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RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:30 pm    Post subject: is a Winter Cabinet Shuffle looming ? Reply with quote

( somewhat a mix of rumours and fact but there is rumours in Ottawa of a possible winter cabinet shuffle but somehow I have my doubts well see any significant changes as trudeau seems more focused on having a gender neutral cabinet than having people qualified to do the job , Maryam Monsef is an obvious candidate to be moved but according to trudeau she is the right race and sex to be in cabinet , does it even matter if she's doing a good job or not ? , his cabinet is all about political correctness )



Winter Cabinet Shuffle Being Mulled By Trudeau


Posted: 12/16/2016 7:29 pm EST Updated: 12/17/2016 2:03 pm EST

Althia Raj Become a fan
Althia.Raj@huffingtonpost.com


OTTAWA — Liberal cabinet ministers, parliamentary secretaries and MPs might like to ask Santa if they can keep their portfolios or get a promotion. The Huffington Post Canada has learned a winter shuffle is being contemplated.

Last December, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appointed his 35 parliamentary secretaries — 23 men and 12 women — the MPs were told their portfolios had a one-year mandate.

Their positions have been extended a few weeks as the prime minister looks to rejig his cabinet, a senior source said. Trudeau may:
•Elevate strong performers, such as Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s parliamentary secretary, François-Philippe Champagne
•Reward hard workers, such as International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland
•Or dump weaker performers from the inner circle, such as Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef.

“[The parliamentary secretaries] are extended until the House returns in January while we evaluate their partnerships with them,” Kate Purchase, Trudeau’s director of communications, told HuffPost in an email.

Late Friday evening, after this story was published, Purchase sent an email saying "nothing on the horizon" was planned regarding a cabinet shuffle.

ceta
European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland, Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard and European Council President Donald Tusk attend the signing ceremony of CETA in Brussels on Oct. 30. (Photo: Francois Lenoir/Reuters)

Rotating parliamentary secretaries may help Trudeau with the management of an ambitious and talented caucus. There are currently 182 Liberal MPs, many of whom are men or women from traditional areas of strength for the party who may not have the gender, demographic, ethnic or religious criteria that increase their chance of landing a cabinet post.

Parliamentary secretaries earn $16,800 on top of their $170,400 base salary as MPs. While most are expected to answer questions when their ministers are not in the House of Commons, some have been given additional responsibilities.

Former Toronto police chief Bill Blair, for example, was charged with leading a federal-provincial task force on the legalization of marijuana. Another who got extra duties was former Toronto municipal councillor Adam Vaughan, who was given the mandate of helping the government address national housing challenges.

maryam monsef
Maryam Monsef stands in the House of Commons during question period on Parliament Hill in Ottawaon Dec. 5. (Photo: Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press)

The job of a parliamentary secretary can often be a stepping stone to cabinet as it’s a way for backbench MPs to showcase their abilities. Conservative MP Michelle Rempel, for example, was a particular strong performer as parliamentary secretary to then environment minister Peter Kent. She was later promoted, by prime minister Stephen Harper, to minister of state for Western economic diversification.

Trudeau has 29 cabinet ministers — 30 including himself. Fifteen are women. He promised gender equality in his cabinet during the last election and received international recognition for his commitment.


The Ottawa guessing game of who will go where has already begun.

Over the summer, there were persistent rumours that Foreign Affairs Minister Stéphane Dion would be shuffled out of his portfolio next year and sent to Paris to be Canada’s ambassador to France. Dion told HuffPost at the Liberals’ summer caucus that he wasn't interested in changing positions any time soon.

Cabinet ministers earn $81,500 on top of the $170,400 base salary.

Update: This story was updated with comments from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's director of communications Kate Purchase. The story originally stated Purchase neither confirmed nor denied a post-Christmas cabinet shuffle.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2.....82828.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

" Rotating parliamentary secretaries may help Trudeau with the management of an ambitious and talented caucus. There are currently 182 Liberal MPs, many of whom are men or women from traditional areas of strength for the party who may not have the gender, demographic, ethnic or religious criteria that increase their chance of landing a cabinet post. "


that comment really stood out for me she mentions gender , demographic , ethnic or religious criteria ? what about skill or knowledge of area cabinet post focuses on ?

