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RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the democrat has apparently declared victory although there is still almost 4000 absentee votes yet to be counted )


Democrat Lamb declares victory in Pa. special election determined too close to call


By Samuel Chamberlain, Edmund DeMarche | Fox News



Democrat Conor Lamb declares victory in Pennsylvania

Conor Lamb declares victory in Pennsylvania special election.

Democrat Conor Lamb declared victory early Wednesday in Pennsylvania’s special House election that was officially too close to call but seen by some political observers as a clear message to Republicans prior to November’s midterm elections.


The most recent results — with 99 percent of the precincts reporting — show Lamb up by fewer than 900 votes over Republican Rick Saccone. State officials said there were about 3,900 absentee ballots that still needed to be counted.

The final result may be determined by a recount.


Still, the unofficial results showed Lamb riding a wave of Democratic enthusiasm in a district that President Donald Trump won 16 months ago by 20 points. The result was expected to raise Democratic hopes of taking back the House in November.

“It took a little longer than we thought,” Lamb, a former Marine, told supporters. “We followed what I learned in the Marines – leave no one behind. We went everywhere; we talked to everyone; we invited everyone in.”


Republican candidate thanks supporters, vows to keep fighting for victory in down-to-the-wire race for Pennsylvania's 18th congressional district.

Saccone appeared more cautious after polls closed. He told an audience that he doesn’t give up. He thanked the crowd that he called “the salt of the earth” and vowed that he is going to keep fighting.



To be sure, Democrats wasted little time to celebrate the outcome.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and Democratic National Committee both issued statements late Tuesday declaring victory.


This is a local race ... I don't think it has anything to do with the president.
- Conor Lamb, Democratic House candidate
“These results should terrify Republicans. Despite their home field advantage and the millions of dollars outside groups poured into this race, Republicans found that their attacks against Conor, including their unpopular tax scam, were not believable,” Ben Ray, the DCCC chairman, said in a statement.

Tom Perez, the DNC chair, praised the “victory,” saying the upset was for “hardworking families of Western Pennsylvania and a victory for Democrats across the country.”

Lamb, a 33-year-old former federal prosecutor, ran up big margins against Saccone, 60, in wealthy Allegheny County and was holding his own in GOP-leaning Westmoreland, Washington and Greene counties.

G. Terry Madonna, director of the Center for Politics and Public Affairs at Franklin and Marshall College, contrasts the different approaches to campaigning by Republican congressional candidate Rick Saccone and his Democratic opponent Conor Lamb.

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Wanda Murren told Fox News the race would not have a mandatory recount. Under state law, three voters in each precinct must petition for a recount and petitions must be filed five days after each county completes its tally.

Lamb insisted that Trump was not the main issue in the race. But the close margin was another setback for the president following Democratic Sen. Doug Jones' victory in Alabama's special election in December.

“We were executing a plan that we came up with a long time ago that had nothing to do with the president,” Lamb told reporters after voting Tuesday morning. “This is a local race. … I don’t think it has anything to do with the president.”

By contrast, Saccone had vowed that he would be Trump's "wingman," telling Fox Business Network's "Mornings with Maria" that the president "needs some help down there [in Washington]."


Conor Lamb courts Republican, independent voters in hotly contested congressional race in Pennsylvania.

The president visited the district twice to campaign for Saccone, once in January and again on Saturday night in a rollicking rally that recalled Trump’s own 2016 campaign.

In a bid to lock up that key voting bloc, Democrats called in former Vice President Joe Biden to stump for Lamb.

“You said you want your piece of the sidewalk,” Biden, a potential 2020 presidential candidate, told a group of union workers last week. ”Hell, you own the sidewalk.” Biden has also said that Lamb reminds him of his late son, Beau, an Iraq War veteran and former Delaware attorney general who died of brain cancer in 2015 at age 46.

Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District, which stretches from the affluent Pittsburgh suburbs into deep Pennsylvania steel and coal country, had been held by Republican Tim Murphy since 2003. But Murphy was forced to resign in October amid revelations of an extramarital affair in which he urged his lover to get an abortion when they thought she was pregnant.


Lamb and Saccone could face off again in November – though they may not meet in the same district. In January, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled that the state’s congressional district boundaries were unfairly gerrymandered to aid Republicans.

The Democrat-controlled court has drawn a new map that puts Saccone and Lamb’s homes in separate districts. However, the matter is now in the hands of a three-judge federal panel, which is considering an appeal by Republican lawmakers.


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....-call.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( in other special election news an atheist democrat was defeated in a state election in Tennessee)


Openly atheist Dem trumped by Republican landslide in special election in Tennessee


By Lukas Mikelionis | Fox News


Gayle Jordan, an openly atheist Democratic candidate lost in Tennessee's 14 district on Tuesday. (Facebook)

Openly atheist Democrat Gayle Jordan lost a special election on Tuesday to fill a vacant seat in the Tennessee Senate.


Republican Shane Reeves won in a landslide, according to unofficial results from the Tennessee secretary of state. He received 13,139 votes compared to 5,179 votes for Jordan.


Reeves will fill a seat vacated by Republican Jim Tracy after he resigned to serve as state director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development office.


