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RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 9:04 pm    Post subject: Can Conservatives win over Millennial voters ? Reply with quote

( an interesting story and poll done for the manning conference on the Millennial vote )


Millennials rank conservative political parties as least trustworthy, pollster tells Conservative conference

Marie-Danielle Smith | February 24, 2017 11:47 AM ET
More from Marie-Danielle Smith
.
Conservative leadership contender Kevin O'Leary, foreground, faces a tough job attracting young people to the party, according to pollind data released Friday...


OTTAWA — Conservative political parties are the institutions the least trusted by Canadians aged 15-34, researchers told a Manning Centre Conference audience Friday.

Young people, according to a survey commissioned for the centre, trust right-wing parties less than they trust all levels of government, left-leaning parties, corporations and unions, among other institutions.

It proves a challenge for the group of conservative thinkers that has descended on Ottawa for discussions over the future of their federal party, and for a leadership debate Friday afternoon.

Some Conservative Party leadership candidates have made the millennial vote a priority. Political outsider and reality TV personality Kevin O’Leary has repeatedly promised since launching his campaign that he’d bring young people back into the fold in droves — despite youth being a traditionally tricky group for conservatives to appeal to.

.
The panel Friday morning was led by Heather Scott-Marshall, president of Mission Research, who collected polling data, and Ted Kouri, the co-founder of marketing firm Incite, who collected qualitative data from Alberta youth.

They concluded that issues such as balancing the budget, fostering the shared economy and supporting entrepreneurs could offer Conservatives a chance at the millennial voting pool. But according to Scott-Marshall’s presentation, only 16 per cent of young Canadians identify as conservative and 20 per cent as right-of-centre on the political spectrum, according to data.

The numbers are based on an online survey last October of 2,000 people, aged 15-34, accurate within 2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. The age group represents 27 per cent of Canadians and 37 per cent of the labour force.

A full two-thirds of millennials feel Canada is “on the right track,” but only 10 per cent felt “strongly” about that, according to the survey. Only 26 per cent felt the country is going in the wrong direction, and eight per cent “strongly” so.

More challenging for conservatives — and in many ways a branding issue, as Kouri noted — is that few millennials are ready to identify themselves as conservatives. One in three see themselves as liberals; another 18 per cent say they’re centrist, and only 16 per cent conservative. Rounding out the list: 14 per cent identify as progressive, 11 per cent as socialist and seven per cent as libertarian.

With the question put another way, as a spot on the political spectrum, about 32 per cent put themselves in the “centre,” 26 per cent left of centre and 20 per cent right of centre (with five per cent putting themselves on the “extreme right”).

On two issues highlighted by Scott-Marshall, millennials could find some common ground with the conservative movement. Youths overwhelmingly — at 82 per cent — feel federal budget deficits and the national debt are a “major problem,” with 40 per cent saying it should be addressed right away. And almost half, or 46 per cent, like the idea of a two-track public and private health care system rather than the status quo.

Still, trust will be a major issue for the Tories. On average, young people rated their trust in conservative political parties at 4.3 out of 10, the lowest of any group, while trusting themselves nearly twice as much (8.2 out of 10) and left-wing political parties at a level of 5.3 out of 10.

Policymakers take note: in focus groups with Albertans aged 18 to 35, Kouri said young folk felt Conservatives are “out of touch” on social issues such as minority rights and immigration.

They are also “definitely turned off” by rhetoric suggesting climate change is not an important issue, and want “a strong, clear approach or policy,” he added.

Email: mdsmith@postmedia.com | Twitter: mariedanielles

http://news.nationalpost.com/n.....conference
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there is an abacus data poll out , that just focuses on this age group , there numbers

lib 42 , cpc 24 , ndp 19 , green 11 , bloc 3 , among the 18 -36 age group )



Is Prime Minister Trudeau losing the Millennials?

February 25, 2017


By David Coletto

Recently, a CBC opinion journalist asserted that Millennials had “finally fallen out of love” with Justin Trudeau because of his decision not to pursue electoral reform. The argument was that electoral reform was so important to Millennials that this breach of faith was a final straw in the relationship.

