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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:28 am    Post subject: unnamed liberals call on Wynne to resign Reply with quote

( just saw this online , a mysterious unnamed group of liberals is calling on wynne to resign for the good of the party , although they aren't coming out and saying who they actually are or if any mp's or mpp's are part of this push )



RE-ENERGIZING THE ONTARIO LIBERAL PARTY.


ONTARIO LIBERAL RENEWAL


WHO ARE WE?

We are past and present members of the Ontario (and Federal) Liberal Party Some of us are relatively new to politics while others have been door knocking, running campaigns, creating policy and working for MPP’s /MP’s, cabinet ministers as well as Prime Ministers and Premiers for over forty years. While we consider ourselves “progressively minded” we run the gamut from left of center to middle of the road to right of center. We are committed to core Liberal principles of equality, democracy, diversity and inclusion.

We are rural and urban; First Nations, decedents of settlers as well as first and second generation Canadians. You will find us in Timmins and in the Toronto subway; in Nepean and Nanticoke; in Smith Falls and St. Catherines. We grow grapes in Niagara, work in Ottawa, assemble cars in Windsor and create the services and products of the future in Waterloo. We teach the next generation, provide care for the previous generation, and those of us who are millennials have precarious work and face a bleak future.

WHY DID WE FORM THIS GROUP

Premier Kathleen Wynne has failed not only us and our fellow Liberals but all Ontarians as well.

We, therefore, have no choice but to call on the Premier to resign immediately so that we can chose a fit and proper person to renew the Ontario Liberal Party who at the very least will prevent the OLP from being relegated to third place in June 2018.

Premier Wynne hit the reset button four times in 2016 and once so far this year. Nothing has worked because the problem is the Premier herself, her lack of a viable vision for Ontario, and policies that are seemingly created (or reversed) on the back of an envelope.

Mea Culpas and Tears are not enough to prevent OLP from suffering a defeat even worse than in 1990.

We need a new leader from a new generation with a new vision and innovative and creative ideas to lead the Ontario Liberal Party.

Premier Wynne may have been appropriate for a time when facsimile machines were considered cutting edge, Toronto was still an affordable and relatively uncongested city, Sunday was a day of pause, assembly plants in Oshawa offered good jobs with good retirement benefits and Heinz still produced ketchup in Leamington.

That world is no more. We live in an age of disruption. It is estimated that by 2040 forty percent of today’s jobs could be handled by robots. Uber and Airbnb are here to stay. An increasing number of people work from their homes. Millenials will be the first generation to have a lower standard of living than the immediately preceding generation.

Despite the strong advice of CAMH that when it is legalized marijuana should not be sold through the LCBO that approach remains the Premier’s preferred choice. It is stark reflection of the values of an inherently conservative soon to be senior citizen who is out of touch with current Ontario values. It also reflects the lack of insight and adaptability of the Premier and those she relies on for advice.

The Premier broke her promise to Ontarians not to privatize Ontario Hydro.

The Premier broke her promise to Torontonians that she would not stand in the way of highway tolling by the City of Toronto.

The Premier has saddled Ontario taxpayers with an additional 25 Billion Dollars in interest payments with her latest half baked shell game regarding the curtailing of the cost of electricity.

The Premier’s plans to lower electricity rates results in unfairly saddling future generations with the costs of current production of electricity. To cover-up our mistakes we have mortgaged our children’s future.

The Premier knowingly misled Ontarians by claiming that her favourite labour group were not getting any new money though the Premier has given an extra $80 Million Dollar in previously undisclosed benefit to teachers. This money would have been spent on repairing our crumbling school buildings rather than on teachers who are already otherwise very well paid (as they should be).

The Premier supports a one stop subway in Scarborough that now is estimated to cost 3.5 Billion Dollars but will carry less than 4,000 passengers per day solely to protect one Liberal seat in Scarborough. The Premier has failed to justify why she supports a one stop subway over a seven stop LRT line that will serve many more residents of Scarborough as well as the residents of northeastern and eastern suburbs of Toronto.

