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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:43 pm    Post subject: Hi I'm Andrew Scheer new ad introduces him to voters Reply with quote

( there is a new ad campaign in the works to introduce Scheer to Canadians , I watched the ad and found it hard to watch , it sounds a lot better if you just listen to it like a radio ad , I felt its the right direction or type of ad to run as an introduction but was a little soft or something just didn't click for me )



POLITICS


'Hi, I'm Andrew Scheer': Tories Hope To Introduce Leader To Canadians With New Ad

"Millions of Canadians don’t know Andrew – and we need to change that."

 11/14/2017 11:42 EST | Updated 22 hours ago





Ryan Maloney 
Senior Politics Editor, HuffPost Canada


YouTube/Conservative Party of Canada

A screengrab of Andrew Scheer in a new ad from the Conservative Party of Canada.




Federal Conservatives are seeking to raise the profile of their leader with a new ad that presents him as a friendly, familiar face at a neighbourhood park.

And, following in the footsteps of other opposition leaders, the 30-second spot gives Andrew Scheer a chance to introduce himself to Canadians by name.


Tories promoted the clip in a fundraising email Monday sent on behalf of Hamish Marshall, the former Rebel Media director who has been named the Tories' 2019 national campaign manager months after helping Scheer win the party leadership.


"Millions of Canadians don't know Andrew – and we need to change that," Marshall said in a pitch to party members in which he lauded Scheer as a "devoted father of five" who is "true to his conservative principles, in politics and out."


Watch the ad embedded below:


Marshall asked supporters to "chip in $38" to help get the ad on TV, presumably because Scheer is 38 years old.

The clip shows a smiling, untucked Scheer talking about his middle-class upbringing as people sitting on benches interrupt him to say hello and children climb on playground equipment.


"Conservatives want to see every Canadian succeed and prosper," he says. "So, the other guys can take their cues from the cocktail circuit and celebrities. I'll take mine from the grocery stores and the soccer fields.

"That's who I am. That's who I'm fighting for."

The quip about the cocktail circuit is similar to one Scheer used in his first speech to caucus after winning the Tory leadership last May.


"We're the party of everyday Canadians who work hard, who make sacrifices to secure a better future for their kids. That's who we are, that's who we fight for — that's never going to change," he said at the time.

"The Liberals can take their cues from the cocktail circuit. We will take ours from the minivans, from the soccer fields, from the legion halls and the grocery stores.''

Since then, Scheer has doggedly tried to make the case that Liberals are making life harder for ordinary Canadians, even as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau touts how his government raised taxes on the wealthy and cut taxes for middle class families.

In the House of Commons last week, for instance, Scheer accused the prime minister of making things harder for small businesses while turning a blind eye to "loopholes" enjoyed by the rich. Liberals make things easier for those in the "jet-set life," while always making things tougher for those "in the road-trip life," he said.

Needs 'name recognition' boost


But Scheer has conceded he needs to do better with "name recognition," saying as much in a lengthy profile in The Globe and Mail last month.

In a poll from Abacus Data released last week, 71 per cent of respondents said they either don't know Scheer "all that well" or "don't know much about him at all," despite him having served as a Saskatchewan MP since 2004 and four years as Canada's youngest Speaker of the House of Commons.

By comparison, 79 per cent felt the same about new NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh, a former Ontario MPP who won the job last month and does not hold a federal seat.

Unsurprisingly, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is far better known than his rivals, with 84 per cent of respondents saying they had a very or pretty good idea what Trudeau is about.


Past party leaders have tried the same tactic as Scheer to get themselves better known. Before he became prime minister, former Tory leader Stephen Harper released ads in which he said: "My name is Stephen Harper."

Back in 2009, Liberals released ads showing then-leader Michael Ignatieff sitting in the woods, talking about his values and career before politics. The ads were meant to respond to Tory attacks claiming that Ignatieff, who spent decades outside of Canada working as an academic and journalist, was "just visiting" and just in Canadian politics for himself.

Those ads began with the Liberal leader saying: "Hi, I'm Michael Ignatieff."


