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RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 8:04 am    Post subject: John Tory to announce tolls on DVP and Gardiner Reply with quote

( in a sure sign he is no longer a conservative or never was to begin with , John Tory is set to announce his support for tolls on several major Toronto highways , does he really plan to get re-elected ? )


Tory set to announce tolls on the DVP and Gardiner


The $300 million raised each year will be used for roads and transit.


A weekday average of about 228,000 vehicles used the Gardiner east of Highway 427, that report said, while 110,000 drivers used the DVP north of the Bayview Ave./Bloor St. interchange.

A weekday average of about 228,000 vehicles used the Gardiner east of Highway 427, that report said, while 110,000 drivers used the DVP north of the Bayview Ave./Bloor St. interchange. (Randy Risling / Toronto Star file photo)


By David RiderCity Hall Bureau Chief
Robert BenzieQueen's Park Bureau Chief

Wed., Nov. 23, 2016


Toronto Mayor John Tory is set to endorse a controversial introduction of road tolls on the Gardiner Expressway and Don Valley Parkway to raise $300 million a year for his cash-starved government, the Star has learned.

Tory is expected to make the daring declaration in a luncheon speech shortly after the Thursday release of city staff reports recommending highway tolling, along with other so-called revenue tools including a new tax on hotel stays. The reports will also make clear, sources say, that a yearlong push to privatize Toronto Hydro is dead.

Tory spokeswoman Amanda Galbraith refused comment late Wednesday on the tolls proposal. Earlier she was likewise mum on new taxes and fees that city manager Peter Wallace has warned are needed to avoid deep budget cuts as the booming city struggles to close the gap between annual spending and revenues.

“For too long, we have been underinvesting in our city, making life harder for everyone. And that can’t go on,” Galbraith said, adding Tory will propose “bold” measures while speaking to the Toronto Region Board of Trade.

“The mayor will be standing up and announcing his plan to give us the money we need to build transit and protect city services.”

It was unclear when or how Tory, who plans to run for re-election in 2018, will propose road tolls be introduced.

During his successful 2014 election campaign, he rejected them. However, earlier this year, faced with a cash crunch and almost $30 billion in unfunded, council-approved capital projects, he stopped ruling out tolls.

A September 2015 city staff report proposed drivers pay a flat fee, for a single trip on either or both roads, of between $1.25 and $3.25, with trucks paying double. Alternatively, council could adopt a distance-based system with drivers paying between 10 cents and 35 cents per kilometre and trucks double, the report said.

A weekday average of about 228,000 vehicles used the Gardiner east of Highway 427, that report said, while 110,000 drivers used the DVP north of the Bayview Ave./Bloor St. interchange.

In March, city staff issued a call for a consultant to report on suitable tolling technologies and potential impacts of road pricing on the two highways. That as-yet-unreleased report was to look at how to fund the $2-billion-plus cost of rebuilding east Gardiner while also reducing gridlock and generating cash for other infrastructure projects.

The feasibility study was to include financial targets over a 30-year timeline, assuming tolls would not be charged until 2024 at earliest.

While the City of Toronto Act opens the door to tolls, Ontario regulations are required before implementation.

Provincial sources tell the Star that Tory is expected to say all motorists who use the freeways would pay if city council goes along with his proposal.

The $300 million in forecast toll revenues would be spent only on road and transit projects — such as the Scarborough subway, SmartTrack and a proposed downtown relief line — and not go into general city revenues.

While insiders say Premier Kathleen Wynne privately assured Tory last summer that she would not stand in the way of a toll plan, ‎the stage could still be set for a showdown between Queen’s Park and City Hall.

With Wynne’s struggling Liberals headed to the polls four months before the October 2018 civic election, there are concerns at the province about the optics of endorsing a controversial new fee.

The Liberals hold nearly all the seats in the Greater Toronto Area so MPPs are bracing for an earful from constituents already angry about rising electricity costs and other pocketbook issues.

However Wynne, who is selling the province’s majority share of the Hydro One transmission utility to bankroll new transit, shares Tory’s view that a massive infusion of money is needed to build infrastructure.

Politically the tolls could be challenging for the premier — in January the Liberals are raising gasoline prices by 4.3 cents a litre and natural gas by an average of $5 a month with proceeds aimed at initiatives to fight climate change.

Tolling drivers is also a huge political risk for Tory, viewed by many as governing midway into his first term catering to the concerns of suburban drivers. He might face a 2018 mayoral fight with ex-councillor Doug Ford, who would be certain to pounce on a tolling proposal.

The Star has learned Wallace’s reports will recommend city council resurrect the vehicle registration tax — enacted at $60 under former mayor David Miller in 2007 and killed under Miller’s successor, Rob Ford, in 2011 — but that Tory will categorically reject that idea.

