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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gaetz: Gov. Scott Claiming Broward Election Board Missed Deadline Because His Vote Count Increased


Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz reacted to news that Gov. Rick Scott's Senate campaign is claiming Broward County election official Brenda Snipes intentionally missed a recount deadline by two minutes.

Scott said the late submission appeared intentionally because the machine recount in Broward netted him 779 votes -- which are now rejected because they were tardy.

Gaetz (R-Fort Walton Beach) said that in the universe of approximately 2,000 total ballots in question, "Rick Scott [did] well and is understandably frustrated."



He said that the debacle showed the "hypocrisy" of Sen. Bill Nelson's (D-Fla.) argument to "count every vote" -- because the votes mentioned by Scott won't be counted and would help him.


Gaetz said that the gubernatorial election between Ron DeSantis (R) and Andrew Gillum (D) is much clearer, as the former leads by a wide margin.

He called on Gillum's team to "stop this charade" and concede to DeSantis, who is already making moves to establish a presence in the Tallahassee Capitol.



http://insider.foxnews.com/201.....ally-gaetz
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( someone tell the democrats the election is over in both Florida and Georgia , one cannot see any scenario which would alter the outcomes at this point )



Florida’s DeSantis, Georgia’s Kemp look certain to win governorships – but Dems won’t give up fight


Alex Pappas By Alex Pappas | Fox News



Georgia Republican Brian Kemp and Florida Republican Ron DeSantis both look certain to win their gubernatorial races. (AP)<br>

Two southern Republican gubernatorial candidates are ready to move into their governor mansions after appearing to have pulled off victories in their races but their never-say-die Democratic opponents are refusing to give up – though the writing is on the wall.


In Florida, the contest for governor between Republican Ron DeSantis and Democrat Andrew Gillum appeared all but over Thursday, with a machine recount showing DeSantis with a large enough advantage over Gillum to avoid a hand recount in that race. The latest numbers posted online by the state of Florida show DeSantis with more than 33,683 votes than Gillum.


Over in Georgia, unofficial returns show Republican Brian Kemp beating Democrat Stacey Abrams with about 50.2 percent of more than 3.9 million votes. That puts him about 18,000 votes above the threshold required to win by a majority and avoid a Dec. 4 runoff.

Even though the math shows both races are essentially over, both Gillum and Abrams are still claiming they still have a chance of winning. Neither states have certified the outcomes yet.

Gillum, who conceded on Election Night only to retract his concession later, said in a statement Thursday that "it is not over until every legally casted vote is counted." But DeSantis said in a statement the “returns remain clear and unambiguous” that he won.


“Campaigns of ideas must give way to governing and bringing people together to secure Florida’s future,” DeSantis said. “With the campaign now over, that’s where all of my focus will be.”


In Florida, the contest for governor between Republican Ron DeSantis (left) and Democrat Andrew Gillum (right) appeared all but over Thursday.

Abrams' campaign and legal team is preparing an unprecedented legal challenge that could leave the state's Supreme Court deciding whether to force another round of voting. Kemp’s campaign has called Abrams' legal maneuvers a "disgrace to democracy" and an attempt to "count illegal votes."

“The election is over and Brian Kemp is the governor-elect,” his campaign said in a statement. “It's time for Abrams to concede and join our efforts to keep Georgia moving in the right direction."

Meanwhile, national Democrats are raising eyebrows for questioning the legitimacy of Georgia’s gubernatorial contest.


“If she had a fair election, she already would have won,” former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Tuesday night.

Other Democrats thought to be considering runs for president in 2020 are also making the argument about Abrams. Supporters of Abrams have made accusations of voter suppression, long voting lines and other balloting problems.

"If Stacey Abrams doesn’t win in Georgia, they stole it," Ohio Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown said in a speech Wednesday. "It's clear, I say that publicly."

“I think that Stacey Abrams’s election is being stolen from her, using what I think are insidious measures to disenfranchise certain groups of people,” New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker said this week.

During the 2016 contest, Clinton expressed worry that then-candidate Donald Trump wouldn’t accept defeat if she beat him in the election.

“We are a country based on laws,” Clinton said in October 2016. “And we’ve had hot, contested elections going back to the very beginning, but one of our hallmarks has always been that we accept the outcomes of our elections.”


https://www.foxnews.com/politics/floridas-desantis-georgias-kemp-look-certain-to-win-governorships-but-dems-wont-give-up-fight
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Someone needs to know that a runoff election could well be had if the vote is close enough..
RCO wrote:
( someone tell the democrats the election is over in both Florida and Georgia , one cannot see any scenario which would alter the outcomes at this point )


And since most folks understand that the walls are closing in on the orange idiot, including his backers, perhaps they may re-vote and switch teams.

Just sayin' . ;)
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:


“If she had a fair election, she already would have won,” former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Tuesday night.

Other Democrats thought to be considering runs for president in 2020 are also making the argument about Abrams. Supporters of Abrams have made accusations of voter suppression, long voting lines and other balloting problems.

