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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 8:56 am    Post subject: Jodie Emery leaves liberal party Reply with quote

( its official the pot community is not happy with Justin Trudeau and Jodie Emery is going as far as to leave the party altogether )


Marijuana advocate Jodie Emery pledges to campaign against the Liberals in 2019 following raids and arrests


by Travis Lupick on March 20th, 2017 at 9:15 AM



Canada's top advocate for marijuana reform, Jodie Emery, was arrested on March 8 following raids on Cannabis Culture storefronts in Vancouver and Toronto.

Jodie Emery


Jodie Emery has left the Liberal Party of Canada.



“It's official,” the country’s leading advocate for marijuana reform wrote on Twitter on March 17. “I cancelled my @liberal_party membership & monthly donations. I encourage my fellow Canadians to do the same. #cdnpoli #LPC”

In June 2014, the Straight was the first outlet to report that Emery hoped to be a candidate for the federal Liberals in the election that was held the following year. She intended to run in the riding of Vancouver East, where she lives in an apartment with her partner Marc Emery.


Emery subsequently filed nomination papers with the party. However, in January 2015, she received an email carrying a letter from the Liberals' so-called “green-light committee” informing her she would not be competing in the race for Vancouver East.

The email stated her name was removed from the ballot and that her nomination deposit was returned to her bank account.

“Upon careful review, they’ve decided not to recommend me to be a contestant,” Emery told the Straight at the time.

In the run up to the October 2015 federal election, the Emerys remained strong supporters of Justin Trudeau and the Liberals, campaigning for them online and at political rallies across the country.

The couple’s support primarily stemmed from a promise Trudeau made to legalize recreational marijuana. Once he was elected prime minister, Trudeau did follow through on that pledge. He convened a task force on the issue and today legislation is being drafted to remove criminal penalties related to the drug and establish a legitimate distribution system for its sale.

However, many marijuana businesses have not waited for the new laws to come into effect, instead choosing to begin selling cannabis in storefronts in cities such as Vancouver and Toronto. The Emerys are among them, licensing the name of their long-time business, Cannabis Culture, to people who are selling marijuana. (The Emerys' flagship Cannabis Culture location at East Hastings and Cambie streets does not and has never sold marijuana.)

That led Toronto police to conduct a series of raids against those businesses and arrest both Jodie and Marc Emery outside Pearson International Airport on March 8.

Jodie was charged with conspiracy to commit an indictable offence, trafficking, possession, and two counts of possession of proceeds of crime. Marc was charged with conspiracy to commit an indictable offence, three counts of trafficking, five counts of possession, five counts of possession of proceeds of crime, and fail-to-comply recognizance.

In addition, the couple’s bail conditions state that they are not allowed to enter their Cannabis Culture properties on East Hastings Street and must refrain from any dealings with the businesses that they have operated in Vancouver for nearly two decades.

Since their arrest, Emery has quickly become a sharp and loud critic of Trudeau, the Liberal government, and their process to legalize recreational marijuana.

“Our cannabis community helped @JustinTrudeau @liberal_party win the 2015 election,” she wrote on Twitter on March 17. “We can help defeat them in the 2019 election. #Activism”

http://www.straight.com/news/8.....wing-raids
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While I think they are a non-factor no matter how loud they scream in effecting any significant Liberal support.

I did chuckle at this;

Quote:
However, many marijuana businesses have not waited for the new laws to come into effect, instead choosing to begin selling cannabis in storefronts in cities such as Vancouver and Toronto. The Emerys are among them, licensing the name of their long-time business, Cannabis Culture, to people who are selling marijuana. (The Emerys' flagship Cannabis Culture location at East Hastings and Cambie streets does not and has never sold marijuana.)


Because the law may change many business' took it upon themselves to break a law that was still in place and were then surprised they were arrested?

Amazing.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
While I think they are a non-factor no matter how loud they scream in effecting any significant Liberal support.

