say Tories

Last month, Tory MPs alleged in the House that the timing of Di Iorio's exit was suspicious. Though Quebec MP Gerard Deltell accused Trudeau of making a "sweetheart deal" with Di Iorio and "playing games with democracy," the prime minister simply reiterated that the outgoing Liberal would "continue to serve his community until January."

Last year, the leaders of Canada's four main opposition parties — Scheer, the NDP's Jagmeet Singh, Green Party Leader Elizabeth May and interim Bloc Québécois Leader Mario Beaulieu — teamed up on a joint letter pushing Trudeau to call the contests.

"We are in complete agreement that Canadians deserve to have elected representation as soon as possible," it read.


Singh unquestionably has the most skin in the game as he is running for a seat in Burnaby South and a loss could threaten his leadership of the party. Liberals and Tories are also running candidates there, bucking a so-called "leader's courtesy" that is being honoured by the Greens.

But with the NDP struggling mightily in public opinion polls, some Conservatives have not been shy about their hope that their rivals will improve enough to siphon votes away from Liberals in tight three-way races.

Tories hope for strong NDP

Scheer's chief of staff, Marc-André Leclerc, even told HuffPost Canada's "Follow-Up" podcast last summer that he hopes Singh wins in Burnaby South.

"We need to see him more. He needs to be more proactive, so we need to make sure that the NDP has a strong leader in the House, [and] some exposure," Leclerc said at the time.

Tory strategist Jason Lietaer told the podcast that a weak NDP is an "existential threat" to anyone hoping for a Scheer government.

"We won't win the election if [the NDP] is at 10, or 15, or 18 per cent in the polls, that is the truth, we all know it," Lietaer said. "We can all do the math."


https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2019/01/04/andrew-scheer-trudeau-byelections_a_23633703/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the ndp was left wondering once again why the by election was not called ?

as there was a media leak in November which indicated it would be called by now with a vote for early February , now the liberals will no longer confirm that timeline only that it will occur early this year )


NDP's Jagmeet Singh: Trudeau delaying Burnaby South byelection to benefit Liberals

Rally organized in Burnaby South in anticipation for election call that didn't come




Kelvin Gawley / Burnaby Now
January 6, 2019 01:05 PM


Singh Jan 6

NDP leader Jagmeet Singh addressed supporters at his Burnaby South campaign office on Sunday.

Photograph By Jennifer Gauthier


For the second time in just over two months, the NDP gathered supporters in Burnaby in anticipation of a byelection being called for Burnaby South.

And for the second time they were left seething as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau declined to announce a date for the vote to replace departed MP Kennedy Stewart (now the mayor of Vancouver).


“The people of Burnaby South deserve a voice in Ottawa as they face some of the highest housing costs, skyrocketing medical fees and deep concern for their own future and the future of the environment,” federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh said in a statement. “It’s clear Mr. Trudeau isn’t acting on the best interest of the people of Burnaby but rather he’s focused on the best interest of his own political party.”

In late October, Trudeau called a byelection for one of four vacant Parliament seats. At the time, New Democrat MP Peter Julian called the decision “unprecedented and very petty and manipulative.”


In November, a Liberal source told the NOW that Trudeau would call byelections “early in the new year” for the three other ridings without representation – Burnaby South, Outremont (in Montreal) and York-Simcoe (in Toronto).


This week, the NDP announced Singh would be rallying volunteers at his Burnaby campaign office on Sunday. “Following months of delays, media reports suggest the Trudeau government may formally commence to campaign for the by-election in Burnaby South as early as this weekend.”

But once again no announcement came from the Prime Minister’s office and the NDP was left criticizing the delays rather than officially launching a campaign to get its leader his first seat in the House of Commons.

“Having an elected representative is a bedrock of our democracy,” Singh said. “When there is already so much disappointment in the Trudeau government for failing to deliver on the progressive platform they were elected on, this pokes them right in the eye.”