so were suppose to put someone in cabinet because they are the right gender ? and the right ethnicity ? this is how we got jokes like Monsef in the first place , its no longer about skills its about other factors
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:24 am    Post subject: Re: is a Winter Cabinet Shuffle looming ? Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
( somewhat a mix of rumours and fact but there is rumours in Ottawa of a possible winter cabinet shuffle but somehow I have my doubts well see any significant changes as trudeau seems more focused on having a gender neutral cabinet than having people qualified to do the job , Maryam Monsef is an obvious candidate to be moved but according to trudeau she is the right race and sex to be in cabinet , does it even matter if she's doing a good job or not ? , his cabinet is all about political correctness )


I don't really see what the gender neutral cabinet has to do with anything. Monsef has been a weak performer but so has Dion. And to be fair to Monsef she's also new and has had a tough issue to deal with, though she has made it worse. Expectations for Dion were higher and he's failed miserably. The other female minister who has supposedly done a poor job is Mihychuk, but we haven't heard a whole lot about her. There have been mixed opinions on Sajjan's performance.

I don't see any indications that his cabinet is struggling because it's gender neutral and that one sex is performing worse than the other. I do agree that people need to be qualified for positions and shouldn't just land in cabinet because of their gender.

As for speculation.

If Dion leaves I'd say Garneau and Freeland could be the likely successors for him. Garneau has been fairly quiet but he's supposedly doing a very good job of running his departments, quiet ministers are usually the best. There seemed to be some mixed reviews on Freeland during the final CETA negotiations but she has received praised and there were reports recently that she'd be promoted. She'd also be a good fit for the portfolio, especially after being in international trade.

Hajdu was also mentioned recently as a minister who could expect a promotion. However, her $1 million office might get in the way of that, though Trudeau might not care about the optics.

François-Philippe Champagne, who is the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance was also mentioned as someone who could be promoted. If Dion leaves that gives Trudeau an opening to appoint someone from Quebec. Like Jean Chretien he was raised in Shawinigan and his riding is carved out Chretien's old one. He actually has a pretty impressive resume.

One thing I will say for Trudeau is he does seem to have a caucus of people with strong resumes. Whether that'll lead to strong ministers is another question.

As well, there has also been speculation that Newfoundland and Labrador Minister Judy Foote might leave. Recently she's been called the most powerful politician in the province and has actually helped Ball resolve a number of local issues. Yvonne Jones would likely replace her, not sure what kind of portfolio she would get.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 10:41 am    Post subject: Re: is a Winter Cabinet Shuffle looming ? Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
RCO wrote:
( somewhat a mix of rumours and fact but there is rumours in Ottawa of a possible winter cabinet shuffle but somehow I have my doubts well see any significant changes as trudeau seems more focused on having a gender neutral cabinet than having people qualified to do the job , Maryam Monsef is an obvious candidate to be moved but according to trudeau she is the right race and sex to be in cabinet , does it even matter if she's doing a good job or not ? , his cabinet is all about political correctness )


I don't really see what the gender neutral cabinet has to do with anything. Monsef has been a weak performer but so has Dion. And to be fair to Monsef she's also new and has had a tough issue to deal with, though she has made it worse. Expectations for Dion were higher and he's failed miserably. The other female minister who has supposedly done a poor job is Mihychuk, but we haven't heard a whole lot about her. There have been mixed opinions on Sajjan's performance.

I don't see any indications that his cabinet is struggling because it's gender neutral and that one sex is performing worse than the other. I do agree that people need to be qualified for positions and shouldn't just land in cabinet because of their gender.

As for speculation.

If Dion leaves I'd say Garneau and Freeland could be the likely successors for him. Garneau has been fairly quiet but he's supposedly doing a very good job of running his departments, quiet ministers are usually the best. There seemed to be some mixed reviews on Freeland during the final CETA negotiations but she has received praised and there were reports recently that she'd be promoted. She'd also be a good fit for the portfolio, especially after being in international trade.

Hajdu was also mentioned recently as a minister who could expect a promotion. However, her $1 million office might get in the way of that, though Trudeau might not care about the optics.

François-Philippe Champagne, who is the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance was also mentioned as someone who could be promoted. If Dion leaves that gives Trudeau an opening to appoint someone from Quebec. Like Jean Chretien he was raised in Shawinigan and his riding is carved out Chretien's old one. He actually has a pretty impressive resume.