I did chuckle at this;

Quote:
However, many marijuana businesses have not waited for the new laws to come into effect, instead choosing to begin selling cannabis in storefronts in cities such as Vancouver and Toronto. The Emerys are among them, licensing the name of their long-time business, Cannabis Culture, to people who are selling marijuana. (The Emerys' flagship Cannabis Culture location at East Hastings and Cambie streets does not and has never sold marijuana.)


Because the law may change many business' took it upon themselves to break a law that was still in place and were then surprised they were arrested?

Amazing.



that's one thing I don't understand about this whole debate , is how the pro pot people simply decided to start doing there own thing . well before the law was changed or even before they got to see whats in the new law . as to what type of marijuana distribution would actually be allowed .

everyone is certainly looking for some clarity from the government on this one , they really have to clear up the issue and come out with formal rules and regulations . instead of leaving it up to people to make there own rules
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you really think that you rent a storefront in a place like Vancouver, and get a business license, and all the rest the bureaucracy requires, without anyone knowing, and essentially going along with the program?

There's a place in Victoria where you can get marijuana after hours from a vending machine. They advertise. Do you think that happens without anyone knowing about it? I get the feeling the authorities are letting it go as a test market, to see if there are any deleterious effects.

The law doesn't mean much anymore. Now it's left as a local option for police to enforce or not enforce as they see fit.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Do you really think that you rent a storefront in a place like Vancouver, and get a business license, and all the rest the bureaucracy requires, without anyone knowing, and essentially going along with the program?

There's a place in Victoria where you can get marijuana after hours from a vending machine. They advertise. Do you think that happens without anyone knowing about it? I get the feeling the authorities are letting it go as a test market, to see if there are any deleterious effects.

The law doesn't mean much anymore. Now it's left as a local option for police to enforce or not enforce as they see fit.



what I can't understand is how there stores in Toronto were allowed to reopen and continued to sell marijuana ? just a day or 2 after being raided by police .

that to me makes zero sense ? how is a business that was raided and sells an illegal product according to the laws , allowed to simply reopen and continue like nothing happened

if someone was trying to sell illegal booze in Ontario and were raided , they would be shut down permanently and not allowed to reopen and if they did try and continue , they would be raided again , but my point is they wouldn't be allowed to sell the stuff here if they were selling alcohol , why is pot treated differently ?
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's an interesting question, RCO. How can this happen?

It could be corruption, but I don't really think so. I think this reflects confusion amongst policy-makers. My bet is that signals were given, feelers were put out, and all of that, and that there is communication of sorts between the quasi-legal marijuana growers and the political people.

It isn't the local flatfoot that decides to raid and close down an open vendor of marijuana. The cops drive by the place, and while it may take a while for them to notice, it isn't that long. How long do you think it was when I hit Victoria before I noticed a big sign advertising Cannabis Culture, over what could have been a drug store, otherwise? I didn't even have to ask, I just knew they were selling medical marijuana.

I imagine some sort of report, formal or informal, is given to the hierarchy, and they didn't react because of the impending legalization. You can bet that a plainclothes cop has been in those places. The police are probably just waiting for the green light.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:

what I can't understand is how there stores in Toronto were allowed to reopen and continued to sell marijuana ? just a day or 2 after being raided by police .

that to me makes zero sense ? how is a business that was raided and sells an illegal product according to the laws , allowed to simply reopen and continue like nothing happened


I have been following this one rather closely.

They aren't allowed to just open the next day after the raid, they just do so. The police dont issue the licence so they just do it.

It appears that the target in the last bust was for Marc and Jodie and only those two. The employees were not charged, the patrons were not charged either.

But the cops did get 65K of produce, something like $250G's , a warrant to search their houses producing more contraband. Thats a pretty severe blow but not castastrophic to them.

What hurts is that both Emery's are not allowed near, in, working for nor possess any product for Cannibus Culture. They cannot ingest any MJ and are subject to a surprise test at any time.
It effectively shuts them down for the time being and as we march towards legislation (at a snails pace mind you) it hold them off until the govt has legalized it.
Quote:

if someone was trying to sell illegal booze in Ontario and were raided , they would be shut down permanently and not allowed to reopen and if they did try and continue , they would be raided again , but my point is they wouldn't be allowed to sell the stuff here if they were selling alcohol , why is pot treated differently ?