"If Stacey Abrams doesn’t win in Georgia, they stole it," Ohio Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown said in a speech Wednesday. "It's clear, I say that publicly."

“I think that Stacey Abrams’s election is being stolen from her, using what I think are insidious measures to disenfranchise certain groups of people,” New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker said this week.

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/floridas-desantis-georgias-kemp-look-certain-to-win-governorships-but-dems-wont-give-up-fight


The rhetoric is certainly out in full force.
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:

The rhetoric is certainly out in full force.


And rightfully so.

Not to say anyone stole anything from anywhere. But it is Georgia and the rules they operate and how any vote can be tossed is a serious black eye on the whole process.

Kentucky, Florida Georgia are a mess. Kentucky, anyone with a felony is denied from ever voting again. Done the time....sort of, we shall make you do more time. Any guess to whom this affects more ?

Florida, move from Apt 2 at 10 Main St to Apt 3 at 10 Main St and voila, rejected ballot.

Georgia, sorry Mr Cosmo Stein , we have you as Mr Cosmo A. Stein at this address...rejected !

And they claim to be the best country on earth. <snort>

I wonder if the States were bigger , but less of them, they would be a much better off country.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( she has now admitted she cannot win the election but still plans to sue the state , typical liberal when you lose claim the election was unfair , much like Hilary in 2016 , maybe she's blame Russia somehow too )


Stacey Abrams says she can’t defeat Brian Kemp in Georgia governor race; will sue over mismanagement of state's election



Elizabeth Zwirz By Elizabeth Zwirz | Fox News



Stacey Abrams says she can't win Georgia governor race

Democrat Stacey Abrams effectively ends her challenge to Republican Brian Kemp; Steve Harrigan reports from Atlanta.

Stacey Abrams, the Democrat in Georgia’s governor race, acknowledged Friday that she cannot defeat her Republican opponent, Brian Kemp, but she vowed to file a federal lawsuit challenging the “gross mismanagement” of the state’s elections.


Abrams’ address to her supporters essentially concluded her bid for the governor’s mansion, the final result of which had been in doubt since Election Day, but she noted that she was not officially conceding the race.

While describing a variety of issues at the polls, Abrams said that "the state failed its voters."

"I acknowledge that former Secretary of State Brian Kemp will be certified as the victor in the 2018 gubernatorial election. But to watch an elected official – who claims to represent the people in this state, baldly pin his hopes for election on the suppression of the people’s democratic right to vote – has been truly appalling," Abrams said. "So let's be clear, this is not a speech of concession."

"Because concession means to acknowledge an action is right, true or proper. As a woman of conscience and faith, I cannot concede that. But my assessment is the law currently allows no further viable remedy," she continued, before adding that although she could fight to keep the election going, she doesn't "want to hold public office if I need to scheme my way into the post."


Abrams had hoped to become the first black governor of Georgia and the first black female governor of any state.


Stacey Abrams acknowledged Friday that she could not defeat her GOP opponent in Georgia's gubernatorial election. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Stacey Abrams acknowledged Friday that she could not defeat her GOP opponent in Georgia's gubernatorial election. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Unofficial returns in the state put Kemp ahead of Abrams with roughly 50.2 percent of more than 3.9 million votes. This standing gave him about 18,000 votes above the threshold required to win by a majority and avoid a Dec. 4 runoff.

Kemp issued a statement following his opponent's announcement, saying she "conceded the race and officially ended her campaign for governor."

"I appreciate her passion, hard work, and commitment to public service," the statement said. "The election is over and hardworking Georgians are ready to move forward. We can no longer dwell on the divisive politics of the past but must focus on Georgia’s bright and promising future."

He went on to request that people in Georgia "stand with me in the days ahead."

"Together, we will realize the opportunities and tackle the challenges to come," the statement said. "We will be a state that puts hardworking Georgians – no matter their zip code or political preference - first!”

Kemp, Georgia's former secretary of state, had received the endorsement of President Trump.

Abrams gave her speech, where she also announced her intent to fight back legally," just after 5 p.m. That was the earliest state officials could certify the results after a court-ordered review of absentee, provisional and other uncounted ballots. Abrams' campaign had contended there were potentially enough uncounted votes to force a runoff.

"In the coming days, we will be filing a major federal lawsuit against the state of Georgia for the gross mismanagement of this election and to protect future elections," she said.

Following her announcement, Abrams' campaign sent out a news release that reiterated her comments.

"In her remarks, Abrams outlined the gross injustices Georgians faced when trying to cast their ballots during this election and launched Fair Fight Georgia," the news release said. "This new PAC will pursue accountability in Georgia’s elections and integrity in the process of maintaining our voting rolls."

"In the coming days, Fair Fight Georgia will be filing a major federal lawsuit against the state of Georgia for the gross mismanagement of this election and to protect future elections from unconstitutional actions," it continued.


https://www.foxnews.com/politics/stacey-abrams-acknowledges-she-cant-defeat-brian-kemp-is-georgia-governor-race
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2018 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What was "unfair" about the mid-term election?

