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RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 8:57 am    Post subject: Cuban Americans celebrate in the streets after Castro death Reply with quote

( forget Trudeau's bizarre praise and statement released , this is what the Cuban's who left the island really think about Castro )


In early morning hours, Miami Cubans hit streets to celebrate Castro's death

Published November 26, 2016/
Fox News Latino



MIAMI (AP) – Within half an hour of the Cuban government's official announcement that former President Fidel Castro had died, Miami's Little Havana teemed with life — and cheers.

Thousands of people banged pots with spoons, waved Cuban flags in the air and whooped in jubilation on Calle Ocho — 8th Street, and the heart of the neighborhood — early Saturday. Honking and strains of salsa music from car stereos echoed against stucco buildings, and fireworks lit up the humid night sky.

Police blocked off streets leading to Cafe Versailles, the quintessential Cuban American hotspot where strong cafecitos — sweetened espresso — were as common as a harsh word about Fidel Castro.

"Cuba si! Castro no!" they chanted, while others screamed "Cuba libre!"

Celebration, not grief, permeated the atmosphere. That was no surprise. Castro has cast a shadow over Miami for decades, and in many ways, his policy and his power have shaped the city and its inhabitants.

Cubans fled the island to Miami, Tampa, New Jersey and elsewhere after Castro took power in 1959. Some were loyalists of Fulgencio Batista, the president prior to Castro, while others left with the hope they would be able to return soon, after Castro was toppled. He never was.

Many others believed they would not be truly free under Castro and his communist regime. Thousands left behind their possessions, loved ones, and hard-earned educations and businesses, traveling to the U.S. by plane, boat or raft. Many Cubans died on the ocean trip to South Florida. And many never returned to see their childhood homes, their neighborhoods, their playgrounds, their businesses, their cousins and aunts and uncles, because Castro was still in power.

The ones that made it to Miami took a largely, and vehemently, anti-Castro stance.

On New Year's Eve every year, Cubans in Miami utter a toast in Spanish as they hoist glasses of liquor: "Next year in Cuba." But as the Cuban exiles aged, and as Castro outlived them, and as U.S. President Barack Obama eroded the embargo and younger Cubans returned to the island, the toast rang silent in many households.

In Miami, where Havana is closer both geographically and psychologically than Washington, the news of Castro's death was long anticipated by the exiles who left after Castro took power, and in the decades since. Rumors have come and gone for decades, and Castro's death had become something of a joke — mostly because it seemed to happen so frequently.

This time, though, it was real.

"We're all celebrating, this is like a carnival," said 72-year-old Jay Fernandez, who came to Miami when he was 18 in 1961. He and his wife and another woman held up a bilingual sign he'd made four years ago when Castro first became ill. "Satan, Fidel is now yours. Give him what he deserves. Don't let him rest in peace."

Several blocks away, at the Bay of Pigs memorial, Antonio Hernandez, 76, rode his bicycle up in a light rain and stood at the eternal flame that honors the men who tried, and failed, to wrest Cuba from Castro's grip in 1961.

"Everybody's happy. Now this guy won't do any more damage," said Hernandez, who came to Miami on the Mariel boat lift in 1980. "His brother will now go down, too. But the world has to pay attention to this, not just we Cubans."

Wrote Valentin Prieto, a prominent Cuban-American blogger, on Facebook: "A few hours of sleep tonight is the very last thing fidel castro will ever rob me of." In his writings on his blog, Prieto never capitalized Castro's name.

Many Cubans made successful livings and raised families in Miami despite having to learn a new language and start their lives over. Exiles who arrived as teenagers with no money in their pockets became millionaires, political leaders, clergy members, teachers — influential members contributing to the sturdy fabric of American society.

Cemeteries in South Florida abound with the remains of those who fiercely wished Castro had died before them. Their children weep today because they could not see their parents and grandparents return to Cuba under a democratic regime, to see their homeland one more time.

Gabriel Morales, a 40-year-old financial executive, monitored social media early Saturday from his home in Miami. His parents both left Cuba decades ago. His father left Cuba before Castro took over, and then returned to visit during Castro's regime. He vowed never to return until the regime changed, Morales said.