Scheer's ad similarly begins with him starring in the camera and proclaiming: "Hi, I'm Andrew Scheer. The new leader of Canada's Conservatives."

With a file from The Canadian Press


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2....._23276966/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought it was a less effective offering on the same theme that Patrick Brown has in his introductory videos. Scheer as "dad" as he walks down a pathway in a local park being greeted by representatives of the identity groups he wants to identify with -- women and racial minorities ...

This one is less hard-hitting because, let's face it, the Ontario government is a target-rich zone. I don't think they intend these ads to be aggressive. They are meant to be watchable.

Scheer has a different political task. His opponent isn't as vulnerable as Wynne, on the one hand. On the other, Trudeau is going down a path that is going to be painful if conditions change. And what is the chance of that? I'd say a lot higher than normal.

Scheer has more time as well, but he needs to build a critique of this government.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Opinions

Sure, Scheer’s ad looks like amateur night. That was the point.

By Martin Patriquin. Published on Nov 16, 2017 2:17pm


The Conservative party’s new ad has party leader Andrew Scheer resplendent in rumpled flannel, delivering a Tim Horton’s take on Canadian values as he strolls through vinyl-sided suburbia, pausing only to say hello to people stationed on park benches.

He then seats himself in front of a playground. “The other guys can take their cues from the cocktail circuit and celebrities. I’ll take mine from the grocery stores and the soccer fields,” he says, as children prance around behind him.

So far, the Ottawa bubble reviews haven’t been kind — even the ones from Conservatives themselves. “Not to be critical of this TV ad or anything, but Andrew Scheer looks like someone dragged him off the couch,” said Gerry Nicholls, consultant and former National Citizens Coalition president.

Predictably enough, the tin-foil-hat troops of the left see Scheer’s schtick as subterfuge. Real Conservatives, wrote one blogger, “could set this country on fire. Just as the fascists are setting fire to Poland.”

I love this ad, and not only because both blinkered ends of the spectrum hate it. Good political narratives play to a candidate’s strengths and personal truths. Andrew Scheer believes he is exactly this person: a friendly, mildly paunchy, entirely inoffensive white guy who waves at random people in the park. Wrapping this awkward beast in slick production and slicker clothes (hell, even getting him to iron his shirt, apparently) would come off as fake.

The ad, which is part of a larger rollout that began in mid-October, has played on TSN and CTV, and will appear online to swing voters in targeted ridings. Sometimes a rumpled flannel shirt isn’t just a rumpled flannel shirt. Sometimes it’s a cheery reminder of how we are in the midlife years of the current Liberal mandate, and how campaign wheels are beginning to turn towards the 2019 election.

open quote 761b1bCircumstances have bred an unfamiliar trait in the Tories: humility.

Other indications have been less subtle. This week, the Liberal government introduced its ‘Mandate Letter Tracker’, a report card grading various Liberal promises made in ministers’ mandate letters at the outset of Justin Trudeau’s term. (This is a flawed analogy, mind you, because report cards generally aren’t written by the students themselves.)

This is more of a very public slap on the back for the Liberals. It’s a remarkable display of subterfuge of its own: by tracking mandate letters — not actual Liberal campaign commitments — the party doesn’t have to answer for broken promises made in the giddy, consequence-free months of the last federal election campaign.

Sometimes, broken promises aren’t broken promises. Sometimes, as with this Mandate Tracker, they are simply things “not being pursued.” And because the tracker is hosted on a government website, this nakedly partisan exercise is cloaked in demure, legitimizing government bureaucratese.

As Justin Ling points out in The Walrus, the Liberal government has thumbed the scale in its favour. A Calgary-based independent reviewer saddles the Liberals with 36 broken promises since 2015. According to the government’s own estimate, the number of promises which have dropped off the edge is … three. Onward to victory!