The Democrats spent more money than the Republicans, by quite a margin. They have been able to take back two Senate seats after the election! That surely testifies to the more-than-fairness of the system.

Or is it just unfair that she lost the election? Is this another prima donna like Hillary?

The point is the narrative, of course. They never drop this stuff until they are involved in the next pseudo-event. It's like one huge effort of make-believe. Now, the cover story for the electoral thefts occurring right under our eyes is that the Republicans have rigged the elections.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( democrats also seem ready to admit that the Florida senate seat is lost )


'Nelson has no path': Democrats admit Scott beats Florida icon



By MARC CAPUTO
| 11/16/2018 09:18 PM EST
| Updated 11/16/2018 09:49 PM EST


 Share on Facebook  Share on Twitter

Sen. Bill Nelson has run out of time, run out of favorable court rulings and is about to officially run out of votes.

After losing to Gov. Rick Scott on Election Day, losing after an automatic recount and appearing to not make up the gap following a manual recount Friday, Nelson’s campaign was dealt a mortal blow later that evening by U.S. District Judge Mark E. Walker, who crushed the Democrat’s last major hope by upholding a Florida law that forbids county election offices from counting vote-by-mail ballots received after 7 p.m. Election Day.

.
“It’s done. But it was done before today. This was a total Hail Mary,” said a top Democrat involved in Nelson’s campaign who didn’t want to speak publicly before the Democratic Party icon conceded defeat to one of the party's most-hated rivals.

The night before, Walker had rejected yet another Nelson lawsuit concerning standards for divining voter intent in manual recounts, and he refused to extend the deadlines of the recount.

Without favorable court rulings to expand the available ballot pool, Nelson has no way to make up his 12,603-vote deficit with Scott. Nelson can still appeal, but Democrats said that’s highly unlikely, considering Walker has historically appeared more sympathetic to their arguments compared to appeals courts.

The counties officially have to submit their manual recount totals to the state Sunday. The election is supposed to be certified Tuesday.

On Friday, Nelson gave an emotional “thank you” speech to staff earlier in the day “but it was more of a goodbye,” said yet another top Florida Democrat connected to Nelson’s re-election. A third source added that the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and its mammoth recount ground force is starting to leave Florida: “DSCC is packing up and headed north” — an assertion disputed by a DSCC official who said “no one’s leaving.”

While party officials refused to discuss the hopelessness of the situation on the record, the Florida Democratic Party on Friday continued to fundraise off the recount, suggesting to donors that Nelson had a shot when his own top backers knew he didn’t.

Nelson, a three-term U.S. Senator, was the last Democratic statewide elected official in Florida for years. First elected to the Florida House in 1972, he served as a member of the U.S. House and as insurance commissioner before being elected to the Senate in 2000. He only lost one race: a Democratic primary for governor against party legend “Walkin’” Lawton Chiles in 1990.

Scott's defeat of Nelson certifies him as a Democratic giant-killer who continues to prove party elites wrong. In three straight elections, Democratic insiders have predicted his defeat. Scott first beat Alex Sink, the woman once thought to be the future of the party, in his first gubernatorial race. Then he defeated former Gov. Charlie Crist, a once-highly popular governor. And now he has bested the one politician Democrats thought was unbeatable in a Florida general election, Nelson.

Scott called on Nelson to withdraw.

“Once again, the courts have denied Bill Nelson’s desperate attempt to change Florida law after the election. It’s long past time for Bill Nelson to face the facts: this charade is over, Floridians' votes have been counted multiple times, and Rick Scott is the next Senator from Florida," said Chris Hartline, Scott's campaign spokesperson.

Like Nelson's official campaign spokespeople, the Democrat’s usually voluble recount attorney, Marc Elias, fell uncharacteristically quiet Friday after the recounts and before Walker’s ruling.

Elias this week has held daily conference calls with reporters and — contrary to the assertions of experts who spoke to POLITICO — had insisted throughout that Nelson had a shot. But Elias acknowledged Thursday evening it would take more than “one silver bullet ...[to] ... change the margin in this race.”

During that call, Elias said Nelson was relying on a court ruling to potentially count absentee and provisional ballots that had been rejected because the voter’s signature did not match the signature on file. The state estimated Friday that 5,686 such ballots existed. But even if all somehow voted for Nelson, he still would come up short against Scott.

Elias also hoped that the manual recounts, which wrapped up Friday, would produce new loads of votes for Nelson — especially in Broward County, where he estimated 23,000 votes in the Democratic-rich area might not have been properly read by machines in the precincts on Election Day. In pushing this narrative, Elias specifically tried to bat down experts who said that the county’s bad ballot design — the Senate race was tucked in the lower left-hand corner beneath the instructions — caused many voters to not see the race and therefore not vote in it.

But after the recount Friday in Broward, observers in the room said there was no batch of hidden votes. People just undervoted the race by disproportionate margins compared to the 66 other counties.

