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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:48 am    Post subject: Scarcity of new homes in GTA hits Crisis Levels Reply with quote

( I don't often talk about real estate issues but the situation in the GTA is on the verge of a crisis and clearly the province has played a role in its creation . by deciding some land cannot be developed and by wanting more condo's built instead of detached homes even though there was still strong demand for suburban homes . the numbers are truly shocking only 324 homes are available for sale when there was 12,000 available 10 years ago )



Scarcity of new homes in GTA hits crisis levels


Martin Slofstra, Editor, New Homes and Condos

First posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 01:02 PM EDT | Updated: Friday, March 24, 2017 01:17 PM EDT


Martin Slofstra, Editor, New Homes and Condos If you are in the market for a fully-detached brand new home in Toronto and area, good luck finding one. At the end of February, there were only 324 new fully- detached homes available for purchase in builder inventory. Crisis is not a word he uses lightly, but crisis pretty much describes the lack of new home inventory in the Toronto, says Bryan Tuckey, CEO of the Building Industry and Development Association (BILD).

The number of new low-rise homes available to buy reached unprecedented levels of scarcity, says Tuckey, adding the 324 new homes being built compares with the 12,064 such homes available to buyers in February 2007.

Across the entire GTA (which includes the City of Toronto, and Durham, Halton, Peel and York regions), there were only 1,001 new low-rise homes (including semi-detached and townhomes) available in builder inventories at the end of February, says Tuckey, referring to numbers just published by Altus Group, BILD’s official source for new-home market intelligence. “Today in the GTA we have a scarcity of single-family ground-related housing that is not just unprecedented – it is almost inconceivable,” says Tuckey. “As a result we are seeing record breaking condo sales and continued price growth.

” While there are a complex of factors at work, the lack of supply is the main reason for escalating home prices, says Tuckey. February saw available new fully-detached homes reach a new record average price of $1,469,449, while the average price for all single-family homes including semi-detached and townhomes, climbed to a new high of $1,081,013.

The average price of a new condo has hit $523,000, which is up 15 per cent over February last year. According to Patricia Arsenault, Altus Group’s executive vice-president of research consulting services, the low inventory of available single family product is a key factor driving price increases and it is limiting choices for consumers.

“If I were shopping for a single-family home ten years ago, I would have been able to choose from among 500 different sites and nearly 18,000 units,” she says. “Today, there are less than 100 projects with any available units to purchase, totalling only about 1,000 units. And I would have to act very quickly to get one of those”. According to Tuckey, a healthy level for new homes inventory is “one year's supply, ” or about 15,000 to 18,000 homes.

Tuckey is calling on the government to make housing more of a priority and to change the rules governing land development so new builders can increase the supply of new homes as quickly as possible. “February data demonstrates, quite clearly, that our housing supply crisis in the GTA is getting worse,” says Tuckey. “Furthermore, we are building less low-rise single-family housing and more high and mid-rise housing but consumer demand for low-rise homes has not dropped.”

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....sis-levels
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is a proposal to build 1400 new homes in south barrie , in land near the Georgian downs race track across from the 400 market if you can picture where that is , however I don't know if everyone looking for a home in the gta is going to see moving to barrie is a solution )


Mar 21, 2017 | Vote 0 0

Public meeting held for large development in Barrie’s annexed land area

Much of the land in the combined 318.7-acre proposal has long been used for agricultural purposes


McKay Road development


McKay Road subdivision proposal

Image courtesy of the City of Barrie

A 1,445-unit subdivision has been proposed in land Barrie annexed from Innisfil in 2010. March 18, 2017


McKay Road industrial proposal


next play/pause pre 2/3

Barrie Advance
By Chris Simon


We’re on the cusp of seeing exactly what the lands annexed from Innisfil in 2010 are meant for.



Barrie councillors got their first glimpse at a significant industrial and residential development in the city’s south end during a public meeting March 20. The proposal, which calls for the rezoning of the land to permit 1,445 residential, 16 industrial employment and a block of commercial units, could be constructed south of the McKay Road and Veteran’s Drive intersection. Rezoning is an early but significant step toward the eventual construction of the project.

Much of the land in the combined 318.7-acre proposal has long been used for agricultural purposes. The industrial area is scheduled to be built on the portion wedged between Veteran’s and Highway 400. Meanwhile, the residential and commercial component of the plan would be constructed west of Veteran’s.