In contrast to the sweetheart deals with the teachers the Premier is taking a highhanded approach to negotiating with Ontario doctors resulting in the doctors union being taken over by extremists. The point is not that the doctors are not well paid but the Premier’s lack of respect; they certainly are. This should not be the reason that the Premier treats them as a punching bag.

In the last four years all five independent officers of the legislature have harshly criticized the Premier and her government for dubious accounting practices, unwarranted secrecy, falling to protect the environment and overly optimistic revenue estimates.

In a 2016 year end interview the Premier admitted to behaving like an overeager fourth grader. Surely, Ontario and the OLP deserves and requires a grown-up to lead the province and the party

POLLS

The premier’s popularity has declined steadily over the last one year. The Premier has a 13 per cent favourable rating and a 66 percent disapproval rating.

We cannot hope to form a government in June 2018 if we are unable to maintain Toronto as a Liberal Fortress. The current polling numbers are alarming.

According to a Forum Research poll released on February 10, 2017 “support amongst decided and leaning city of Toronto voters is statistically tied between the Progressive Conservatives (35%) and the Liberals (34%). The NDP would receive (22%), Green (7%), with (2%) to other parties”

A MainStreet Research poll released March 2, 2017 states “While on the surface the Wynne Liberals are performing well, when we drill down into the city a much different picture emerges. The Liberals are trailing the Tories in Etobicoke (45% PC, 32% Liberal) – and are running third in Scarborough (33% PC, 31% NDP, 29% Liberal). In North York they are only ahead by 5 percentage points (42% Liberal, 37% PC). All signs point right now to significant losses in Toronto for the Wynne Liberals if an election were held today.”

The Scarborough Rouge River riding was a Liberal bastion from its inception. The Premiere failed to exercise due diligence and approved a candidate with a problematic background. We lost that seat.

The 905 area code forms an arc around the amalgamated city of Toronto and comprises the seat rich and ethnically diverse outer suburbs of Mississauga, Brampton, Richmond Hill, Vaughn, Markham, Ajax, Pickering and Oshawa. Many of these Liberal seats are in play.


MOVING FORWARD

At the time of writing we have approximately sixty weeks to put the Liberal house in order, select a new leader and present a bold vision for Ontario through 2022. It can be done. It must be done.


WHAT CAN WE DO

Join us in urging the Premier to request the Executive of the OLP to call a leadership convention for the second weekend of July and announce that she will not be a candidate. This will permit the Premier to lead Ontarians in celebrating Canada's sesquicentennial, for the Finance Minister to bring down a budget, for the Health Minister to conclude negotiations with Ontario doctors, pass urgent legislation, and for Leadership candidates to put together their teams and raise funds.

The new leader will then have six weeks to appoint her/his cabinet and present to Ontarians her/his vision and concrete plans for Ontario through 2022 that she or he has developed in the course of the leadership campaign.

As Liberals our loyalty must always be to the party and certainly not to a failed leader. We must do what is in the best interest of the party.

At the same time we must be keenly aware that the Premier, her spouse and key advisers are highly partisan, known to have sharp elbows and will not agree to fade quietly into the night. They will use every means at their disposal to cling to power. They will fight tooth and nail to ensure that Premier Wynne continues as the leader despite the fact that would almost certainly mean that Patrick Brown would become Premier in June 2018.

So, what can we do? Some of the practical steps we can take are:

1.Start a discussion with your family, friends, neighbours, and work colleagues what bothers them (besides electricity rates) and also find out what they feel has been done right in the last 13 years.Not only canvass their opinions but also ask them for their thoughts, ideas and solutions.
1.Organize informal meetings at your home, at Timmy’s or your favorite bar,
1.If you live in a held riding share your concerns with your Liberal MPP and the riding executive.Attend riding executive meetings.
1.If you live in an un-held or new riding become a member, join the executive, partake incandidate selection and other riding activities.Attend riding executive meetings.
1.Share your view with the Premier, the President of OLP and your MPP.
1.Approach potential leadership candidates and urge them to throw their hats in the ring.
1.Discuss your concerns with the local press, radio and TV outlets.Invite them for your events Write letters to the editor. Participate in radio call-in shows.
1.Join this yahoo group list serve.Urge your family, friends, neighbours and work colleagues to s as well.
1.Post your views and comments but please be polite. No bullying, misogynist, racist or homophobic comments will be tolerated.


