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RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:53 am    Post subject: mp's call on government to Stop Illegal border crossings Reply with quote

Rempel and Clement call on Ottawa to stop illegal border crossings



The Canadian Press

Sunday, February 19th, 2017



A young man from Yemen approaches the U.S.-Canada border into Canada near Hemmingford, Que., on Friday, February 17, 2017. A number of refugee claimants are braving the elements to illicitly enter Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson


The Canadian Press




MONTREAL – Two Conservative MPs are calling on the federal government to act to stop the flow of people illegally crossing the United States border into Canada.

Michelle Rempel and Tony Clement have tweeted that illegal crossings are unsafe and place a burden on local law enforcement.

Rempel’s comment is in response to the Manitoba RCMP’s announcement that another 22 people were intercepted crossing the border near Emerson on Saturday night.

Officials say a growing number of people are choosing to walk across the border into Canada to claim refugee status, including dozens who have been arrested in the Emerson area in recent weeks.

Quebec has also seen a large rise in the number of refugee claimants who enter the province illegally.

Refugee advocates have called on Canada to suspend the Safe Third Country Agreement, which prevents most people who have been living in the United States from making a refugee claim at an official border crossing


http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/19.....crossings/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fleeing north: Why asylum seekers are crossing the U.S.-Canada border
.

Daniel Otis, CTVNews.ca Writer

@dsotis
.
Published Friday, February 17, 2017 9:54PM EST
Last Updated Saturday, February 18, 2017 11:53AM EST

Braving bitter winter weather, asylum seekers are illegally crossing the Canada-U.S. border in growing numbers.

WHY ARE PEOPLE ILLEGALLY CROSSING THE BORDER INTO CANADA?

U.S. President Donald Trump’s much-maligned executive order barring travel to the U.S. by citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries, as well as his temporary cessation of the country’s refugee program, has stoked fears that further immigration restrictions are on the horizon.



U.S.-Canada border
A family is helped into Canada by RCMP officers along the U.S.-Canada border near Hemmingford, Que., on Friday, February 17, 2017. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)


Although the travel ban was later rejected by a U.S. federal appeals court, Trump’s anti-immigration rhetoric and a growing push to round-up illegal immigrants in the U.S. means that asylum seekers’ fears have not been allayed by America’s judiciary. Facing possible future deportations, many are now trusting expensive human smugglers to bring them north to Canada, where Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s welcoming overtures to immigrants and refugees stands in stark contrast to his American counterpart’s harsh stance.

WHERE ARE THEY CROSSING?

The most illegal border crossings appear to have occurred in Quebec and Manitoba. British Columbia and the Yukon have also experienced an influx of asylum seekers.

HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE CROSSED?

According to the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA), there were 7,022 land border crossings by asylum seekers in 2016, up from 4,407 in 2015. Quebec and Manitoba have seen the largest increases. The number of refugee claimants in Quebec, for example, hit 593 in December while there were 452 in January -- up from 74 in Dec. 2014. In Manitoba, 403 were recorded in 2016, up from 252 in 2015. At least 82 people have illegally crossed into Manitoba since Jan.1.

CAN THEY LEGALLY CLAIM ASYLUM IN CANADA?

It depends. The Canada-United States Safe Third Country Agreement, which was signed in 2002, requires people to apply for refugee status in the first safe country they arrive in. Any refugee claimant entering Canada at an official border crossing with the U.S., which is the only country that Canada has designated as a safe third country under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, is supposed to be turned away unless they have a blood relative in the country. People who illegally sneak into Canada at unregulated crossings, however, will generally have their asylum cases heard. Because the Safe Third Country Agreement encourages dangerous illegal border crossings, there have been calls for Ottawa to revoke the U.S.’ “safe third country” status. The federal government, however, has expressed no interest in doing this.


Asylum seekers are often ill-prepared for the freezing winter weather they experience during their trips north. Two Ghanaian men who illegally entered Manitoba in December, for example, lost parts of their hands to the extreme frostbite they suffered during their journey. Once in Canada, moreover, there are no firm guarantees that a refugee’s claim will be accepted.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THEY ENTER CANADA?

Refugee claimants who illegally enter the country are generally detained by police until criminal background checks are completed. After that, they meet with CBSA officers for several hours before being released. They are then given 15 days to file a refugee claim. Hearings with the Immigration and Refugee Board are then held within three to four months.

As they wait for their hearings, asylum seekers are eligible for legal aid and social assistance. While they can apply for work permits, that process can take three to four months. It should be noted that Canada’s procedures stand in stark contrast to the U.S., where refugee claimants spend months in detention centres.