Morales' mother left after Castro assumed power; her family had their property appropriated by the government, Morales said.

"Feels weird," Morales said in a text message to an Associated Press reporter. "Been waiting to hear this news all my life. Seems unreal."


http://latino.foxnews.com/lati.....tro-death/
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( meanwhile our PM released this bizarre statement , referring to Castro as remarkable leader who made great improvements to the healthcare and education in Cuba , but seems to have left out the fact there hasn't been a fair and democratic election in Cuba in decades and that most of its residents are extremely poor )



Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on the death of former Cuban President Fidel Castro

News
» Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on the death of former Cuban President Fidel Castro



Antananarivo, Madagascar ‑



November 26, 2016




The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today issued the following statement on the death of former Cuban President Fidel Castro:

“It is with deep sorrow that I learned today of the death of Cuba’s longest serving President.

“Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century. A legendary revolutionary and orator, Mr. Castro made significant improvements to the education and healthcare of his island nation.

“While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for “el Comandante”.

“I know my father was very proud to call him a friend and I had the opportunity to meet Fidel when my father passed away. It was also a real honour to meet his three sons and his brother President Raúl Castro during my recent visit to Cuba.

“On behalf of all Canadians, Sophie and I offer our deepest condolences to the family, friends and many, many supporters of Mr. Castro. We join the people of Cuba today in mourning the loss of this remarkable leader.”


http://pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2016/.....del-castro
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cuba's Fidel Castro dead at 90


Michael Weissenstein And Peter Orsi, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

First posted: Saturday, November 26, 2016 12:28 AM EST | Updated: Saturday, November 26, 2016 01:19 AM EST


HAVANA — Former President Fidel Castro, who led a rebel army to improbable victory in Cuba, embraced Soviet-style communism and defied the power of 10 U.S. presidents during his half century rule, has died at age 90.

With a shaking voice, his younger brother, Raul Castro, announced on state television that his brother died at 10:29 p.m. on Friday night.

Castro’s reign over the island-nation 90 miles from Florida was marked by the U.S.-backed Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961 and the Cuban Missile Crisis a year later that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war. The bearded revolutionary, who survived a crippling U.S. trade embargo as well as dozens, possibly hundreds, of assassination plots, died eight years after ill health forced him to formally hand power over to Raul.

Castro overcame imprisonment at the hands of dictator Fulgencio Batista, exile in Mexico and a disastrous start to his rebellion before triumphantly riding into Havana in January 1959 to become, at age 32, the youngest leader in Latin America. For decades, he served as an inspiration and source of support to revolutionaries from Latin America to Africa.

His commitment to socialism was unwavering, though his power finally began to fade in mid-2006 when a gastrointestinal ailment forced him to hand over the presidency to Raul in 2008, provisionally at first and then permanently. His defiant image lingered long after he gave up his trademark Cohiba cigars for health reasons and his tall frame grew stooped.

“Socialism or death” remained Castro’s rallying cry even as Western-style democracy swept the globe and other communist regimes in China and Vietnam embraced capitalism, leaving this island of 11 million people an economically crippled Marxist curiosity.

He survived long enough to see Raul Castro negotiate an opening with U.S. President Barack Obama on Dec. 17, 2014, when Washington and Havana announced they would move to restore diplomatic ties for the first time since they were severed in 1961. He cautiously blessed the historic deal with his lifelong enemy in a letter published after a month-long silence.

“It’s a tragedy,” said Dayan Montalvo, a 22-year-old nurse. “We all grew up with him. I feel really hurt by the news that we just heard.”

Fidel Castro Ruz was born Aug. 13, 1926, in eastern Cuba’s sugar country, where his Spanish immigrant father worked first recruiting labour for U.S. sugar companies and later built up a prosperous plantation of his own.

Castro attended Jesuit schools, then the University of Havana, where he received law and social science degrees. His life as a rebel began in 1953 with a reckless attack on the Moncada military barracks in the eastern city of Santiago. Most of his comrades were killed and Fidel and his brother Raul went to prison.

Fidel turned his trial defence into a manifesto that he smuggled out of jail, famously declaring, “History will absolve me.”