The NDP expected the call Sunday because Elections Canada needs 35 days to set up a byelection and the Liberals told media outlets the vote would come this February – making this the last Sunday (when byelections are typically called) to meet that deadline.

In November, Liberal sources told several outlets the byelection would come in February, but the NOW’s source would not confirm that timeframe, only saying the vote would come “early in the new year.”


https://www.burnabynow.com/news/ndp-s-jagmeet-singh-trudeau-delaying-burnaby-south-byelection-to-benefit-liberals-1.23579903
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( I still don't understand if the by election was so important for the ndp , why did they not pressure Kennedy Stewart to leave sooner ,

he announced in May he was leaving , did literally nothing as mp until he quit in September , if he had left sooner , the by election would of been called by now . the ndp are true that trudeau is playing games but its partly there own fault for allowing an mp to stay on too long after already saying he was leaving )



Singh demands Trudeau to set Burnaby South byelection date


CTV Vancouver
Published Sunday, January 6, 2019 3:47PM PST



NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh criticizes the prime minister for delaying setting a date for the Burnaby South byelection.

"This is going to hurt hundreds of thousands of Canadians who don't have representation, haven't had it for so long. This is a decision that impacts the bedrock of our democracy," he told supporters at a rally on Sunday.

Singh, who does not have a seat in Parliament, accused Justin Trudeau's government of putting off calling the byelection for its own political gain.


Jagmeet Singh
NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh calls on the federal government to set a date for the Burnaby South byelection.

"It's clear they're not doing this in the best interest of Burnaby South; they're not doing this in the best interest of Canadians; they're doing it in their own political interest and that's deeply disappointing."

On Dec. 29, the Liberals selected daycare owner Karen Wang as a challenger against Singh. Corporate lawyer Jay Shin is running for the Conservatives while the Green party won't have a candidate.

Shin has also been calling for a byelection, saying Trudeau is failing Burnaby South voters by "denying them a voice in the House of Commons."

The Burnaby South seat was vacated in mid-September by former NDP MP Kennedy Stewart, who ran successfully to become Vancouver's mayor.

In the 2015 federal election, the NDP won by just over 500 votes.

https://bc.ctvnews.ca/singh-demands-trudeau-to-set-burnaby-south-byelection-date-1.4242608
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Am I the only one who thinks worrying about this bit of political manoeuvring is silly? If this election were to be announced tomorrow ... and Singh was elected in March, what difference would it make? The general election campaign would follow almost immediately.

Singh might have blown his chance already, but he looks pathetic by seeming powerless until he gets into Parliament. He draws attention to the fact that so few care if he has a seat or not.

For this to work, he has to have a crowd at his back, and he doesn't.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Am I the only one who thinks worrying about this bit of political manoeuvring is silly? If this election were to be announced tomorrow ... and Singh was elected in March, what difference would it make? The general election campaign would follow almost immediately.

Singh might have blown his chance already, but he looks pathetic by seeming powerless until he gets into Parliament. He draws attention to the fact that so few care if he has a seat or not.

For this to work, he has to have a crowd at his back, and he doesn't.


it seems like Singh's leadership of the ndp is hanging on by very little and the liberals know it , so they've decided to play games in an attempt to prolong the uncertainty


no by election for a party leader has ever been delayed this long , at least not in recent memory , the government also typically does not even run a candidate

so the Singh by election is unusual from a historical perspective , not exactly sure why the liberals would want to end the tradition of courtesy for new party leaders , something that in my view helped our democracy and made parliament a little less partisan and mean , the liberals say that they want less partisanship in Ottawa but by contesting this by election there making parliament even more partisan and mean than its ever been before


the outcome also seems very much in doubt at this point ( unlike other leader by elections which were easily won by the party leader )


there was also a couple BC ndp mp's taking the holidays to think about there future , it be interesting to see what they've decided and if they even run again ?
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Does Jagmeet Singh need a seat in the house ?

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