Jordan is executive director of Recovering from Religion, a group that supports people who wish to leave their faith behind. She is a former Southern Baptist who left the denomination 10 years ago “when her then-teenagers began asking questions she could not answer.”

WILL ATHEIST DEM HAVE A PRAYER IN DEEP-RED TENNESSEE’S SPECIAL ELECTION

Reeves, a Murfreesboro-based businessman, made Jordan’s open atheism an issue in the election, telling the Tennessean that her “views are radical” and “out of touch with the district."


He argued that Jordan was unsuited for the state Senate because faith shapes one’s worldview and affects the decisions one makes.

“I'm a Christian and that is going to serve as a filter, serve as a moral compass and how I look at things, if I'm fortunate to get elected," Reeves said, adding that many people with whom he had spoken could not believe the Democratic candidate is an atheist.

At a campaign party Tuesday, Jordan admitted she hoped for a different outcome, despite running in a state that President Donald Trump won by 26 points in 2016.

"We're disappointed in the results but we couldn't be prouder of the campaign that we ran," she told the Daily News Journal in Murfreesboro.

Senate Speaker Randy McNally, who previously called Jordan a “dangerous” candidate, said in a statement Tuesday night that Reeves’ win showed that “any blue wave will hit a big, red seawall in Tennessee."

State Republican Party Chairman Scott Golden said the election "shows that voters see the results of Tennessee's Republican leadership — increased economic opportunity, expanded access to education, and record low unemployment rates."


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....essee.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will be interesting to see how they go through the entrails of the loss to Lamb.

There is a pattern that I am noticing. It was "the rich" who put the Democrats over the top in this election. It isn't the first time. In the last federal election, "the rich" moved to the Democrat camp. Silicon Valley, Google, Facebook, and Hollywood -- all of these huge new corporations almost make Democrat party membership a job requirement.

That's new. Let's see how the losers explain it. On the face of it, the Republicans ought to have won with increased majorities if my perception of the American mood is right.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
It will be interesting to see how they go through the entrails of the loss to Lamb.

There is a pattern that I am noticing. It was "the rich" who put the Democrats over the top in this election. It isn't the first time. In the last federal election, "the rich" moved to the Democrat camp. Silicon Valley, Google, Facebook, and Hollywood -- all of these huge new corporations almost make Democrat party membership a job requirement.

That's new. Let's see how the losers explain it. On the face of it, the Republicans ought to have won with increased majorities if my perception of the American mood is right.



the numbers would seem to indicate the democrats did a better job at getting out there supporters and didn't necessary grow in terms of past results , the democrat did very well in the more urban suburbs near pittsburg , that was were he won the race , the republican still won most of the rural polls

the most recent election for which there was a democrat candidate in PA 18 was 2012 and they got 122,000 votes

Lamb got 111,875 votes so he managed to get just about every democrat in the district out to vote

the republican turnout of 111,000 votes was strong for a special election but not enough to off set the stronger democratic turnout .

although its possible the results could still be overturned by a recount or if the uncounted early votes went heavily republican
Bugs





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Hillary Clinton Starts Onward Together, a New Political Group
By NIRAJ CHOKSHIMAY 15, 2017

Hillary Clinton on Monday announced the launch of Onward Together, a new political group aimed at advancing progressive causes by harnessing grass-roots opposition to President Trump’s policies.

Mrs. Clinton, 69, who until recently had maintained a low profile after her loss in the presidential election in November, said on Twitter that her new group would encourage people to “get involved, organize, and even run for office.”

Mrs. Clinton went on to praise the work of several grass-roots groups that have emerged as part of a broad liberal movement opposed to Mr. Trump and his policies. Onward Together will support those groups, she said, though she did not describe what form the assistance would take.

Onward Together is registered as a 501(c)(4) group, the Internal Revenue Service designation for so-called social welfare nonprofits, which are often cited for a rise in dark money in politics because of their ability to protect donor anonymity. [....]
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/15/us/politics/hillary-clinton-onward-together.html


It's my impression that this group can funnel top line professionals into select districts, and raise enough money to seriously affect the election. And there is lots of money there, when you are thinking of a local election.

Quote:
Hillary Has Sent Over $1 Million From Onward Together to Other ‘Resistance’ Groups
Color of Change, Swing Left received $100,000 each from Clinton

BY: Joe Schoffstall
February 2, 2018 5:00 am

Hillary Clinton has passed over a million dollars from her "resistance" group to other anti-Trump groups, an employee of the organization told the Washington Free Beacon.

Clinton announced in April of last year that she intended to be a "part of the resistance" with the launch of Onward Together, a political action group established to supply funding and support to left-wing organizations that can counter President Donald Trump via direct action and protest.

"From the Women's March to airports across the country where communities are welcoming immigrants and refugees to town hall meetings in every community, Americans are speaking out like never before," Clinton wrote after the group's formation. "I believe more fiercely than ever that citizen engagement at every level is central to a strong and vibrant democracy."
http://freebeacon.com/politics.....ce-groups/


I think this is how anti-Trump money is used in local elections in which the donors have no other interest than in making Trump look bad. They also send professional expertise that most local campaigns lack. Their mission statement: “Resist, insist, persist, enlist.” And they will show you how.