Millennials are those born between 1980 and 2000. They are the largest generation in Canada and will make up the largest portion of the electorate in 2019 which will mark the end of Baby Boomer dominance in deciding elections. Millennial views matter more than ever. And the CBC column was correct in making the point that Millenials were drawn to the idea of electoral reform but in a recent CP article, I question whether it was a primary reason for their strong support for the Liberals in 2015.

However, there’s a problem with the CBC “fallen out of love” assertion. It doesn’t square with the evidence.

We conducted a large survey of over 4,000 Canadian adults in mid-February including 783 voting age Millennials (18 to 36). We compared this data with our post-election data from October 2015. (Note, this is a different survey than the data we released yesterday. I’m using this data because of the much larger sample size, even though it’s a week older).

A quick look at the data finds:

• The Liberals would do about as well today with Millennials (42%) as they did in October 2015 (44%).


• Compared with our post-election survey in October 2015, the Liberals are down 2, the Tories are up 3, and the NDP is down 5. The Greens are up 5.

• The Liberals hold a wide lead among Millennial men and women and across all age groups.



• The Liberals have a substantial lead among Millennials in BC (15 points), in Ontario (24), and in Quebec (28). The Liberals trail the Conservatives in Prairies, which is true among older age groups as well.



• In mid-February, 53% of Millennials say they approve of the job the federal government and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is doing while 29% disapprove. Millennials are 9-points more likely to approve than older generations.



The Liberals may or may not keep Millennials in their corner when the next election rolls around. But the evidence simply does not support the argument that Millennials have “fallen out of love” with the Liberals so far. While our surveys show that the Liberals are seeing a tighter competition with the Conservatives, this has more to do with narrowing among older voters. Millennials continue to be a core support group for the federal Liberal coalition at least for the time being.

Naturally, there’s a difference between news coverage and opinion pieces, but I still feel it’s reasonable to expect some evidence to back up an inaccurate observation that is presented as a fact, as was the case in the CBC piece.

- See more at: http://abacusdata.ca/is-prime-.....1mW9l.dpuf
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

also think it might be a mistake to lump this age group into one big category . to me there is at least 2 very separate groups of millennial voters

- on campus 18- 25 , the typical college student or final year of high school , typically most campuses are left wing in nature . although the conservatives have had some success in establishing so called " campus clubs " at some larger universities , the % of students who are part of one is rather small .
I feel that this group of millennial voters would be the most difficult to reach and less likely to identify as conservative


- next group would be the off campus , entering workforce 18-36 age group , were talking about younger employees and young people who have recently graduated and looking for work . and are away from the left wing influence found on campus .

might be a mistake to lump them all together in one group as might be some separate groups of millennials here but I think overall most in this age range are trying to find work or working . and there looking ahead and have goals of owning there own home or starting a business .

and perhaps this group might have more potential but we'd have to find a way to reach them and talk about issues that were important to them


but I think one of the main reasons were having trouble with this age group as that being " conservative " is not seen as trendy or cool , were lacking a cool factor when compared to the liberal , ndp or green .

know here even though the green party has no chance of winning there is still a cool factor if someone is seen as being " green " is something that some of the younger people seem to be identifying with especially at the high school level , they have done very well when they have high school votes here , winning by large margins
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Want millennial voters? Conservatives must change, researchers say

Manning Centre conference hears sobering message about why party's message isn't working for younger voters

By Janyce McGregor, CBC News Posted: Feb 25, 2017 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Feb 25, 2017 5:00 AM ET

Interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose spoke at the start of the Manning Centre conference Friday, where recent research was discussed on the political values of voters under 35 and how they relate to the conservative movement.

Researchers brought a sobering message to the annual convention of the right-leaning Manning Centre Friday: most voters under 35 aren't connecting with the conservative movement, and if it wants to reach them, more than just messaging needs to change.

Making Conservative policies more relevant to millennials — a younger demographic not consistently defined, but most often referring to voters under 35 — has preoccupied a federal party that doesn't want to sit on the Opposition bench for very long. Under interim leader Rona Ambrose, the Conservative caucus has been seized with this at recent strategy sessions.