One thing I will say for Trudeau is he does seem to have a caucus of people with strong resumes. Whether that'll lead to strong ministers is another question.

As well, there has also been speculation that Newfoundland and Labrador Minister Judy Foote might leave. Recently she's been called the most powerful politician in the province and has actually helped Ball resolve a number of local issues. Yvonne Jones would likely replace her, not sure what kind of portfolio she would get.


I'm not yet convinced there is going to be a cabinet shuffle yet , the optics of removing Monsef from her post before her review and such are finished would look horrible , how could you all of a sudden put someone else in there ? before she had even done her job .

there also hasn't been any confirmations that anyone is leaving so there is not any vacancies to fill either

they might choose to rotate the parliamentary secretaries around as a away to make every one feel happy and so as many mp's as possible get to be one , but those posts aren't considered that important

although if the liberals troubles continue into the new year , such as cash for access and electoral reform , I could definitely see there being one
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 11:17 am    Post subject: Re: is a Winter Cabinet Shuffle looming ? Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
Progressive Tory wrote:
RCO wrote:
( somewhat a mix of rumours and fact but there is rumours in Ottawa of a possible winter cabinet shuffle but somehow I have my doubts well see any significant changes as trudeau seems more focused on having a gender neutral cabinet than having people qualified to do the job , Maryam Monsef is an obvious candidate to be moved but according to trudeau she is the right race and sex to be in cabinet , does it even matter if she's doing a good job or not ? , his cabinet is all about political correctness )


I don't really see what the gender neutral cabinet has to do with anything. Monsef has been a weak performer but so has Dion. And to be fair to Monsef she's also new and has had a tough issue to deal with, though she has made it worse. Expectations for Dion were higher and he's failed miserably. The other female minister who has supposedly done a poor job is Mihychuk, but we haven't heard a whole lot about her. There have been mixed opinions on Sajjan's performance.

I don't see any indications that his cabinet is struggling because it's gender neutral and that one sex is performing worse than the other. I do agree that people need to be qualified for positions and shouldn't just land in cabinet because of their gender.

As for speculation.

If Dion leaves I'd say Garneau and Freeland could be the likely successors for him. Garneau has been fairly quiet but he's supposedly doing a very good job of running his departments, quiet ministers are usually the best. There seemed to be some mixed reviews on Freeland during the final CETA negotiations but she has received praised and there were reports recently that she'd be promoted. She'd also be a good fit for the portfolio, especially after being in international trade.

Hajdu was also mentioned recently as a minister who could expect a promotion. However, her $1 million office might get in the way of that, though Trudeau might not care about the optics.

François-Philippe Champagne, who is the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance was also mentioned as someone who could be promoted. If Dion leaves that gives Trudeau an opening to appoint someone from Quebec. Like Jean Chretien he was raised in Shawinigan and his riding is carved out Chretien's old one. He actually has a pretty impressive resume.

One thing I will say for Trudeau is he does seem to have a caucus of people with strong resumes. Whether that'll lead to strong ministers is another question.

As well, there has also been speculation that Newfoundland and Labrador Minister Judy Foote might leave. Recently she's been called the most powerful politician in the province and has actually helped Ball resolve a number of local issues. Yvonne Jones would likely replace her, not sure what kind of portfolio she would get.


I'm not yet convinced there is going to be a cabinet shuffle yet , the optics of removing Monsef from her post before her review and such are finished would look horrible , how could you all of a sudden put someone else in there ? before she had even done her job .

there also hasn't been any confirmations that anyone is leaving so there is not any vacancies to fill either

they might choose to rotate the parliamentary secretaries around as a away to make every one feel happy and so as many mp's as possible get to be one , but those posts aren't considered that important

although if the liberals troubles continue into the new year , such as cash for access and electoral reform , I could definitely see there being one


I could see him waiting till summer but there's usually some truths to these rumours.