Quote:
... "In some cases, we’ll provide direct funding to these organizations. For others, we’ll help amplify their work and do what we can to help them continue to grow their audiences and expand their reach," Clinton said in a press release.

The groups backed by Onward Together include Swing Left, which offers its support to Democratic candidates in swing states with the goal of taking back the House in 2018; Emerge America, which works to inspire and train Democratic women to run for office; Color of Change, an organization that fights criminal justice reform, voter freedom, and other critical issues of racial justice; Indivisible, an organization led by former Congressional staffers who work to help ordinary people reach members of Congress; and Run for Something, which two former campaigners started on Inauguration Day to recruit and support young people running for office.
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics.....d=47426428


This organization seems to be a corporate version of the Tea Party. It seems to be a Democrat funding apparatus to replicate the tactics of the Tea Party, which used its grass roots to "primary" Republican candidates. Except it is not bottoms-up, it is top-down, and corporate. So it delivers TV money, and experts to the local contest.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Republicans sound the alarm after likely loss in Pennsylvania

One GOP leader called the outcome a ‘wake-up call,’ but rank-and-file lawmakers were largely in denial.



By RACHAEL BADE and ALEX ISENSTADT
| 03/14/2018 10:01 AM EDT
| Updated 03/14/2018 12:11 PM EDT


 Share on Facebook  Share on Twitter

Republicans on Wednesday struggled to explain their likely loss in the Pennsylvania special election: GOP leaders warned lawmakers that the outcome in the pro-Trump district could spell disaster in the midterms if they don’t respond forcefully, but many lawmakers dismissed the race as an anomaly and seemed to be in denial.

During a closed-door conference meeting at the Capitol Hill Club, House Republican leaders said that Tuesday’s special election, where Democrat Conor Lamb is narrowly leading, could portend a monster Democratic year. They told rank-and-file members in no uncertain terms that they needed to get their campaigns in order or that they could be casualties, and they need to raise money now to protect themselves come November.

.
“Prepare to bear down," warned National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), who kicked off the huddle by calling the race “a wake-up call,” said one person in attendance.

But most rank-and-file going in and out of the meeting downplayed the election, suggesting Republican candidate Rick Saccone was weak and Lamb was a "unicorn" who couldn't be replicated in tight races this fall.

“We’ve won five [House special elections]; they’ve won one. I’m feeling pretty good,” said New York Rep. Chris Collins, a close ally of President Donald Trump.


The conflicting takeaways come as Lamb claimed victory and Republicans have hinted they will seek a recount. President Donald Trump carried the blue-collar, Pittsburgh-area by 20 points in 2016. And the party has held the district for well over a decade.

GOP leaders tried to use the likely loss to motivate their incumbents, more than 40 of whom were outraised by Democratic opponents last quarter.


Appearing before the conference, House Speaker Paul Ryan said the contest was evidence that members needed to up their fundraising game and warned them not to get caught off guard in November. Ryan acknowledged that Republicans should have won the district, and that Democrats' enthusiasm was "real."

Stivers told Republicans they needed to run a real race “if you have 50 percent suburban voters."

But even GOP leaders put a positive spin on the election. Ryan argued at a news conference later Wednesday that facets of the race wouldn’t extend to other competitive seats. He noted that Lamb ran on a conservative platform, highlighting his opposition to Nancy Pelosi, and that other Democrats wouldn’t have that luxury because they need to appeal to the base in primaries. Lamb did not have a primary opponent.


“You will have primaries in these other races and the primaries bring them to the left,” Ryan said. “I just don’t think this is something you’ll see a repeat of. "

Stivers, likewise, noted to the conference that Lamb out-spent and out-raised Saccone five-to-one. However, outside Republican groups spent more than $10 million trying to save the seat, compared to roughly $2 million by Democratic groups.

Republican members latched onto those talking points. Vulnerable Reps. Carlos Curbelo of Florida and Leonard Lance of New Jersey both argued that the special election results meant little to their districts and did not necessarily foreshadow a Democratic wave.


Even former NRCC chairman Greg Walden seemed torn about how to read the race, saying Republicans “know we got to go work” but also arguing Lamb was a candidate Democrats couldn’t “replicate.”

“The reason they call them special elections is because they’re special and I wouldn’t read much into it,” he said. “If you go back and look at special elections over time they generally don’t predict what’s going to happen in the next election.”

At one point, Rep. Mike Kelly (R-Pa.) got testy with reporters who peppered him with questions about what the race meant for the midterms. Kelly tried to argue that Lamb “ran as a guy who would line himself up with President Trump.” When a reporter retorted that that was not exactly true, Kelly said sarcastically, “Sorry, I didn’t answer it the way you want it.”


By ELENA SCHNEIDER

Other GOP strategists, however, say it's time for some soul-searching. Corry Bliss, who runs the Congressional Leadership Fund super PAC, which is aligned with Ryan, said the party needs to reckon with what happened in Pennsylvania.