Tory is expected to endorse a tax applied to all nightly stays in hotels and accommodations, including short-term rentals on websites such as Airbnb.

Wallace has warned that, after years of below-inflation property tax hikes, Toronto desperately needs new sources of cash or council will have to impose dramatic cuts to close the gap between annual spending and revenues.

Tory’s plan to stake his political future on tolls comes as another controversial revenue-generation proposal, selling a sizable portion of Toronto Hydro, is yanked off the table.

Sources say Wallace will recommend that council not sell either the 105-year-old electricity distribution utility or Toronto Parking Authority, which operates Green P lots and on-street parking, for one-time windfalls of cash.

Instead, Wallace will recommend, and Tory will endorse, a novel arrangement to invest $200 million in Toronto Hydro to end the utility’s cash-flow crisis while also boosting Hydro’s annual dividend to help city council balance the overall budget in 2017 and beyond.

Sources with knowledge of the plan say council would transfer the $200 million from a city capital reserve fund to Hydro. In return, Hydro would boost its dividend — which the Hydro board recently voted to slash from almost $60 million a year to $25 million, blowing a hole in the city budget — to about $66 million a year starting in 2017.

Sources said the proposal has a stamp of approval from management consultants Deloitte, hired to work on issues related to Hydro, which has a debt-to-equity ratio high enough to concern the rate-setting Ontario Energy Board and bond-rating agencies that can influence Hydro’s borrowing costs.

https://www.thestar.com/news/queenspark/2016/11/23/tory-set-to-announce-tolls-on-the-dvp-and-gardiner.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mayor John Tory to announce tolls proposal for 2 major Toronto highways

Tolls expected to raise $200M annually, with the money earmarked for transit

By Andrew Lupton, CBC News Posted: Nov 24, 2016 5:56 AM ET| Last Updated: Nov 24, 2016 8:02 AM ET

A senior city hall source says Toronto Mayor John Tory will announce his intention to introduce road tolls today, with reports saying the tolls will apply to the Don Valley Parkway and Gardiner Expressway. (Mark Blinch/Reuters)



Toronto Mayor John Tory will today announce plans to introduce road tolls for the Gardiner Expressway and Don Valley Parkway, key highways that carry thousands of commuters into Canada's largest city.

■Toronto to study road tolls on Gardiner Expressway, DVP
■Unlock Toronto gridlock with 'congestion pricing,' report says

Tory will give an afternoon speech at the Toronto Region Board of Trade, according to a source in the mayor's office.

In moving toward road tolls, Tory will not proceed with other proposals to boost city revenue. They have included a parking levy and the contentious suggestion to sell Toronto Hydro, the city-owned electrical utility.

A road toll of $2 a vehicle could raise $200 million a year for city coffers, the source said, with all that money earmarked for transit expansion.

The source said the money will help fund two crucial big-ticket transit items:

■A new north-south subway line, also known as the Downtown Relief Line, to help ease pressure on Line 1, which operates well above capacity during rush hour.
■Smart Track: Tory's plan to add stops in the city to existing regional rail lines as a way to ease the burden on the Toronto Transit Commission.

Tory will also push for a hotel tax to address the gap in operating revenue, the source said. The tax is expected to generate about $22 million a year that will go into general revenue.

The city has roughly $33 billion in projects that need a source of capital to pay for them, according to information provided to CBC Toronto. Most of those projects are connected to the mayor's plans to expand the transit network, the source said.

Toronto transit funding 'a major urban crisis'

Coun. James Pasternak said tolls for Toronto highways are "long overdue" because without them, Toronto taxpayers effectively subsidize commuters who travel to the city from its suburbs and surrounding cities.

"It's very important that people coming into the city and out of the city pay their fair share," he said. "It's grossly unfair for the residents of Toronto to be subsidizing commuters from Mississauga and Markham and Vaughan."

Pasternak said he expects the tolls to have enough support to carry through council, but said a key to that support is ensuring the revenue remains earmarked for transit and not general revenue.

"If [the money] goes into one big black hole, cynicism creeps in and support for the revenue tools declines," he said. "The key is to make sure it's highly targeted to transit, it's the region's No. 1 issue. It's a major urban crisis."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.3865246
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( tory once campaigned against road tolls , the very thing he now plans to impose on the city , what a hypocrite )


Tory once called road tolls ‘highway robbery’


When Tory ran for mayor against David Miller, he openly opposed road tolls, worrying about the ‘impact it will have downtown.’


After John Tory called the idea of road tolls "highway robbery," his supporters stood at the Spadina Ave. entrance to the Gardiner holding signs reading "Road Tolls = Highway Robbery" and "Honk if you hate tolls." (Randy Risling / Toronto Star) | Order this photo


By Betsy PowellCity Hall Bureau

Wed., Nov. 23, 2016


Mayor John Tory has a somewhat complicated relationship with road tolls.