In short, it’s exactly the kind of stealthy campaigning the Liberals themselves used to complain about when Conservatives did it. Three short years ago, Liberal MP David McGuinty called the Conservatives’ use of public dollars to sell Canadians on the party’s achievements “a complete abuse of taxpayers money.” So furious was McGuinty that he introduced a bill that would eliminate such partisan spending. Yada yada, blah blah … McGuinty’s bill died a cheap death in 2015. McGuinty himself doesn’t seem particularly eager to reintroduce it today.

If online Liberal hackery isn’t your thing, you can get the real thing in person. As part of the party’s National Week of Action, MPs and cabinet ministers are fanning out across the country to champion the Liberal brand. Again, it’s a partisan exercise designed to improve the government’s image, and is therefore ripe for abuse.

The Liberal party of 2013 would have a field day with the Liberal government of 2017.

If this is the case, then today’s Conservatives are more like the Liberals of 2013: out of power, faced with a popular opponent and saddled with a new and unproven leader, without the benefit of power or the attendant luxury of contradicting themselves without consequence.

These circumstances have bred an unfamiliar trait in the Tories: humility. Just as Justin Trudeau once dressed himself up in Hope and Hard Work, Andrew Scheer is now dressing down in Joe Fresh, traipsing through the suburbs with a grin and a ready wave.

It’s not flashy, and lord knows he’s easy to poke fun of. But it’s exactly what he has to do.

https://ipolitics.ca/2017/11/16/sure-scheers-ad-looks-like-amateur-night-point/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, there's nothing wrong in Andrew's world ... that's the trouble. Maybe this article puts its finger on it -- its that Andrew looks so happy.

The ad is a picture of Andrew back when he lived with the Hobbits. He's going to be our Frodo.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I thought it was a less effective offering on the same theme that Patrick Brown has in his introductory videos. Scheer as "dad" as he walks down a pathway in a local park being greeted by representatives of the identity groups he wants to identify with -- women and racial minorities ...

This one is less hard-hitting because, let's face it, the Ontario government is a target-rich zone. I don't think they intend these ads to be aggressive. They are meant to be watchable.

Scheer has a different political task. His opponent isn't as vulnerable as Wynne, on the one hand. On the other, Trudeau is going down a path that is going to be painful if conditions change. And what is the chance of that? I'd say a lot higher than normal.

Scheer has more time as well, but he needs to build a critique of this government.



I suppose this type of ad strategy is his best option when considering his opponent , trudeau is no doubt considered one of the most popular world leaders and viewed as wildly popular around the world , although his polling numbers in Canada have remained rather stagnant and not really that impressive when compared to past liberal leaders .

Scheer isn't that well know even though he's been an mp since 2004 and was speaker of the house in 2011 but he does come across as rather average , has a young family and seems like a nice guy . so there is some positive aspects to advertise which some people might find appealing but you can only get so far with personality , eventually people will want something more
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scheer ad an attempt to cast him as an anti-Vogue everyman: strategists

By Janice Dickson. Published on Nov 16, 2017 2:52pm

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer talks with media in Ottawa on Wednesday, June 21, 2017. iPolitics/Matthew Usherwood


Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer introduced himself to Canadians this week in a glamour-free video depicting the 38-year-old as a very average guy. According to Conservative strategists, dorky and likeable is just what the party needs.

“Andrew Scheer is aware Vogue magazine is never going to pay money to photograph him. Andrew is a slightly dorky extremely nice guy and it’s always easy to make fun of an extremely dorky guy and if people learn his name, the ad is working,” said Chad Rogers, a Conservative strategist and partner at Crestview Strategy. Rogers was referring to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau being featured on the cover of Vogue.

But if People magazine’s latest choice for its ‘Sexiest Man Alive’ is any indication, says communications and conservative strategist Alise Mills, Scheer might just land himself a cover spot one day.

“I think there’s a turning point now,” said Mills, tongue-in-cheek.

In the video, Scheer is seen walking through a park, wearing an untucked, slightly rumpled, short-sleeved shirt. “Hi, I’m Andrew Scheer,” he says before approaching people on a bench. “Hi guys,” he says.