Let us “spring forward” together in undertaking the urgent responsibility of renewing the Ontario Liberal Party.

Be the change you seek.


ONTARIO LIBERAL RENEWAL



Please post your message at ontarioliberalrenewal@yahoogroups.ca

Please subscribe to our Yahoo Group ontarioliberalrenewal-subscribe@yahoogroups.ca

Please participate in the poll




http://us15.campaign-archive1......649ad6d5bb
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

after reading the letter it appears the people who wrote it are upset at a lot of the things wynne and her government have done .

but even if the liberals find a new leader they were still the government when a lot of these decisions were made and cannot entirely run away from there own record as these "liberals " suggest

but wynne still manages incredible caucus discipline as not a single mpp has ever come out publically saying she should resign even as her personal numbers plunge to record lows and that by itself is rather hard to believe
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If they are MPPs I would imagine they are MPPs from the regions the OLP looks to lose seats in next year.

Based on that its not too hard to assume who some of them are.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
If they are MPPs I would imagine they are MPPs from the regions the OLP looks to lose seats in next year.

Based on that its not too hard to assume who some of them are.



its not really clear if this letter involves any mpp's although from reading it I'd say not likely . more grassroots liberals who are tired of wynne and direction of party
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
If they are MPPs I would imagine they are MPPs from the regions the OLP looks to lose seats in next year.

Based on that its not too hard to assume who some of them are.



its not really clear if this letter involves any mpp's although from reading it I'd say not likely . more grassroots liberals who are tired of wynne and direction of party


Its pretty specific in terms of time-lines;
Would not surprise me if this was linked to a potential leadership candidate who has already done the math on fundraising in this time period.
RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2017 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
If they are MPPs I would imagine they are MPPs from the regions the OLP looks to lose seats in next year.

Based on that its not too hard to assume who some of them are.



its not really clear if this letter involves any mpp's although from reading it I'd say not likely . more grassroots liberals who are tired of wynne and direction of party


Its pretty specific in terms of time-lines;
Would not surprise me if this was linked to a potential leadership candidate who has already done the math on fundraising in this time period.


it does look very official for something that was supposedly done by a grassroots movement
a CBC reporter had posted it to twitter and not sure where he found it originally

I wouldn't be shocked if there was at least a couple mpp's behind the scenes considering the possibility of a leadership run
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would think that a real journalist would report his sources, or at least some authentication that this is not something put out by Wynne's opponents. That isn't impossible. The statement does claim that Wynne has failed the people of Ontario as well as the supporters of the Liberal Party. That's kind of devastating.

To me, it is the hydro thing that really cooks her goose. At the level of cynical politics, it is a payoff to the people, so they should, the playbook reads, thank their benefactors and return to the fold. But it is also a virtual admission that the Green Energy policy has turned into a job-killing fiasco.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the cbc reporter who originally posted the resign wynne article is now saying he doesn't think it was legitimate and that the knives aren't truly out for her , not sure I believe all his reasons though )


Analysis
No sign that Liberal knives are truly out for Kathleen Wynne

Wynne 'has really strong support' among MPPs and party members, says Deb Matthews

By Mike Crawley, CBC News Posted: Mar 11, 2017 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Mar 11, 2017 5:00 AM ET

Kathleen Wynne has said repeatedly that she intends to stay on as premier and Ontario Liberal Party leader until the next election, in June 2018.


One of the questions I get asked most often these days by friends and acquaintances is whether Premier Kathleen Wynne is going to resign to give her Ontario Liberal Party a fighting chance in next year's election.

Rumours certainly abound that there is a concerted movement to push Wynne out.