“The votes weren’t there. It was bad ballot design,” said Democratic data analyst Matt Isbell, who first raised the issue of the undervotes after Election Night. “Nelson has no path.”

Late Friday, the Scott campaign reported that Nelson netted fewer than 300 votes in Broward County after the recount. The campaign obtained the numbers through a public records request.

The third “silver bullet” Elias was hoping for concerned the mail-in ballots that were not received at county offices before 7 p.m. Election Day. The estimated number of these ballots is unclear, but likely totaled in the thousands.

Elias had said the ballot-receipt rule was unfair because overseas absentee ballots that were postmarked before Election Day could continue to be counted through Friday, Nov. 16.

But Judge Walker said the rule just helps soldiers and other U.S. citizens who are disadvantaged by the mail system since they’re overseas, and that this effort to give them a little help does not disadvantage domestic absentee-ballot voters.

Walker also noted that the challenge of a longstanding law by Nelson came too late in the process, and that the state at a certain point has the right to fix the deadlines it wants to make sure elections are orderly.

“The fact that there might be problems with the mail does not outweigh the state’s important interest in delineating finality in elections. To hold otherwise could call into question the entirety of the vote-by-mail system itself,” Walker said. “The restriction is reasonable, and the state’s regulatory interest is sufficient to justify the deadline.”

And though other states allow absentee ballots to be received after Election Day as long as they’re postmarked by Election Day, the judge said that has no bearing on Florida.

“A later or more lenient deadline in other states may not a constitutional violation make,” he ruled.

https://www.politico.com/states/florida/story/2018/11/16/nelson-has-no-path-democrats-admit-scott-beats-florida-icon-702880
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
What was "unfair" about the mid-term election?

The Democrats spent more money than the Republicans, by quite a margin. They have been able to take back two Senate seats after the election! That surely testifies to the more-than-fairness of the system.

Or is it just unfair that she lost the election? Is this another prima donna like Hillary?

The point is the narrative, of course. They never drop this stuff until they are involved in the next pseudo-event. It's like one huge effort of make-believe. Now, the cover story for the electoral thefts occurring right under our eyes is that the Republicans have rigged the elections.



I don't think that I can ever recall an American election where democrats had such of a financial advantage over the republicans especially at the local or House level . they had access to an unheard of amount of money this election .

and for some to now claim the election was unfair , does seem to not be looking at the facts of this election . an election where the democrats had many advantages they typically don't have
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2018 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Funny how you look now with such a ridiculous statement huh ?
RCO wrote:
typical liberal when you lose claim the election was unfair ,


I didnt know the Orange idiot was a liberal. Do tell, when did he switch parties ?
Quote:

“Ted Cruz didn’t win Iowa, he stole it,” Trump tweeted.
Based on the fraud committed by Senator Ted Cruz during the Iowa Caucus, either a new election should take place or Cruz results nullified.”

he election is going to be rigged—I’m going to be honest,” Donald Trump said to a rowdy crowd in August, at a rally in Columbus,

If I lose Florida, we will know that there’s voter fraud. If there’s voter fraud, this election will be illegitimate, the election of the winner will be illegitimate, we will have a constitutional crisis, widespread civil disobedience, and the government will no longer be the government.’



So um.... need more, cuz there are lots more where this came from ?

Glad to see your partisan bent is firm and solid.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill Nelson concedes Florida Senate race to Rick Scott after manual recount


Barnini Chakraborty By Barnini Chakraborty | Fox News



Senator Nelson concedes following Florida election recount

Democratic Senator Bill Nelson to make statement regarding Florida election recount; Phil Keating has the latest in Florida.

Florida’s long-time Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson conceded to Republican challenger Gov. Rick Scott Sunday, drawing the hotly contested race to represent the Sunshine State to a close after 12 days of legal wrangling.


According to the Florida Secretary of State's office, Scott led Nelson by approximately 10,000 votes after the state's 67 counties completed machine and manual recounts


Nelson, who served three terms in the U.S. Senate, met his match in Scott, who launched a competitive campaign for Florida votes. Scott, a two-term governor of the state, said Nelson called him to “graciously” concede and that Scott, in turn, thanked Nelson for his years of service. Scott has now won narrow victories in three statewide races since 2010.

“Now the campaign truly is behind us, and that’s where we need to leave it,” Scott said. “We must do what Americans have always done: come together for the good of our state and our country.”

President Trump congratulated Scott on Twitter Sunday, saying that Scott "was a great Governor and will be even a greater Senator in representing the People of Florida."


Nelson tweeted that "things turned out a little differently than we had hoped, but I by no means feel defeated ... I’ve had the privilege of serving the people of Florida for most of my life. It’s been a rewarding journey and a very humbling experience. No one could be more blessed."


Scott's victory also marks the first time in more than a century that Florida has two Republican senators representing them in Washington. The state is scheduled to certify results in the race on Nov. 20.