Some on social media were quick to poke fun of the video. Conservative political strategist Gerry Nicholls tweeted: “Not to be critical of this TV ad or anything, but Andrew Scheer looks like somebody just dragged him off the couch.”

Mills said she watched the ad more than once. Her initial reaction? “Oh my god …”

After a second viewing, she said, she understood the intent of the ad was anti-glamour. “This is what a real person looks like in a very basic, non-manufactured ad.”

“To meet Andrew Scheer is to know he’s a pretty decent, average guy,” said Rogers. “So to point a camera at a Scheer … there’s not a lot of strategy. He’s banking on fact that if you meet him, you like him.”

Tim Powers, Conservative strategist and vice chair of Summa Strategies, said the ad reminded him of Stephen Harper in his early days.

“It’s not sizzle and flash, it’s, ‘Here’s who I am. This is what I’m about and I’m not threatening,'” he said. “It’s a big thing for Conservative leaders, particularly federal ones, who people murmur about having social conservative views to demonstrate they’re not threatening.

“Andrew Scheer’s untucked shirt is Stephen Harper’s blue sweater vest. Whether it has the same effect over time, we shall see.”

So is Scheer trying too hard to appear unthreatening?

Powers said those who know Scheer might think he’s “overdoing” average, but it still might put voters at ease. He said the ad introduces him to people who don’t know him and to those who have heard him described as “Harper-lite”.

Susan Elliott, a Conservative strategist with Strategy Portal, said Scheer is taking advantage of a huge strategic error on the Liberals part — leaving the perception through its botched tax policy rollout that they’re going after ordinary Canadians and the middle class.

“While they are trying to fix those things, the damage is done. Meanwhile, the spotlight is on the uber wealthy and their efforts to avoid paying tax or declaring their assets,” Elliott added.

“This is the best moment to distinguish Scheer from Trudeau/Morneau and the Liberals, and they are wise to take advantage while the issues are timely.”

https://ipolitics.ca/2017/11/16/scheer-ad-attempt-cast-anti-vogue-everyman-strategists/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2017 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't like the argument that selling Andrew Scheer as part of the mediocre middle is a strategy. This isn't, in fact, a real everyman. It's a successful young "dad" who's a little too pudgy for his shirt, but he is aggessively approachable, to the point of creepiness. Look at the houses in the background.

But this is best seen as a backdrop to a drama that is yet to unfold.

I may be a little 'down-market' from those that Andrew is appealing to, but being a 'nice guy' isn't really high on my list of priorities for a new leader. I'd rather someone with a little more fire in their belly and a little more "pimp" in the way he walks, something women respect. I want somebody who can put his knee in his opponent's groin, figuratively speaking, when the knives come out.

Scheer is trying to head off the idea that he is a racist homophobe by portraying himself as a kind of wholesome suburban eunuch. His mistake -- in my eyes -- is that he is trying to appeal to everybody. It means he presents himself as bland and 'square'.

If you compare the Brown ad with the Scheer ad -- both of which have the same goals, I think -- the Brown ad is better because where it transmits the sense of determination and calm resolve, the Scheer ad presents us with an amiable dork whi seems to be an approval-seeker, and thus, weak.

But it's only backdrop. Maybe at some time, the narrative will have the amiable dork mount up and make his move against Mordor. That's why I called him Frodo. Personally, I would rather have Daenerys Targaryen at the helm. But what matters is that he mounts up.

These media images seem wide of the mark but they are not because they correspond to the way audiences see things. It is a way of communicating verbally about what is being communicated non-verbally.

The question is what will work with Andrew. I accept the sentiment that one can anticipate the Left's attacks will include accusations of racism and the dreaded homophobia disease, which includes a whole cluster of forbidden thoughts and a stint at a re-education camp.

The problem is it rarely works.

Secondly, it says to me he is going after the women's vote by being gormless, which is another loser. It would be a better strategy to defend men. Not attack women, but defend men -- it's different. Most of this country thinks this stuff has gone far enough, including young women. It's feminists who are the aggressors, and their demands are childish. Most people laugh at "manspreading" and they don't think it keeps women down.