“I’m very excited to be here as the first applications for the annexed lands,” Keith MacKinnon, a consultant working on behalf of the developer, Watersand Construction, said, noting the residential portion proposed will offer a variety of housing options ranging from townhouses to large detached homes.


A nearly 15-acre stretch close to the western border of the project will be reserved for environmental protection.

“The subject lands are wholly within the 2010 annexed lands … adjacent to the northern boundary of the Town of Innisfil,” city manager of growth planning Stacey Forfar said, in a report to councillors. “A neighbourhood meeting was not held for these lands given the site’s isolated location and that the majority of the surrounding lands are owned by the applicant.”

Staff will present a report to councillors on upcoming annexed land applications April 3.

“This isn’t just another development,” Councillor Andrew Prince said. “We’re looking at a complete neighbourhood — the first of many to come. We’re seeing a lot of multi-generational families moving up from Vaughan and (Toronto). My concern is on traffic. We’ve seen the mistakes that have been made when we don’t take into consideration the number of people we bring to a certain development.”

For more information on the McKay project, check out the March 20 general committee agenda available at

http://www.simcoe.com/news-sto.....land-area/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Housing affordability measures will be in spring budget: Ontario Finance Minister


Jessica Smith Cross

TORONTO — The Canadian Press


Published Monday, Mar. 27, 2017 2:32PM EDT



Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa confirmed Monday he plans to include housing affordability measures in his upcoming budget.

Premier Kathleen Wynne has said her government is working on a “comprehensive set of plans,” to deal with rising home prices in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA), as well as rising rental rates.

Sousa said he’d like to include those plans in the spring budget.

There is a “suite of options” available to Ontario, but the province must be careful to avoid “unintended consequences” from those measures, he said.

Sousa also spoke about pressures on both the supply and demand side of the GTHA housing market.

“Demand is high for a number of factors,” he said. “Could be speculators, could be people from outside the country, it could very well be the many who are now moving into Ontario creating that demand.”

“The degree of supply is in question and how to expedite that is also something we’re trying to address,” he added.

The housing package in the budget will concern the red-hot housing market in the GTHA, while taking into account different circumstances in the rest of the province, Sousa said.

Just prior to the release of the federal budget, Sousa had asked Finance Minister Bill Morneau for changes to the taxation of capital gains on the sale of homes that are not classified as a primary residence, as a way to address speculative investors flipping homes.

Speculative investing in the real estate market — buying a home in the hope of turning a profit rather than to live in — is believed to be one of the culprits behind the soaring house prices.

While Sousa’s wish wasn’t granted in the federal budget, Morneau did not rule out capital gains changes in the future.

Earlier this month, Sousa said a foreign buyers’ tax was back on the table in Ontario.

He’d announced a year ago that the province wouldn’t pursue that option, but said he was “keenly aware” of how quickly house prices have risen in the intervening time.

The average price of a detached home in Toronto broke the $1.5 million mark for the first time last month, reaching $1,573,622 in the City of Toronto — 29.8 per cent higher than a year ago.

The average selling prices of all homes in the Greater Toronto Area was $875,983 in February, 27.7 per cent higher than last year. In the City of Toronto the average across all homes was $859,186, up 19.2 per cent.

Figures from the B.C. government show a drop in real estate transactions in the Vancouver area after the provincial government brought in a 15 per cent tax on foreign buyers last August. However the market had been showing signs of softening prior to the tax after months of scorching sales.

The Toronto Real Estate Board urged the Ontario government not to implement a tax on foreign buyers, arguing that it would do little to address the problem of rising house prices.

The Ontario Real Estate Association said the overwhelming majority of foreign home buyers are immigrants or permanent residents looking for a home, not speculators.

“The main culprit behind rapidly rising house prices is the GTA’s unbalanced market — housing supply cannot meet demand — not foreign buyers,” association CEO Tim Hudak said in a statement earlier this month.

A report by Ryerson University’s City Building Institute — titled “In High Demand” — favoured a tax on foreign buyers similar to the one introduced in Vancouver, but suggested it should be implemented in addition to a “progressive surtax” on expensive homes owned by people who aren’t paying income tax, including people with foreign capital.

No date has been set for the Ontario provincial budget, but it’s expected in the coming weeks.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e34434958/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The challenges developers are facing building "non-high density" detached homes are a significant issue.