With files from CTV Montreal, CTV Winnipeg and The Canadian Press

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/f.....-1.3291157
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

College of Family Physicians calls for review of Safe Third Country Agreement

The Canadian Press
Published Friday, February 17, 2017 4:40AM EST



OTTAWA - A physician's organization wants a review of an agreement that it says is preventing refugees coming from the U.S. to seek asylum in Canada.

The College of Family Physicians of Canada says it is worried about the health of migrants who have suffered from exposure to extreme winter cold after crossing into Manitoba and other provinces.

Dr. David White, president of the college, says the Safe Third Country Agreement needs to be reviewed due to uncertainty about the U.S. order to place travel restrictions on people from seven Muslim-majority countries.


U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order was suspended by a judge pending a legal challenge in the U.S. courts.

White says the 35,000-member college opposes the restrictions because of the risks it creates for vulnerable people.

He says the college also strongly opposes all expressions of xenophobia and Islamophobia.

"These changes warrant a review of the Safe Third Country Agreement which prevents refugees from entering Canada from the U.S. to seek asylum," the college said in a release.

"Our organization, its members and their patients come from all religions, cultures and ethnicities and we stand together in support of equity and dignity for all."

Under the Canada-U.S. agreement, refugee claimants are required to request refugee protection in the first safe country they arrive in, unless they qualify for an exception. If they manage to get on Canadian soil and are then arrested, they can stay while their refugee applications are processed.

Some immigration groups have called on the federal government to repeal the refugee agreement so that people fleeing the U.S. can go to official border crossings instead of sneaking through fields and risking frostbite or death.

The federal government said earlier this month it saw no need to make the change.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said Canada is compassionate when it comes to refugees.

"We have a system in place that is one of the most compassionate refugee systems in the world," Hussen said in the House on Thursday.

"The U.S. executive order has had no impact on domestic asylum policy. Each and every eligible asylum claimant has access to a fair hearing and each case is assessed on its merits."

http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/c.....-1.3289604
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lawyers call for changes to Safe Third Country Agreement amid refugee influx



Nicole Thompson, The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, February 12, 2017 5:11PM EST



Immigration lawyers say they've received an influx of requests from refugees in the U.S. hoping to seek asylum in Canada -- despite an agreement that makes it nearly impossible.

The Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement requires people to apply for asylum in the first country where they arrive, unless an immediate family member lives in the other country.

The Canadian government has faced pressure to repeal the agreement since President Donald Trump issued an executive order banning travel and immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. But Canada's government has so far refused.



Alastair Clarke, of Clarke Immigration Law in Winnipeg, said that's a mistake. He said 10 new clients have been referred to him in the last week -- some of whom crossed the border on foot, successfully bypassing border points so they could make their refugee claims once already in the country.

It's a method police say is on the rise -- the RCMP said 21 people were arrested for illegally crossing the border into Emerson, Man., Saturday.

Clarke said it's putting people at risk.

"They're crossing farmer fields on foot," he added. "When it's -10, -15 with the wind chill factors, it's highly risky."

He noted that refugees are avoiding coming through border crossing points because they fear that if they get turned away from the border due to the Safe Third Country Agreement, they won't be able to file for refugee status in Canada later on.

He said the agreement should either be "repealed, amended or suspended."

"The refugees who are coming into Canada do not feel safe in the United States," he said.

The federal government did not immediately respond to a request for comment Sunday, but earlier this month, a spokesperson said the government wouldn't suspend the agreement.

"Our government has no indication that the executive order has any impact on the American asylum system," said the Feb. 1 statement from Nancy Caron.

Caron said the agreement is focused on how to handle people who show up at either land border to make asylum claims, not the resettled refugees covered by Trump's edict. Even if they were covered, the deal operates independently of any executive orders, she added.

Henry Giroux, an American-born cultural critic and professor at McMaster University in Hamilton, said it's no wonder refugees don't feel safe in the U.S.

"It seems to me that when you have seven countries largely populated by Muslims labelled as terrorist countries, when in fact almost none of those countries has actually been responsible for a terrorist act in the United States, it instills an enormous amount of fear in people. An enormous amount of insecurity," he said.

Zool Suleman, of Suleman and Co. in Vancouver, said he's heard from people other than those who would have been affected by the executive order.

"It's not as simple as, 'I'm a new refugee to America and I want to come to Canada.' There is such a group, but there's another group of people who arrived in America from very difficult situations years ago, who now have lives in America," he said.

He said he's received calls from people who were originally from Mexico, Central America, South America and Africa. It's not just claimants from Muslim-majority countries.