But that's just me. Let's see what he does with the opportunity. So far, I haven't seen much. Let's all suspend disbelief until we see some results.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andrew Scheer’s dad jeans and awkward hellos are painstakingly deliberate


Scheer’s new ad may seem too poorly executed to be calculating, but the Conservative leader is positioning himself as the only un-slick future candidate in the race for PM, Emma Teitel writes.


This commercial released by the Conservative Party of Canada has party leader Andrew Scheer introducing himself to Canadians.



By Emma TeitelNational Columnist

Tues., Nov. 21, 2017



If you’re an average-looking conservative politician running for the highest office in the nation against two very handsome, left-leaning competitors, both of whom have been written up in top fashion magazines, how do you use your difference to your advantage? Easy. You flaunt it. You do exactly as federal Conservative party leader Andrew Scheer did this month in a new campaign spot: You put on your least remarkable shirt and your most forgiving pair of pants and you tell your fellow country men and women that the mild-mannered schlub standing before them is the answer to what ails them.

“The other guys can take their cues from the cocktail circuits and the celebrities,” Scheer says in the new ad released last week, referring presumably to Justin Trudeau and Jagmeet Singh, as he walks through a suburban park, kids playing on a jungle gym behind him. “I’ll take mine from the grocery stores and the soccer fields. That’s who I am, that’s who I’m fighting for.”

The ad not only appears low-budget, it’s also quite awkward to watch — particularly when Scheer stops mid-spiel to say hello to two women and one man strategically placed on the park benches that line his path. It has the feel not of a federal politics spot, but of a video shown at a school assembly by a 16-year-old running for student council president. (In fact, it reminds me of my own student council campaign videos, which also made use of the local suburban landscape.)

This awkward, amateurish quality is why so many on the “cocktail circuit” (what I assume is Scheer’s term for elites in big cities whose pants aren’t so forgiving) have taken to mocking the leader and the ad endlessly online. Here’s Warren Kinsella on Twitter: “This ad is so bad, and so fundamentally weird, you half expect David Lynch to appear on one of the benches, holding an owl and a log.”

I expected no such thing. Unlike my celebrity peers on the cocktail circuit, I thought Scheer’s new clip was actually rather endearing, not in spite of its embarrassing, amateur quality but precisely because of it. Scheer looks so uncomfortable in the spotlight, I almost want to hug him. (That’s saying a lot because I dislike pretty much everything he stands for.)


And I highly doubt that I am alone in this feeling.


Andrew Scheer's new clip was actually rather endearing, not in spite of its embarrassing, amateur quality but precisely because of it, Emma Teitel writes.




Scheer’s ad may seem to some too weird and too poorly executed to be calculating. But I think every awkward pause and quirk therein is painstakingly deliberate. The Conservative leader is positioning himself as the only unapologetically unsophisticated, un-slick future candidate in the race for PM — in the way he dresses, carries himself and even in the company he keeps: neighbourhood moms who aren’t intimidated to interrupt his official campaign message to say hello (the implication being that nothing, not even a rolling camera, can stop Scheer from greeting an ordinary Canadian on the street). And then of course, there are the kids scaling the jungle gym behind him.

In a 2012 article on the science of political advertising in the American Psychological Association’s Monitor on Psychology, Sadie Dingfelder writes that “reminders of children” can influence “otherwise liberal voters to endorse more conservative views.” I believe the same truth holds for reminders of dad jeans and untucked plaid shirts.

I may not be a political scientist but I did win three high school student council elections in a row and I don’t think campaigning among adult politicians with big budgets is drastically different. The late Toronto mayor Rob Ford had enormous success throwing massive parties in his backyard and giving away hamburgers in a public park (a tactic taken right out of the student council election handbook). Justin Trudeau is the epitome of the class president about whom nerdier, more deserving candidates complain, “No fair, it shouldn’t be a popularity contest.”