But findings presented Friday to attendees of the conference, organized by the right-leaning think tank named after and spearheaded by Reform Party founder Preston Manning, outlined the scope of the gap between the conservative movement and the bulk of this demographic, which currently makes up about a quarter of Canada's population and more than a third of its work force.

Social conservatism? Forget it, that's for baby boomers, explained Heather Scott-Marshall from Mission Research, taking the audience through the findings of a national political values study conducted last October.

While some candidates for the leadership of the Conservative Party may think there's support to be gained by championing "Canadian values," that won't fly with this group, her research suggests.

"They don't want any great authority telling them which cultural values need to be favoured over other groups," she said

Her findings suggest younger voters strongly support minority rights and about half of the younger voters surveyed believed the government isn't going far enough to protect minorities.

"They do believe in a big tent and inclusivity — in as much as they trust themselves first, they want everyone to have an equal shot," she said.

"I think the message where we're declaring war on transgendered people and undocumented immigrants and religious minorities like Islamists is anathema to that group."

'Can't rely on free market'

Then there's the role of government.

Conservatives often campaign on spending cutbacks and champion the virtues of small, unobtrusive institutions. But that's not where millennial heads are at.

"They still have an appetite for strong government," she said. "They believe that government has a role in stabilizing the economy, in their job and economic futures. They don't want to see government get so small that it's not able to intervene."

Part of the reason may be this generation's precariousness: recently out of school, they're finding it hard to find steady, well-paying work and afford to buy homes.

Millennials believe "we can't just rely on the free market to take care of our most vulnerable groups," she said.


Scott-Marshall's research found trust in conservative political parties was low, with respondents reacting much better to the label "progressive" than the label "conservative."

Why? The conservative label makes them think of politics resistant to change, stuck in the past and favouring the rich, she said.

The news wasn't much better for the federal Conservatives when it came to current government policies: a majority of those surveyed favoured taxing the wealthy, legalizing marijuana and implementing a carbon tax.

Show up in the House of Commons and you'll hear Conservatives attacking the government for doing exactly those types of things, with a few exceptions.

Economic concerns top list

The findings weren't always consistent.

While the label "libertarian" scored very low with this demographic, the same survey said millennials are big on "individual rights."

The political values study may back up Conservatives who want their party to focus on jobs and the economy: the cost of living, jobs and the general state of the economy were top issues for younger voters.


Health care, an issue that has topped surveys of the general population, fell farther down the list, behind climate change and education.

The size of the national debt also registered as a major problem with millennials, Scott-Marshall said, suggesting a typically conservative policy plank that might register with this group.

The research also found millennials also respond positively to things like entrepreneurship and supporting small business.

More than re-branding

Ted Kouri, from the Edmonton-based marketing group Incite, said qualitative research his firm has done with interviews and group sessions in Alberta is consistent with Scott-Marshall's work.

Millennials are looking for positive, constructive messages, he advised, and they're turned off when criticism is offered without an alternative course of action.

While some of the work the conservative movement may need to do is about branding — "the decorating on the cake," Kouri called it — a party will fall short if it does only that, he warned.

"Look at the ingredients in the cake," he advised: engage with younger voters and develop new policies or run the risk of continuing to fail to connect.

After the researchers spoke, the audience for the panel — millennials appeared well-represented — was invited to break into small groups to discuss what the conservative moment needs to start doing, stop doing and continue doing.

As several other sessions continued simultaneously at the conference, Manning himself chose to join in the discussion at this one.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3998207
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The social issues that a number of Conservatives still like to focus on - LGBT rights, abortion and what not - aren't helping the party either bit with millennials. I know hardcore millennial supporters within the NL PC Party who won't be involved with the federal party because they view them as too socially conservative.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
The social issues that a number of Conservatives still like to focus on - LGBT rights, abortion and what not - aren't helping the party either bit with millennials. I know hardcore millennial supporters within the NL PC Party who won't be involved with the federal party because they view them as too socially conservative.



I haven't really mentioned the social conservative issue but it was mentioned in some of the articles , I've heard it mentioned as well by some of the leadership candidates such as O'Leary .
but under Rona Ambrose's leadership I have a hard time recalling any social conservative issues or positions the party has taken ? some hard core social conservative mp's such as Brad Trost obviously have some but the party as a whole has not focused on any for some time
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this the way you want to approach the next election? Find some person with the 'royal jelly' and throw half your tradition into the dumpster in the hope that the youngest and dumbest voters will support your guy?

