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RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


Dumped from the Trudeau cabinet, Saint-Laurent-Cartierville MP Stéphane Dion is quitting politics.

In a statement issued just as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was swearing in a new federal cabinet on Tuesday that did not include him, Dion said while he enjoyed the “incredible adventure” of public life, he now will be pursuing his future outside active politics.

http://montrealgazette.com/new.....au-cabinet


I was shocked that after 2008 and the failed coup with the NDP and BQ he stuck around for another eight years.

Saint-Laurent being contested in a by-election is interesting;
Given that it was Robert Bourassa riding Provincially the Liberal ties run deep, as well as Western Montreal being very nationalist historically with all ridings currently occupied by the LPC except for Thomas Mulcairs which will be once he steps aside.


I don't see any realistic chance of that riding flipping to any of the opposition parties , that part of montreal never votes bloc , the ndp is polling down and the cpc is not strong in that part of the city unlike Mount Royal

although the by-election in Markham Thornhill sounds a lot more interesting as the riding is bordered by 2 cpc ridings , Thornhill and Markham Unionville and it has historically been somewhat of a swing area but by election was somewhat unexpected and we don't know who possible candidates might be yet
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Markham - Thornhill could be an interesting by-election if Trudeau's numbers drop a bit and the leadership race creates some excitement.

Although this riding was considered new in 2015, McCallum nearly lost his seat in 2011. From what I saw the CPC did well in the areas closest to Peter Kent's riding of Thornhill while the eastern portions voted heavily Liberal. The Conservatives should definitely try to target this seat and get someone nominated soon.
Progressive Tory





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


Dumped from the Trudeau cabinet, Saint-Laurent-Cartierville MP Stéphane Dion is quitting politics.

In a statement issued just as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was swearing in a new federal cabinet on Tuesday that did not include him, Dion said while he enjoyed the “incredible adventure” of public life, he now will be pursuing his future outside active politics.

http://montrealgazette.com/new.....au-cabinet


I was shocked that after 2008 and the failed coup with the NDP and BQ he stuck around for another eight years.

Saint-Laurent being contested in a by-election is interesting;
Given that it was Robert Bourassa riding Provincially the Liberal ties run deep, as well as Western Montreal being very nationalist historically with all ridings currently occupied by the LPC except for Thomas Mulcairs which will be once he steps aside.


I feel a bit bad that Dion was unable to redeem himself as Foreign Affairs Minister, like Joe Clark was able to do. Personally I would have liked to have seen him do well and be able to retire on a bit of a high note. He had been quite successful as a minister under Chretien and Martin, with many considering him a force in keeping Canada together. However, like his time as leader he was pretty much a failure in the portfolio and seems to have been forced out by Trudeau.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


Dumped from the Trudeau cabinet, Saint-Laurent-Cartierville MP Stéphane Dion is quitting politics.

In a statement issued just as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was swearing in a new federal cabinet on Tuesday that did not include him, Dion said while he enjoyed the “incredible adventure” of public life, he now will be pursuing his future outside active politics.

http://montrealgazette.com/new.....au-cabinet


I was shocked that after 2008 and the failed coup with the NDP and BQ he stuck around for another eight years.

Saint-Laurent being contested in a by-election is interesting;
Given that it was Robert Bourassa riding Provincially the Liberal ties run deep, as well as Western Montreal being very nationalist historically with all ridings currently occupied by the LPC except for Thomas Mulcairs which will be once he steps aside.


I feel a bit bad that Dion was unable to redeem himself as Foreign Affairs Minister, like Joe Clark was able to do. Personally I would have liked to have seen him do well and be able to retire on a bit of a high note. He had been quite successful as a minister under Chretien and Martin, with many considering him a force in keeping Canada together. However, like his time as leader he was pretty much a failure in the portfolio and seems to have been forced out by Trudeau.


Do you really think these decisions are made on the basis of demonstrated merit? I think they a 'pay off' based om one's stature in the party, and other similar considerations geographical roots for another, and so on. (Now sitting to pee has been added to the qualifications sought.)

