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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
So one can still get a sub for under $4?

Good to know.



but I've never ordered some of those subs ever , so it does me no good that there cheaper if I don't even like them ?


on this topic , the government should look into raising the $4.00 no tax ( or provincial hst ) on food to $5 , as with so many places raising prices , there is going to be few to no options for students or people on low incomes to buy anything cheap without having to pay the extra tax they previously weren't paying

it looks bad on the government that there gaining tax revenue over this and fact people are struggling to feed themselves
Toronto Centre





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Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

on this topic , the government should look into raising the $4.00 no tax ( or provincial hst ) on food to $5 , as with so many places raising prices , there is going to be few to no options for students or people on low incomes to buy anything cheap without having to pay the extra tax they previously weren't paying

I know what you are saying but the reality is fast food is expensive for poor people and students.

If a can of soup is able to be had for less than a dollar, or ramen then thats the type of stuff they need to buy. There are a few things folks can buy that exceed a Subway sandwich.

But, and I somewhat contradict myself because eating fresh food and veggies IS expensive on a limited budget and some fast food is cheaper. Its why it exists.
Quote:

it looks bad on the government that there gaining tax revenue over this and fact people are struggling to feed themselves

I doubt thats true at all. You could still have your $3.99 sandwich for.... $3.99.

BUt the govt is looking to get back in and frankly if Brown doesnt wake up we will be stuck with her highness for another 4 years.

She has looked good on this from what I see. And thats hard for me to type.
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5878
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votes: 8

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing! The magic of TC, who has turned a serious discussion of the Wynne government's desperate ploy -- estimated to cost 60,000 jobs in Ontario -- into a search for a $4 half-sub. That, presumably, would make it a good thing.

Doesn't his frau make him sandwiches?
Toronto Centre





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Posts: 1163
Reputation: 118.5
votes: 4
Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dude...stay focused here. I know its hard for you.
Bugs wrote:
Amazing! The magic of TC, who has turned a serious discussion of the Wynne government's desperate ploy -- estimated to cost 60,000 jobs in Ontario -- into a search for a $4 half-sub. That, presumably, would make it a good thing.

RCO was the one making claims about a $4 sandwich...which kind of doesnt exist on the subway website.

Just sayin' .
Quote:

Doesn't his frau make him sandwiches?


No. Contrary , I am not disabled.
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 8950
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

National Post‏Verified account @nationalpost · 3h3 hours ago

Ontario’s minimum wage hike will cost average Tim Hortons franchisee $243,889 this year




( according to reports the wage hike will cost the average tim hortons almost $243,889 this year , so you can see why some are so upset over the wage increase . that's not a small amount of money for a business. tim hortons is losing more money cause the typical outlet has many staff on at once , an average pizza place might have 1 or 2 but they could have 8 - 10 staff .

the perception is tim hortons is making a lot of money and can afford to pay there staff more but this increase will take a lot of that profit away and make the typical outlet less profitable than years past )
Toronto Centre





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Location: Toronto

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

Ontario’s minimum wage hike will cost average Tim Hortons franchisee $243,889 this year

That math does not work.

"The calculation assumes every employee’s hourly wage is boosted by $3.35, which includes the $2.40 minimum wage hike and factors in additional costs from other changes to the province’s employment and labour laws, like increased vacation pay."

So right there is a problem.

Ahh but what about RBI ? Raise the coffee price a nickle. Problem solved.

So easy . Tims fight should be w the head office.