Freed under a pardon, Castro fled to Mexico and organized a rebel band that returned in 1956, sailing across the Gulf of Mexico to Cuba on a yacht named Granma. After losing most of his group in a bungled landing, he rallied support in Cuba’s eastern Sierra Maestra mountains.

Three years later, tens of thousands spilled into the streets of Havana to celebrate Batista’s downfall and catch a glimpse of Castro as his rebel caravan arrived in the capital on Jan. 8, 1959.

The U.S. was among the first to formally recognize his government, cautiously trusting Castro’s early assurances he merely wanted to restore democracy, not install socialism.

Within months, Castro was imposing radical economic reforms. Members of the old government went before summary courts, and at least 582 were shot by firing squads over two years. Independent newspapers were closed and in the early years, homosexuals were herded into camps for “re-education.”

In 1964, Castro acknowledged holding 15,000 political prisoners. Hundreds of thousands of Cubans fled, including Castro’s daughter Alina Fernandez Revuelta and his younger sister Juana.

Still, the revolution thrilled millions in Cuba and across Latin America who saw it as an example of how the seemingly arrogant Yankees could be defied. And many on the island were happy to see the seizure of property of the landed class, the expulsion of American gangsters and the closure of their casinos.

Castro’s speeches, lasting up to six hours, became the soundtrack of Cuban life and his 269-minute speech to the U.N. General Assembly in 1960 set the world body’s record for length that still stood more than five decades later.

As Castro moved into the Soviet bloc, Washington began working to oust him, cutting U.S. purchases of sugar, the island’s economic mainstay. Castro, in turn, confiscated $1 billion in U.S. assets.

The American government imposed a trade embargo, banning virtually all U.S. exports to the island except for food and medicine, and it severed diplomatic ties on Jan. 3, 1961.

On April 16 of that year, Castro declared his revolution to be socialist, and the next day, about 1,400 Cuban exiles stormed the beach at the Bay of Pigs on Cuba’s south coast. But the CIA-backed invasion failed.

The debacle forced the U.S. to give up on the idea of invading Cuba, but that didn’t stop Washington and Castro’s exiled enemies from trying to do him in. By Cuban count, he was the target of more than 630 assassination plots by militant Cuban exiles or the U.S. government.

The biggest crisis of the Cold War between Washington and Moscow exploded on Oct. 22, 1962, when President John F. Kennedy announced there were Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba and imposed a naval blockade of the island. Humankind held its breath, and after a tense week of diplomacy, Soviet leader Nikita Krushchev removed them. Never had the world felt so close to nuclear war.

Castro cobbled revolutionary groups together into the new Cuban Communist Party, with him as first secretary. Labour unions lost the right to strike. The Catholic Church and other religious institutions were harassed. Neighborhood “revolutionary defence committees” kept an eye on everyone.

Castro exported revolution to Latin American countries in the 1960s, and dispatched Cuban troops to Africa to fight Western-backed regimes in the 1970s. Over the decades, he sent Cuban doctors abroad to tend to the poor, and gave sanctuary to fugitive Black Panther leaders from the U.S.

But the collapse of the Soviet bloc ended billions in preferential trade and subsidies for Cuba, sending its economy into a tailspin. Castro briefly experimented with an opening to foreign capitalists and limited private enterprise.

As the end of the Cold War eased global tensions, many Latin American and European countries re-established relations with Cuba. In January 1998, Pope John Paul II visited a nation that had been officially atheist until the early 1990s.

Aided by a tourism boom, the economy slowly recovered and Castro steadily reasserted government control, stifling much of the limited free enterprise tolerated during harder times.

As flamboyant as he was in public, Castro tried to lead a discreet private life. He and his first wife, Mirta Diaz Balart, had one son before divorcing in 1956. Then, for more than four decades, Castro had a relationship with Dalia Soto del Valle. They had five sons together and were said to have married quietly in 1980.

By the time Castro resigned 49 years after his triumphant arrival in Havana, he was the world’s longest ruling head of government, aside from monarchs.

In retirement, Castro voiced unwavering support as Raul slowly but deliberately enacted sweeping changes to the Marxist system he had built.