"This is a tough environment for Republicans,” Bliss said of the national mood. “Republicans can win if we have good candidates who raise money and run strong campaigns. It's not nice to say, but the Saccone campaign was a joke, and if we simply had a candidate who can walk and chew gum at the same time we would have easily won."


https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/14/pennsylvania-special-election-blue-wave-461726
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Republicans prepare for recount in Pennsylvania special election


By ELENA SCHNEIDER
| 03/14/2018 12:10 PM EDT


PITTSBURGH — The special congressional election in Pennsylvania appears headed to a recount, with Republicans preparing behind the scenes to cry foul after the vote count showed Democrat Conor Lamb leading Republican Rick Saccone by 627 votes.

The GOP is considering challenging the accuracy of voting machines in the district, in addition to confusion over the state's changing congressional map later this year, according to two sources familiar with the process, granted anonymity to discuss ongoing plans that have not been finalized.


.
State law does not require an automatic recount in congressional races, even when the margin is this close: Lamb currently leads Saccone by 0.2 percentage points, 49.8 percent to 49.6 percent. But Saccone and his allies can request a recount after all the counties have completed their tallying of provisional and overseas military ballots.

One Republican source said the party's legal strategy focused on three main issues thus far: GOP attorneys were allegedly not allowed to witness the tabulation of absentee ballots; changes to the secretary of state’s website caused confusion for voters about their polling locations; and there were internal reports of voters miscasting their ballots when they used touchscreen machines in Allegheny County, which Lamb carried by a 15-point margin.

The source also said it’s not clear yet if Republicans would file in state or federal court.

Lamb has already declared victory, telling supporters at an election-night party in Canonsburg, “It took longer than we thought, but we did it.”


By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time.

But Republicans on Wednesday, in Washington and here in western Pennsylvania, declined to acknowledge Lamb, a former federal prosecutor and Marine veteran, as the victor.

"Win or lose ... it's too soon to say what's gonna happen," House Speaker Paul Ryan said at a press availability on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.

The Associated Press has not yet declared a winner in the race, citing the state's recount provisions.

Greene County, a largely rural area that makes up the smallest percentage of the district — and the final county to complete its absentee count — reported Wednesday morning, shrinking Lamb's lead by just 14 votes.

Regardless of the eventual victor, the result — an extremely close election in a district President Donald Trump carried by 20 percentage points — is an ominous sign for Republicans about the political environment that awaits them in this year's midterm elections.

There are still some provisional and military ballots to be counted throughout the district. Those are unlikely to unseat Lamb as the leader, but they could continue to shrink his margin.

There aren't many votes left to count: Westmoreland County, which Saccone carried, has remaining provisional and military ballots that could total “up to 100 votes, but that’s a high estimate,” said Beth Lechman, director of elections there.



One of the GOP complaints centers around the state's changing congressional map. The state Supreme Court earlier this year ruled the existing map was gerrymandered by Republicans to such a degree that it violated the state constitution. But because the special-election campaign was already ongoing, the court ruled that it could continue under the old lines.

When the Republican-controlled state Legislature and Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf were unable to agree on new district lines, the state Supreme Court drew its own map and ordered state officers to implement it. That led to the secretary of state's office publishing the new lines on its website, in advance of the state's primary elections this May.

Republicans are preparing to claim those new lines confused voters, both GOP sources said. But it's unclear what legal remedy they could seek during recount proceedings on that issue.

If legal proceedings fail to change the result, and the secretary of state certifies Lamb as the winner, the GOP-led House would then decide whether to seat the Democrat.



The new district lines are also forcing both Lamb and Saccone to consider a new deadline: March 20. That's the filing deadline for the May primaries, and while both men are likely to run for a full term in the fall, it's unlikely they'll be matched in the same district.

Saccone, a state legislator and Air Force veteran, told The Observer-Reporter of Washington, Pa., that he would run in the new 14th District, which includes much of the rural counties in the old district, like Greene and Washington. The race has already attracted several potential Republican candidates and is a safer GOP seat.

Lamb hasn’t confirmed yet where he plans to run in November, but he’s expected to move into a district where Rep. Keith Rothfus (R-Pa.) lives — who saw his home move into a district where the 2016 presidential race was far closer than his old district, or the district where Lamb ran in the special election


https://www.politico.com/story/2018/03/14/recount-pennsylvania-special-election-2018-413822
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There doesn't seem to be any explanation that detracts from the meaning of this election -- which is that the enchantment with Donald Trump is waning.

It seems to indicate that a district that went heavily for Trump in the Presidential election has gone for a reallly good Democrat that loudly denounced Pelosi, and promised to maintain independence -- in other words, a Democrat at odds with his party.

So ... what do you make of that? It seems to me to say that the electorate, in districts like this, stilll prefers the Democrat Party, but they prefer the Young Republican qualifications of the candidate. Lamb is an ex-Marine with all the right background.

The other thing -- this electoral district will disappear before the next election. Lamb's term of office will last until next November.

It shows the way ahead for the Democrats. They have to reform. If the people who can win seats for the Democrats get the upper hand -- a long struggle -- there is hope.

But the short-term irony is that this election will likely delay the reforms that the Democrats need to make in order to have a functioning two-party system. It will inspire them to double down on what they are doing now.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( another seat in congress has opened up after a long time democrat from up state NY passed away , although unclear if there will be a special election or if it will be left vacant until the fall )


New York Rep. Louise Slaughter, top Democrat and only microbiologist in Congress, dies at 88


Chad Pergram By Chad Pergram | Fox News



Rep. Louise Slaughter dead at 88

Democrat from New York died after being hospitalized for a head injury.