Actually that is not really correct

Bootleggers exist up north. Always have, but likely diminished since my time up Wawa way.
Anyhow, the cops get a warrant and bust someone selling booze because they have seen it and can verify, thru perhaps undercover or whatnot. But the bootlegger will lie low for a week or so and start up again.
The police have to start from zero more or less and then obtain another warrant when info is presented to the Judge..
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, and of course there's the policy confusion. The way the government has unfurled this new liberty has shown the usual degree of mastery. That is, very little.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
RCO wrote:

what I can't understand is how there stores in Toronto were allowed to reopen and continued to sell marijuana ? just a day or 2 after being raided by police .

that to me makes zero sense ? how is a business that was raided and sells an illegal product according to the laws , allowed to simply reopen and continue like nothing happened


I have been following this one rather closely.

They aren't allowed to just open the next day after the raid, they just do so. The police dont issue the licence so they just do it.

It appears that the target in the last bust was for Marc and Jodie and only those two. The employees were not charged, the patrons were not charged either.

But the cops did get 65K of produce, something like $250G's , a warrant to search their houses producing more contraband. Thats a pretty severe blow but not castastrophic to them.

What hurts is that both Emery's are not allowed near, in, working for nor possess any product for Cannibus Culture. They cannot ingest any MJ and are subject to a surprise test at any time.
It effectively shuts them down for the time being and as we march towards legislation (at a snails pace mind you) it hold them off until the govt has legalized it.
Quote:

if someone was trying to sell illegal booze in Ontario and were raided , they would be shut down permanently and not allowed to reopen and if they did try and continue , they would be raided again , but my point is they wouldn't be allowed to sell the stuff here if they were selling alcohol , why is pot treated differently ?

Actually that is not really correct

Bootleggers exist up north. Always have, but likely diminished since my time up Wawa way.
Anyhow, the cops get a warrant and bust someone selling booze because they have seen it and can verify, thru perhaps undercover or whatnot. But the bootlegger will lie low for a week or so and start up again.
The police have to start from zero more or less and then obtain another warrant when info is presented to the Judge..



well true the bootlegging example is one that does happen in northern and remote areas , especially first nations where alcohol is banned in some cases

what I was more referring to was if someone opened a " retail store " that sold booze in a downtown area like the pot dispensaries . it would obviously be shut down and not allowed to ever reopen (cause only the LCBO or licensed breweries can sell booze here ) . yet these dispensaries are shut down and simply reopen again and again .

there clearly breaking the current laws and the liberals have yet to say if the independent dispensary model would even be allowed to legally sell marijuana even if they do legalise it somewhat
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
what I was more referring to was if someone opened a " retail store " that sold booze in a downtown area like the pot dispensaries . it would obviously be shut down and not allowed to ever reopen

Oh ok, sorry about that.

I do see your point but the issue still stands and that is the cops have to start at zero after a raid .

Im guessing the cops are just tired of bothering for the most part. Hell, plenty of cops and the top dog likely smoke it themselves.

Cannibus Culture had a shop on Eglinton at the Allen Expressway , 100 or so meters away was the big police station. The cops were able to shut that one down by pressuring the landlord. Sad to see that one go, it was sooo convenient for um....my friend...yea my friend
:)
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 27, 2017 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( reports are out today indicating the liberals are rushing the legislation and hope to have it legalised by july 2018 )


Ottawa rushing to draft marijuana legalization bill ahead of 4/20: sources


Daniel Leblanc


OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail


Published Monday, Mar. 27, 2017 5:00AM EDT



The federal government has been scrambling to draft legislation to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, hoping to have a bill in place ahead of the symbolic date of April 20, sources said.

A senior federal official said preparing the legislation has exposed a number of divisions on key issues between the Health, Justice and Public Safety departments, requiring federal lawyers to work overtime to find the appropriate legal language to express the government’s final intentions.