There were rumours before that Dion was going to become Canada's Ambassador to France.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dropping Minister Monsef from that portfolio basically kills electoral reform dead till after the next election.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
" Rotating parliamentary secretaries may help Trudeau with the management of an ambitious and talented caucus. There are currently 182 Liberal MPs, many of whom are men or women from traditional areas of strength for the party who may not have the gender, demographic, ethnic or religious criteria that increase their chance of landing a cabinet post. "


that comment really stood out for me she mentions gender , demographic , ethnic or religious criteria ? what about skill or knowledge of area cabinet post focuses on ?

so were suppose to put someone in cabinet because they are the right gender ? and the right ethnicity ? this is how we got jokes like Monsef in the first place , its no longer about skills its about other factors


Skills don't matter. Optics matter. At least for these guys.

Cabinet ministers are not supposed to administer departments so much as be the political interface. They are supposed to ride herd on them, keep them in in line with policy. The gender stuff is supposed to signal a change in the way the winds are blowing. All through the civil service, already heavily out of proportion in favour of women and immigrants, administrators read the signal and understand -- women, multiculturalsm, and the other forms of officially approved racism and sexism are ín', and 'merit' is thrown out with the old administration. You know, the tyrannical crooks.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
Dropping Minister Monsef from that portfolio basically kills electoral reform dead till after the next election.



the optics of dropping Monsef before she had even finished the electoral reform issue would be terrible

until someone actually leaves the cabinet , the likelihood of a major shakeup seems unlikely , were also entering the most quiet time of the year for politics until the house resumes early next year
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
Dropping Minister Monsef from that portfolio basically kills electoral reform dead till after the next election.



the optics of dropping Monsef before she had even finished the electoral reform issue would be terrible


Worse than keeping her?
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
Dropping Minister Monsef from that portfolio basically kills electoral reform dead till after the next election.



the optics of dropping Monsef before she had even finished the electoral reform issue would be terrible


Worse than keeping her?


she clearly won't be minister of democratic reform forever , but it wouldn't make sense to move her midway thru this initiative , although I'd expect her to be put in charge of a quieter ministry sometime down the road , out of sight and out of mind ?
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

(an interesting poll from abacus data about the cabinet and who's liked and disliked )

Rating 14 Trudeau Ministers: None show high negatives

December 23, 2016 By Bruce Anderson & David Coletto

In our final survey of the year, we asked Canadians to give us their impressions of a wide range of people including 14 current federal Cabinet Ministers (we intend to gather impressions of other Ministers in an upcoming survey).

Here are the highlights:
• As expected, many of the ministers are not household names for a significant proportion of voters. Between a third and a half of those surveyed were unable to offer an opinion about the job being done by the ministers tested.
• The amount of negative opinion about any of the ministers tested is quite limited, ranging from 11% to 21%. Given that most respondents didn’t vote Liberal, this suggests the Cabinet is generally not, at this point anyway, a focal point of partisan tension.
• Of the 14 tested, the ministers with the highest profile (fewest respondents unable to offer an opinion) included three rookies and two political veterans: Defense Minister Harjit Sajjan, Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna, Health Minister Jane Philpott, Foreign Affairs Minister Stephane Dion, and Transport Minister Marc Garneau.
• For all ministers tested, more people offered good or acceptable ratings than offered negative assessments. The largest proportion of “good job” ratings went to Harjit Sajjan, Catherine McKenna, Marc Garneau, Stephane Dion, and Bill Morneau. The smallest positive ratings were for Maryam Monsef, who is also the least familiar to our sample.
• The ministers with the highest negatives were Bill Morneau, Jane Philpott, and Catherine McKenna. The ministers with the lowest negatives were Scott Brison, Navdeep Bains, Jody Wilson-Raybould, and Ralph Goodale.
• Few Liberal voters give poor assessments to any of the ministers. The performance of Ministers Sajan, Goodale, and Morneau are more likely to be rated positively. Only Ministers Philpott and Monsef get negative ratings in double digits.
• Among Conservative voters, Ministers Morneau and McKenna draw the largest number of negative assessments while Ministers Goodale, Bains, and Brison trigger few negative reactions.
• Among NDP voters, relatively few are unhappy with the Ministers tested. Ministers Philpott and Morneau draw the most criticism, disappointing 27% of NDP voters. Opinion about Minister McKenna is somewhat polarized – she tops the list in term
s of positive ratings, but ranks third in terms of drawing criticism among NDP voters.