The people involved (according to the whispers) range from ambitious cabinet ministers who want to be premier, to backbenchers worried about losing their seats, to grassroots Liberals who believe Wynne has irreversibly become a lightning rod for voter anger.
■Why Kathleen Wynne is so unpopular

But if there truly is a movement among Ontario Liberals to topple Wynne so that someone else can lead the party into the 2018 vote, I can't find it.

I've spoken to a range of people who you'd think would delight in seeing the back of Wynne: strong supporters of Sandra Pupatello, her chief rival in the last leadership race; longtime Liberal backroomers who've been frozen out by Wynne's inner circle; and senior officials whose greatest loyalty is to the party, not to Wynne.

Even given the opportunity to speak off the record, none of them purports to smell even a whiff of an imminent revolt.

The strongest statement I could coax out of a senior Liberal (not a Wynne loyalist) is that some key activists in the party are giving her until summer to show signs of a turnaround in the polls.

Premier Kathleen Wynne
Deputy Premier Deb Matthews (left) is one of Wynne's staunchest allies. (Geoff Robins/The Canadian Press)

"The knives are not out," he said, speaking on condition of anonymity. "But these people are in the tool-shed and they're sharpening the knives. Whether they use them or not depends on where things go from here."

He said that Wynne would only step down if there is pressure from "a combination of caucus members and the party executive." He added that he sees no evidence of such pressure now.


One of Wynne's staunchest allies, Deputy Premier Deb Matthews, dismissed talk of dissension in the ranks.

"Kathleen Wynne has really strong support in our caucus, in our party membership," said Matthews in an interview.

'Our best weapon'

Matthews is also co-chair of the Ontario Liberal re-election campaign and insisted that Wynne is the best person to lead the party into the 2018 vote "because she's smart, really hard working, cares deeply about issues that matter to people and gets the job done."

Another senior party official — who also said he sees no sign of a desire to dump Wynne — called her "our best weapon."

Here's something else that makes me skeptical there really is a movement to push Wynne out: the fact that the PCs are loudly insisting there is one.

From the PC candidate in the Ottawa-Vanier byelection:

Earlier this week, I received an email purporting to be from a group of Ontario Liberal Party members, past and present, calling for Wynne to resign.

The message's credibility quickly crumbled upon closer inspection.

There was no name or contact number. Nobody responded to my reply asking for an interview. It contained numerous sloppy grammatical errors and typos, referred to Hydro One as "Ontario Hydro" and spelled St. Catharines wrong.

But the final straw was the message's rant against Wynne's plan to cut hydro rates by a further 17 per cent.

The plan may indeed have some long-term negative consequences for the province, but in the short term, it can bring only political benefits for the Liberals. Knowing how intense the hydro price backlash has been, and how relieved the Liberals are that the plan could neutralize what was the hottest political issue in the province, I can't imagine any real party member would see the move as a reason to push Wynne out.

Too early for an obituary

Yes, the Liberals are jittery about polls putting them on average 14 points behind the Progressive Conservatives and putting Wynne's personal approval rating at near-record lows.

But polls only indicate how voters feel right now. The election is 15 months away, an eternity in politics. The Liberals were sagging at similar points ahead of the elections in 2007, 2011 and 2014 and won them all.

It's also unclear that any other leader would be able to magically produce a surge in the polls. No matter who the premier is, the party will almost certainly have to battle against sentiment that it's "time for a change" after 14 years of Liberal governments.

It's simply a little early to write Kathleen Wynne's political obituary just yet. But if you are a Liberal party member and you do want her gone, please do let me know that you're out there.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4017225
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( well I agree she might not be entirely out of it but at some point your window politically closes and people get sick of you , only have so much "political capital " as they say and eventually its time for change )



Posted on March 11, 2017׀ Editorial, Richard Forbes


Don’t count Kathleen Wynne out just yet


By Richard Forbes.
Featured Image via Frank Gunn.