Rona Ambrose just introduced a private members bill that will politicize our lame courts even more than they are now.

Quote:
Interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose has introduced a private member’s bill in the Commons that would require mandatory training for would-be judges on issues surrounding sexual assault.

If passed, the legislation — Bill C-337 — would restrict eligibility for judicial appointments to those who have completed comprehensive sexual assault education.

It would require the Canadian Judicial Council to report on continuing education seminars in matters related to sexual assault law and amend the Criminal Code to require judges to provide written reasons in sexual assault rulings.
http://globalnews.ca/news/3269.....ult-cases/


Trust me, if this goes through, it is not going to do anything for Conservatives, and it will add to the oppressive sexism of our courts. It's as if the Ghomeshi trial hadn't revealed what a mess our courts on in. We ought to be wondering why those women, who have successfully used the Courts -- by lying and contriving evidence -- aren't being charged with something serious. It is only one illustration of the sexism that is built into our courts and, in fact, the hiring policies of the Canadian state.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
Progressive Tory wrote:
The social issues that a number of Conservatives still like to focus on - LGBT rights, abortion and what not - aren't helping the party either bit with millennials. I know hardcore millennial supporters within the NL PC Party who won't be involved with the federal party because they view them as too socially conservative.



I haven't really mentioned the social conservative issue but it was mentioned in some of the articles , I've heard it mentioned as well by some of the leadership candidates such as O'Leary .
but under Rona Ambrose's leadership I have a hard time recalling any social conservative issues or positions the party has taken ? some hard core social conservative mp's such as Brad Trost obviously have some but the party as a whole has not focused on any for some time


Having a vocal MP like Trost talking about being against SSM, abortion, transgendered rights etc. doesn't help. He might be a very small minority but a lot of people see him getting attention and think it's a wide held belief within the party.

The whole marijuana debate is a turnoff to millennial voters as well. People are more likely to smoke pot when they're younger, but many of those who don't smoke it see no need for it to be illegal. The party has been trying to find a middle ground here and many of the leadership candidates won't re-criminalize it.

I think the party really needs to take a more libertarian approach to moral and social issues to appeal to millennial voters.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see, so the answer is to stifle that debate, to refuse to allow those issues into politics?

WTF, who needs democracy anyway? Moslems don't like that either.
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
Is this the way you want to approach the next election? Find some person with the 'royal jelly' and throw half your tradition into the dumpster in the hope that the youngest and dumbest voters will support your guy?

Rona Ambrose just introduced a private members bill that will politicize our lame courts even more than they are now.

Quote:
Interim Conservative leader Rona Ambrose has introduced a private member’s bill in the Commons that would require mandatory training for would-be judges on issues surrounding sexual assault.

If passed, the legislation — Bill C-337 — would restrict eligibility for judicial appointments to those who have completed comprehensive sexual assault education.

It would require the Canadian Judicial Council to report on continuing education seminars in matters related to sexual assault law and amend the Criminal Code to require judges to provide written reasons in sexual assault rulings.
http://globalnews.ca/news/3269.....ult-cases/


Trust me, if this goes through, it is not going to do anything for Conservatives, and it will add to the oppressive sexism of our courts. It's as if the Ghomeshi trial hadn't revealed what a mess our courts on in. We ought to be wondering why those women, who have successfully used the Courts -- by lying and contriving evidence -- aren't being charged with something serious. It is only one illustration of the sexism that is built into our courts and, in fact, the hiring policies of the Canadian state.


I heard about Ambrose's proposal but not that familiar with it , don't really see why it would cause any problems but also not exactly sure why it would be necessary either
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
RCO wrote:
Progressive Tory wrote:
The social issues that a number of Conservatives still like to focus on - LGBT rights, abortion and what not - aren't helping the party either bit with millennials. I know hardcore millennial supporters within the NL PC Party who won't be involved with the federal party because they view them as too socially conservative.