Election Day results showed Nelson trailing Scott by more than 56,000 votes. Scott’s lead narrowed to 12,603 votes after a statewide machine recount. The new numbers triggered an automatic hand recount under Florida law.

Marc Elias, the attorney who represented Nelson, acknowledged on Twitter that "the margin narrowed, but did not close" as a result of the recount.


It’s unclear what Nelson’s plans will be post-race. The 76-year-old was first elected to office in a state House district near Cape Canaveral in 1972. He’s served three terms in the Florida House, six terms in Congress and was Florida’s insurance commissioner after Hurricane Andrew swept the Miami area.

Sunday’s hard-fought conclusion comes after a series of election missteps – in Broward and Palm Beach counties in particular -- that put Florida back in the national spotlight.

After getting off to a slow start, embattled Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes boasted Thursday about making the state’s deadline for machine recounts.

“We are excited to be at this point,” she said Thursday afternoon.


A few hours later, election officials were forced to admit the county had uploaded the results of the recount two minutes after the state’s 3 p.m. cutoff -- making its machine recount tally void.

“Basically, I just worked my ass off for nothing,” Joseph D’Alessandro, Broward County’s election planning and development director, said.

D’Alessandro said he had a hard time uploading the results in time because he wasn’t familiar with the website used to send them to the secretary of state.

When asked what would happen if Broward missed Sunday’s deadline, county attorney Drew Myers inhaled deeply and told Fox News he couldn’t even entertain the idea.

“They have to make that deadline,” he said.

Broward’s bungled recount efforts had many calling for Snipes to step down, including former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

“There is no question that Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes failed to comply with Florida law on multiple counts, undermining Floridians’ confidence in our electoral process,” Bush tweeted on Monday. “Supervisor Snipes should be removed from her office following the recounts.”

Protesters have been camped outside Broward’s Lauderhill recount site since last Sunday.

Some carried signs that read, “Corrupt Snipes!!! Lock Her Up!” “Busted Brenda” and “I trust [Michael] Avenatti more than Brenda!” while shouting at election officials, counter-protesters and the news media.


https://www.foxnews.com/politics/bill-nelson-concedes-florida-senate-race-to-rick-scott-after-manual-recount
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a post online indicates that voter turnout for the mid terms was 49 % , doesn't sound that high but was the highest turnout in 100 years , between the late 70's and 2014 it normally was in the high 30's - low 40's but had never been close to 50 % )



Elliott Gauthier‏ @GauthierElliott


Follow Follow @GauthierElliott



Highest Midterm Voter Turnout In Over A Century


https://www.statista.com/chart/16132/voter-turnout-for-the-us-midterm-elections/?utm_campaign=6b0fb0a4ee-
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the election is not over yet , at least not till Mississippi votes in the final senate election , although republicans will control the senate no matter the outcome its still a critical seat , every senate vote is very important . )


Trump to campaign for Hyde-Smith in Mississippi as Dems aim to energize black voters



Andrew O'Reilly By Andrew O'Reilly | Fox News



With the recounts over and the races in Florida and Georgia finally decided, the nation's attention is shifting to another southern state.

In what is the last battle of the 2018 midterm season, a special runoff election is taking place in just over a week to decide who will fill Mississippi’s second seat in the Senate. The runoff pits Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith against her Democratic challenger, former Secretary of Agriculture and ex-Democratic Rep. Mike Espy.


Hyde-Smith, who was appointed in April to fill retired Republican Sen. Thad Cochran's seat, and Espy beat out two other candidates earlier this month, but neither was able to accumulate more than 50 percent of the vote to win the race outright. Now the runoff is drawing national attention – and money – in a competitive contest that could see Espy become the state’s first Democratic senator since 1962.

Before the November 6 elections, polling showed Hyde-Smith enjoying a sizeable lead over her three contenders in the deeply red state, but on Election Day she garnered only 41.4 percent of the vote with Espy close behind at 40.7 percent.

Since then her campaign has run into some public relations issues after two videos surfaced in the last week of her making questionable comments.

In one video, the senator says that if she were invited by one of her supporters to a "public hanging," she would be in "the front row,” while in the other she is heard telling a group of supporters that “there's a lot of liberal folks in those other schools who that maybe we don't want to vote. Maybe we want to make it just a little more difficult. So, I think that's a great idea.”

While her campaign has said her comments were "an exaggerated expression of regard” and “all a joke,” both have upset many in a state known for its history of lynchings and other racially-motivated attacks on African-Americans.

Her opponent, Espy, is African-American.

Mississippi also has the highest percentage of black residents – at 37 percent – and community leaders have heavily criticized the senator for her comments.

“Hyde-Smith’s decision to joke about ‘hanging,’ in a state known for its violent and terroristic history toward African Americans is sick," NAACP President Derrick Johnson said in a statement. "To envision this brutal and degenerate type of frame during a time when Black people, Jewish People and immigrants are still being targeted for violence by White nationalists and racists is hateful and hurtful. Any politician seeking to serve as the national voice of the people of Mississippi should know better."