His longevity allowed the younger brother to consolidate control, perhaps lengthening the revolution well past both men’s lives. In February 2013, Raul announced that he would retire as president in 2018 and named newly minted Vice-President Miguel Diaz-Canel as his successor.

“I’ll be 90 years old soon,” Castro said at an April 2016 communist party congress where he made his most extensive public appearance in years. “Soon I’ll be like all the others. The time will come for all of us, but the ideas of the Cuban Communists will remain as proof that on this planet, if one works with fervour and dignity, they can produce the material and cultural goods that human beings need and that need to be fought for without ever giving up.”

Key events in Cuba under Fidel Castro:

Jan. 1, 1959 — Castro’s rebels take power as dictator Fulgencio Batista flees Cuba.

June 1960 — Cuba nationalizes U.S.-owned oil refineries after they refuse to process Soviet oil. Nearly all other U.S. businesses expropriated by October.

October 1960 — Washington bans exports to Cuba, other than food and medicine.

April 16, 1961 — Castro declares Cuba socialist state.

April 17, 1961 — Bay of Pigs: CIA-backed Cuban exiles stage failed invasion.

Feb, 7, 1962 — Washington bans all Cuban imports.

October 1962 — U.S. blockade forces removal of Soviet nuclear missiles from Cuba. U.S. President John F. Kennedy agrees privately not to invade Cuba.

March 1968 — Castro’s government takes over almost all private businesses.

April 1980 — Mariel boatlift: Cuba says anyone can leave; some 125,000 Cubans flee.

December 1991 — Collapse of Soviet Union devastates Cuban economy.

August 1994 — Castro declares he will not stop Cubans trying to leave; some 40,000 take to sea heading for United States.

March 18, 2003 — 75 Cuban dissidents sentenced to prison.

July 31, 2006 — Castro announces has had operation, temporarily cedes power to brother Raul.

Feb. 19, 2008 — Castro resigns as president.

July 2010 — Castro re-emerges after years in seclusion, visiting a scientific institute, giving a TV interview, talking to academics and even taking in a dolphin show at the aquarium.

April 19, 2011 — Castro is replaced by his brother Raul as first secretary of the Communist Party, the last official post he held. The elder Castro made a brief appearance at the Congress, looking frail as a young aide guided him to his seat.

April 19, 2016 —Castro delivers a valedictory speech at the Communist Party’s seventh Congress, declaring that “soon I’ll be like all the others. The time will come for all of us, but the ideas of the Cuban Communists will remain.”

November 25, 2016 — Fidel Castro dies


http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....es-aged-90
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( meanwhile on CTV or the Communist TV network ? , 9 days of mourning in cuba for Castro )


Castro latest: Cuba announces 9 days of mourning


The Associated Press
Published Saturday, November 26, 2016 4:18AM EST
Last Updated Saturday, November 26, 2016 8:57AM EST


HAVANA -- The Latest on the death of Cuban leader Fidel Castro (all times local):

6:40 a.m.

The Cuban government has declared nine days of national mourning for the death of Fidel Castro, ending when his remains are interred on Dec. 4.


Cubans gathered after Fidel Castro death
People gather along the Malecon seawall, as is customary on weekend nights, after President Raul Castro announced the death of his brother Fidel on national TV in Havana, Cuba, early Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016. (AP / Ramon Espinosa)

Public activities and events will be canceled, and the Cuban flag will fly at half-mast. The Council of State says state radio and television "will maintain informative, patriotic and historic programming."

5:20 a.m.

Cuba's government says the remains of Fidel Castro will be interred in the eastern city of Santiago that was key to his early life and his revolution.

State media say Cubans throughout the country will be invited to pay homage to Castro on Monday and Tuesday by signing a "solemn oath of complying with the concept of the revolution."

There will then be a mass gathering in Havana's Plaza of the Revolution, where Castro often addressed huge crowds.

His ashes will make a cross-country tour starting Wednesday from Havana to Santiago, retracing in reverse the route Castro took when the revolution triumphed in 1959.

He's to be interred in a Santiago cemetery on Dec. 4. Castro grew up near Santiago and attended school there as a youth.