New York Rep. Louise Slaughter, the top Democrat on the powerful House Rules Committee and the only microbiologist in the Congress, died Friday at a Washington hospital just days after being injured in a fall at home, her congressional office said.

She was 88.

Known as one of the most liberal members of Congress, Slaughter played an integral part of the Violence Against Women Act, the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act, the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act and writing President Barack Obama’s health care law.

“To have met Louise Slaughter is to have known a force of nature,” her chief of staff, Liam Fitzsimmons, said Friday.

Originally from Lynch, Kentucky, Slaughter brought her dedication to public health and her southern drawl all the way to Washington in 1986. Slaughter quickly earned a reputation. As a freshman Slaughter said her colleagues would “just smile and say, 'Oh, you're the one from New York who doesn't sound like it.’”

Slaughter was first elected to Congress in 1986 after four years in the New York State Assembly.

With a master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Kentucky, Slaughter focused on public health issues. In 1993, Slaughter funneled $500 million to the National Institute of Health for breast cancer research. In 1994, she ensured that all research be done on minorities and women, as opposed to just men, as it had been in the past.

Slaughter co-authored the Violence Against Women Act in 1994. The measure helps the investigations and prosecutions of crimes against women. During the law’s reauthorization in 2013, Slaughter said “Today’s signing of the Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization into law gives women and all victims of domestic violence across America the peace of mind that their government will not abandon them in their time of need.”

Slaughter’s younger sister, Virginia, caught double pneumonia and died. Her sister’s death persuaded Slaughter to focus on health policy while in Congress.

“That we have children coming into this world already polluted, at the same time we don't know what the effects of that pollution will be on their mental and physical development, is both bad policy and immorally wrong,” Slaughter said.

Until the end, Slaughter blamed the coal-infused air of Harlan County, KY for her sister’s demise.

Slaughter was the first female elected to Congress from western New York. Slaughter also served as the first chairwoman of the House Rules Committee from. She had been the top Democrat on the panel in recent years.

Slaughter was the daughter of a blacksmith. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., noted that Slaughter never forgot that in her work on Capitol Hill.

Slaughter was born Louise McIntosh and was a distant relative of American folk life hero Daniel Boone. The mother of three daughters, Slaughter once quipped “Our girls have learned that sweat is sexy, brawn is beautiful and a little dirt never hurt anyone.”

She married Bob Slaughter in 1957. They were married for 57 years until his death in 2014. Her husband used to drive the Congresswoman back and forth from the district in upstate New York to Washington until he passed away. Bob Slaughter would often sit in on meetings of the House Rules Committee.

In, 2014, Slaughter eked out a victory in the closest race of her political career. She defeated Republican Mark Assini by a margin of 869 votes. She planned to run for reelection this year.


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....ports.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some big news out of Nevada , no challenger for current GOP senator , he'll now run for a congressional seat )


Trump convinces GOP primary challenger to drop out of Nevada Senate race for 'unity'



Alex Pappas By Alex Pappas | Fox News


President Trump nudged GOP challenger Danny Tarkanian out of Nevada’s Senate race on Friday, convincing him to drop his primary bid against incumbent Sen. Dean Heller in return for a Trump endorsement in a House race instead.


Tarkanian, a conservative businessman in Nevada who has unsuccessfully sought office before, had been challenging Heller in this year’s Republican primary for the U.S. Senate.

But on Friday, Trump tweeted: “It would be great for the Republican Party of Nevada, and it’s unity if good guy Danny Tarkanian would run for Congress and Dean Heller, who is doing a really good job, could run for Senate unopposed!”


Shortly after that tweet, Tarkanian released a statement saying he planned to drop out of the Senate race and run in the third congressional district.

He said Trump and his political team reached out to him on Wednesday and “asked me to consider supporting the America First agenda as a congressional candidate” in the third district. Tarkanian lost to Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen by just one point in 2016. Rosen is now running as a Democrat for the Senate.

Trump won the district by around one point in 2016.



“With President Trump's full support and endorsement, I am filing to run again in CD3 with the firm belief that we will finish what we started in 2016 and win in 2018,” Tarkanian said.

Tarkanian’s wife thanked Trump for his endorsement in a tweet on Friday.


“Thank you Mr. President for supporting my husband @DannyTarkanian & the Nevada Republican Party overall. He would've made an excellent Senator, but will also make a tremendous member of Congress...looking fwd to continuing the fight in helping implement America first policies!” Amy Tarkanian tweeted.

Heller is considered one of the most vulnerable Republicans running for re-election in the Senate this year. His seat is the only one up for grabs in a state carried by Democrat Hillary Clinton when Trump won in 2016.


http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....unity.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2018 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the primary for Illinois takes place today and there is some interesting races being decided )


Illinois GOP governor, Democratic businessman spend millions to win nominations



Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner (R) is trying to fend off a challenge from state Rep. Jeanne Ives, a hard-right Republican who is getting some help from Democrats who see her as easier to beat in a general-election matchup. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

By Mark Guarino March 19 at 2:29 PM


Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and Democrat J.B. Pritzker, both billionaire businessmen seeking their party’s nomination in Tuesday’s Illinois gubernatorial primary, are fighting insurgencies that their combined campaign spending of $127 million hasn’t been able to tamp down.