Are there Tims in Alberta ? I dont think so.
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the story on the minimum wage keeps getting worse and worse in Ontario , now its been revealed the government has hired 175 "inspectors " to go around the province and police businesses to make sure there following the new rules . and I'm assuming they have a mandate to lay charges or issue fines under the new law , which will be an added burden to our already struggling business community

175 to me seems like an insane number of inspectors just for this labour law , there is only maybe 20 or 30 distinct regions of Ontario , so there could literally be 2 or 3 inspectors just for 1 city or county . and what are they all going to be doing ? and are these jobs temporary ? just until the businesses are familiar with the law or are they permanent ?

by my estimates at 175 employees , lets assume they make $40,000 a year ( it could even be more we don't know ) , that is $7,000,000 in new labour costs alone )


January 10, 2018

Wynne Hires 175 “Business Police” for Minimum Wage Crackdown

Ezra Levant
Rebel Commander



On last night's show, I reported on Kathleen Wynne hiring 175 new business police to investigate companies coping with her decision to drastically increase Ontario's minimum wage.



Small businesses and retailers are cutting staff benefits to adjust to a sharp increase in wages, including franchises like Tim Horton's that are unable to raise menu prices and have little financial flexibility.

Wynne was quick to capitalize on the struggle of Ontario businesses by calling owners who objected to her policies "bullies".

But it's Wynne who's the bully, she's using taxpayers money to hire 175 new business police to strongarm Ontario employers. These new bureaucrats will likely be making five-figure salaries, vote for pro-union Liberals in every provincial election, and I'm sure none of them will have any experience running a business or meeting payroll.



https://www.therebel.media/wynne_hires_175_business_police_for_minimum_wage_crackdown
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 8950
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
RCO wrote:

Ontario’s minimum wage hike will cost average Tim Hortons franchisee $243,889 this year

That math does not work.

"The calculation assumes every employee’s hourly wage is boosted by $3.35, which includes the $2.40 minimum wage hike and factors in additional costs from other changes to the province’s employment and labour laws, like increased vacation pay."

So right there is a problem.

Ahh but what about RBI ? Raise the coffee price a nickle. Problem solved.

So easy . Tims fight should be w the head office.

Are there Tims in Alberta ? I dont think so.



that's only an average number , each outlet is different , some are bigger than others , so they might have more staff


think tim hortons already has been gradually raising prices as the minimum wage has been going up over the years , but realistically there is only so much they can charge for a coffee and donut , there not a fancy expensive coffee house like starbucks is


the new question is why is wynne hiring 175 new "inspectors " to run around the province and inspect ? private businesses ?

is there any evidence or reports that a single business anywhere in the province plans to NOT pay the new minimum wage ? seems like a clear no , so there doesn't even seem to be a need for the inspectors

what are they going to go ? show up in a town and randomly go thru all the businesses ? go thru there accounting books ? meet with employees ? what is there mandate or mission ?

and why 175 inspectors to begin with , you'd have a hard time to get an MNR game warden to reply to a complaint in these parts cause there is so few of them but there is a need for 175 new business police inspectors to run around the province and harass private businesses , it sounds purely crazy

this government is clearly losing sanity and needs to be put out of its misery soon
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 8950
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( I found a job add on ministry of labour's website , they are hiring " employment standards officers , this posting is for a bilingual position in Sudbury Ontario , its also permanent and could possibly pay $78,000 a year ( estimated $1500 a week for 52 weeks )



EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS OFFICER (BILINGUAL)


Organization:

Ministry of Labour


Division:

Operations Division


City:

Sudbury


Job Term:

1 Permanent



Job Code:

05523 - Employment Standards Auditor 2


Salary:

$1,359.79 - $1,672.00 Per Week*
*Indicates the salary listed as per the OPSEU Collective Agreement.

Understanding the job ad - definitions
Posting Status:
Open



Job ID:

111387

View Job Description
View More Information

Fairness in the workplace is the right of all Ontarians. Employment standards are enforced under the Employment Standards Act, 2000, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of both employees and employers in Ontario workplaces.

Bring your investigative, analytical, advanced oral and written communication skills, and your skills interpreting and applying legislation, to this unique position in the Ministry of Labour.