I haven't really mentioned the social conservative issue but it was mentioned in some of the articles , I've heard it mentioned as well by some of the leadership candidates such as O'Leary .
but under Rona Ambrose's leadership I have a hard time recalling any social conservative issues or positions the party has taken ? some hard core social conservative mp's such as Brad Trost obviously have some but the party as a whole has not focused on any for some time


Having a vocal MP like Trost talking about being against SSM, abortion, transgendered rights etc. doesn't help. He might be a very small minority but a lot of people see him getting attention and think it's a wide held belief within the party.

The whole marijuana debate is a turnoff to millennial voters as well. People are more likely to smoke pot when they're younger, but many of those who don't smoke it see no need for it to be illegal. The party has been trying to find a middle ground here and many of the leadership candidates won't re-criminalize it.

I think the party really needs to take a more libertarian approach to moral and social issues to appeal to millennial voters.



I do agree there might be a false perception among millennial voters that the federal conservatives were more socially conservative than they really were . some of that would go back to the 2005 same sex marriage debate when they opposed that legislation and some of the abortion bills that technically weren't about abortion that several backbench mp's introduced when cpc in power

the whole marijuana debate was a vote loser , know for a fact here there were millennial voters who showed up at the polls mostly cause of that issue , I had heard some specifically talk about it and saw some vote at the advance polls , younger people you wouldn't normally see vote here , that were specifically interested in that issue

I agree the party needs some sort of middle ground on drug laws , and if the liberals actually legalise it , it make little sense to campaign a year or 2 later on taking it away , that's just giving the pot heads another reason to show up and vote against cpc

but I think the conservatives should try and bring forward some sensible and reasonable restrictions relating to its sale and distribution and more health studies on what legalisation means for people's long term health , its there job as the opposition to make sure this is done right and to criticise the legislation the government creates
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
I see, so the answer is to stifle that debate, to refuse to allow those issues into politics?

WTF, who needs democracy anyway? Moslems don't like that either.


I didn't say that.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
Progressive Tory wrote:
RCO wrote:
Progressive Tory wrote:
The social issues that a number of Conservatives still like to focus on - LGBT rights, abortion and what not - aren't helping the party either bit with millennials. I know hardcore millennial supporters within the NL PC Party who won't be involved with the federal party because they view them as too socially conservative.



I haven't really mentioned the social conservative issue but it was mentioned in some of the articles , I've heard it mentioned as well by some of the leadership candidates such as O'Leary .
but under Rona Ambrose's leadership I have a hard time recalling any social conservative issues or positions the party has taken ? some hard core social conservative mp's such as Brad Trost obviously have some but the party as a whole has not focused on any for some time


Having a vocal MP like Trost talking about being against SSM, abortion, transgendered rights etc. doesn't help. He might be a very small minority but a lot of people see him getting attention and think it's a wide held belief within the party.

The whole marijuana debate is a turnoff to millennial voters as well. People are more likely to smoke pot when they're younger, but many of those who don't smoke it see no need for it to be illegal. The party has been trying to find a middle ground here and many of the leadership candidates won't re-criminalize it.

I think the party really needs to take a more libertarian approach to moral and social issues to appeal to millennial voters.



I do agree there might be a false perception among millennial voters that the federal conservatives were more socially conservative than they really were . some of that would go back to the 2005 same sex marriage debate when they opposed that legislation and some of the abortion bills that technically weren't about abortion that several backbench mp's introduced when cpc in power

the whole marijuana debate was a vote loser , know for a fact here there were millennial voters who showed up at the polls mostly cause of that issue , I had heard some specifically talk about it and saw some vote at the advance polls , younger people you wouldn't normally see vote here , that were specifically interested in that issue

I agree the party needs some sort of middle ground on drug laws , and if the liberals actually legalise it , it make little sense to campaign a year or 2 later on taking it away , that's just giving the pot heads another reason to show up and vote against cpc

but I think the conservatives should try and bring forward some sensible and reasonable restrictions relating to its sale and distribution and more health studies on what legalisation means for people's long term health , its there job as the opposition to make sure this is done right and to criticise the legislation the government creates


I think Ambrose has done this to an extent, but the Conservatives should focus more on how the process of legalizing marijuana should work. The age limit, where it should be sold, what health Canada's approach should look like ect..
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is what is hard for you to understand. The millenials don't live in the same kind of social world we occupy. We don't understand their feelings of foreboding.