Rauner, who made his money as a venture capitalist and private equity manager, is trying to fend off a challenge from state Rep. Jeanne Ives, a hard-right Republican who is getting some help from Democrats who see her as easier to beat in a general-election matchup.

Pritzker, also a venture capitalist, whose family wealth stems from the Hyatt hotel chain, is struggling in the primary to defeat Chris Kennedy, the son of Robert F. Kennedy, and Daniel Biss, a state senator. The campaign has shown that allegiance to the Illinois Democratic establishment is no guarantee of success.

The contests reflect the divide playing out on Capitol Hill and in a spate of primaries in both parties. Pragmatism, compromise with the opposition and establishment backing are pitted against demands for political purity.


The Democratic split also is evident in a fierce U.S. House primary on the southwest side of Chicago and western suburbs. Seven-term Democratic Rep. Daniel Lipinski, an antiabortion conservative who broke with his party to oppose the 2010 Affordable Care Act, is locked in a close race with liberal Marie Newman, who has the backing of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)


Lipinski has warned about creating a “tea party of the left.” Newman has argued that the incumbent is out of step with the Democratic Party and more in line with President Trump.

[A conservative Democrat in Illinois feels the ire of his liberal base]

The marquee race is for governor, with a state-record amount of spending on television ads and a familiar name.

Despite the historic allegiance between the Kennedy family and the Chicago political establishment, Chris Kennedy came out swinging against all of its top leaders, including Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D), whom he accused of gentrifying the city through school closures in hard-hit neighborhoods. Powerful state House Speaker Mike Madigan (D) is also one of Kennedy’s targets.


“We have to decide whether we want to send a message from Illinois to the rest of the country, the rest of the world, that a democracy can be bought,” Kennedy said Saturday.

On the Republican side, Ives said she decided to run against Rauner after he signed a bill that expanded public funding of abortion in Illinois and another that restricted cooperation between state and federal immigration authorities.

She has benefited from rising disappointment with the governor within his own party, which gained momentum in the fall when the National Review named him “The Worst Republican Governor in America.”

According to Ives, Rauner is weak because he cedes control to Madigan, whose iron rule has dominated Springfield, the state capital, for three decades. Rauner campaigned on changing Springfield’s culture, starting with Madigan, and once in office, he drew a defiant line, refusing to negotiate unless deals went his way. As a result, the state did not have a formal budget for two years. Its pension debt is as high as $250 billion, according to Moody’s Investors Service, making it the largest of its kind in the nation.


The position has left Rauner in a stalemate of his own creation. “I am not in charge,” he told reporters in December, blaming Madigan, whose politics he has likened to a “mafia protection racket.” The rhetoric only ramped up as the race has tightened. During a campaign stop last week, Rauner characterized the speaker as “a unified force of bad, of evil.”

Charlie Wheeler, director of the public affairs reporting program at the University of Illinois at Springfield, says as a former private equity manager, Rauner was “not prepared to be in a situation where he had to cut deals.”

“He can’t tell Michael Madigan what to do because they are leaders of co-equal branches of government, and I think that’s hard for him to accept,” Wheeler said.

In a campaign twist, Ives received a boost from the Democratic Governors Association, which released a television ad last week that listed all her conservative positions — antiabortion, “A” rating from the National Rifle Association, anti-immigration — after asking, “When is a conservative leader too conservative for Illinois?” The ad is seen as a way to emphasize her credentials to Republican voters. Rauner responded swiftly with an ad of his own accusing “Washington liberals” of partnering with Ives. Once again, he said Madigan was to blame.


Rauner has avoided Ives; he will not debate her in public. In a poll released last month by the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University, Rauner was 20 points ahead of Ives, although last week her internal polling showed a single-digit gap.

Pritzker launched his campaign as a referendum on Trump, whom he invariably linked to Rauner. That quickly changed once it became evident that, in a post-Trump world, the public might be uncomfortable with a candidate whose background happens to resemble that of both the governor and the president — a political novice and billionaire who refuses to release his full tax returns.

Through last week, Pritzker had spent $69.5 million of his own wealth in the primary alone, representing not just the largest spending in the race but also an Illinois record.

He has the endorsement of the Cook County Democratic Party, state labor unions and lawmakers such as U.S. Sens. Richard J. Durbin and Tammy Duckworth. His momentum slowed early this year when FBI wiretaps leaked to the Chicago Tribune revealed Pritzker negotiating with former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich (D) in 2008 for a state treasurer job. Other tapes revealed Pritzker making racially insensitive comments about who might be “the least offensive” black official to fill President Barack Obama’s former U.S. Senate seat.


Blagojevich is now in federal prison serving a 14-year sentence for corruption. Pritzker has denied any wrongdoing, and he has apologized for the racial comments.