"I'm hearing from people who are already in America and do not feel that they will get a fair hearing. And there has been a noticeable increase in these types of calls since the executive orders took place."

Suleman said his responses to callers vary case-by-case, but he said he has to warn them about the Safe Third Country Agreement.

"I think the Canadian government should seriously explore if the Safe Third Country Agreement is a viable option," he said. "Increasingly this problem is going to be on the front pages, and I think our government needs to look at some sort of humanitarian response."

Trump's executive order was suspended by a judge pending a legal challenge in the U.S. courts.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3281958
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the bold quote at the end might explain why they are coming to Canada , those who lose there claim in the US are almost always given it in Canadian courts )


Minneapolis Somali leaders warn against crossing into Canada


New insight about the underground railroad bringing asylum seekers to Manitoba. Beth Macdonell has more on the network and warnings.



Josh Dehaas, CTVNews.ca Writer

@JoshDehaas
.
Published Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:29PM EST
Last Updated Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:31PM EST

Leaders of the Somali community in Minneapolis are warning their fellow countrymen not to risk their lives by trekking across the U.S.-Canada border in freezing nighttime temperatures.

More than 400 people have illegally crossed the border near Emerson, Man., between April, 2016 and the end of January, according to the Canadian Border Services Agency. More than half are Somali.

Minneapolis community activist Omar Jamal told CTV Winnipeg that he has counselled as many as 30 families -- mostly from Minnesota but also from Ohio -- against crossing the border. About half have gone anyway, he said.


Omar Jamal
Omar Jamal speaks to CTV Winnipeg, in Minneapolis, Minn., on Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017.

Jamal said the families are paying $600 to $1,000 a person for rides to the border, often with small children. “When the sun goes down at night,” he said, “they will start walking.”

Jamal said their immigration statuses vary. “Some of them just came out of jail … they were in immigration detention and awaiting their process, some have been convicted on some level of a crime, some of them may even have a green card,” he said.

One thing he said they have in common is fear of U.S. President Donald Trump’s 90-day travel ban on people from seven countries, including Somalia. The Jan. 27 executive order was suspended by a federal appeals court on Feb 9.

Jamal said there is a lot of “fearmongering” in the community and that people should keep in mind that the travel ban was only meant to be temporary. “If you don’t have any conviction,” he said, “I think you have a (better) chance of getting your documents here.”

Jibril Afyareh, an advocate with the Somali Citizens League, agreed that many of those heading north are people who have already been rejected by the U.S., and are now worried about deportation by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

“It seems those rejection documents are a valid reason to go to Canada as asylum seekers or immigrants,” he said. “And, as the Canadian prime minister has put it, he’s welcoming them,’ Afyareh added.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau famously tweeted on the weekend Trump’s travel ban took effect: “to those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength #WelcomeToCanada.”

However, a Canada-U.S. treaty known as the Safe Third Country Agreement requiring refugee claimants to make their claims in the first country they arrive in remains in place, so asylum seekers can expect to be turned back if they show up at a regulated crossing.

Afyareh said he urges people to “stay calm” and avoid the risk of crossing into Canada.

He also said the ban has had a devastating effect on those who saw the U.S. as a beacon of freedom but are now being told “you don’t belong here.”

“Obviously we need to secure and work on the safety of this country,” Afyareh said. “I do this every day, working with the youth attorney trying to stop radicalization.”

“But this (travel ban) defeats the purpose,” he added. “This sends the message that you’re not wanted by this country which is not the case.”

Bashir Khan, a Winnipeg immigration lawyer, told CTV News Channel earlier this month that the asylum seekers have a high likelihood of success -- even if the U.S rejected them.

“In my experience,” Khan said, “80 to 90 per cent of the people who are denied asylum in the United States do end up winning their refugee claim before the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada.”

Manitoba isn’t the only province seeing a spike in asylum seekers illegally crossing the border. In fact, Quebec has seen the biggest increase.

With a report from CTV Winnipeg’s Beth MacDonell

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/m.....-1.3287676
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two Tory MPs call on Ottawa to stop irregular Canada-U.S. border crossings

Increase in asylum claims, which remains 'well below previous fluctuations,' government spokeswoman says

By Morgan Lowrie, The Canadian Press Posted: Feb 19, 2017 5:47 PM CT| Last Updated: Feb 19, 2017 6:55 PM CT


Two Conservative MPs are calling on the federal government to act to stop the flow of people irregularly crossing the United States border into Canada.

Michelle Rempel and Tony Clement tweeted on Sunday that the crossings are unsafe and place a burden on local law enforcement.