Alas it is. But luckily for Scheer, popular comes in different shapes and sizes these days. Make fun of the Conservative leader all you like for his schlubby style and his corny videos, but underestimate him at your peril. He is shaping up to be the Blake Shelton of Canadian politics

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2017/11/21/opinion-andrew-scheers-dad-jeans-and-awkward-hellos-are-painstakingly-deliberate.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2017 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boy, no wonder The Star published this. I gotta say, the author thinks the mass mind is a lot subtler than I do.

There's a picture that critics like, but you'd never want in your dining room ... ceci n'est pas un pipe. The point is that the image is not the thing itself. They spend a lot of money on these things getting them like they want them. They are usually necessary.

But they are not the thing itself.

I find myself having some fears confirmed. I think Andrew could accomplish more of what he wants by carving out a position and popularizing it. And, to popularize it quickly, these days, means taking on one or another of the sacred cows of the welfare state.

But let's see how well this works, as a first step.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2017 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is not about Quebec politics. It's an illustration of what I think Andrew would be doing if he had one iota of the statesman in him. Just an illustration.

Quote:
Quebec without equalization?
François Legault’s promise to wean Quebec off equalization payment isn’t realistic, but it’s good politics
Paul Wells
November 22, 2017

One of my superstitions is that when you watch a televised leaders’ debate, if there’s one leader everyone else is facing with an angry expression, that’s who’ll win the election. One leader sets the agenda, the others react. It actually doesn’t matter much who’s right on the facts: what matters is who’s making everyone dance.

On Wednesday in Quebec politics, that person was François Legault, the leader of the Coalition Avenir Québec party (shortened everywhere as CAQ, pronounced “cack.” I don’t make it up, I just report it). In Question Period, Legault was making the best of things, going after Premier Philippe Couillard for the previous day’s actually quite rosy fall economic update. Federal equalization payments to Quebec have tripled since 2003, Legault said, to more than $11 billion. Isn’t it a shame?

Then Legault uncorked the following: “What I want to tell Quebecers is that a CAQ government will aim for zero equalization. A CAQ government will eliminate the wealth gap with the rest of Canada. A CAQ government will have ambition, will aim high for Quebec.”

[....]

It’s clever of Legault to “aim for zero equalization.” It’s the same as championing an economy on fire. It’s also not realistic. By most measures, Quebec’s economy is already on fire—it was “raining money” this summer, though growth should slow to a drizzle by next year—and equalization payments to Quebec have increased lately anyway.
We’re probably headed for at least a year of equalization debates anyway, which nobody would wish on their worst enemy, so I’ll avoid details for now. What strikes me, from the parochial perspective of an old Montreal Gazette reporter, is that dynamic we saw in Quebec City this morning. Couillard’s right: Legault is saying random things he can’t possibly mean. But Legault was leading the parade today, with the premier and the leader of a larger opposition party trying to squeeze into the frame.[Emphasis added] He must be pleased with his day. It’s the sort of day that improves his chances of replacing Couillard.
http://www.macleans.ca/news/ca.....alization/


You can't evaluate this by the old rules of debate. Or by the standards of economic analysis. This is all about rallying the crowd and getting them involved. Right now, most Canadians aren't involved in Canadian federal politics. Once people do get involved, and watch Justin for a while, the public distaste will grow. We want to drag him out ito the spotlight and compel them to answer serious challenges. It doesn't matter if the rallying cry is off-centre, realistically speaking if it attracts attention and the counter-attack is weak.

Warren Kinsella said, of Harper, that his cold distance he liked to keep between him and people would be his failing. I don't know if he's right or not, but it seems to me that what will bring Justin down is his arrogance and his weightlessness. Most people won't have to watch him answer questions in question period very long to realize our PM is a haughty jerk ...

The problem for Andrew is to drag him out into the sunlight and get him to illustrate how unlikeable he is. If he tries to rely totally on TV and clever but unanswered questions in Parliament, we will have to wait until the Liberals get to Wynne levels of corruption and bankruptcy.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:

Warren Kinsella said, of Harper, that his cold distance he liked to keep between him and people would be his failing. I don't know if he's right or not, but it seems to me that what will bring Justin down is his arrogance and his weightlessness. Most people won't have to watch him answer questions in question period very long to realize our PM is a haughty jerk


If by "people" Warren Kinsella is referring to the media;
Than sure.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As to the approach the CPC is taking in painting Andrew Scheer is the unslick "Un-Politician".