4:30 a.m.

While Fidel Castro's foes celebrate his death, his friends across Latin America mourn.

The leftist government of El Salvador is expressing "eternal gratitude" to Castro and the Cuban people for help "in the most difficult times." That's apparently a reference to Cuba's support of the guerrilla bands battling a U.S. backed, military-dominated government in the 1980s.

The government statement issued Saturday says Castro's "example will live forever in our struggles and will flower in the noble ideas of new generations."

4:15 a.m.

Cuban state television is carrying special programming celebrating the life of deceased former leader Fidel Castro.

The programming includes footage from years past of Castro giving speeches on revolutionary struggle.

Castro stepped down from the presidency provisionally in 2006 due to a severe illness, and left office permanently two years later.

He was succeeded by his younger brother Raul, who announced Fidel's death on state TV.

4 a.m.

Within half an hour of the Cuban government's official announcement that former President Fidel Castro had died, Miami's Little Havana teemed with life - and cheers.

Thousands of people banged pots, waved Cuban flags and whooped in jubilation on Calle Ocho, the heart of the Cuban exile community in Florida. Honking and strains of salsa music from car stereos echoed against stucco buildings, and fireworks lit up the humid night sky.

Police blocked off streets leading to Cafe Versailles, the quintessential Cuban American hotspot where strong Cuban coffee was as common as a harsh words about Fidel Castro.

Castro has cast a shadow over Miami for decades, and in many ways, his policy and his power have shaped the city and its inhabitants, many of whom fled from his socialist rule.

---

3:35 a.m.

The nightly news had started as usual on Cuban state television when suddenly something changed.

President Raul Castro appeared, seated before a desk in military uniform and delivered sombre news: His brother Fidel Castro had died, nearly 58 years after leading a rebel army to a victory that led to one of the globe's most durable socialist states.

The president said his brother's remains would be cremated on Saturday and news about tributes would follow.

He closed with his brother's decades-old slogan: "Toward victory, always."

---

The death of Cuba's Fidel Castro has caught many people in Havana by surprise in the wee hours of the morning.

Mariela Alonso is a 45-year-old doctor. She calls the retired Cuban leader "the guide for our people."

In her words: "There will be no one else like him. We will feel his physical absence."

Mechanic Celestino Acosta was sitting on a porch in the capital's central neighborhood of Vedado.

He called the news of Castro's death "a painful blow for everyone."

http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/ca.....-1.3177957
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its interesting to read some of the Canadian reaction to Castro's death , of the cpc leadership candidates Maxime Bernier has been out early wondering what on earth Trudeau was thinking by releasing that statement )


Maxime Bernier ‏@MaximeBernier · 26m26 minutes ago  Canada

1/I can't believe our PM is expressing "deep sorrow" and calling "legendary revolutionary" and "remarkable leader"...

Maxime Bernier ‏@MaximeBernier · 26m26 minutes ago  Canada

2/ a despicable dictator who killed and imprisoned thousands of innocents and drove away in exile more than a million...

Maxime Bernier ‏@MaximeBernier · 26m26 minutes ago  Canada

3/ who kept his country poor with his crazy communist policies, repressed free expression, persecuted gays...

Maxime Bernier ‏@MaximeBernier · 26m26 minutes ago  Canada

4/ while he himself amassed a fortune and lived in luxury like all dictators who exploit their people. It's revolting.



( some of the American reaction has been the same , Cuban American senator Marco Rubio went after Obama )


Marco Rubio ‏@marcorubio · 13m13 minutes ago

President Obama issued a pathetic statement on death of dictator #FidelCastro with no mention of thousands he killed & imprisoned. #Cuba
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm liking Bernier more and more.

There was a time when Castro had the good will of the American people. And then he decided to join the Red Team. Big mistake. It led to Cuba's isolation from the American market (though it could trade with everyone else).

Imagine what Cuba could have been if Castro had taken the other road! It could be an elite tourist destination, as well as a provider of prime agricultural products to the North American market. It could be prosperous.

Castro gave up Cuba's future for a lot of gestures of defiance.