What can I expect to do in this role?
In this position, you will administer, enforce and obtain compliance with the Employment Standards Act, 2000, Employment Protection for Foreign Nationals Act and related legislation by:
• conducting workplace inspections
• investigating complaints of alleged violations
• exercising quasi-judicial powers
• rendering written decisions based on established standards
• issuing orders, notices and penalties
• issuing certificates of offences, developing crown briefs and laying charges as described under the Provincial Offences Act
• delivering educational seminars to various stakeholders

Please note:
• you will be expected to travel throughout a designated service area for extended periods of time


How do I qualify?

Mandatory:
• you hold a valid class “G” driver's licence or equivalent as recognized by the Province of Ontario
• you have oral proficiency in French at an advanced level
• you have oral and written proficiency in English


Communication Skills:
• you have demonstrated oral communication skills and interpersonal skills to act as a public speaker, appear as a witness at hearings/court and to interact with stakeholders
• you have demonstrated written skills to write orders, note taking, prepare accurate and comprehensive reports and correspondence
• you have interpersonal skills, impact and influence skills and conflict management skills, including the ability and willingness to undertake all aspects of prosecution activities
• you exercise emotional control, good judgment and the ability to remain objective when dealing with conflict and hostile situations


Judgment, Analytical and Decision-Making Skills:
• you have the ability to read, interpret, apply and enforce legislation, policies and procedures in a timely manner
• you have working knowledge of the Employment Standards Act, 2000 and other relevant regulations
• you have experience using analytical, investigative and research skills
• you have decision-making skills to make timely interpretations and determinations
• you have interpersonal and conflict management skills that effectively impact and influence others to a logical or appropriate course of action respecting different needs and interests
• you exercise emotional control, good judgment and the ability to remain objective when dealing with conflict and hostile situations

https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?Language=English&JobID=111387
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 8950
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( according to another post they are hiring 53 permanent inspectors based out of the Toronto area , all are going to be given some legal power to enforce the law and each position will also pay on the low end $72800 a year )


AMENDED - EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS OFFICER



Organization:

Ministry of Labour


Division:

Operations Division



City:

Mississauga, Newmarket, North York, Scarborough



Job Term:

53 Permanent


Job Code:

05523 - Employment Standards Auditor 2



Salary:

$1,359.79 - $1,672.00 Per Week*
*Indicates the salary listed as per the OPSEU Collective Agreement.



Understanding the job ad - definitions
Posting Status:
Open



Job ID:

111386

View Job Description
View More Information

Fairness in the workplace is the right of all Ontarians. Employment standards are enforced under the Employment Standards Act, 2000, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of both employees and employers in Ontario workplaces.

Bring your investigative, analytical, advanced oral and written communication skills, and your skills interpreting and applying legislation, to this unique position in the Ministry of Labour.


What can I expect to do in this role?
In this position, you will administer, enforce and obtain compliance with the Employment Standards Act, 2000, Employment Protection for Foreign Nationals Act and related legislation by:
conducting workplace inspections
• investigating complaints of alleged violations
exercising quasi-judicial powers
• rendering written decisions based on established standards
• issuing orders, notices and penalties
issuing certificates of offences, developing crown briefs and laying charges as described under the Provincial Offences Act
• delivering educational seminars to various stakeholders

Please note:
• you will be expected to travel throughout a designated service area for extended periods of time


https://www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/Preview.aspx?Language=English&JobID=111386
Bugs





Joined: 16 Dec 2009
Posts: 5878
Reputation: 286.6
votes: 8

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are hidden qualifications that go with any job in the civil service.

It helps a lot if you are a minority, particularly if it shows as skin colour.

It helps a lot if you female.

That's what "fairness" means. Fairness means you impose a penalty on half the population or more, keeping them out of the best jobs in the country, on the basis of their sex and gender.

It's "fair" because of the alleged sins of the people that led the economy before 1985. It's only fair that people who weren't even alive then pay the penalty in the form of foreclosed career opportunities because they are the same colour and gender of those that are supposedly the 'perps' in this case.

It can't be job-discrimination because that's what they do at google, and everyone knows how progressive they are! If everybody does it, it must be OK.