In a momentous mea culpa, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne and other ministers spent last week addressing what they called ‘the elephant in the room’: ‘gee, I know we’ve been avoiding the subject, guys,’ they said with some contrition, ‘but we really do care – honest!’

That elephant being, of course, the rising cost of hydro.

Between 2006 and 2014, hydro rates have risen by 70% for families and small businesses, according to Ontario’s auditor general. The cost of hydro in Ontario has amounted to the perfect political grenade, one that appears singularly placed to bury the Ontario Liberals if they aren’t able to – dare I say it – turn the switch and bring a fresh new light to the subject. To that end, Wynne’s unveiled her plan this month to slash hydro rates by as much as 25% – spreading out the costs of past contracts to future generations.

“Hydro is a necessity,” writes Wynne in her editorial, striking a sympathetic tone. “But for many living outside of large urban centres, high delivery charges were leading to impossible choices between groceries, rent or electricity. That’s not right. With this change, everyone in Ontario is going to be paying roughly the same in delivery charges.”

The expectation on the part of the Wynne Liberals is that this humbling aboutface might resonate with voters. The reality is it hasn’t been paying dividends. In fact, it’s not even the first attempt at an aboutface – Wynne’s throne speech last September where she announced her intentions to cut a portion of the HST from hydro bills, a response to PC leader Patrick Brown’s win in a Scarborough by-election, was met with positively miserable poll numbers for the Wynne Liberals.

Brown’s PCs ended last year with skyrocketing support, leading poll analysts to muse about the possibility of a PC supermajority and the Liberals being relegated to (gulp) third party status. Half of Ontarians believe that the PCs will win the next provincial election and, worse still for the premier, half of respondents also believe Kathleen Wynne will be dumped as leader before then.

patrick-brown.jpg.size.custom.crop.1086x725.jpg
Polling indicates although Patrick Brown is the front-runner, Ontario voters still don’t necessarily trust or approve of the PC leader (Steve Russell, Toronto Star.)

Truth be told, the decisions that have been made up to this point that have led our province to its current predicament aren’t as unreasonable as some have made them out to be: Ontario was suffering from regular brownouts and blackouts in the mid noughties, so much so that then opposition leader Dalton McGuinty was campaigning on reducing energy consumption and ensuring Ontario’s outdated grid could meet our energy demands. Today’s hydro challenges mark a reversal of that situation: our energy production (30,203 megawatts) now exceeds our province’s daily demand (15,959 megawatts) – a surplus we possess today as a result of massive investments, to the tune of $50 billion, in new power plants and upgrades which the McGuinty government purchased to meet energy demands and oversee the province’s promised transition away coal.

The soaring electricity rates now frustrating Ontario homeowners are a result of the province signing more energy deals then than were ultimately needed – 20-year contracts with private sector companies that were and still are expensive, long-term and ultimately locked in for the foreseeable future. The extent to which the McGuinty government overshot the province’s energy needs also got considerably worse after the Global Economic Meltdown – an unexpected factor – which drove down electricity demand with a recession from which Ontario has been slow to recover.

While she won’t get the credit she expects for it, Wynne is embarking on the only reasonable response to this crisis available to her: spreading out or amortizing debt, shifting and redistributing costs in such a way as to shield the province’s most vulnerable from the costs of past decisions.

The contracts aren’t going to disappear, the province will pay for them – it’s just a question of who will pay for it and when. In comparison, many of the opposition’s various positions – chief among them, scrapping wind farms and reversing the privatization of Hydro One – amount to pure ideological dogma that won’t lower anyone’s bills. Patrick Brown even managed to get himself in hot trouble on conservative talk radio recently for dodging questions regarding his own (nonexistent) plan.

“It’s very satisfying, I’m sure, to recap how awful everything has been and how we’ve gotten to this point,” said Newstalk 1010‘s John Moore, catching Brown off guard, “but…what is your plan? What is the alternative?”

bwwynnhydro118.jpg.size.custom.crop.1086x725
Wynne announcing her government will stretch the costs of electricity generation contracts to future generations. (Frank Gunn, CP.)