His life should be a marker of the wrong path.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Andrew Scheer also recently came out against trudeau's statement , Rona Ambrose also just came out with a statement but I can't find a copy I could paste to this site )


Andrew Scheer ‏@andrewscheer · 2m2 minutes ago

I pray for the day when the people of Cuba are free from the dictatorial Castro dynasty.


Andrew Scheer ‏@andrewscheer · 4m4 minutes ago

I'm disgusted by Trudeau's statement about the brutal dictator Castro. We should honour his victims, not the tyrant.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( some American politicians are reacting with disbelief after reading trudeau's statement , Cuban American senator Marco Rubio couldn't believe it was even real )



Marco Rubio Verified account 
‏@marcorubio
Marco Rubio Retweeted CanadianPM

Is this a real statement or a parody? Because if this is a real statement from the PM of Canada it is shameful & embarrassing.



Statement by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on the death of former Cuban President Fidel Castro:
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau attacked worldwide for Castro statement

Politicians, journalists take to Twitter to decry prime minister’s tribute


Beatrice Britneff

Beatrice Britneff

Saturday, November 26th, 2016


People around the world reacted with astonishment Saturday after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau waxed poetic about Cuba’s former leader Fidel Castro in a statement he released hours after news broke that Castro had passed away.

In his statement, Trudeau referred to the former dictator as a “remarkable leader” and pointed to his friendship with Trudeau’s late father, Pierre Trudeau. Castro attended Trudeau’s Montreal funeral in 2000.

“It is with deep sorrow that I learned today of the death of Cuba’s longest serving President,” Trudeau wrote in the statement, which was circulated around 4 a.m. EST this morning. “Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century. A legendary revolutionary and orator, Mr. Castro made significant improvements to the education and healthcare of his island nation.”

“While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for ‘el Comandante.'”

Trudeau’s full statement can be found at the bottom of this article.

Here in Canada, Conservative members of Parliament and Tory leadership candidates took to Twitter to condemn Trudeau’s tribute. Maxime Bernier published a series of tweets in both French and English, calling the prime minister’s praise of Castro “repugnant.”


Castro, a socialist and Cuban nationalist, formed and led a rebel army in the 1950’s and overthrew Cuban president Fulgencio Batista in 1959. Throughout his almost five-decade rule of the island nation, Castro was a deeply divisive leader. He embraced Soviet-style communism; under his rule, Cuba became a one-party socialist state and Castro imposed radical economic reforms throughout the country.

Relations between the United States and Cuba reached crisis levels under Castro’s administration, culminating in the severance of diplomatic ties in January 1961.

Journalists in North America and the United Kingdom also expressed their surprise and disapproval of the Canadian prime minister’s tribute to Castro on Twitter Saturday morning.



News of Trudeau’s statement spread far and wide, with social media users in Israel, Spain, The Netherlands and Egypt expressing shock and outrage.



The son of former Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper also called Trudeau’s statement “an embarrassment for Canada.”



Saturday afternoon, Interim Conservative Leader Rona Ambrose issued her own statement on Fidel Castro’s passing, in which she focused more on Cuban citizens than on their former leader.

“With the passing of Fidel Castro, my thoughts and prayers are with the people of Cuba who continue to endure his long and oppressive regime, even after his death,” Ambrose wrote. “Under his rule, thousands were impoverished, thousands were imprisoned and executed, and free speech, thought and assembly were curtailed or banned, all to live up to his version of ‘socialism.'”


Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on the death of former Cuban President Fidel Castro

November 26, 2016

The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today issued the following statement on the death of former Cuban President Fidel Castro:

“It is with deep sorrow that I learned today of the death of Cuba’s longest serving President.

“Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century. A legendary revolutionary and orator, Mr. Castro made significant improvements to the education and healthcare of his island nation.

“While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for “el Comandante”.

“I know my father was very proud to call him a friend and I had the opportunity to meet Fidel when my father passed away. It was also a real honour to meet his three sons and his brother President Raúl Castro during my recent visit to Cuba.

“On behalf of all Canadians, Sophie and I offer our deepest condolences to the family, friends and many, many supporters of Mr. Castro. We join the people of Cuba today in mourning the loss of this remarkable leader.”


http://ipolitics.ca/2016/11/26.....statement/
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trudeau called Castro a ‘remarkable leader.’ Twitter imagined what he would say about Stalin.