=================================

I used to get disgusted, now I only get amused ...
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 8950
Reputation: 295.4
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
There are hidden qualifications that go with any job in the civil service.

It helps a lot if you are a minority, particularly if it shows as skin colour.

It helps a lot if you female.

That's what "fairness" means. Fairness means you impose a penalty on half the population or more, keeping them out of the best jobs in the country, on the basis of their sex and gender.

It's "fair" because of the alleged sins of the people that led the economy before 1985. It's only fair that people who weren't even alive then pay the penalty in the form of foreclosed career opportunities because they are the same colour and gender of those that are supposedly the 'perps' in this case.

It can't be job-discrimination because that's what they do at google, and everyone knows how progressive they are! If everybody does it, it must be OK.

=================================

I used to get disgusted, now I only get amused ...



one has to wonder about the real reasons for the sudden need for 175 employment standards inspectors ?

is it really about making sure the new minimum wage is being implemented ? for which there has been no evidence or complaints it isn't

or is it about Unions ? and bringing union type rules and laws into non-unionised employers . as essentially they inspectors have union like powers , well there actually more powerful than unions as they can lay charges and issue fines . but there giving non unionized employees more power and possibly power over there employers in some cases by bringing in these inspectors

and what would an inspection even look like ? are they honestly going to send an inspector into a mcdonalds and make sure there followings the laws ? sounds like a lot of pointless paperwork , its extremely unlikely any major chain would not pay its employees the new minimum wage , there seems to be no point sending in inspectors to verify the obvious , which leads me to wonder what are they inspecting ?

and has there ever been this number of inspectors ? inspecting private businesses at any point in time here ? it seems rather unheard of


and what is the exact cost ?

by my estimates 175 employees x 70,000 a year is $ 12,250,000 million a year just in salary

it appears they also get a white Ontario government vehicle , so that's another 175 x 30,000 for a total of $5,250,000 in vehicle costs

and what about expenses , there will be hotel stays , gasoline , food , office supplies , computers , cell phones , it have to be at least another $20,000 average per employee a year for extra costs so another $3,500,000 million

estimated cost $21 million for the 175 new inspectors and that's just for 1 year , the jobs are permanent so the cost will continue year after year , unless a new government has enough common sense to end the insanity
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 10, 2018 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why do you think this is about the minimum wage changes? First of all, wages have to be reported to various government agencies at least monthly. There's Workmen's Compensation premiums, for just one thing. Or a pay-stub is all that an employee would need if (s)he took her case to the Labour Board. There's no need of a bunch of inspectors tramping around checking the books.

The second thing is that the salary is low by government standards. It's less than coppers get paid, and the fact that the wages are reported as a weekly sum seems strange if the position is salaried.

Third, the language is the language of something that the participants on this board probably aren't aware of -- social justice. That's indicated by the dog-whistles about "fairness" ... In that way of looking at the world, it isn't fair that you own a house and someone else doesn't, so you will have to do something to make that right.

My bet: they are political activists, probably graduates of Womens' Studies programs and the like. In other words, a poorly educated, envious and hate-filled bunch of intersectional feminists, racists, and sexual weirdoes.

This is late in the term of an unusually incompetent and more than normally corrupt government. It has the look of an Obama-type booby trap that the Liberals are leaving behind in case the lose. I doubt if it is about enforcing the minimum wage. More likely, they will probably being doing things like making the world more respectful of trans-gendered people and their ilk. Gotta make sure people are using the new pronouns, and whatever other forms of compelled speech that are coming ....
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Philip Cross: Wynne’s cynical wage hike proves she’s not really on your side

The government is broke. Therefore, it is trying to mandate that business spend its own money pursuing the government’s goals


Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne addresses questions from the public during a town hall meeting in Toronto on Nov. 20, 2017.Christopher Katsarov/CP


Special to Financial Post
Special to Financial Post


January 11, 2018
7:19 AM EST

Filed under
FP Comment



The sharp hike in Ontario’s minimum wage to $14 an hour on Jan. 1 is only the most recent of a wide range of actions and gestures signalling the Wynne government’s indifference or outright hostility to the business community. The government for years had increasingly regulated the relationship between businesses and their customers; now it is increasingly controlling the relationship between business and its workers. Both sets of actions are predicated on the assumption that businesses fundamentally act as predators toward customers and workers. If that really were true, capitalism would have ceased to exist long ago.