Hyde-Smith’s comments have become prime fodder for the political action committees that have funneled millions of dollars into helping Espy win the Senate seat.


FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2018, file photo, Mike Espy, a former congressman and former U.S. agriculture secretary, speaks at the Neshoba County Fair, one of the state's largest political events, in Philadelphia, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2018, file photo, Mike Espy, a former congressman and former U.S. agriculture secretary, speaks at the Neshoba County Fair, one of the state's largest political events, in Philadelphia, Miss. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

One PAC in particular, PowerPACPlus, has latched on to Hyde-Smith’s “hanging” comments by putting out an ad that features a 1930 photo of a white crowd in Indiana posing around a tree as the lifeless bodies of two black men hang above them, lynched in nooses. The ad then superimposes an unrelated photo of Hyde-Smith alongside the “This is where U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith would like to be.”

PowerPACPlus has also given ESPY’s campaign around $1.8 million.

To combat the bad press, Hyde-Smith’s campaign and national Republican leaders are pulling out all the stops to make sure she retains her seat come January.


President Trump is making two stops in Mississippi the day before the special election – in Tupelo and Biloxi – to rally voter support for Hyde-Smith as he did for a number of other candidates across the country in a mad dash of appearances before Nov. 6. In the 2016 presidential election, Trump won Mississippi by almost 18 points and remains popular within the Magnolia state.

“President Trump is so committed to getting out the vote for Cindy Hyde-Smith that he scheduled two rallies in the great State of Mississippi on the day before the run-off election,” Trump campaign chief operating officer Michael Glassner said in a news release. “The President needs all hands on deck on Election Day on November 27 so he can continue to count on Senator Hyde-Smith’s outstanding support for his America First agenda.”

Along with the presidential support on the stump, the Hyde-Smith campaign is also receiving a sizeable financial bump from the GOP, with the National Republican Senatorial Committee expected to spend more than $1 million on a TV ad blitz.

Despite the cash infusion and Hyde-Smith’s missteps, Espy is not even close to a guaranteed win in next week’s runoff. Mississippi is still a deeply conservative state overall and even more so when it comes to the people in the state who vote. To that end, Espy is trying to rally African-American voters to head to the polls once again in November to cast their ballots for him.

Espy – who has played off Hyde-Smith’s “hanging” comment while on the campaign trail – hopes to use those voters, along with any crossover Republicans put off by the comment, to win the race.

"Here's what you're not going to get from me: You're not going to hear any talk about voter suppression. You're not going to hear any talk about public hanging," Espy said on Sunday.

Before the Nov. 6 elections there were a number of parallels drawn between the Senate race in Mississippi and last year’s special election that saw Democrat Doug Jones defeat the scandal-plagued Republican Roy Moore to fill the seat vacated by Jeff Sessions when he was appointed attorney general.

Some critics at the time balked at the comparison as Hyde-Smith’s record was squeaky clean, but with two high-profile missteps emerging in the last week, the question remains, does that change anything?

“Cindy Hyde-Smith is giving Espy some freebies with those comments,” Marvin King, a political science professor at the University of Mississippi, told Fox News. King noted that Hyde-Smith’s comments have heightened the attention on the race and energized some voters appalled by her words – both helpful to Espy.

But will it be enough to turn Mississippi blue?

“I don’t think so,” King said. “It will change nothing in the aggregate, but maybe some things on the margins.”


https://www.foxnews.com/politics/trump-to-campaign-for-hyde-smith-in-mississippi-as-dems-aim-to-energize-black-voters
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2018 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the mid terms are not over yet , at least not till Mississippi votes for the final senator position which remains undecided , typically a safe red state but all the extra attention leads to some thinking it might be closer than normal . although still likely to be a republican hold )



Trump, at Mississippi rally ahead of pivotal Senate special election, touts border security and NASA


Gregg Re By Gregg Re | Fox News


Trump holds Make America Great Again rally in Mississippi



With just hours to go before a pivotal special election in Mississippi that will determine the strength of the GOP's Senate majority next year, President Trump vowed to keep criminals "the hell out of our country" and touted NASA's recent Mars landing and his administration's progress building a border wall.


His comments came at a fiery rally in Tupelo, Miss. for incumbent GOP Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, who is facing off in Tuesday's special election against Democrat Mike Espy. Trump is set to hold another rally, in Biloxi, at 9:00 p.m. ET, underscoring the importance of the race for Senate Republicans.


Voting for Hyde-Smith is "so important," Trump told the cheering crowd, as Republicans look to expand their Senate majority to 53 seats.

Hyde-Smith was appointed in March to fill retired Republican Sen. Thad Cochran's seat. Espy, who served in former President Bill Clinton's administration, is seeking to become Mississippi's first black senator since Reconstruction.

"Your vote on Tuesday will decide whether we build on our extraordinary achievements, or whether we empower the radical Democrats to obstruct our progress," Trump said.


The president was joined on stage at one point by South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, who told him he has "done a hell of a job."