The government is hoping to legalize pot by July 1, 2018, CBC News reported Sunday night.


The governing Liberals used last year’s 4/20 celebrations – festivals held annually across the country in which marijuana enthusiasts publicly light up – to announce that they would table their legislation this spring. The government is now hoping to table the long-awaited bill in less than a month, ahead of that same date this year, sources said.

This would entail introducing the legislation in the week of April 10, as the House will be on break during the actual celebrations of April 20 the following week.

Another senior official said there are still “lots of moving parts” as the government tackles complex issues such as whether to allow home production of small amounts of marijuana and the best way to crack down on drug-impaired drivers.

“The government has to decide how it will handle all sorts of things,” the federal official said. “It’s big and complicated.”

A third federal official cautioned that the legal drafting and cabinet-approval process could drag into early May. Still, the official said the government wants to unveil the legislation as soon as possible to ensure that the House of Commons has time to study the bill before the summer break.

Liberal MP Bill Blair, who is parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Justice and Ottawa’s point man on the legalization file, has said that the production and sale of marijuana will be tightly regulated.

The legislation will be inspired by a task force that was led by former Liberal minister Anne McLellan, which proposed a complete legalization model in a well-received report last year.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has already endorsed one of its key recommendations, namely that marijuana should be legal for 18- or 19-year-olds, depending on each province’s legal drinking age.

The task force also urged the government to allow Canadians to buy or carry 30 grams of marijuana for personal use, and to grow up to four plants at home. The task force also recommended a system that would feature storefront sales and mail-order distribution, and allow a wide range of producers to operate legally, including “craft” growers and the current producers of medical marijuana.

Mr. Trudeau said last year that the Liberal government was in overall agreement with the task force’s 80 recommendations.

Even if the legislation was tabled in the coming weeks, it remains unknown when marijuana will actually be legal for recreational users. A senior federal official said last year that the time frame will depend on the “readiness of the provinces,” which will regulate wholesale distribution and retailing. The official said aiming for 2018 would be ambitious, with 2019 being more likely.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com.....e34431990/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Mar 27, 2017 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There you have it ... the 'problem' they are experiencing is a problem inside the bureaucracy of the Federal government.

Quote:
A senior federal official said preparing the legislation has exposed a number of divisions on key issues between the Health, Justice and Public Safety departments, requiring federal lawyers to work overtime to find the appropriate legal language to express the government’s final intentions.


And they don't even mention The Competition Bureau and Revenue Canada.

They want the profits to be in the hands of cartels that they can tax. That means there will still be law enforcement and the equivalent of 'bootleggers' around.

Why bother? Leviathan is hungry and is looking for new revenues to gobble up, that's why.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Legalizing weed was never about anything but votes — and money

iPolitics Insights


Tasha Kheiriddin



Monday, March 27th, 2017


iPolitics/Mathew Usherwood



Oh cannabis, we stand on guard for thee. By now you know that the Trudeau government plans to make recreational marijuana use legal by July 1, 2018 and is “scrambling” to draft a bill by April 20 — in time for ‘4/20’, the annual event which sees pot enthusiasts gather from all over to consume their drug of choice in public.

On AM640 radio in Toronto, self-proclaimed ‘Prince of Pot’ Marc Emery crowed about the significance of the two dates. “It’s exciting to see it actually put down in numbers, that it’s coming out just before our national holiday, April 20, next month … and then on cannabis day 2018 it’ll be legal … we celebrate both those holidays in Canada with lots of celebration with cannabis and so those are appropriate days to introduce the legislation and make it legal.”

Personally, I don’t relish the thought of my seven-year-old standing in a cloud of second-hand marijuana smoke at our local Canada Day celebration, asking me why the maple leaf on the flag has been replaced with a pot plant. If legalizing marijuana is really meant to keep it out of the hands of children, then why plan to make it legal in time for Canada Day, when thousands of kids are congregating on Parliament Hill and other public places with their families?