[Daughters’ pleas, model jail behavior don’t earn a corrupt governor a reduced term, judge decides]

While all three Democrats share similar policy positions, they’ve wrestled over middle-class values. Biss has criticized his two opponents because they are rich. He has energized liberals, receiving endorsements from groups such as the Sierra Club and the Russian band Pussy Riot. “J.B. Pritzker is trying to buy this election because Mike Madigan told him to,” he told reporters Saturday


https://www.washingtonpost.com/powerpost/illinois-gop-governor-democratic-businessman-spend-millions-to-win-nominations/2018/03/19/c208fcbe-2b73-11e8-8ad6-fbc50284fce8_story.html?utm_term=.c2ab8ac88cbd
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2018 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( whats interesting is the democrats allowed a so called blue dog to win the PA18 election but when it comes to there own primaries they seem to prefer more liberal democrats )


An Illinois Democrat may be the first member of Congress to lose re-election in 2018



By Emily C. Singer | March 19, 2018



After Illinois voters head to the polls for the state’s primaries on Tuesday, Rep. Dan Lipinski (D-Ill.) may become the first member of Congress to lose re-election in 2018.

Lipinski — a “blue dog” Democrat with a conservative voting record who is anti-abortion, anti-LGBT, anti-$15 minimum wage and voted against the Affordable Care Act in 2010 — is facing a primary challenge from fellow Democrat Marie Newman.

At surface level, the race is symbolic of the schism between the Democratic Party and the progressive wing rallying against “establishment” force. However, the Lipinski race doesn’t perfectly fit into that narrative.

Lipinski’s fellow Illinois Democratic Reps. Luis Gutiérrez and Jan Schakowsky endorsed Marie Newman earlier this year, as did rising Democrat star Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.).

Additionally, Newman picked up the endorsement of NARAL Pro-Choice America, EMILY’s List — both of whom endorsed Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential primary. She also received the endorsement of the Service Employees International Union — an interest group in the Democratic coalition that spends big on Democratic candidates in federal elections.

Meanwhile, top aides to former President Barack Obama have waded into the race, bashing Lipinski for using a mailer featuring the former president in an attempt to use Obama to carry himself to victory. Lipinski refused to endorse Obama for his re-election bid in 2012.

“It’s not like the two so-called [Democratic party] wings are lining up contrary to each other,” Tom Bowen, an Illinois Democratic strategist, told Mic in an interview. “Nobody in the delegation cares to defend him, and there’s been simmering hostility in the delegation since he’s been here.”

Some Illinois Democrats say Lipinski didn’t take the race seriously until the final weeks of the race. He spent just over $400,000 from Jan. 1 through Feb. 28, and sat on a $1.3 million campaign fund, according to data from the Federal Election Commission.

Meanwhile, pro-Newman and anti-Lipinski groups planned to spend $1.6 million on the race, according to NBC News.

Little public polling exists in the race, so it’s unclear where favor truly stands. A Public Policy Polling survey for NARAL released March 5 showed Lipinski leading Newman, 43% to 41%, with 15% undecided.

Bowen said Lipinski, who took over the seat from his father, Bill Lipinski, in 2004, say Lipinski’s familiar name in the district may not be enough to carry him to victory this time around.

“His biggest problem is that turnout is not going to be so overwhelmingly skyrocketed that his name ID will carry him,” Bowen said. “Low-turnout elections bring high-information voters that can change their mind.”


Whoever wins the primary on Tuesday is likely to be the member of Congress for this district — which includes part of Chicago proper, as well as the city’s suburbs.

The district has steadily gotten more Democratic.

Obama — a Chicago native — won the district by an 18-point margin in 2008. Four years later, in 2012, he carried it by a 14-point spread, while Hillary Clinton increased the margin even further, winning this seat by 15 points in 2016.

https://mic.com/articles/188506/an-illinois-democrat-may-be-the-first-member-of-congress-to-lose-re-election-in-2018#.egIIRy7QD
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2018 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Illinois primary: What to know and how to watch


By Adam Levy, CNN


Updated 6:16 AM ET, Tue March 20, 2018


(CNN) — The Land of Lincoln heads to the polls today for its primary, the second state to hold a primary this year for the 2018 midterms. While four congressional districts are ranked on CNN's Key Races, the one major House race to watch tonight is a Democratic primary that's turned some of the party's biggest leaders and outside supporters against each other.


Here's what you need to know:

Polls are open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT

•Seven-term Democratic Congressman Dan Lipinski, a conservative Democrat who ran for the seat when his father retired in 2004, could meet his match by a political newcomer, Marie Newman, whose more liberal views and major endorsements made big waves in a race in which he ran opposed just two years ago.
•Democrats are also in a tough race for the gubernatorial nomination to take on Republican incumbent Bruce Rauner, who is considered to be among the most vulnerable among GOP governors this fall. Tonight's winner will have one of the best chances to flip a governor's seat in the country.
•There are no mandatory recount laws in Illinois. A candidate who is within five points of the top vote leader may request a non-binding recount in up to 25% of precincts. Further actions can be taken after the votes are counted.



Here's a closer look at what to watch tonight (and after):


Fight for the soul of the Democratic Party: Lipinski is a conservative Democrat who is against abortion, voted against Obamacare and sponsored the Religious Freedom Act, a bill strongly opposed by the LGBTQ community. He's been an ally of the unions and has long sat on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, an important role for his district, which harbors Midway International Airport. He's been a staple among "Blue Dog" moderate Democrats, who have found themselves at odds with a party that has swung more to the left. A loss for Lipinski against Newman will say a lot about how the Democratic Party views its more conservative members.