Indeed, we’ve reached a point in this debate where electricity rates have taken on a political dimension of their own, dwarfing the province’s reality: opposition parties are proposing ‘magic’ solutions, misdirecting the public’s anger to decisions on an ideological basis. In this sense, hydro is not an issue Wynne can ‘win’ on – she can show she has a plan and the public can be relied on to snuff out snake oil salesmen eventually (Hudak’s ‘million jobs plan‘ con comes to mind) – but this now seasonal routine of hammering on her own government’s mistakes is like trying to stop the bleeding with lemon juice. It may be the truth but her opposition won’t constrain themselves with that level of debate – not when the public is irate and looking for answers. No, for better or for worse, this is a political fight now and Wynne’s Liberals will need a political solution.

In search of that political solution, some Liberal insiders are reportedly considering a leadership coup, forcing Wynne out for a fresh, err, well, different face; Toronto Star named some possible contenders, including Health Minister Eric Hoskins, Attorney General Yasir Naqvi, someone named ‘Mitzie’ and (c’mon, really?) Finance Minister Charles Sousa. (You might as well throw bloody Liz Sandals into the mix.) Forcing a resignation and changing the leadership would be an act of desperation – a last ditch attempt to revive the party’s brand and resurrect its re-election chances. For her part, Wynne said she wasn’t concerned about traitors in her midst, expressing confidence in her team.

And why should Wynne be worried?

Replacing Kathleen Wynne would be foolhardy for the Ontario Liberals: she’s their best chance at victory – if not in the short term, most certainly in the long term. She may very well be the most hated person in Ontario as far as the polls are concerned, but nobody but a complete moron would write Kathleen Wynne off – her last name is all you need to know about the premier; she’s a political cage fighter and if she goes out this next election, she’ll go out scrapping admirably just the way anyone would expect her to.


PM Pierre Trudeau strikes his famous ‘gunslinger’ pose in 1973. He would face unlikely odds for re-election six years later against Joe Clark.

The daunting re-election fight facing Kathleen Wynne is easy to compare with Pierre Trudeau’s fourth in 1979. Trudeau’s chances were slim going into that election – he was as unpopular in Canada then as Kathleen Wynne is now in Ontario – but like Wynne, Trudeau commanded authority and respect – which led to the brazen (and frankly ridiculous) decision on the part of the Liberal team to run their 1979 campaign centrally around the elephant in the room, warts and all: their leader and his experience. Braving the tough race ahead with the tautological mantra, ‘A leader must be a leader,’ the Trudeau Liberals ran a gunslinging campaign that came tantalizing close to victory against Joe Clark’s Progressive Conservatives. In a surprising turn of events, Clark’s own government would fall only a few months later, largely as a result of his clumsy leadership.

To defeat Brown’s PCs, Wynne’s Liberals will have to set similar bear-traps for Patrick Brown along the way – exploiting the same weaknesses surrounding Brown that existed with Clark: namely, bad judgement and poor coalition-making. Patrick Brown is running a provincial campaign against ‘incompetence and corruption’ without a specific plan of his own, attempting to forge relations with every corner of the Conservative tent: at this rate, he might be better off not winning this next election; that is, not with the economic situation he will inherit and the contradictory slate of promises he’s made to different factions – the Social Conservative tent will expect him to make changes to the sex-ed curriculum, the Red Tory tent will expect him to fulfill his promise to implement a provincial carbon tax. He, like Clark, will be faced with a decision to follow through on a number of ill-advised electoral promises or risk being accused of flip flopping.

In this respect, the Ontario Liberals have a leader in their corner who is the antithesis of that shilly-shallying and that contrast – backbone to spineless – should be a central focus of their re-election campaign. Wynne very well may lose but it’s easier for political parties to bounce back when they lose an election standing tall and proud of their track record rather than cutting and running in the manner an emergency leadership transition would suggest. Who knows, a year after Patrick Brown’s win, Ontarians might be nostalgic for a day when they actually knew where the premier stood on a given issue…


cartoon

Richard Forbes studied Political Science and Philosophy at the University of Waterloo. Winner of the Peter Woolstencroft Prize in Canadian Politics (2015).