"The government must respond to this situation in a way that keeps Canadians safe, and sends a strong message to those considering an illegal crossing that there are proper channels to do this," Rempel wrote.


Clement, who is the public safety critic for the Conservatives, tweeted his support for Rempel's comments.

"Illegal crossings are unsafe and a burden on local communities. Our laws should be enforced," he wrote.


Rempel's message was posted after Manitoba RCMP announced that another 22 people were intercepted crossing the border near Emerson on Saturday night.

Officials have said a growing number of people are choosing to walk across the border into Canada to claim refugee status, including dozens who have been arrested in the Emerson area in recent weeks.


Other provinces including Quebec have also seen a large rise in the number of refugee claimants who enter the province irregularly.

The tactic is a way to avoid the Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement, which prevents most people who have been living in the United States from making a refugee claim at an official border crossing on the premise that they are already somewhere safe.

This has prompted some people to cross elsewhere in order to make their claims from within Canada, where authorities generally grant them a hearing.

Montreal immigration lawyer Eric Taillefer said the easiest way to stop the irregular border crossings is to suspend the Safe Third Country Agreement and allow people to request refugee status at official border crossings.

"These people are not crossing in the winter in -30 degree weather for fun — they're doing it because they don't have a choice," he said in a phone interview.

Question Period 20170131
Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Ahmed Hussen during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Tuesday, Jan.31, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

No plans to suspend agreement, Ottawa says

A spokesperson for Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said Ottawa wasn't planning to suspend the agreement.

"The Safe Third Country Agreement remains an important tool for Canada and the U.S. to work together on the orderly handling of refugee claims made in our countries," Camielle Edwards said in an email.

Edwards said the government and RCMP were working to address the increase in asylum claims, which remains "well below previous fluctuations."


As for Rempel and Clement's comments, Taillefer suggested the tougher rules implemented under former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper may have contributed to the current problem by making it more difficult for refugees to enter the country lawfully.

"It's a bit their fault if we're in this situation, because the new refugee claim system that is having problems was put in place by the Conservatives in 2012. Before that, we didn't have these kind of problems," he said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3990697
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ahem ... these are not refugees. They are illegal immigrants to the USA who are leaving the country precisely because they are not refugees. They are simply trying to avoid law enforcement. That isn't the same thing as a persecution.
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2017 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the big story coming out of the news today is how an upset Tony Clement hung up on a CBC reporter )


Vexed Clement hangs up on CBC interview about border-hopping migrants



Janice Dickson

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017


Conservative MP Tony Clement cut off a CBC Daybreak interview Tuesday morning that turned heated over questions about asylum-seekers crossing the border in Emerson, Manitoba from the United States.



In an interview with Montreal Daybreak host Mike Finnerty, Clement said the Liberal government should do more to stop people from crossing the border illegally — but he didn’t offer any suggestions as to how the government should do that.

“I think we need to make sure refugee claimants are abiding by Canadian law and that the RCMP have the resources necessary both at border crossings and in between crossings to make sure that we don’t get illegal claimants, because that’s a huge strain on the system, it promotes illegal activity and (it’s) unsafe and dangerous activity for the claimants themselves. So, yes, we are calling on the government to put in more resources at the border,” said Clement.



When asked repeatedly what he believes the RCMP’s role should be at the border, Clement sounded frustrated. “I’ve already told you. I’ve already told you, sir. We should apply the law. We should make sure the RCMP have the resources to apply the law.”

Finnerty asked him several times what ‘applying the law’ in this context would look like, what that would mean and what he would like the RCMP to do differently.

“I’m not the government. The CBC is not the government. It’s up to the government to come up with a plan,” said an exasperated Clement.

After another line of similar questioning, Clement repeated his earlier response: “We have a problem. It’s simple. Apply the law.”

“But how would they apply the law?” Finnerty asked again. “Would they stop them, would they say, ‘I’m sorry you can’t cross here and you should go back across the border?’ How would …”

Dial tone: Clement had hung up.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/21.....-migrants/
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2017 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blaney calls for crackdown on illegal migrants



Janice Dickson

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017



Conservative leadership candidate Steven Blaney played off the increase in migrants crossing the border on foot from the U.S. with a call today to counter “illegal immigration.”

Blaney writes in a press release that the number of illegal migrants is growing “following recent events” — a possible reference to President Donald Trump’s attempt to close the border to migrants from certain countries.

“The potential scale of the problem of illegal border crossings makes it imperative that we harmonize the rules governing the reception of refugees coming from the United States,” Blaney said in the release.

Blaney proposes giving the RCMP more...