According to Bruce Anderson: “After just a year in office, it would be surprising if more of these ministers were better known, especially in an era when many people pay limited attention to national politics. The results suggest that, consistent with the fact that the large majority give the PM good or acceptable marks for his cabinet selections (80%) most people are not finding much to fault in the performance of the cabinet. Those handling some of the trickiest files (e.g. Finance, Health and Environment) are seeing slightly more polarized reactions, but this is, to this point anyway, a fairly mild version of polarization. The fact that only half of Conservative voters give a bad rating to the Finance Minister illustrates this point.

As well, Resources Minister Jim Carr, who handled the pipeline file that could have sparked strong negative views on the left, finds only 23% of NDP voters giving him a negative rating. The results for Democratic Reform Minister Monsef indicate some disappointment in her approach. But perhaps the more notable point is that while she has been the focus of a lot of Parliamentary and media criticism personally over the year (including about where she was born), half have not even been aware of Ms. Monsef so far.”

METHODOLOGY Our survey was conducted online with 1,848 Canadians aged 18 and over from December 12 to 14, 2016.

A random sample of panelists was invited to complete the survey from a large representative panel of over 500,000 Canadians. The Marketing Research and Intelligence Association policy limits statements about margins of sampling error for most online surveys. The margin of error for a comparable probability-based random sample of 1,848 is +/- 2.3%, 19 times out of 20. The data were weighted according to census data to ensure that the sample matched Canada’s population according to age, gender, educational attainment, and region.

Totals may not add up to 100 due to rounding. ABACUS DATA INC. We offer global research capacity with a strong focus on customer service, attention to detail and value-added insight. Our team combines the experience of our Chairman Bruce Anderson, one of Canada’s leading research executives for two decades, with the energy, creativity and research expertise of CEO David Coletto, Ph.D - See more at: http://abacusdata.ca/rating-14.....Mstdq.dpuf

http://abacusdata.ca/rating-14.....negatives/
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

you have to look thru the poll in more detail to understand it ,

looking thru the ndp voters , none of the ministers are that negative , although the health minister Philpott and Finance Bill Morneau were the highest , there doesn't yet seem to be a reason for ndp voters to be that upset , even after all the electoral reform troubles being in the news only 18% gave Monsef a negative view


conservative voters are a bit different , Morneau and Catherine McKenna , scored huge negatives at 50% each , considering others are around 40% down to 20% negative .
Ralph Goodale is the only high profile minister somewhat liked by cpc voters but they didn't poll some of the lower profile ministers who might be liked or disliked we don't know


the Morneau numbers don't really surprise me , I've never liked him for some reason ,he comes across as fake or some reason I don't trust him , his handling of finance hasn't been impressive at all either
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

‘Complex times’ present trouble and opportunity: Paul Wells


Senior Liberals say Justin Trudeau is in a mood to make modest changes to his cabinet whenever trouble and opportunity intersect, rather than wait for an overhaul later.


A week after Donald Trump’s election, International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland said she was on the phone to leading U.S. investors and CEOs, pitching Canada as a destination for investors. She admitted more needs doing, writes Paul Wells.



By Paul WellsNational Affairs

Fri., Jan. 6, 2017




MONTREAL—Count back from known events. Late this month the Trudeau cabinet will hold a two-day retreat outside Ottawa. The last time the prime minister summoned his colleagues for one of these occasional getaways, in Sudbury at the end of August, he gave a few ministers new jobs and shook up the committees that organize their work.

Is it time for a larger shuffle? Maybe. Final decisions are the prime minister’s, and his public daily agenda still says “Personal.” But senior Liberals say Trudeau is in a mood to make modest changes to his cabinet whenever trouble and opportunity intersect, rather than wait for an overhaul later.

Where’s the biggest trouble? On the morning of Jan. 20, trouble will be on Capitol Hill in Washington facing the chief justice of the United States, with his left hand on a Bible. At least I hope it’s a Bible his hand will be on. With this guy, who knows.

About the future, no more can be known. About Thursday, I can report that 300 people showed up at a lunchtime meeting of the Montreal Council on Foreign Relations. The guest speaker was Chrystia Freeland, who for the moment is Trudeau’s minister of international trade. The topic of her speech was the intersection of trouble and opportunity.

“We are living in complex times,” Freeland said in French. Every word of her speech was in French, improvised at first and then read from a text, with good results. (She did say “gaucher unique” when she meant to say “guichet unique.” As a result, she seemed to be offering international investors a “single left-hander” instead of “one-stop shopping.”)