"We're sending a clear message to the caravans, to the trespassers -- go back home."
— President Trump

"If you like [Supreme Court Justice Brett] Kavanuagh, there's more coming," Graham, one of Kavanaugh's staunchest defenders during his Senate confirmation hearings earlier in the year, told the crowd. "Let's win tomorrow." (The Senate has exclusive authority to confirm all federal judicial appointments.)

The president briefly pivoted to discuss Sunday's confrontation at the border, when hundreds of caravan migrants rushed the port of entry at San Ysidro, Calif., and were dispersed with tear gas from U.S. Border Patrol authorities.


"Are we doing OK on the border, folks?" Trump said to cheers of "Build that wall."

"We're not going to have it -- you've got to come into our country legally," Trump said. "We have a lot of [the wall] built, and it's going up. And the rest of it -- it's pretty nasty looking wire, isn't it? We're doing well."

He added: "We're not letting people into our country unless they come in legally -- and we want people to come in through merit. We have great companies coming into our country. We need workers. We want them to come in. But they have to be talented people who can love our country -- they have to come in through merit, not through a [visa] lottery."

Criticizing migrants who waved their home country's flags and threw rocks at U.S. officials -- even as they sought entry into the U.S. -- Trump unequivocally condemned Sunday's attempted incursion at San Ysidro.

"We will not tolerate any form of assault or attack upon our border agents, like happened yesterday," Trump said. "We're sending a clear message to the caravans, to the trespassers -- go back home."

He then touted historically low African-American unemployment rates and told the crowd that "we made history" on Election Day "by expanding our Senate majority."

For her part, Hyde-Smith said she was "honored" by Trump's visit and emphasized her support for the Second Amendment and the president's judicial nominees.

"I've worked very, very hard for you," Hyde-Smith told the crowd. "I will stand for your conservative values, and that is what is on the ballot tomorrow."


"We have reawakened NASA. And that's a good thing."
— President Trump

After discussing his plans for a Space Force, Trump highlighted the historic landing of a NASA spacecraft on Mars earlier in the day.

"Today, we just landed on Mars, did you hear that?" Trump said. "They were celebrating at NASA. We have reawakened NASA. And that's a good thing." He added: "A lot of the rich guys like rockets. So we charge them rent. Just make sure you have an American flag on the rocket."


He then immediately turned to the Iran nuclear deal, which he called "one-sided" and pulled the U.S. out of earlier this year, and touted his decision to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem.

Large crowds gathered hours in advance of the rally at Tupelo Regional Airport, where GOP Rep. Trent Kelly led supporters in a chant of "Build the wall" as Air Force One approached for landing.

The president carried Mississippi over Hillary Clinton by nearly 20 percentage points in the 2016 presidential election, and GOP Sen. Roger Wicker won reelection by a similar margin earlier in the month.

Hyde-Smith also remains popular among black Mississippi Republicans, according to local reports.

But Trump cautioned voters not to make assumptions or stay home. "Don't take any chances," he warned the crowd in Tupelo Monday evening.

And Democrats have seen some cause for optimism in recent weeks, fueled by a series of missteps by Hyde-Smith.


The incumbent Republican lawmaker was recorded during a campaign stop saying that if a supporter invited her to a "public hanging," she would be in "the front row.” She has since said her comment was made in jest and denied any racial connotation.



Speaking to reporters outside the White House earlier Monday before flying to Mississippi, Trump said Hyde-Smith "felt very badly, and she certainly didn't mean that, and she's already apologized and I think very strongly."

He said her comments were "taken a certain way, but she certainly didn't mean it."


President Trump speaks to reports outside the White House as he departs for a campaign rally for Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith.

"I've known her for a period of time now as a senator -- she's been an excellent senator," Trump said. "I'm going there -- I'm going to make, I guess, two rallies on top of everything else. And I hope you're all coming."

Amid fallout from those remarks, Major League Baseball asked that Hyde-Smith return the organization’s $5,000 donation. Other organizations have made similar requests.

Hyde-Smith also co-sponsored a bill in the Mississippi state Senate in 2007 that would have honored a former Confederate soldier for his efforts to "defend his homeland."

The resolution, which was first reported over the weekend, called a Mississippi resident identified as Effie Lucille Nicholson Pharr "the last known living 'Real Daughter' of the Confederacy living in Mississippi" and praised her father's work to "defend his homeland."

Meanwhile, Hyde-Smith's campaign sharply pushed back against a report in the Jackson Free Press over the weekend that she had attended what was described as a "segregation academy" in the 1970s to avoid studying with black students, calling it a "new low."

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/trump-headlines-first-of-2-mississippi-rallies-ahead-of-pivotal-senate-special-election
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'We don't want an Alabama': Hyde-Smith has Republicans holding their breath

Democrat Mike Espy claims momentum in the final days of the Mississippi special Senate election, but Donald Trump heads to the state Monday to blunt it.