It's becoming apparent that the welfare state has reached its limit. In the long term, it is unsustainable because it is financed through debt. Even Stephen Harper added $100 billion to the national debt during his tenure.

The point is that this debt becomes a heavy tax load. The ability of a government to borrow is limited by its revenues (which largely come from taxes). It is also important because it is this ability to borrow that allows societies to withstand economic shocks and even wars.

Right now, more and more commentators are expressing worry. We seem to be coming to a crisis, because the economy is probably going into a period of contraction, which means reduced revenues, etc.

The millennials don't know this, but they feel their declining opportunities. Just the cost of housing has been spiralling upwards all our lives, but is unsupportable for Millenials. No wonder they stay with their parents so long. Their generation is wracked with drug abuse, broken families, and weird, gender politics that demoralizes what would have been our working classes.

That's why Ambrose's gesture is foolish. This is the point at which people -- if not the bureau-rats -- are realizing the pendulum has swung too far on the gender issues.

If Conservatives want Millennial support, they should speak up for their real, practical concerns, not simply those complaints expressed by that fraction of university students that are politically vocal. It means protecting them from more and more of this debt financing, which is likely to create burdens that will hang over their heads forever.

I offer this as evidence that Millennials are listening:

Quote:
Kevin O’Leary professes himself a “Conservative expansionist,” with a target of growing the party by 40 per cent under his leadership, mainly by appealing to 18-35 year old voters disillusioned by Justin Trudeau’s Liberals.

At first glance, it would seem that he is succeeding — in most polls he has the most support among existing Conservatives, and even rivals admit he is signing up new members at a faster rate than their campaigns.

“The biggest eye-opener so far was when we made a decision last week to go to a pub at (the University of British Columbia) at 11 p.m., just to see if anybody would talk to me,”O’Leary said in an interview at an Ottawa restaurant, ahead of Friday’s program at the Manning Conference. “We thought maybe 15 or so would, and we’d do some social media. Three hundred and fifty turned up — we had to close the doors with another 150 waiting outside.

“They feel Trudeau has screwed them and they’re pissed,” he said. “They’re ripe for this party …. It’s a new ball game — if you can’t get to that youth, you can’t get a majority mandate.”
http://news.nationalpost.com/n.....vin-oleary


He may be exaggerating, I don't know -- but I know that the generational interests of the Millennials are not the further, endless expansion of the welfare state because they are going to be left holding the bag for it.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a millenial and hang around with plenty of them, so I have a bit of understand of how they think.

As I said previously, Conservatives like to tell older voters we need to lower debt and deficits so that their children and grandchildren aren't stuck footing the bill. Well Conservatives also need to tell young voters that they're balancing the budget for them and why that's so important.

Jobs and housing are also importnat issue. Simply saying that lower taxes will create jobs probably isn't going to be enough for young people. Millenials are coming out of university with degrees and still can't get jobs because entry level now means 3-5 years experience. I saw a comment recently from someone I know saying that she didn't have the 5 years retail experience a company wanted because she was busy getting an education and not working at walmart.

Then there's the housing issue. Some people's expectations are a bit high when it comes to housing, but who can really blame someone from wanting a similar lifestyle from the one they grew up in? One problem that I see with housing is that the federal government is bringing in a national policy to address overheated markets in Vancouver and Toronto. A friend of mine was recently planning to buy a second property to use as a rental. He had some issues with his bank and by the time he got them resolved Trudeau had made changes to mortgage rules, which then prevented my friend from buying a house in small town Newfoundland.

Michael Chong has promoted privatizing the CMHC to help housing prices, not sure how this would work exactly. I'm not sure what other policies could be adopted to help millenials with housing? And if anything should be done, but it's definitely a concern. St. John's has recently seen a downtown in its housing market which is good for first time home buyers. But St. John's housing prices are nowhere near what it costs in some big cities.

Conservatives don't need to necessarily change their economic principles to appeal to millenials, they just need to figure out how to sell their principles with the right message and policies.
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Can Conservatives win over Millennial voters ?

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