In the short term, firms will minimize the impact on total labour costs by adjusting non-wage benefits and hours of work. In the longer run, firms will adjust employment and capital by cutting back on hiring, by automating jobs, and by moving to nearby jurisdictions, especially export-based industries that face U.S. competitors with much lower minimum wages and income taxes along with cheaper hydro rates. In both the short term and long term, large firms have an advantage over small firms in being able to juggle their labour force and capital investment to adapt, although even Loblaw, the grocery behemoth, and auto parts giant Magna have complained about the high cost of the minimum wage.

George Stigler, who led the defence of classical microeconomics even as his University of Chicago colleague Milton Friedman spearheaded the post-war attack on Keynesian macroeconomics, wrote: “To an economist no truth is more firmly held than the one that as something gets more expensive, people buy less of it. Demand curves have a negative slope.” This applies to labour as much as it does bread or cars; raise the price by 20 per cent overnight, and demand is surely going to fall.


While those keeping their jobs will benefit, the most vulnerable will see cuts to non-wage benefits

-

This is why it is hard to understand the social justice warriors in the Wynne government and the union movement who argue that hiking the minimum wage will help low-income people. While those keeping their jobs will benefit, the most vulnerable will see cuts to non-wage benefits, shorter hours of work or the loss of jobs altogether. Non-partisan estimates from both the Bank of Canada and Ontario’s own Financial Accountability Office predict job losses of about 60,000 due to higher minimum wages, possibly much more. Since people in low-paying jobs have the fewest skills, especially youths, losing a job further marginalizes their place in the labour force and increases their dependency on government handouts. Perhaps it is no coincidence that Ontario also started its free pharmaceutical program for people under 25 years on Jan. 1.

Then again, why would anyone expect the Wynne government to be on the side of ordinary people? This is the same government that cruelly raised hydro rates last year to pacify militant environmental groups and was tone deaf to the subsequent outcry — at least until Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was famously confronted at a public town hall by an Ontario mom in tears over her hydro bills.


Contracting out social policy to businesses is a recipe for harming firms while failing to achieve these policy goals

-
It was a mistake from the start to ask business firms to implement a social policy on behalf of government. If the Wynne government wanted to tackle poverty directly, then some combination of wage subsidies, skills upgrading, tax credits and tax cuts were options. However, after years of fiscal profligacy (including borrowing $10 billion this year even as it pretends to have balanced the books), the government is broke. Therefore, it tried to mandate that business spend its own money pursuing the government’s goals. Now it’s complaining that firms might do so in a way that it finds distasteful, like rolling back hours and benefits. Governments fail to anticipate the response of firms because they have no understanding of the importance of cost cutting in a competitive marketplace. Contracting out social policy to businesses is a recipe for harming firms while failing to achieve these policy goals, leaving everyone unhappy.

We all want people to become better off through higher economic growth. However, fantasizing that prosperity can simply be legislated is wrong-headed and may even backfire. Sustainable growth for low-income earners comes from a strong economy, as evidenced by the tight U.S. labour market where 625,000 job vacancies in retailing alone have induced firms like Target and Wal-Mart to announce a policy of raising their minimum wage to US$15 an hour (more than twice the mandated federal minimum). This is how to create better-paying jobs without setting off a chain reaction of cuts to non-wage benefits, fewer hours of work and ultimately lost jobs that will cause more friction for Ontario’s businesses in dealing with their government, customers and workers.