For that reason, I think these changes have to do with the coming face-off with Donald Trump. which requires someone with a 'harder edge' as foreign minister. I thought McCallum was doing well in Immigration, which is a potentially explosive field these days. He's wiley enough to fool the media. But I can only speculate on that.

It seems likely that two older, more senior members of the cabinet are leaving because their experience and political sense is no longer wanted around the cabinet table.
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau gives Freeland foreign affairs, moves Monsef in cabinet shuffle


Joan Bryden, THE CANADIAN PRESS

First posted: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 10:58 AM EST | Updated: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 04:20 PM EST


OTTAWA — Justin Trudeau made cabinet cornerstone Chrystia Freeland his new foreign affairs minister and promoted a trio of up-and-coming MPs on Tuesday as part of an inner-circle shakeup aimed in part at preparing for a Donald Trump presidency.

Freeland, a former economics journalist with extensive contacts in the United States, leaves the trade portfolio to replace veteran Liberal MP Stephane Dion, who announced Tuesday that he plans to leave active politics.

Ahmed Hussen, a Somali-born rookie MP first elected in 2015, is one of several new faces in cabinet that include Quebec MP Francois-Philippe Champagne, named international trade minister, and Karina Gould of Burlington, Ont., who takes Democratic Institutions from Maryam Monsef.

Patty Hajdu, a strong performer who shone as status of women minister, is taking over the labour portfolio from MaryAnn Mihychuk, who is being dumped from cabinet altogether.

Monsef — widely criticized for her handling of Trudeau’s promise to reform Canada’s voting system — is moving to replace Hajdu at Status of Women.

Hussen is taking over the immigration portfolio from John McCallum, who is also quitting politics in order to become ambassador to China.

The fact that there was no immediate indication of a similar posting for Dion made clear that the ex-foreign affairs minister and one-time federal Liberal leader has been left at loose ends by the changes.

“Over the last 21 years, I have devoted myself to my riding, to my fellow citizens, to Quebec, to all of Canada, to the role that we must play in the world, and to the Liberal Party of Canada,” Dion said in a statement.

“I have enjoyed political life, especially when I was able to make a difference to benefit my fellow citizens. I emerge full of energy ... renewable! But politics is not the only way to serve one’s country. Fortunately!”

Dion’s tenure at Foreign Affairs has been a rocky one, marred by controversy over his approval of a $15-billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia. His prickly demeanour was also seen as ill-suited to dealing with the unpredictable Trump, who has demonstrated a tendency to easily take offence.

Tuesday’s announcement paid special tribute to Dion but would only say Trudeau looks forward to his “wisdom and his tireless service” in “the next chapter of Mr. Dion’s contributions to our country.”

Dion’s replacement, meanwhile, is a bona-fide cabinet superstar, credited with deftly navigating through some eleventh-hour obstacles that threatened last fall to scupper the Canada-European Union free trade agreement — potentially valuable experience for dealing with the incoming Trump administration.

Trump, whose inauguration takes place Jan. 20, has vowed to adopt an unapologetically protectionist, America-first policy on trade, including re-opening or even tearing up the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Trudeau also paid tribute to McCallum, calling his work in the immigration portfolio on behalf of Syrian refugees “an inspiration to Canadians and an example to the world.”

News of the shuffle leaked out Monday, just as the Prime Minister’s Office confirmed that Trudeau’s two top aides, Katie Telford and Gerald Butts, have been meeting with some of Trump’s senior advisers, building bridges to the incoming administration.

In his first cabinet of 30 ministers, Trudeau famously appointed an equal number of men and women “because it’s 2015.” That parity was upset last fall when Hunter Tootoo resigned from cabinet and the Liberal caucus in order to seek treatment for alcohol addiction following what he later admitted was an inappropriate relationship with a female staffer.

With the addition of Gould, Hussen and Champagne, Tuesday’s shuffle restores that gender balance.

This week’s shuffle may well be a prelude to another reset expected midway through Trudeau’s first mandate. Insiders expect a major realignment this summer, with a cabinet shuffle followed by a throne speech to kick off the second half of the mandate.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has shuffled his federal cabinet. Here’s what it looks like now:

Justin Trudeau , Prime Minister, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and Youth.