Marijuana advocates may accuse me of over-reacting. (The government had to pick a day, so why not that day?) But that’s the point: Why does legalization have to be planned around that day in particular? Why drag our national holiday into the spectacle, instead of just passing the bill and getting back to business? Is Trudeau planning to toke up on national television, the better to nail down the votes of marijuana enthusiasts?

We are, of course, talking about a government timeline for legislation — the sort of thing that tends to go sideways. Enacting a federal law is just the first step; the provinces will have to deal with the devilish details of point-of-sale, health impacts and law enforcement issues, including a potential increase in cases of driving under the influence.

The PM protests too much. The true purpose of marijuana legalization is twofold: to court the millennial vote and to reap the kind of tax windfall that has debt-heavy governments salivating.

Municipalities will have to enact bylaws to deal with the consumption and sale of various forms of marijuana. Will restaurants serving marijuana edibles need a pot licence, like they do to serve alcohol? When is a cookie not just a cookie? Maybe cannabis connoisseurs shouldn’t be so quick to celebrate.

Trudeau has said he’s “not legalizing marijuana to please recreational users” but to keep pot away from kids and break the grip of organized crime on the business.

“Right now we know that young people have easier access to marijuana than just about any other illicit substance. It’s easier to buy a joint for a teenager than it is to buy a bottle of beer. That’s not right,” Trudeau told reporters in B.C. on March 2. “Secondly, we know that criminal organizations and street gangs are making billions of dollars off of the sale of marijuana. We feel that regulating it, controlling it, will bring that revenue out of the pockets of criminals and put it into a system where we can both monitor, tax it and ensure that we are supporting people who are facing challenges related or unrelated to drug use.”

The PM protests too much. Yes, Canadian teenagers already smoke more pot than any other kids on the planet — but they’ll still be buying black market marijuana once it’s legal, just like they purchase contraband cigarettes today. And gangs will still be running that business, pricing their product to be cheaper than the regulated, taxed marijuana. It’s economics.

The true purpose of marijuana legalization is twofold: to court the millennial vote and to reap the kind of tax windfall that has debt-heavy governments salivating. By CIBC’s estimate, legal pot could bring in $5 billion a year for federal and provincial governments. According to Deloitte, the total value of legal weed to Canada’s economy — growing, distribution, paraphernalia, tourism and business taxes — could reach $22.6 billion a year. Those are welcome numbers in a country where deficits are growing, young people can’t find jobs and the renegotiation of NAFTA looms like a black cloud on the horizon.

So why should tackling those priorities get in the way of the all-important promise to legalize pot? Maybe it’s a two-for-one: Governments get out of the red, young people get jobs in legal grow-ops and American tourists pressure Trump to keep the borders open, so they can come up here to party.

Happy Cannabis Day.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/03/27.....and-money/
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
— but they’ll still be buying black market marijuana once it’s legal, just like they purchase contraband cigarettes today. And gangs will still be running that business, pricing their product to be cheaper than the regulated, taxed marijuana. It’s economics.


I don't agree with the writer on this.

We have bootleg liquor and it is nowhere on the meter for anyone. Its cheap, powerful and .....well no one really wants it.

Gangs will give up that which does not make them money. The price is up there due to the illegality of the product.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Centre wrote:
Quote:
— but they’ll still be buying black market marijuana once it’s legal, just like they purchase contraband cigarettes today. And gangs will still be running that business, pricing their product to be cheaper than the regulated, taxed marijuana. It’s economics.


I don't agree with the writer on this.

We have bootleg liquor and it is nowhere on the meter for anyone. Its cheap, powerful and .....well no one really wants it.

Gangs will give up that which does not make them money. The price is up there due to the illegality of the product.


How about the part where Justin tells the whopper that he isn't interested in making life q little more civilized for 'recreational users'? His purpose is only to save the children by making it legal ... Everyone is a 'recreational user' these days. Even the children.

If you want to get down on drug, why not put ritalin on the list? Teachers have been drugging boys in public schools with it for decades.
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Jodie Emery leaves liberal party

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