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/21.....-migrants/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( our immigration minister says refugees can still make " fair " claims in the US , so why the need for them to illegally cross the border ? )



Refugees can still make fair claims in States, says Hussen



Kelsey Johnson

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017


Canada’s immigration minister says he feels refugees arriving in the United States can still make a fair claim there, despite an “uptick” in the number of people crossing into Canada illegally.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen told reporters in Ottawa that America’s domestic refugee program continues to meet its international obligations.

“As far as we’re concerned, someone in the United States can still make a credible asylum claim through their system.”

He noted the suspended executive order that banned travel from seven Muslim countries did not apply to domestic claims and said Canada isn’t looking to end a third party agreement between the two countries that...

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/21.....ys-hussen/
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony Clement defends position after hanging up on radio interview



Conservative MP Tony Clement is calling on the government to take action against illegal crossings from the U.S. by people seeking asylum.


Laura Payton, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@laura_payton
.
Published Tuesday, February 21, 2017 6:09PM EST


Tony Clement is still not explaining how he wants the Liberal government to amend its handling of an influx of refugee claimants entering Canada illegally.

Clement hung up on a radio interview Tuesday morning when the interviewer pressed him for details on his desire for the government to come up with a plan to deal with the increase in asylum seekers jumping the border.

In an interview with CTV Power Play host Don Martin, Clement repeated his call for a plan.


Then-treasury board president Tony Clement fields questions in the foyer outside the House of Commons in Ottawa, Monday, May 11, 2015. (Adrian Wyld / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

"We are calling for two things in particular. One, more resources, more money and funding, and human resources for the border agents and for the RCMP to deal with this much higher influx," Clement, the party's public safety critic, told Martin.

"Secondly, we want the federal government to develop a plan. What is the plan that is going to be employed or deployed to ensure that the rule of law continues in this country, that the laws are obeyed, that we don't have illegal crossings?"

Canada has seen an increase in the number of refugee claimants crossing the border near Emerson, Man. and near Hemmingford, Que., since U.S. President Donald Trump took office and tried to block entry to people from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Under the 2004 safe third country agreement, someone who has claimed refugee status in the U.S. can't make a claim in Canada, and vice versa. But the agreement is only applied at border crossings, not at rural points of entry to Canada where there is no official crossing.

Those who cross illegally are arrested by the RCMP and transported for interviews by the Canada Border Services Agency, then usually released until their Immigration and Refugee Board hearing.

Refugee advocates, as well as the NDP, are pressing the Liberal government to suspend the safe third country agreement until it's more clear how refugee claimants in the U.S. will be treated under the new administration. The Liberals have resisted those calls.

"They're crossing through a farmer's field which is snow-packed or they're crossing along a laneway from Vermont to Quebec," Clement said.

"This raises concerns for their own health and safety... at the same time we're saying our laws have to be enforced, and that's I think a simple request to make of the federal government. Make sure our laws are enforced properly and fairly and equally."

It's on that point that Clement stumbled in his interview with CBC Radio in Montreal. Pressed on what he meant when he said the government should apply Canadian law, Clement couldn't provide a specific recommendation. The host asked him more than a dozen times to describe what he felt the government or the RCMP should be doing, but Clement eventually hung up mid-question, leaving a dial tone as the only response to the host's query.

In his interview with CTV's Power Play, Clement said Canada has obligations once a refugee claimant crosses into the country.

"That's why I think that we need to beef up our ability to patrol our border at these areas where we're getting this problem," he said.

"This problem ain't going away. [The] weather's getting warmer, snow will be melting and so we will be dealing with this issue for months unless the government has a plan that can secure our borders and make sure the law is applied fairly and equally

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3295344
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( look at these poll results I found online , was actually looking thru the soo news site trying to find news about the by election but saw this poll , the results are rather shocking and go against the media's positive refugee spin as to whats been happening )



Poll Results

Should Canada accept the flood of refugees fleeing the United States?


Yes
509 votes 25.49 %



No
1308 votes 65.50 %



Don't know
180 votes 9.01 %



Total votes: 1997
Added: about 23 hours ago

https://www.sootoday.com/polls/should-canada-accept-the-flood-of-refugees-fleeing-the-united-states-5267
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( how many need to cross before its considered a trend ? serious what a joke )


Despite Manitoba concerns, immigration minister not convinced of an asylum trend



The Canadian Press

Sunday, February 26th, 2017




Canada’s immigration minister says he’s not yet convinced a recent increase in the number of asylum seekers crossing the border illegally from the United States constitutes a growing trend, despite concerns raised by Manitoba that the situation may be getting out of hand.