Ralph Goodale , Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

Lawrence MacAulay , Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

Carolyn Bennett , Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs.

Scott Brison , President of the Treasury Board.

Dominic LeBlanc , Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard.

Navdeep Bains , Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development.

Bill Morneau , Minister of Finance.

Jody Wilson-Raybould , Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada.

Judy Foote , Minister of Public Services and Procurement.

Chrystia Freeland , Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Jane Philpott , Minister of Health.

Jean-Yves Duclos , Minister of Families, Children and Social Development.

Marc Garneau , Minister of Transport.

Marie-Claude Bibeau , Minister of International Development and Minister responsible for La Francophonie.

Jim Carr , Minister of Natural Resources

Melanie Joly , Minister of Canadian Heritage

Diane Lebouthillier , Minister of National Revenue

Kent Hehr , Minister of Veterans Affairs, and Associate Minister of National Defence

Catherine McKenna , Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Harjit Sajjan , Minister of National Defence

Amarjeet Sohi , Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Maryam Monsef , Minister of Status of Women

Carla Qualtrough , Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Kirsty Duncan , Minister of Science

Patricia Hajdu , Minister of Employment, Workforce and Labour

Bardish Chagger , Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Francois-Philippe Champagne , Minister of International Trade

Karina Gould , Minister of Democratic Institutions

Ahmed Hussen , Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship

http://www.torontosun.com/2017.....-positions
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( one has to wonder if Mihychuk is not only a horrible cabinet minister but also a horrible mp ? being demoted from cabinet gives her more time to focus on her riding and I'm guessing she isn't doing a very good job there either )


Manitoba MP removed from Trudeau's cabinet

Sarolta Saskiw, CTV Winnipeg
Published Tuesday, January 10, 2017 2:16PM CST
Last Updated Tuesday, January 10, 2017 7:52PM CST


A Manitoba Member of Parliament will no longer be part of Justin Trudeau's Liberal cabinet.

MaryAnn Mihychuk, MP for Kildonan-St. Paul, was not only pushed out of her labour portfolio, but was removed from cabinet altogether.

"Of course it's disappointing. I mean, I had an opportunity to be in cabinet," Mihychuk said. "On the positive side I made changes that had a role to play, and some very significant changes to Canadians."

She will be replaced by Ontario MP Patty Hajdu, who was previously the minister for the status of women.

Jim Carr, MP for Winnipeg South Centre, will remain in his portfolio as the minister of natural resources.

Mihychuk is not the only MP removed from cabinet during Tuesday's shuffle.

MP Stephane Dion will no longer be the foreign affairs minister and MP John McCallum is leaving his post as immigration minister.

Justin Trudeau is making Chrystia Freeland his new foreign affairs minister and promoting Toronto MP Ahmed Hussen to immigration, as part of a cabinet shakeup aimed in part at preparing for a Donald Trump presidency.

Both Dion and McCallum are expected to resign as MPs in order to become ambassadors.

With three ministers out, three new members take cabinet spots, including Hussen, Francois-Philippe Champagne as the international trade minister and Karina Gould takes the democratic institutions portfolio.

This week's shuffle may well be a prelude to another reset expected midway through Trudeau's first mandate. Insiders expect a major realignment this summer, with a cabinet shuffle followed by a throne speech to kick off the second half of the mandate.

With files from The Canadian Press and CTVNews.ca.

http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/man.....-1.3235551
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Progressive Tory wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:


Dumped from the Trudeau cabinet, Saint-Laurent-Cartierville MP Stéphane Dion is quitting politics.

In a statement issued just as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was swearing in a new federal cabinet on Tuesday that did not include him, Dion said while he enjoyed the “incredible adventure” of public life, he now will be pursuing his future outside active politics.

http://montrealgazette.com/new.....au-cabinet


I was shocked that after 2008 and the failed coup with the NDP and BQ he stuck around for another eight years.

