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RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6276
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votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:19 pm    Post subject: voter turnout high among jailed voters last election Reply with quote

( an interesting video/article from the rebel , a conservative mp asked some hard questions , such as how many actually voted and in what ridings were those votes cast ?

the number of votes cast by incarcerated electors is shockingly high at 22,362 when considering the number of jails and prisoners we actually have in Canada . the number of votes cast also aren't that high in ridings with prisons like Kingston and the islands ( which is a safe liberal riding ) , only 118 votes were cast there , so a lot were actually voting in the "original" ridings they lived in prior to going to prison ,

the big question is why did so many care to vote in ridings they don't even live in anymore and who was organizing this effort from behind bars ? )



February 15, 2017

EXCLUSIVE: Tough-on-crime candidates lost in ridings with large prison populations

Christopher Wilson
Rebel Commentator



In 2002, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled on Sauve v Canada, overturning an Elections Canada law barring prisoners from voting. So prisoner voting is nothing new in Canada; we’ve now had it for five elections.



But do ridings in Canada with large prison populations tend to vote for a particular party, and has that determined some election results?

Conservative MP Jim Eglinski filed an order paper question in the House of Commons asking those very questions.

The results are in and we will as always post the entire document below so you can see how many prisoners voted in each riding across the country.

But I want to highlight two ridings for you in particular, Elmwood-Transcona in Manitoba and Churchill in Saskatchewan. Both are ridings where Conservative incumbent MPs lost, and they lost by less than the margin of prisoner votes cast.

But here is what is most interesting:

Both the defeated incumbent Conservatives were outspoken and tough on crime...

This can be a lesson for our American viewers, especially those in Florida where a political action committee wants the Supreme Court to overturn that state’s ban on those with felonies from voting.

Florida is so valuable in the Electoral College — would you like to see over 1.7 million convicted felons regain their right to vote and possibly tip every election from now on to the soft-on-crime Democrats?

http://www.therebel.media/excl.....opulations
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6276
Reputation: 229
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

another thing that stands out when looking thru the more detailed numbers is the number of " rejected ballots " there much higher than normal levels in an average riding , they run as high as 10 % of the prisoner vote cast in some ridings


why would so many prisoners go to all the trouble of requesting a ballot for a riding they don't live and might not of lived in for years only to spoil it ?


it really doesn't make any sense unless you look at things from a different perspective , perhaps there was internal pressure from within the jail to request a ballot for some reason ? and these prisoners felt it would be in there best interest to vote and participate in the election

but they didn't actually care if there vote counted or not , they just wanted " someone " to think they had voted

its all very weird and definitely hard to explain
RCO





Joined: 02 Mar 2009
Posts: 6276
Reputation: 229
votes: 3
Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( according to WPB and a detailed page about Canada's prisons , there is on average 40,663 prisoners in Canadian jails , a little calculations and according to my numbers that means a voter turnout of 54 % , which is less than an average riding in Canada but seems really high when considering all the trouble involved in requesting a ballot out of riding and such )




Prison population total (including pre-trial detainees / remand prisoners)


40 663


http://www.prisonstudies.org/country/canada
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