Its as much a supply issue as it is a demand issue.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
The challenges developers are facing building "non-high density" detached homes are a significant issue.

Its as much a supply issue as it is a demand issue.



what were seeing is extreme opposites , years ago there was a new housing market in that area which was almost too hot and just about every farm and lot beside a major city near Toronto was being developed . which lead to people feeling there was too much development and a need to protect some of the remaining farmland . and this lead to creation of the greenbelt , so now a lot of empty farmland is off limits to developers .


they also misread the market and people's desires by encouraging so many highrise condos to be built , sure there is a hot condo market but not everyone wants to live in a condo building . many young families want the yard and large home in the suburbs not a small condo unit


I think they also need to look at immigration , if the area is nearly filled up and is so few available homes . then maybe its time to look at redirecting some of that immigration somewhere else ? there is cities in northern Ontario as an example that are seeing drastic drops in population . sault ste marie , north bay and timmins , were all way down when last census numbers came out . the government should be sending some new immigrants to other places instead of the GTA .
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( even though available land for housing is at an all time low , wynne won't reduce the greenbelt and in fact she plans to expand it )


Housing supply solutions won't see Greenbelt area shrinking: Wynne

Wynne says the government remains committed to expanding the Greenbelt


The Canadian Press

Wednesday, March 29th, 2017




TORONTO – Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says that as the province looks to tackle housing supply issues, it won’t reduce the Greenbelt lands.

She says the government is actually committed to expanding the Greenbelt, which is about 800,000 hectares of protected land that borders the Greater Golden Horseshoe area surrounding Lake Ontario.

Wynne says the Greenbelt is “like the lungs of this highly populated part of the province.”

But Wynne says Finance Minister Charles Sousa is looking at a range of supply and demand issues because housing affordability is a “huge issue.”

Sousa has said he plans to include measures in the spring budget to address the red-hot housing market in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, while taking into account different circumstances in the rest of the province.

The average price of a detached home in Toronto broke the $1.5-million mark for the first time last month.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/03/29.....ing-wynne/
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you can solve the problem without touching the Greenbelt.
Eventually, you are going to need to cut into it. In Halton Especially.

There are huge swathes of land between the 401 and QEW which are simply "waiting". Halton Hills, Sections of Miltion, North Oakville and the section of Burlington before the Greenbelt are mostly undeveloped.

Essentially North of highway five after Mississauga to the middle of Burlington and South from the edge of Milton after the ring of Greenbelt

Even with the "ring" around Milton you can still work within those areas to add homes.

The demand is clearly there;
Why are there more challenges for developers looking to build low density homes? Those are the units that are pushing up the market the most and the ones being built the least.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The developers aren't the problem -- the state is. They zone the land and control what is built on it, right down to the doorknobs on the doors. There isn't much of a market input in a state-planned economy, even if most of the planning is at a municipal level.

Watch the planners at Toronto city hall, and match their actual results with the goals they have. Where have their plans made Toronto better? David Crombie -- remember him -- worked on some fictional basis to 'improve' the waterfront. Haw, haw, haw, fooled you! Look at what the brilliant minds did to the west side of the mouth of the Humber, for example. Look at Queens Quay, another of their projects. How about one of the old white elephants, Ontario Place, which was supposed to bring life to the CNE grounds for the other 50 weeks of the year! (The only way they could ever attract a crowd was by offering free entertainment.)

The City of Toronto are probably the worst town planners outside of Russia, but their profession's record in other metropolitan areas is not one of unblemished success. Not everything they do is a failure, and not everything they do would have been a success anyway, but most of it is.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ontario’s anti-sprawl restrictions not a factor in housing shortage: government


Jessica Smith Cross


TORONTO — The Canadian Press


Published Sunday, Apr. 09, 2017 10:31AM EDT


The Ontario government is dismissing suggestions that the province’s anti-sprawl policies are contributing to housing supply shortage and soaring home prices in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area.

Developers argue that easing restrictions on construction of detached homes and townhouses on “greenfield” land – areas set aside by municipalities for development as part of Ontario’s growth plan a decade ago – could help boost supply.

The province is expected to release its updated growth plan this spring after years of consultations, but preliminary recommendations suggest it will be more restrictive of low-rise homes, with higher intensification and density targets aimed at limiting urban sprawl.