Saint-Laurent being contested in a by-election is interesting;
Given that it was Robert Bourassa riding Provincially the Liberal ties run deep, as well as Western Montreal being very nationalist historically with all ridings currently occupied by the LPC except for Thomas Mulcairs which will be once he steps aside.


I feel a bit bad that Dion was unable to redeem himself as Foreign Affairs Minister, like Joe Clark was able to do. Personally I would have liked to have seen him do well and be able to retire on a bit of a high note. He had been quite successful as a minister under Chretien and Martin, with many considering him a force in keeping Canada together. However, like his time as leader he was pretty much a failure in the portfolio and seems to have been forced out by Trudeau.


It was always an odd choice for Dion.
He is generally an academic and career politician tossing him into Foreign Affairs always seemed like a strange choice given how many more qualified candidates there were within the cabinet.

If the Prime Minister really wanted to give an opportunity to succeed he should have put him back into his prior portfolio of Environment which largely became his primary political objective later in his career.
cosmostein





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With John McCallum stepping aside it needs to be all hands on deck for the Markham—Thornhill By-Election.

The CPC have Markham—Unionville & Thornhill and narrowly lost Markham—Stouffville & Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill.

Its a winnable riding with the right CPC candidate;
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John McCallum 'excited' to be next ambassador to China

Ex-ambassador says former immigration minister's experience and proximity to prime minister are valuable

By Susan Lunn, CBC News Posted: Jan 11, 2017 5:00 AM ET| Last Updated: Jan 11, 2017 5:27 AM ET

John McCallum has been named Canada's next ambassador to China, marking the end of his 16-year career as an elected politician


John McCallum says making the move from immigration minister to ambassador to China isn't as big a leap as people might think.

He pointed to his wife, who is Chinese, and to constituents in his Markham-Thornhill riding, many of whom are also of Chinese descent.

"So in my personal life, in my work life, and with visits to China, I have lived and breathed things Chinese for a long, long time," he told reporters in the foyer of the House of Commons after Tuesday's cabinet shuffle.

McCallum said the appointment first came up in a conversation with the prime minister last week.

"He spoke about the importance of a knowledge of China, and also a link to his office that I would have," McCallum said.


It is unusual to appoint a sitting cabinet minister to an ambassador's job.

"I need my top people to be out there engaging at the highest levels around the world," Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said of the appointment.

More than trade

David Mulroney, Canada's former ambassador to China and current president of St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto, applauded the move.

"The Chinese are going to be impressed with his experience, his academic credentials and the fact that the prime minister obviously listens to him," Mulroney told Rosemary Barton, host of CBC News Network's Power & Politics.

Mulroney said McCallum's economics background will help with exploratory talks for a possible free trade deal with China.

But he cautions trade won't be the only issue to cross the new ambassador's desk.

CHINA-CANADA/
Trudeau met with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in Beijing this summer. The Canadian government has expressed interest in a trade deal with China and a partnership on green technology. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

"The fact is that we have a big, rich, but complicated relationship with the Chinese. So there are big environmental files, health is a big file, education is a huge file," Mulroney said.

"And then there are a series of things we don't want to deal with but China is a security challenge, and will be an increasing security challenge — whether its in its region, whether its cyber espionage, interference in Canadian affairs. And there will be a dimension of China interfering with Canadians and we've seen that recently."

Conservative foreign affairs critic Peter Kent said he hopes McCallum raises those issues in Beijing.

"I think Ambassador McCallum needs to talk directly and honestly and frankly to the Chinese about Canadians' concerns about human rights abuse. He needs to talk about improving trade but improving trade on an equal playing field," Kent told CBC News.


Sarah Katulakos, executive director of the Canada China Business Council, said McCallum's economic background will be an asset in dealing with China.

"We hope that he will take with him an understanding of what it is that Canadian companies want from their relationship with China because there's a lot of things that can improve," said Kutulakos.

"It's a tough place to do business. It can be very rewarding and profitable but it's never easy."

Eye on the Americans

McCallum will move into this role at a time when the United States — from the president-elect to his new cabinet — is taking a more aggressive stance on China.

Mulroney and others have speculated that if Canada gets too close to China, it could undermine this country's relationship with the U.S., its number one trading partner.