In the days and weeks that followed a move by President Donald Trump to ban travellers from seven Muslim-majority entering the U.S., Canada has seen an increase in the number of refugee claimants walking across the border to request asylum.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister has expressed worries that those numbers could rise further as the weather becomes warmer, and has called on Ottawa to provide more help in dealing with the influx.

In an interview with CTV’s “Question Period”, Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen said, for now, Ottawa is monitoring the situation, but added it’s still too early to say whether even more asylum seekers will continue walking over Canada’s doorstep.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, meanwhile, says officials are analyzing the influx, and that most of the asylum seekers intended to eventually end up in Canada, rather than the United States.

But in an interview with Global’s “The West Block”, Goodale couldn’t say why people are choosing to cross illegally from the U.S. if their goal was always to end up on Canadian soil.

http://ipolitics.ca/2017/02/26.....lum-trend/
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The road north: Dozens of asylum seekers are now flooding into Canada across unmanned borders every day amid fears of Trump's crackdown on immigration

Dramatic photos show asylum seekers flooding into Canada across unmanned borders every day
They are fleeing US amid fears of Donald Trump presidency, which has seen a crackdown on immigration
Number of asylum seekers crossing into Canada has increased in recent weeks, according to officials
As of February 13, some 3,800 people had made an asylum claim in 2017, up from the same period last year
PM Justin Trudeau came under pressure Thursday to deal with asylum seekers illegally coming into Canada
Experts have also warned that warmer weather could spur more arrivals of asylum-seekers in the country
By DAILYMAIL.COM REPORTER and ASSOCIATED PRESS and REUTERS
PUBLISHED: 01:20 GMT, 26 February 2017 | UPDATED: 14:38 GMT, 26 February 2017

Dramatic photos show asylum seekers flooding into Canada across unmanned borders every day from the United States amid fears of a Donald Trump presidency.

The number of asylum seekers crossing into Canada at isolated and unguarded border crossings has increased in recent weeks as many believe Trump will start expelling illegal immigrants.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came under increasing pressure on Thursday to deal with asylum seekers illegally crossing into Canada from the US

Dramatic photos show asylum seekers flooding into Canada across unmanned borders every day from the United States amid fears of a Donald Trump presidency. An extended family of eight people from Colombia were detained by the Canadian Mounted Police officers near Hemmingford, Quebec, on Saturday

The number of asylum seekers crossing into Canada at isolated and unguarded border crossings has increased in recent as many believe Trump will start expelling illegal immigrants. The desperate family crossed the border illegally, according to authorities

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came under increasing pressure on Thursday to deal with asylum seekers illegally crossing into Canada from the US. A woman is pictured carrying a young boy

Trudeau, who stresses that Canada welcomes refugees, has so far avoided political fallout with Trump. The two talked on the phone about the border and other issues on Thursday but neither government gave many details of the conversation. Officers spoke with the family on Saturday

Trudeau, who stresses that Canada welcomes refugees, has so far avoided political fallout with Trump. The two talked on the phone about the border and other issues on Thursday but neither government gave many details of the conversation.

Allies and opponents alike say they want a strategy to cope with the dozens of people - mainly from Burundi, Eritrea, Syria, Ghana and Sudan - walking across the border every day.

The premier of the western province of Manitoba, where many of the refugees end up, on Thursday asked Ottawa for more resources to deal with the new arrivals, some of whom have lost fingers to frostbite in the dangerous crossing.

While Brian Pallister said his province will welcome those in need with 'open arms and open hearts,' his call for a national strategy to deal with the arrivals adds to opposition criticism that Trudeau has put national security at risk by embracing asylum seekers.

As of February 13, some 3,800 people had made an asylum claim in 2017, up from the same period last year and on track to approach the 2008 peak of 36,867, said Scott Bardsley, spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale.

Allies and opponents alike say they want a strategy to cope with the dozens of people - mainly from Burundi, Eritrea, Syria, Ghana and Sudan - walking across the border every day. A man carrying bulky suitcases also crossed into Canada on Saturday

On Thursday, some asylum claimants were arrested by Canadian authorities after they crossed into Canada from the US. The man (left) claimed to be from Turkey, authorities said

A woman, who also claimed to be a claimant from Turkey, was handcuffed near the US-Canada border on Thursday

The number of migrants claiming refugee status at the Canadian-US border rose to over 7,000 last year, up from 4,316 in the previous year

Bardsley said comparable data for the January 1 to February 13 period in 2016 was not available.

The asylum seekers are breaking the law because Canada's policy under a Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement is to turn back refugees if they make claims at border crossings. Trudeau and Trump discussed border cooperation in their phone call on Thursday.