By Cleve R. Wootson Jr.

November 26 at 2:33 PM 


Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

In America, President-elect Donald Trump and Cuban American senators all but cheered Fidel Castro's death.

A little farther north, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he was mourning "a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century."

“While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for 'el Comandante,'" Trudeau's statement said.

“I know my father was very proud to call him a friend and I had the opportunity to meet Fidel when my father passed away. It was also a real honour to meet his three sons and his brother President Raúl Castro during my recent visit to Cuba."

The prime minister ended his statement by calling Castro a "remarkable leader."

Trudeau's positive statements about Castro met with an instant backlash in Canada and elsewhere.

[How Donald Trump responded to Fidel Castro’s death]

Political scientist Ian Bremmer, the president of Eurasia Group tweeted: "Cubans deserve better." Canadian politician Maxime Bernier suggested Trudeau didn't know the difference between "longest-serving president" and "dictator."



Trudeau's statements about Castro even sparked the hashtag #trudeaueulogies, as people chimed in with positive things about historically evil people.


https://twitter.com/UWork4It/status/802530204912521217

Despite the United States’ history with Cuba, Canada has maintained its relationship with the largest island in the Caribbean since the 18th century. Along with Mexico, Canada was the only other country in the Western hemisphere to continue diplomatic relations with Cuba in the years after Fidel Castro took power in 1959.

About a million Canadians vacation in Cuba every year — which accounts for about 40 percent of the tourist population.

This post has been updated.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/11/26/trudeau-called-castro-a-remarkable-leader-twitter-imagined-what-he-would-say-about-stalin/
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2016 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

one also has to start to wonder about trudeau's recent visit to cuba and its timing ,

questions

1. did he know Fidel Castro was on his death bed ?

2. was his visit to cuba actually an attempt to visit Fidel Castro one last time before he died ?

3 . what was he doing in cuba exactly ? the whole reasons for the visit are not clear ? he meet with Raul Castro and wanted to visit fidel but was unsuccessful

4. his statement on castro's death was also released very early , did he have any advance knowledge of the death before others in Canada did ?


the fact he was in cuba only a couple of weeks ago raises a lot of unanswered questions
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Justin Trudeau's statement on Fidel Castro's death a revisionist embarrassment


Bonokoski 2016
By Mark Bonokoski, Postmedia Network
First posted: Saturday, November 26, 2016 12:43 PM EST | Updated: Saturday, November 26, 2016 01:17 PM EST



Blind to Cuban history, and blinkered by his late father’s fairy tales about Fidel Castro, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s statement on the death of the Cuban dictator was an embarrassment of international proportions.

He ignored the brutal truth about the man, dancing around it like a clown in a parade dodging horse droppings.

Today he is likely searching for his tattered Che Guevara T-shirt to wear in nostalgic homage.

“It was with deep sorrow that I learned today of the death of Cuba’s longest-serving president,” Trudeau said. “Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century.

“A legendary revolutionary and orator, Mr. Castro significant improvements to the education and healthcare of his island nation.

“While a controversial figure,” said Trudeau, “both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for ‘el Comandante.’” For a supposed world leader, this is revisionist history at its worst, and therefore shameful.

Perhaps our prime minister should read the Washington Post, and a piece regarding the 13 facts that, in a just world, would be “etched on Castro’s tombstone, and highlighted in every obituary, as a fitting metaphor for someone who used firing squads to murder thousands of his own people.” Among them, Castro turned his island nation into a Communist outpost of the Soviet Union, and almost caused a nuclear conflagration during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. Google it.

He forced almost 20% of his people into exile, leading to thousands losing their lives at sea while trying to make it to the safety of the Florida coast in crude boats.

He sponsored terrorism at every opportunity, and aligned himself with some of the worst dictators on the planet.

He condoned torture, and executions without trial.

The education system Trudeau lauded was actually a fraud, and was based on indoctrination as opposed to learning.

Castro built prisons at a rate that rivaled Stalin, and filled them to the brim with political prisoners and run-of-the-mill dissenters.