When asked what ‘one does exactly’ with said degree, he laughs and politely declines to answer. A perfect night for him involves a cup of Lady Grey, writing and a re-run of Yes Minister.

https://theribbon.net/2017/03/11/dont-count-kathleen-wynne-out-just-yet/
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the CBC is holding back because the Liberals faced a situation almost as dire in the last election, and managed to not only win, but came back with a majority.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I think the CBC is holding back because the Liberals faced a situation almost as dire in the last election, and managed to not only win, but came back with a majority.



its true the liberals faced poor polling numbers before 2007 , 2011 and 2014 elections although they hadn't been in power as long going into those elections and there was also a conservative government federally which was unpopular among liberal and left wing voters here so they didn't want another one provincially and backed wynne just to prevent hudak from winning .


so I don't really think the dynamics are the same going in to 2018 , we have a liberal government federally and often when there is a liberal government federally we have a pc government provincially . and liberals have also been in power since 2003 , which is well past the number of years a government normally lasts here . usually if they last 2 terms that would be considered a success , winning 4 elections in a row is really unheard of here


I also just don't see what the case is for another wynne term , her personal approval numbers are dismal . her government has no real focus and she comes across as being out of new ideas . what would possibly be the case for another 4 years of her as premier ? the unions need another raise ? sell more of Hydro One ? give more money to there liberal friends around the province ?
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( a high profile liberal has said its time for wynne to go and highly unlikely she could win a province wide election )

'Extremely unlikely' Liberals can win election under Wynne, says Greg Sorbara


By Mike Crawley, CBC News Posted: Mar 22, 2017 11:50 AM ET| Last Updated: Mar 22, 2017 11:50 AM ET

"There's a whole lot of people in the Ontario Liberal Party who think that it's all over," former Ontario Liberal party president Greg Sorbara said Tuesday night in an interview on TVO.


One of the most senior figures among the Ontario Liberals, Greg Sorbara, believes the party is in grave danger of losing the 2018 election and is urging Kathleen Wynne to consider stepping down.


Sorbara served as finance minister, Ontario Liberal Party president and campaign co-chair during his 30-year career in politics.

"There's a whole lot of people in the Ontario Liberal party who think that it's all over," Sorbara said Tuesday night in an interview on TVO's The Agenda with Steve Paikin.


Sorbara said Wynne has not sought his advice but he would tell her that it is "extremely unlikely" that she will win the next election

"You have to ask yourself premier, whether given that scenario, it's better to step down before the next election," Sorbara said. "The (polling) numbers do not lie and the ability to win the next election is in grave grave doubt."

On the same program, one of the current Liberal campaign co-chairs, Tim Murphy, defended Wynne

"I talk to lots of Liberals and not one of them wants her to go. Not a single one," said Murphy. "She's our best asset."

Wynne has said repeatedly she intends to stay on as leader to fight the June 2018 election.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.4036033
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

She's done.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 12:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
She's done.



Greg Sorbara is a very high profile member of the provincial liberals and a former mpp . his comments will have to be taken seriously by the provincial liberals , if he doesn't think she could win a province wide election he wouldn't of came out publically with these comments .

although I still personally think she plans to stick around as long as possible and if she planned to resign , she would of done so already

she clearly doesn't care about the by elections the liberals lost or the polls which say her approval rating is historically low
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Liberal on Liberal Attack;
Ouch.

At this point does the OLP feel that tossing someone like Charles Sousa or anyone from within the current party is going to distance themselves from vitriol toward this party from the electorate?

While I understand its uncomfortable to let loose the grip of power;
Is burning another leader really the direction you want to go?

Having a quicky leadership election then potentially losing anyway?

It doesn't matter to me if the OLP loses today, tomorrow or in 2018.
However this mess spilling out into the public eye is just indicative of the issues the party overall seems to have.
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unnamed liberals call on Wynne to resign

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