The White House said Trump emphasized the importance of working closely with Canada on cross-border issues, 'including implementation of his administration's actions to protect America from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals and others'.

Officials say Trump will soon issue a new executive order to replace the administration's directive suspending travel to the US by citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries.

Warmer weather could spur more arrivals of asylum-seekers in Canada.

'They know they are in a pickle. If people are coming over in February, what's it going to be like in June and July?' said University of Toronto political science professor Nelson Wiseman.


Polls show Canadians are split over whether Canada should be accepting more or fewer refugees. But even Liberal legislators are starting to hear from constituents concerned about the arrivals.

'One or two people have raised the issue with me ... and I expect I'll have a few more' conversations with constituents about the arrivals, said Kevin Lamoureux, member of parliament for Winnipeg North, where many asylum seekers settle awaiting their refugee hearing.

Other dramatic photos that were taken last week, captured the moment eight asylum seekers, including four children, barely made it across the Canadian border as a US border patrol officer tried to stop them.

The photos, which included smiling Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) greeting men, women, teens and children went viral last week.

A US Customs and Border Patrol officer seized their passports and questioned a man in the front passenger seat of a taxi that had pulled up to the border in Champlain, New York.

As the man was being questioned, four adults and four young children fled the cab and ran to RCMP on the other side.

The asylum seekers (pictured on Monday) are breaking the law because Canada's policy under a Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement is to turn back refugees if they make claims at border crossings

Experts have said that warmer weather could spur more arrivals of asylum-seekers in Canada. 'They know they are in a pickle. If people are coming over in February, what's it going to be like in June and July?' said University of Toronto political science professor Nelson Wiseman

Polls show Canadians are split over whether Canada should be accepting more or fewer refugees. But even Liberal legislators are starting to hear from constituents concerned about the arrivals. A family talks with police on Monday near Hemmingford, Quebec

A refugee claimant from Mauritania crossed the border into Canada from the US on near Hemmingford, Quebec

One by one they scrambled across the snowy gully separating the two countries.

Family members dragged luggage and pushed their toddler in a stroller through the snow before Canadian officers detained them, per standard procedure for refugee claimants.

RCMP officers watching from the other side helped them up, lifting the younger children and asking a woman, who leaned on her fellow passenger as she walked, if she needed medical care.

The children looked back from where they had come as the US officer held the first man, saying his papers needed to be verified.

The man turned to a pile of belongings and heaved pieces of luggage two at a time into the gully - enormous wheeled suitcases, plastic shopping bags, a black backpack.

'Nobody cares about us,' he said. He said they were all from Sudan and had been living and working in Delaware for two years.

A photo showed that at least one of their passports was Sudanese. Some media reports list the family as being from Somalia.

The man then appeared to grab their passports from the US officer before making a run for the border.

The officer yelled and gave chase but stopped at the border marker. Canadian police took hold of the man's arm as he crossed.

The border patrol officer told his counterpart that the man was in the US illegally and that he would have detained him.

Other dramatic photos that were taken last week, captured the moment eight asylum seekers, including four children (pictured), barely made it across the Canadian border as a US border patrol officer tried to stop them

A US Customs and Border Patrol officer seized their passports and questioned a man in the front passenger seat of a taxi that had pulled up to the border in Champlain, New York . As the man was being questioned, four adults and four young children fled the cab and ran to RCMP on the other side
A US Customs and Border Patrol officer seized their passports and questioned a man in the front passenger seat of a taxi that had pulled up to the border in Champlain, New York . As the man was being questioned, four adults and four young children fled the cab and ran to RCMP on the other side

One by one they scrambled across the snowy gully separating the two countries. Family members dragged luggage and pushed their toddler in a stroller through the snow before Canadian officers detained them, per standard procedure for refugee claimants. One officer flashed a smile as he helped a little girl over a gully
One by one they scrambled across the snowy gully separating the two countries. Family members dragged luggage and pushed their toddler in a stroller through the snow before Canadian officers detained them, per standard procedure for refugee claimants. One officer flashed a smile as he helped a little girl over a gully

Officers on both sides momentarily eyed the luggage strewn in the snow before the US officer took it, and a walker left on the road, to the border line.

Canadian police carried the articles to their vehicles, and the people piled in to be driven to a nearby border office to be interviewed by police and to make a refugee claim.

'The RCMP aren't there to treat them like bandits. They're here to apply the law', retired Sûreté du Québec police officer and Hemmingford resident François Doré told CBCNews.

The small town of Hemmingford has seen a surge of asylum seekers since Trump took office and instated a ban on travel from seven Muslim-majority countries, including Sudan and Somalia.