McCallum dismissed that concern.

"Whoever is the president of the United States, whatever the policy of the United States might be, China and the Chinese economy and Canada-China relations are extremely important. We are a trading nation. China is the second biggest GDP in the world with a high growth rate and much of Canada's future lies in our dealings with China," he said.

McCallum isn't the ambassador just yet — that will happen when his credentials are accepted by the Chinese government. In the meantime, he's promised to work on improving his Mandarin.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3930086
RCO





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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
With John McCallum stepping aside it needs to be all hands on deck for the Markham—Thornhill By-Election.

The CPC have Markham—Unionville & Thornhill and narrowly lost Markham—Stouffville & Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill.

Its a winnable riding with the right CPC candidate;



it will be interesting to see when they have the by-election , someone I'd assume its going to take place before the cpc elects a new leader as to take advantage of the party being distracted and if a leader without a seat was elected they couldn't use the riding to get into the house

McCallum won it by a large % in 2015 but that was a great year for the liberals and its not clear if they can maintain those sort of numbers and turnout especially for a by-election .

turnout is also a huge question there was a provincial by-election in the old Markham riding in 2007 and only 18000 people bothered to vote that year , which is a crazy low number , somehow being a federal by-election I suspect it will generate more interest
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stéphane Dion accepts role as ambassador to EU, Germany, as he and John McCallum depart House

House pays tribute to long-serving Liberal MPs and former ministers who are moving on to diplomatic postings

By Peter Zimonjic, CBC News Posted: Jan 31, 2017 2:47 PM ET| Last Updated: Jan 31, 2017 3:50 PM ET



Former foreign affairs minister and one-time Liberal leader Stéphane Dion told MPs he has accepted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's offer to become Canada's "senior diplomatic to Europe" by taking on the dual role of ambassador of the European Union and Germany.

Dion made the announcement while reading a farewell statement in the House of Commons, as MPs paid tribute to him and fellow MP John McCallum, who is also stepping down as an MP. Both were shuffled out of the federal cabinet earlier this month.

CBC.ca is livestreaming the statements live.

Dion said that after the cabinet shuffle he had to consider whether to return to teaching or to remain in public service. Thanking the University of Montreal for giving him a tempting offer, Dion said he had instead decided to join the diplomatic corps.

"I have accepted the prime minister's offer to be Canada's senior diplomat to Europe," Dion said. "I will do my part to strengthen Canada's relationship with Europe. It will be an honour to join the Canadian diplomatic corps."

McCallum, formerly the minister of immigration, refugees and citizenship, also addressed the House. He is on his way to China to be Canada's new ambassador to the country where preliminary talks over a free trade deal between the two nations promise to dominate his early years there.

Mixed emotions

"As I stand in this place for the last time, I naturally do with mixed emotions," McCallum told his colleagues, adding that the more he thought about it "this China assignment is the perfect job for me and I am grateful to the prime minister for his confidence."

McCallum said the immigration portfolio "is in good hands" because new minister Ahmed Hussen is a "quick study" and has a "big heart."

Speaking of his most memorable moments in the House, McCallum spoke particularly of nominating the late South African president Nelson Mandela for honorary Canadian citizenship.

McCallum also said the work he did over the last year to bring nearly 40,000 Syrian refugees to Canada was another highlight of his political career, especially since it was done when so many other countries were "closing their doors" to refugees, he said.

Looking to China, McCallum said he would work very hard as ambassador to help vulnerable Canadians in China who need consular assistance.

"Have the capacity to govern our country well, and have the wisdom to make Canada even better in years to come," he said in his parting words to MPs.

Dion, most recently Canada's foreign affairs minister and a one-time Liberal leader, was replaced at Foreign Affairs by Canada's Chrystia Freeland, who had held the international trade portfolio.

Sources have told CBC News Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered Dion a unusual dual role as Canada's ambassador to the European Union and Germany. Trudeau didn't divulge specifics to reporters after the cabinet shuffle, saying only he offered Dion a "very important, senior position."