He persecuted gays and attempted to end religion, all while outlawing free enterprise and labour unions.

Yet Justin Trudeau eulogizes Castro as if he were benign, and some harmless old coot who ran out of time at the age of 90.

“I know my father was very proud to call (Castro) a friend, and I had the opportunity to meet Fidel when my father passed away,” Trudeau wrote in his statement.

“On behalf of all Canadians, Sophie and I offer our deepest condolences to family, friends and many, many supporters of Mr. Castro, (and) we join the people of Cuba today in mourning the loss of a remarkable leader.” This is so naïve that it defies credulity, yet these are nonetheless the precise words Trudeau put out.

One suspects that not “all” Canadians are mourning Castro’s death, nor remembering him as a “remarkable leader.” If “remarkable” means despotic and murderous then fine.

But that is not the definition Trudeau wants used.

It makes him look like a fool, and justifiably so.

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....arrassment
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Has the embarrassment only started now? He's traipsing around as many world capitals as his expense account can allow, working his 'celebrity' to the max. He looks like the very embodiment of superficial twerp to the serious players. (I'd love to see the file that Whitehall has on him, for example.) But he gives money away so they give him a banquet.

He's just the face of a political machine.
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( Canada is sending an official representative to this ceremony and its not even the funeral , no word yet who is going to the actual funeral )


Governor General to attend commemoration for Fidel Castro

David Johnston to travel to Cuba for Tuesday ceremony

CBC News Posted: Nov 28, 2016 11:42 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 28, 2016 12:05 PM ET

Cuba will hold a commemoration ceremony Tuesday for late leader Fidel Castro, pictured here in March 1985. Canada is sending Gov. Gen. David Johnston.



Governor General David Johnston will attend a commemoration for former Cuban president Fidel Castro in Havana on Tuesday.

Castro, who seized power in 1959 and controlled the country until 2006 when he relinquished leadership to his brother, died last week at the age of 90.

Johnston will attend the commemoration at the request of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

A funeral service is planned for Sunday, but it is not yet clear who will represent Canada at that ceremony.


Trudeau was widely criticized this weekend for his statement on the passing of the Cuban leader and some critics have called on him to not attend the funeral.

Castro attended the 2000 funeral of former prime minister Pierre Trudeau.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic.....-1.3870803
RCO





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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( trudeau has confirmed he is not attending the funeral of Castro )


Trudeau skipping Castro's funeral

Rempel calls decision ‘cowardly’


Janice Dickson

Monday, November 28th, 2016


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not attend Fidel Castro’s funeral Sunday. Instead, Governor General David Johnston will travel to Cuba tomorrow to attend a commemorative ceremony for the late Cuban president.

“At the request of the Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, will travel to Havana, Cuba, to attend a commemoration in honour of former President Fidel Castro, at the Plaza de la Revolución,” says a press release issued by Johnston’s press office.

Trudeau faced a global barrage of criticism over a statement he released hours after news broke that Castro had passed away.

In the statement, Trudeau called Castro a “remarkable leader” and pointed to Castro’s friendship with Trudeau’s late father, Pierre Trudeau. Castro attended Trudeau’s Montreal funeral in 2000.

While Trudeau drew criticism from Canadian Conservative politicians, his comments also irked U.S. politicians and foreign journalists. U.S. Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio took to Twitter to attack Trudeau. Rubio, the son of Cuban immigrants, called the statement “shameful.”

Trudeau’s decision to ask Johnston to do the honours in Cuba is drawing fresh criticism from Conservatives.

Tory MP Michelle Rempel called Trudeau’s decision “cowardly” on Twitter.

“If @JustinTrudeau feels that it’s so important to have a rep there, why doesn’t he go himself? Seems a bit cowardly,” she tweeted. “Honestly, can someone please explain the upside of Canada having a state presence at Castro’s funeral?”

Conservative Senator Linda Frum tweeted: “GG should send a letter and nothing more. @JustinTrudeau and @gmbutts still don’t get it.”

https://ipolitics.ca/2016/11/28/trudeau-skipping-castros-funeral/
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Cuban Americans celebrate in the streets after Castro death

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