“Complex” doesn’t mean much, but she wasn’t shy about being more specific. “We’re living in extremely protectionist times, perhaps the most protectionist I’ve ever seen.”

Millions around the world are unconvinced that the modern economy works for them, she said. They take it out on “two easy targets: immigrants or people who look different, and international trade agreements.”

And then there’s Canada, which keeps welcoming immigrants and refugees, and which last year concluded, knock on wood, negotiations toward a bold trade deal with Europe. For both policies, there is broad support across parties. “I am so proud of Canada now,” Freeland said. “Not of our government but of our country.” She thanked Stephen Harper and “my friend Ed Fast,” the former Conservative trade minister, for their work on the EU trade deal.

“Isn’t it impressive that in 2016, the year of Brexit and Donald Trump’s election, Canada was sealing the largest trade agreement in our history?” But Freeland was not here only to run victory laps. “Opportunities offer themselves to us. But they won’t fall from the sky.”

The opportunity is to attract international investment and to encourage Canadian companies to export. To double down on trade while others are recoiling. A week after Trump’s election, she said, she was on the phone to leading U.S. investors and CEOs, pitching Canada as a destination. More needs doing, she admitted.

At the news conference afterward I said she seemed to be saying Trump’s election presents not only dangers, but a chance for Canada “to mow the Americans’ lawn.”

“Well, I think you’ve put a few words into my mouth,” she replied. “But it sounds like I was generally intelligible.”

And indeed, she does think Canada’s “openness . . . represents very significant and distinctive opportunities for our country.”

Now, back to the trouble and opportunities at hand for Trudeau. Stéphane Dion is still young at 61 and has been travelling nearly non-stop — Beirut, Lima, The Hague and Hamburg in November and December alone. Reviews are mixed. He’s pushing files forward, including advance work for a peacekeeping mission in Africa and Canada’s candidacy for a UN Security Council seat. He is majestically skeptical of anything his colleagues try to sell him, a born Dr. No in a cabinet that’s short of them.

Rumours were flying about his exit from elected politics even before Trump was elected. Now is he the best pitchman and advocate for an open Canada, in the face of a highly unpredictable new U.S. president? In Ottawa, Freeland is getting a second look. “That woman is one contact away from everyone in Washington,” a Liberal insider said this week.

The next move is Trudeau’s. But if he sees his economic agenda as worth defending, he’ll want to put its best advocate, Freeland, in the foreign minister’s post

https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/01/06/-paul-wells.html
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2017 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, Freeland is pitching investment opportunities while taking apart what the
Conservatives were doing to encourage investment. They're raisng corporate tax rates and driving the price of energy through the roof. At a time when Trump is promising big tax breaks and tariffs against companies leaving the USA.

It'll probably work.

Why doesn't somebody just throw her a raspberry when they hear this b.s.?
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2017 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dion tops shuffle watch list

Liberal insiders don’t expect shakeup before budget


Amanda Connolly and BJ Siekerski


Saturday, January 7th, 2017


Liberal insiders aren’t expecting a major cabinet shuffle any time soon — owing in part to a federal budget expected in late February or early March — but many see a Trump-induced reset as inevitable in 2017 and Foreign Affairs Minister Stéphane Dion as one of several ministers who could be poised for a change.

“The one we’re hearing lots of is Dion,” said one former adviser to a current cabinet minister who, along with several others, spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid jeopardizing relationships with the government.

“It might be a bit unusual to have such a major minister shuffled, but I think part of the thinking is that we need folks in those key portfolios, with regard to Canada-U.S. relations, who will just have an easier time getting along with their Trumpian counterparts.”

Dion, who staked his leadership of the Liberal party on the Green Shift, an electorally unsuccessful plan to introduce a carbon tax, is seen as an awkward messenger to deal with the climate deniers Trump is putting in positions of leadership.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s current cabinet was sworn in on November 4, 2015 and save for two minor portfolio adjustments prompted by the eviction from cabinet of former fisheries minister Hunter Tootoo, there hasn’t been a major shuffle yet.

Diplomatic circles were abuzz this past summer with rumours that Dion would be shuffled into the ambassadorship to France, likely come winter, given that the term of current ambassador and Harper-era political appointee Lawrence Cannon is scheduled to come to an end in May 2017.