The Liberals have promised to bring forward a package of housing affordability measures, with at least some of them to be included in the spring budget.

The Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) would like the province to make changes to its growth plan that will allow developers to build more low-rise detached homes and townhouses on unbuilt land in the GTHA.

BILD and other industry groups note they aren’t proposing venturing into the Greenbelt – an 800,000-hectare area of government-protected swaths of farmland, green space and wetlands around the GTHA. Instead they’re suggesting targeting the “greenfield” lands on the outskirts of the region’s cities.

The association’s president and CEO Bryan Tuckey says the restrictive growth plan policy that’s been in place for the last decade – known as Places to Grow – has contributed to the housing shortage and soaring home prices.

In 2002, there were 53,660 homes sold in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), 72 per cent of which were low-rise, according to BILD. Last year, there were 47,161 homes sold in the GTA – 38 per cent were low-rise and 62 per cent were condo apartments.

Municipal Affairs Minister Bill Mauro wouldn’t comment on the updated growth plan – but he disagreed with the BILD’s premise that the growth plan is tied the hot housing market.

“That line of thinking is looking to create a link between housing pricing and the growth plans and Greenbelt policies,” he said last week. “We don’t think that’s the situation.”

Mauro said the government doesn’t see the availability of land as an issue because there is enough serviced land – connected to municipal water and wastewater systems – to accommodate three to four years’ worth of development.

The Neptis Foundation, a charitable foundation that does urban planning research, released a report last month that found there is a significant amount “unbuilt” land in the GTHA still available for development.

It calculated there is over 45,000 hectares of “greenfield” land that remains unbuilt.

Most of it is located on the outskirts of built-up areas, for instance in Brampton, Vaughan, and East Gwillimbury – but none in Toronto or Mississauga, said executive director Marcy Burchfield.

The land is enough to accommodate housing and job growth to 2031, if not beyond, she said.

To speed up development of that land, the provincial government could “play a more active role,” in making sure that municipal zoning aligns with the Ontario’s growth plan and the development approval process works swiftly, Burchfield said.

The development industry is also calling for the government to find ways to expedite the planning approval and appeals process, to allow for faster building.

Mauro acknowledged that, in some cases, that process might be taking too long.

“We’re still doing a deeper dive on that,” he said.

The average selling price for all properties in the Greater Toronto Area was $916,567 last month – a 33.2-per-cent jump from $688,011 in March 2016.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e34643697/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PCs offer ideas to address Ontario's housing affordability crisis

Patrick Brown urges province to release plan this week


Ainslie Cruickshank

Monday, April 10th, 2017


Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown is pressuring the province to release its plan this week to address the housing crisis that’s plaguing not just Toronto, but the surrounding region as well.

In a statement, Housing Minister Chris Ballard said the government would bring forward a “package of measures” addressing housing affordability in the “near future.”

In the meantime, Brown offered a number of recommendations to help bring down exorbitant prices, which have jumped 33 per cent in the Greater Toronto Area since March 2016, according to figures released by the Toronto Real Estate Board last week.

“After 14 years...

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/04/10.....ty-crisis/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fix rising house prices, rents now, PC Leader Patrick Brown urges government


Government must act, Tories charge, as some tenants see rents double in a time of uncertainy, as house prices skyrocket.


PC leader Patrick Brown is urging the government to act now to cool the overheated housing and rental market.


By Kristin RushowyQueen's Park Bureau

Mon., April 10, 2017


The government needs to act quickly to ease the overheated housing market and address uncertainty that has led to huge hikes in rental rates, says Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown.

“The premier’s wild speculation and the constant stream of policy rumours have started to affect the rental market and hurt real people,” Brown said at Queen’s Park at a press conference with MPP Ernie Hardeman, his party’s housing critic.

“I am calling on Premier (Kathleen) Wynne to release whatever is in her rental housing plan this week — not in the budget, not next month, but immediately.”

Wynne has previously said it is “an extremely urgent matter” and “unacceptable” that landlords are boosting rates because of the possibility that rent controls will be extended. In some Toronto neighbourhoods, tenants have received notice that their rents are doubling.

Brown called on the government to act on skyrocketing housing rates, which has priced many out of the market.


In a statement, Minister of Housing Chris Ballard said the government has a “housing affordability team looking at these issues” and is also taking part in a federal working group.