By JAMES ARKIN
| 11/25/2018 08:01 PM EST


Republicans think Cindy Hyde-Smith will ultimately pull out a win in Mississippi's special Senate election on Tuesday. But they say the race has tightened — and after what happened in Alabama last year, they're on edge.

A swirl of controversy surrounding the Republican senator — stirred up by her comment about attending a "public hanging" — has given Democrat Mike Espy momentum in the homestretch, officials from both parties say. Hyde-Smith has never trailed in polling, and Democrats acknowledge she's likely to win, but they argue that her flubs have given Espy a very narrow opening if everything breaks his way.


Henry Barbour, the Republican National Committee committeeman and a longtime Mississippi operative, said base voters in both parties are energized, but gave a slight edge to Espy’s supporters. He said he expects Hyde-Smith to win, though he added that Republicans should be concerned about the potential for a weak turnout.

“I think Espy supporters are probably a little more energized than Hyde-Smith,” Barbour said. “But I do think conservative voters realize this race is going to decide if we have a conservative or liberal representing us in Washington and that is very motivating to conservative voters.

“We don't want to have an Alabama,” he added, referring to Republican Roy Moore's 2017 loss to Democrat Doug Jones in a special Senate election in the deep-red state.


Republicans are sending the full force of the party to Mississippi to prevent that scenario — starting with Donald Trump. The president is holding two rallies for Hyde-Smith Monday, events that officials hope will spike interest and turnout among conservatives during an oddly timed holiday season election.

“I will be in Gulfport and Tupelo, Mississippi, on Monday night doing two Rallies for Senator Hyde-Smith, who has a very important Election on Tuesday. She is an outstanding person who is strong on the Border, Crime, Military, our great Vets, Healthcare & the 2nd A. Needed in D.C.,” Trump wrote Sunday in one of a pair of tweets for the senator.

The RNC has more than 100 paid staff members on the ground as of this weekend, and has made more than 500,000 voter contacts since Nov. 6, a spokesman said. The RNC transferred $1 million to the National Republican Senatorial Committee earlier this month to help fund TV ads in Mississippi.

National Republican and White House officials, who’ve been reviewing polling over the past week, remain confident Hyde-Smith will prevail. They say surveys have consistently shown her with a lead ranging from the mid-single digits to the low double digits. A public poll conducted this past week by RRH Elections had Hyde-Smith up by 10 points.

Still, White House officials have long expressed unease about Hyde Smith and worry that she isn‘t ready for prime time. Earlier this year, two Trump aides implored Gov. Phil Bryant to appoint someone else to the seat following the retirement of longtime Republican Sen. Thad Cochran. But they’re convinced that Hyde-Smith will pull out a win, even if it’s narrower than it should be.


One Republican working on the runoff who requested anonymity to discuss private polling said the race has tightened recently, but expressed confidence Hyde-Smith would be elected. “A win’s a win,” the Republican said.

.
Dan Eberhart, a Republican megadonor who has contributed heavily to GOP Senate campaigns this year, said Trump’s rallies should eliminate any lingering concerns about the race.

“Trump will carry her over the finish line,” Eberhart said.

Democrats acknowledge Hyde-Smith will receive a significant boost from the president's rallies on Monday. But they say the appearances will provide a spark to their voters, too.

“When he shows up, of course he's going to fire up the Republican base,” said Bobby Moak, the state Democratic Party chairman. “But he also does the same thing with the Democratic base.”

Joe Trippi, a consultant working with Espy’s campaign, said the Democrat is probably losing by low single digits in the closing days of the race. Hyde-Smith outpaced Espy by about 8,400 votes, or just a single percentage point, on Nov. 6, while Republican Chris McDaniel took 17 percent. They are in a runoff because no candidate eclipsed 50 percent.

Democrats expect high turnout from their base, boosted in part by backlash to Hyde-Smith’s comments about being first in line to a public hanging if one of her supporters invited her, and a second remark about limiting liberals' ability to vote. A Jackson, Miss., newspaper also reported Friday that she attended a segregation academy for high school.

Espy called the senator's comments during the campaign a “black eye” for the state, and a recent TV ad by his campaign said she's reinforced stereotypes the state has worked to overcome. Multiple national companies, including Walmart and Major League Baseball, have requested their donations to Hyde-Smith be refunded because of the comments.

.
Trippi advised Jones during his improbable win in Alabama last year, and emphasized that Jones won by only 23,000 votes despite facing a historically bad opponent in Moore who motivated Democratic voters and depressed GOP turnout.

“We do think we have a real shot,” Trippi said, comparing Tuesday’s election with the Alabama race Jones won. “But if we win, it's going to be the same thing" — by a very small margin.

Republicans, meanwhile, have gone on the attack against Espy, airing TV ads highlighting the $750,000 lobbying contract he received from an Ivory Coast dictator earlier this decade. They’re also airing ads linking him to Democrats like Nancy Pelosi, hoping to prevent any crossover Republican support.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/11/25/mississippi-senate-cindy-hyde-smith-mike-espy-race-1014685
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2018 - US Midterm Elections

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