Dion, with strong ties to France, was viewed by some as perhaps a natural successor. According to one source close to the Liberals, Dion was approached and offered the position — but turned it down.

Joseph Pickerill, director of communications for Dion, called that suggestion “completely false.”

Dion is not the only one facing spring or summer shuffle speculation.

MaryAnn Mihychuk Jun14/2016
MaryAnn Mihychuk talks to reporters in June. Photo: Matthew Usherwood, iPolitics.

Employment Minister MaryAnn Mihychuk is widely expected to be shifted to another cabinet role given questions about her capabilities. A large chunk of her responsibilities, including employment insurance, were punted to Social Development Minister Jean-Yves Duclos in August and multiple sources say she has outworn her welcome with the Liberal brass.

Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef’s name was also raised by one source, who said her reaction to the barrage of opposition criticism in Question Period didn’t go over well, and she has been a frequent target of media criticism for her handling of the electoral reform file.

Others, like Status of Women Minister Patty Hajdu, are being touted as possible contenders for a promotion because of what many have judged as a solid performance and affability. It was also suggested that House Leader Bardish Chagger could lose her small business and tourism portfolio.

Another element to consider in any possible shuffle, one Liberal lobbyist told iPolitics, is the age of certain cabinet ministers — Immigration Minister John McCallum and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett are both 66, for example — and may choose not to run again in 2019.

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, whose name wasn’t raised, is older than both.

The looming Trump presidency also may fit into shuffle considerations, with one former cabinet minister adviser pointing to Chrystia Freeland as someone who, while capable and well-liked, may rub some in the Trump administration the wrong way.

“Chrystia Freeland is held in very, very high regard, but she also embodies the New York media elite thing that might not play quite as well in the Trump administration,” the source said.

Canada would not be the first country to shuffle its political front bench in search of ministers who might be the best fit with the Trump administration.

FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump walks with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto at the end of their joint statement at Los Pinos, the presidential official residence, in Mexico City. Trump called his surprise visit to Mexico City a 'great honor.' A week later one of Nieto's closest advisers and confidants, Finance Secretary Luis Videgaray, resigned in a move seen as linked to the unpopular decision to invite Trump to visit Mexico. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump walks with Mexico President Enrique Pena Nieto in Mexico City in August 2016. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced Thursday he was appointing former finance minister Luis Videgaray to the foreign minister post.

Videgaray was forced to resign after arranging Trump’s controversial visit to Mexico in September and his re-appointment was widely seen as a sign Mexico is strategizing how best to court senior members of the incoming US administration.

However, two former ambassadors cautioned against viewing that move as a sign Canada should follow suit.

“Ottawa and others have time to take a closer look. Mexico is in a very different situation,” said Paul Frazer, president of Washington consulting firm PD Frazer & Associates and Special Advisor on Canada-U.S. Relations to the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. “They’ve been under direct attack essentially from the day Mr. Trump launched his campaign in the primaries.”

Frazer, who has held senior assignments at Canadian embassies in Ottawa, New York, Warsaw, Washington, and was ambassador to the Czech Republic and Slovakia, said Canada would do well to hold off making any rash changes to how it deals with the incoming administration.

Instead, his advice is simple.

“Canada should do what it does very well in these circumstances: keep their eyes and ears open really wide and watch the changing situation,” he said.”

Michael Bell, a former member of Trudeau’s foreign affairs advisory council and now a senior fellow at Carleton University’s Norman Patterson School of International Affairs, said that while the government and officials will have to adjust how they engage with the Trump administration, that won’t necessarily translate into major changes to the players involved.

“Depending on the positions he takes, we’re going to have to perhaps modify the way we present views, but I don’t see any dramatic change,” said Bell, who has also served as ambassador to Jordan, Egypt and Israel.

For Canada, the challenge will be in focusing its core priorities and how it wants to approach the messaging around those, said Frazer, noting once those are more detailed, it’s more likely than not that the rest of the puzzle pieces will fall into place.

“I think that’s the first thing is for Ottawa to get a good sense of what it wants to do with the new administration, what is has to protect and then say, do we have the resources in place in the right spot to do it?” said Frazer. “I think if they get the first part right, the next part is not as difficult

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is a Winter Cabinet Shuffle looming ?

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