“Our government is serious about reducing the pressure of housing costs felt by Ontarians, as well as providing more affordable options for people to choose from,” said Ballard, who pointed to some changes, such as increasing rental units in homes, banning increases to apartment property tax levels and boosting refunds for first-time home buyers.

“We look forward to bringing forward a package of measures that deal with housing affordability in the near future,” he said.


New Democrat MPP Peter Tabuns (Toronto-Danforth) recently put forward a private member’s bill to make all buildings subject to rent control, not just those built before 1991.

Hardeman plans to table a motion on Monday asking the government to reduce red tape and create an expert panel to look at housing issues both in the short and long term.

“Ontario families work hard and they worry how they’re going to be able to afford that home or condo whether they can achieve that dream,” Brown said.

“It’s reached a crisis point.

“The dream of home ownership has become just that: a dream that is out of reach for many.”

Lack of supply is a key issue that needs to be addressed, Brown said. When it takes close to two years for municipal approvals for even the most straightforward of single-family home projects, it’s time the government cut some red tape, he said.

“The status quo is not an option,” said Brown. “There has to be some measures to manage this crisis.”

Brown said the PCs are “willing to look” at a tax on vacant units among other solutions, and are “going to have an open mind to the recommendations that the government puts forward, but we believe there’s urgency here.”

Home prices in the Greater Toronto Area have gone up 33 per cent over the last year.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2017/04/10/fix-rising-house-prices-rents-now-pc-leader-patrick-brown-urges-government.html
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are there many apartment buildings (For Rent, Non-Condo) units being built in the GTA?

It seems the biggest shift in the rental market has been private ownership by individuals in condo buildings whereas in the past it was large for rent apartments built for that purpose.
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have figures, but it seems that rent control and the state of the market leads builders to build an overwhelming number of condos, and few if any rental units.

Ny daughter lives near Dundas and Jarvis, in Toronto. On that corner, where the used to be a desolate, crime-infested strip mall, a Tim Hortons, and a small HIlton hotel, there are now three 44 story condos being constructed. (The fourth corner is a parking lot for government employees so it will never be subject to the ordinary pressures of economics.)

There are other 40+ story condos being built ajacent to those new condos. One is a 40+ story student housing for Ryerson, which is as much a land-acquisition outfit as a university. It certainly isn't the normal rental housing.

The density of that corner is going to increase by a factor of at least 100.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Cosmostein - Are there many apartment buildings (For Rent, Non-Condo) units being built in the GTA?

Actually more now than in the past 25 years.
Quote:
Bugs -rent control and the state of the market leads builders to build an overwhelming number of condos, and few if any rental units.

I do not think those two go together .

Any new rental units are exempt from rent control so the sky is the ceiling....or what folks will pony up for.
But even then , a developer contemplating a build might lean to the condo route as they can see by the time 'it' is built they can cash out as the prices will be higher than they were at planning stage. Get in get out cash out.

But condo rentals can incur so much more for an owner. The value does not rise like a single family dwelling , the condo fees can rise rapidly especially once the condo corp takes over and the real values (not the low ball developer fees ) are announced.

An older condo can produce some astronomically high fees in a short time.

Case in point, condos in Etobicoke, 2000sf and monthly dues of $1450 per month. They recently told owners that there is an assessment coming of between $35,000 to $45,000 for each unit (size dependant) That is hard to get around when thinking of a rent valuation.

The problem is people are flocking to live in Toronto and particularly in the heart of the city.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2017 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Are there many apartment buildings (For Rent, Non-Condo) units being built in the GTA?

It seems the biggest shift in the rental market has been private ownership by individuals in condo buildings whereas in the past it was large for rent apartments built for that purpose.


that's a good question , there is definitely many new condo's being built all over the place .

I know in Barrie from reading some posts online , there is several condo's being planned there . including a large one downtown , one in the south end and another near the hospital and maybe another near the waterfront .

the pace at which new condo's are being built in some areas is rather unheard of


I really have no idea if there are any large rental apartments being currently built around the GTA


know from driving around where I live there is virtually no single family homes for sale and those with signs all say sold on them ( even older ones in bad locations or down back roads are all sold ) , I've seen no new homes going up for sale here so far this spring and not sure I could recall any homes available currently in my town of around 1000 or so people
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Scarcity of new homes in GTA hits Crisis Levels

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