Not perhaps my first choice but an interesting one none the less.

The argument that has been made over the last few weeks is that Canada was generally content with Stephen Harper's management of the economy, they just grew tired of him.

Drawing a sharp contrast between Scheer and Trudeau is an interesting approach.

The entire underlining Trudeau has three nannies for three kids whereas Scheer appears to have all five of his kids with him at every campaign stop is not lost on me.

It appears that the CPC is trying to directly appeal to those middle class families that voted for the LPC en mass in 2015, the ones who handed Trudeau his majority and had handed Harper three straight election victories.

The secondary benefit is the LPC attempted to paint Stephen Harper as some sort of super villain twisting his mustache in his Lair built into a dormant volcano plotting the hidden agenda he would spring on Canadians if he was ever given power.

Its going to be harder to have that stick to Scheer;
He is more of the guy who brings the oranges to your kids soccer game than a bond villain.

If that is a good thing or not...
I dunno?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find myself having to restrain myself because what he's establishing is, in effect, a back story. It's Frodo when he was still back in the Shire. The question is ... when does the quest start?

I want him to be more heroic, but I want honest politicians, and let's face it, that doesn't work. Most of all, I want him to pick up the issues that aren't yet in politics, but only because the media is so effective in suppressing information.

I have posted some material on Canadian universities on here. It pulls together some of the material that people need to understand what is going on in our universities. We see professors stifling ideas because they don't want to 'legitimize' them by allowing them a part in course presentations! But beyond that, we hear people using words in ways that are unfamiliar with, and they have even coined new words lest they be accused of " ... favouring the cis-gendered nomative" way of doing things. (That's the 99.4% of us that are not transsexuals.)

People tend to think if they don't see problems, they won't worry about it. But this feminist nonsense has been fed into the public in hidden ways, through the educational system, for almost fifty years now.

What we don't realize is that these things have been introduced into the population by age-grades, slivers of population who have been dosed up with ever-increasing doses of the insanity. Now it is normal to think of every white male as a potential rapist. I don't know how colour factors in, but it would be racist to say that every black male is a potential rapist.

The age-grade that's in university arts programs is being subjected to nothing less than an ideological bombardment. Yes, that's bad enough, but worse, these people go out into the workforce -- particularly government work -- and have seemingly reached a critical mass. So-called social justice trumps the Charter of Rights...

But the craziness has gone way beyond that. It is now at the point where you can graduate from our best universities thinking that the biological differences between the sexes aren't real! Let's hope it's a small group of already disturbed individuals, but the point is that our young men are facing a situation that they, themselves, don't realize. They are now at the point where they largely accept a system of discrimination that has been built up around them. Even the way they sit can get them hectored and in some places, fined. It's called "manspreading."

And the occupational structure itself is riddled with this thinking. I don't think you can ignore political correctness if you want a professional career. Intimidation is all over on these issues.

I hope you can take the time to listen and watch, and absorb it. It's no longer the case where self-respecting Conservative parties can go along with this nonsense. These are the issues are that move the crowd. Jordan Peterson has became an internet star in a few weeks when he addressed these issues. He's at the eye of the storm, on university campuses, so it would be wrong to expect that kind of result, but in all the big cities, there is a growing number of disenfranchised young men who face discouragement and rejection, and where owning a house seems impossibly far away ...

Andrew Scheer had an interview in Chatelaine where he said a weak "me too" to the feminist politician of the year, Justin Trudeau. It's the wrong path. What he tells the public is that he's too far in the bubble, as they say, to understand. He probably still thinks it's about "fairness" and "equality", the cluck.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 27, 2017 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The thing with the University and Free Speech issue is that it was one he was discussing before it was trendy

http://nationalpost.com/news/p.....cheer-says

It was a bold position that seemingly no one discussed during the campaign.
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