Philip Cross is a Munk Senior Fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute.


http://business.financialpost......-your-side
RCO





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Posts: 8950
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kathleen Wynne just stuck Ontario restaurateurs with a $1.8 billion tab. So who’s paying?

Ontario restaurateurs operate with razor-thin margins, on average just 3.4 per cent, which is the lowest in Canada. These cost increases will push many restaurateurs to the brink


The increase in minimum wage will be meaningless to an employee if his or her employer ends up having to close its doors after facing a mountain of new costs, Shanna Munro writes.Chris Young/The Canadian Press



Special to Financial Post

Shanna Munro


January 11, 2018
6:00 AM EST

Last Updated
January 11, 2018
6:00 AM EST

Filed under
FP Comment



While most Ontarians rang in 2018 with hope and optimism, small businesses are scrambling to keep the lights on. Ontario restaurants have to pay the highest rents in the country; skyrocketing hydro rates; relentless liquor mark-ups; and the costs of inter-provincial trade barriers that make no sense. We believe it’s time to have an honest conversation.

In this election year, the Wynne government has delivered a clear message to Main Streets across Ontario with Bill 148, which has now dramatically raised the minimum wage while imposing a myriad of costly new regulations on Ontario’s employers. That message: Small businesses will pay for the Wynne government’s social agenda. Now the government is vilifying business owners by announcing that it’s adding 175 new enforcement officers to police small businesses throughout the province. There’s also a new “hotline” to report on employers. This comes on top of tough talk from the minister of labour, who issued a stern warning that business owners should not contravene the “spirit of the legislation.”

Ontario business owners are hurting. Each day we are contacted by restaurateurs wondering how they will survive with these new increased costs. While the Wynne government promotes its public narrative that pits owners against employees, the real debate should focus on why the Wynne government has so wilfully enacted legislation that will cost tens of thousands of jobs and hurt the same people they so desperately want to help. The increase in minimum wage will be meaningless to an employee if his or her employer ends up having to close its doors after facing a mountain of new costs. This is simply too much pain, inflicted too fast.


Restaurants Canada communicated these challenges countless times to the government over the past seven months. We shared our insights and member research data; that included a survey showing that 95 per cent of our members indicated they would have to make serious choices for their operation by finding ways to control costs, and a further 26 per cent suggested that they will be forced to close their doors altogether.

We also shared key insights from numerous other sources including the TD Bank, Fraser Institute, C.D. Howe Institute and the Canadian Centre for Economic Analysis, with each one forecasting that the government’s new raft of labour costs would bring job losses in the tens of thousands. Bank of Canada researchers recently released a study that not only outlined potential job losses, but the overall inflationary impact and reductions in GDP


The Wynne government stubbornly ignored business owners, including the foodservice sector on this critical issue. Ontario restaurateurs operate with razor-thin margins, on average just 3.4 per cent, which is the lowest in Canada. These cost increases will push many restaurateurs to the brink. The 21-per-cent increase in the minimum wage (with another hike due next year) is just a portion of the costs related to Bill 148. Wage-related adjustments are roughly 58 per cent of the total costs, but another 42 per cent come from the various other regulatory changes.


The message: Small businesses will pay for the Wynne governments social agenda

-

All totalled, this equates to $1.8 billion in new costs for Ontario’s foodservice industry. And it’s not just restaurants: The entire value chain of growers, wholesalers, transportation and logistics firms, and everyone within the supply chain is being hammered with the same increased costs. All of those added expenses end up in the lap of the restaurateur, who is then left with few choices: cut services or raise prices, or a combination of both.

With a provincial budget coming soon, there is a small window for the government to show some of the fairness that the premier speaks so frequently and passionately about — the fairness of helping small businesses across Ontario survive and help their employees keep their jobs.

Shanna Munro is president and CEO of Restaurants Canada.

http://business.financialpost......hos-paying
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Wynne knows $15 minimum wage will kill thousands of jobs

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