Though key parts of the ban have been blocked by a federal judge, there is still confusion.

Asylum seekers from around the world have shown up in Canada cold and hungry from difficult border crossings in the dead of winter.

Asylum-seekers sneak across because even if they are caught, they can make a claim in Canada; if they make a claim at a border crossing, they are turned away. Trudeau has admitted that he is 'very concerned' with the amount of asylum seekers crossing into rural areas

The majority of these crossings have been happening on the New York-Quebec border, which authorities attribute to its closeness to the major East Coast cities
The majority of these crossings have been happening on the New York-Quebec border, which authorities attribute to its closeness to the major East Coast cities

'Sometimes when you're left with no options and you're looking for a better life for yourself, people do take risks', Mohamud Noor, executive director of the Confederation of Somali Community in Minnesota told Global News.

'It will increase rather than decrease … This is not going to reduce'.

The Canadian government does not have statistics on the number of people seeking refugee status who enter the country illegally.

But Sergeant Harold Pfleiderer of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police told The New York Times that 'there has been an increase in illegal migration in Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia, with the largest increase being seen in Quebec'.

The reason they are crossing into Canada is because the country is part of an agreement that bars refugees that have already arrived in another 'safe' country from trying to trade up to another country.

Asylum-seekers sneak across because even if they are caught, they can make a claim in Canada; if they make a claim at a border crossing, they are turned away.

Trudeau has admitted that he is 'very concerned' with the amount of asylum seekers crossing into rural areas.

But Trudeau did not say whether he would seek to suspend Canada's agreement with the US and allow these people to apply for refugee status at official borders.

The majority of these crossings have been happening on the New York-Quebec border, which authorities attribute to its closeness to the major East Coast cities

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....anada.html
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Close the Safe Third Country loophole: Jason Kenney



Laura Payton, Ottawa News Bureau Online Producer

@laura_payton
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Published Sunday, February 26, 2017 7:00AM EST
Last Updated Sunday, February 26, 2017 9:14AM EST

OTTAWA -- The federal government should eliminate a loophole that encourages asylum seekers to cross the border illegally, former Conservative immigration minister Jason Kenney says.

Canada has seen an increase in the number of refugee claimants walking over the border from the U.S. to request asylum in the weeks following U.S. President Donald Trump's attempt to ban travellers from seven Muslim-majority countries. Under the Safe Third Country Agreement between Canada and the U.S., refugee claimants in one country can't make the same claim on the other side of the border.

But the agreement only applies to those who make their claims at official border crossings. If they manage to cross in an open area and hit Canadian soil, they are entitled to a hearing.


Alberta PC leadership candidate Jason Kenney
Alberta PC leadership candidate Jason Kenney speaks on CTV's Question Period.

The risks of crossing illegally -- for example, walking across a dark field in the middle of a Manitoba winter -- has led advocates to call for the government to suspend the safe third country agreement.

But Kenney says the government should simply close the loophole.

"We should not suspend [the agreement], we should seek to eliminate those exemptions in my view," Kenney said in an interview with Evan Solomon, host of CTV's Question Period.

In the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, Kenney said, Canada and the U.S. came up with an agreement that said those seeking protection have to do so in the country they're in.

"And the U.S. has a fair, just, independent asylum system," he said.

"It's not run by Donald Trump. It's run by the independent American judiciary, the same judiciary that struck down his executive order."

The problem is the exemption that allows people to enter Canada illicitly to make a refugee claim "is incentivizing people coming in illegally and dangerously. We want regular, safe, legal migration, not unsafe illegal migration," Kenney said.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, in an interview on Question Period, echoed Kenney's comments

"The U.S. domestic asylum system is the way it was before the executive orders were issued," Hussen said.

"It has no impact on government-resettled refugees, which is what the executive order impacted, and [which] was overturned by the courts."

The asylum system, Hussen agreed with Kenney, is monitored by the American judiciary.

"The U.S. executive doesn't actually monitor the agreement. As of today, and we continue to monitor the situation very closely, the U.S. asylum system is available to those that are seeking asylum."

Kenney says Trump doesn't define conservatism in any way.

"Unfortunately I think some of what Donald Trump has done has created a false dichotomy, a false choice, between the kind of utopian idea of open borders and a kind of xenophobic reaction to immigration. What we need is a balance," Kenney said

"I think he's a populist who used to be a liberal democrat. I think there's a danger that some of what he's doing will cause brand contamination for conservatism."

http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics.....-1.3300400
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mp's call on government to Stop Illegal border crossings

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