Dion has been tight-lipped about his future, but McCallum seemed to let the news slip out in his farewell speech, saying he was happy he could look forward to continuing to work with Dion in the world of diplomacy, prompting a smiling Dion to wave his hands in denial.

Dion's career in the House

Dion entered politics at the request of former prime minister Jean Chrétien on Jan. 25, 1996, "envisaging a brief parenthesis" in his life, according to a statement he released after he was replaced as Canada's foreign affairs minister.

Chrétien had called on Dion soon after the narrow federalist victory in the 1995 referendum on Quebec sovereignty, and appointed him intergovernmental affairs minister.


Dion went on to write the Clarity Act to establish rules and conditions for any future attempts at secession. The Supreme Court backed his position — that Quebec could not unilaterally secede from Canada — with the bill passing into law in 2000.


Dion didn't make it into former prime minister Paul Martin's first cabinet but he returned to cabinet in 2004 as environment minister, presiding over tricky climate change negotiations in Montreal in 2005. He won the party's leadership after Martin's defeat in 2006, but lost the 2008 election and was forced out of the job.

After his return to the cabinet with Trudeau's victory in 2015, Dion spent little more than a year in the role of foreign affairs minister before Trudeau moved him on.


Economist goes to China


McCallum was first elected to the House of Commons in 2000 and held the defence, veterans affairs minister and national revenue portfolios under Martin. He was appointed immigration minister by Trudeau.

A former chief economist of the Royal Bank of Canada, McCallum also worked as a professor of economics at McGill University, Simon Fraser University, the University of Manitoba and the Université du Québec à Montréal.

In announcing his departure from cabinet, Trudeau applauded McCallum's work in helping to bring in nearly 40,000 Syrian refugees to Canada.

"The Canada-China relationship will be well served by such a strong presence from our government," Trudeau said in a statement when he announced McCallum's new job.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3960087
RCO





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( it turns out Dion has accepted the postion as EU ambassador after all and will be leaving for Europe )


Liberal MP Stephane Dion is Canada's new EU ambassador

Dion was shuffled out of cabinet earlier this month in favour of Chrystia Freeland, a move widely seen as part of the government's response to the ascendance of Donald Trump.


Former Liberal leader and foreign affairs minister Stephane Dion made the announcement while saying goodbye to his colleagues in the House of Commons.
.

By: Staff The Canadian Press Published on


OTTAWA — Former Liberal leader and foreign affairs minister Stephane Dion says he has agreed to be Canada's ambassador to the European Union and Germany.


Dion made the announcement while saying goodbye to his colleagues in the House of Commons, following a similar tribute from former immigration minister John McCallum.


Dion, who represents a Montreal riding, was shuffled out of cabinet earlier this month in favour of Chrystia Freeland, a move widely seen as part of the Liberal government's response to the ascendance of Donald Trump.


Dion did not initially accept the "senior position" he was offered by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a sign that he was not happy about the decision to relive him of his portfolio.


McCallum, the Markham-area MP who was also shuffled out of cabinet earlier this month, has already agreed to serve as Canada's ambassador to China.


In a statement, Trudeau hailed Dion's continuing dedication to public service.


"Stephane's commitment to Canada knows few parallels, and I am grateful he has agreed to undertake this unique and important task," Trudeau said.


"As Canada's senior voice in Europe, I know he will continue to serve his country in an extraordinary way and help deepen Canada's enduring relations with Europe."

http://www.metronews.ca/news/c.....=hootsuite
Bugs





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PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Both of these positions are prime plums ... ample rewards for long service to the party. It means tickets to all the theatres, symphonies, openings of any kind. Prime seats at sports events. Lavish banquets. A clothes allowance. A driver. It's better than being in the Senate!

Staffing shortcomings are not the reasons these two have been put out to pasture. It's more understandable in Dion's case because he appears weak and yet can be snottily abrasive; further, he is in a portfolio that has to deal with Trump.

But what did McCallum do wrong?

I suspect it's because they were strong in cabinet meetings and in senior committees, and acted as a restraint on the more foolish risks that Trudeau is willing to take with the public's future. This has aspects of a purge to it.
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is a Winter Cabinet Shuffle looming ?

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