An anti-abortion, conservative Democrat fights for survival in Illinois primary



Which establishment rules? Sens. Bernie Sanders and Kirsten Gillibrand joined NARAL, Planned Parenthood, EMILY's List, the Human Rights Campaign and Illinois Democratic Reps. Schakowsky and Gutierrez in supporting Newman for Congress. Lipinski took in the support of the Illinois AFL-CIO, Illinois AFSCME, dozens of local mayors, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, the Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times. The winning candidate will show which side of the party has the most strength right now.



Holocaust denier on the ballot: The Republican running for the 3rd Congressional District's nomination is Arthur Jones, a Holocaust denier with a history of anti-Semitic comments. Though many Republicans might not support him, he is running unchallenged in this district Hillary Clinton won with 15 points in 2016. This is considered a safe Democratic district, so it's unlikely he will win in the general election. Still, come 8pm ET tonight, Jones will be the official GOP nominee.



Money, money, money: With over $150 million raised so far, the gubernatorial race here could end up as one the most expensive governor races in history. Rauner, a millionaire former businessman, could end up facing billionaire J.B. Prtizker, should he win tonight's Democratic primary. A fight between these two would end up costing both a lot of their own personal money. The current record is the $280 million spent in California's 2010 race between Democrat Jerry Brown and Republican Meg Whitman, a record this race could easily surpass.


https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/20/politics/what-to-watch-illinois-primary/index.html
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2018 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
( some big news out of Nevada , no challenger for current GOP senator , he'll now run for a congressional seat )

Trump convinces GOP primary challenger to drop out of Nevada Senate race for 'unity'

Alex Pappas By Alex Pappas | Fox News

President Trump nudged GOP challenger Danny Tarkanian out of Nevada’s Senate race on Friday, convincing him to drop his primary bid against incumbent Sen. Dean Heller in return for a Trump endorsement in a House race instead.

Tarkanian, a conservative businessman in Nevada who has unsuccessfully sought office before, had been challenging Heller in this year’s Republican primary for the U.S. Senate.

But on Friday, Trump tweeted: “It would be great for the Republican Party of Nevada, and it’s unity if good guy Danny Tarkanian would run for Congress and Dean Heller, who is doing a really good job, could run for Senate unopposed!”

Shortly after that tweet, Tarkanian released a statement saying he planned to drop out of the Senate race and run in the third congressional district.

He said Trump and his political team reached out to him on Wednesday and “asked me to consider supporting the America First agenda as a congressional candidate” in the third district. Tarkanian lost to Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen by just one point in 2016. Rosen is now running as a Democrat for the Senate.

Trump won the district by around one point in 2016.

“With President Trump's full support and endorsement, I am filing to run again in CD3 with the firm belief that we will finish what we started in 2016 and win in 2018,” Tarkanian said.

Tarkanian’s wife thanked Trump for his endorsement in a tweet on Friday.

“Thank you Mr. President for supporting my husband @DannyTarkanian & the Nevada Republican Party overall. He would've made an excellent Senator, but will also make a tremendous member of Congress...looking fwd to continuing the fight in helping implement America first policies!” Amy Tarkanian tweeted.

Heller is considered one of the most vulnerable Republicans running for re-election in the Senate this year. His seat is the only one up for grabs in a state carried by Democrat Hillary Clinton when Trump won in 2016.

http://www.foxnews.com/politic.....unity.html


It seems the GOP is learning from some of its prior mistake.
Tommy Thompson could have won in Wisconsin in 2012 but walked out of a brutal primary to lose to Tammy Baldwin.

With an Alabama Senate Seat now in the hands of the Democrats its possible the Democrats could win Nevada and Arizona and potentially retain all their seats and take control of the Senate.

Allowing Heller to walk into the election clean while the Democrats are still having it out is the best move possible.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2018 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the Illinois primary is over and it will be a battle of money for governor , with 2 wealthy candidates winning the nominations , overall strong turnout and the republican narrowly beat his socially conservative opponent )



Illinois Primary Election Results


By THE NEW YORK TIMES March 21, 2018, 4:50 PM ET



After a primary campaign that revealed fissures in both major parties, Illinois voters winnowed the field of gubernatorial candidates on Tuesday and were finalizing congressional matchups in several competitive districts. Polls closed at 8 p.m. Eastern Time. Early voting began Feb. 8.

The state is reliably Democratic in presidential elections, but Republicans control the governorship and seven of 18 congressional districts. Democrats see an opening to pick off several seats this year, but the primary season brought forth bitter disputes over money, race and what it means to be a Democrat. Republicans encountered their own reckoning with litmus tests and party values in the governor’s race.


Governor


Gov. Bruce Rauner, a Republican, and J.B. Pritzker, a Democratic billionaire heir and businessman, will face off in November after each won his primary on Tuesday, according to The Associated Press. Their victories promise a contest that will be fiercely fought and dominated by big money, with each candidate controlling tremendous sums of personal wealth to spend on his campaign. Mr. Pritzker is expected to present a serious threat to Mr. Rauner, who has alienated voters on both the left and the right during his rocky term. Read more about the race.


https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/03/20/us/elections/results-illinois-primary-elections.html
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