Back in 2003, the first time Tory ran for mayor of Toronto, he attacked rival David Miller for suggesting he would consider imposing road tolls on the Gardiner Expressway and Don Valley Parkway.

Miller refused to back away from the idea, saying a discussion on road tolls was needed if the city could come up with no other way to pay for transit.

Tory called the idea “highway robbery.”

His supporters stood at the Spadina Ave. entrance to the Gardiner holding signs. One said, “Road Tolls = Highway Robbery.” Another said “Honk if you hate tolls.”


“What really worries me is the negative impact it will have on the downtown,” Tory said during the campaign. “If people just had that one other thing to worry about — paying $4.50, $2.25 each way — they may not bother to go downtown to do some shopping or go to a restaurant.”

Tory lost that election to Miller, who never carried through with the tolling idea.

Fast forward to January 2013, when Tory, then a private citizen, participated in a panel discussion on transit in a pub.


Tory told the small gathering that he had “performed a disservice” with his attacks on Miller and that it is unfortunate that politicians were “afraid to talk about the truth about what’s needed.”

“I don’t happen to think that road tolls are the best answer of all the sort of (revenue) tools that are available, but I will say and have said consistently we need some combination of tools to raise this money.”

The following year, while running for mayor a second time, Tory consistently ruled out highway road tolls, but so did the other front-running candidates for mayor.

“We need to make Toronto more affordable and imposing new taxes is not the way to tackle traffic congestion,” he said in 2014. “As your mayor, I will build my 53-kilometre, 22-station SmartTrack line, and provide real transit and traffic congestion relief across the city.”

But earlier this year, Tory’s position appeared to soften.

“A broader discussion around new ways of raising revenue will begin in April when the city manager presents his long-term fiscal plan,” his spokesperson said in March.

“Road and congestion pricing will almost certainly be part of that as one item on a long list of possibilities. The mayor does not wish to pre-empt that discussion but his views on road tolls are well documented: it would not be his preferred way to pay for road infrastructure.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/city_hall/2016/11/23/torys-changing-position-on-road-tolls.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Toronto Mayor John Tory to support road tolls

Traffic congestion on the Gardiner Expressway. (ERNEST DOROSZUK, Toronto Sun)



TORONTO SUN STAFF
Nov 24, 2016
, Last Updated: 8:50 AM ET


TORONTO - Toronto Mayor John Tory is poised to throw his support behind imposing tolls on the Gardiner Expressway and the Don Valley Parkway, the Toronto Sun has learned.

Tory will announce he’s ready to target drivers on the city’s highways when he unveils possible “revenue tools” — new taxes and fees — during a speech to the Toronto Board of Trade on Thursday.

A source told the Toronto Sun the mayor is “dedicated to building transit and infrastructure.”

While the city has been reviewing many possible ways of generating cash — including a hotel tax and the sell off of assets — road tolls are likely the most controversial.

Right-wing councillors, who traditionally support Tory, will be the most likely to oppose the measure. Those on the left are most likely to welcome the move.

The city has $30 billion worth of projects, including Tory’s SmartTrack surface rail project and other transit lines, that it has no money to pay for.

The move towards road tolls is somewhat of a flip-flop for Tory, who has in past years opposed or been luke warm to the idea of hitting up drivers for using roads already paid for with taxes.

Tory has also approached the Ontario's Liberal government about imposing a hotel tax — a move that would require provincial approval.

Documents obtained by the Toronto Sun show that Premier Kathleen Wynne looked favourably on the idea.

The city has also raised the prospect of selling off parts of Toronto Hydro. Tory has maintained that the city must keep majority control of the utility

http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/C.....85478.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( tory is assuming he can easily get re-elected but this poll was taken before he broke he promise not to support road tolls , his numbers are surely going to go down in the suburbs where more people own cars )


Tory would beat Doug Ford by wide margin: Poll

John Tory and Doug Ford in heated debate at George Brown College in Toronto, Ont. on Wednesday...

Shawn Jeffords, Postmedia Network
Nov 19, 2016
, Last Updated: 12:11 AM ET


Have the masses from Ford Nation moved to Tory Town?

A new Forum Research poll suggests just that, as Mayor John Tory more than doubles Doug Ford in popular support if a head-to-head mayoral race were held today. The poll, provided exclusively to the Toronto Sun, says that Tory would be re-elected with 53% support. About a quarter of respondents would support Doug Ford (24%). A similar number of respondents, 23%, said they would support someone else.

The poll also throws left-leaning Councillor Joe Cressy into the mix. Tory still easily wins a three-way contest against both Ford and Cressy with 49% support. Ford comes second with 27%, while Cressy draws 8% support and 16% of respondents say they would prefer someone else.

“It’s early times to talk about the 2018 election, of course, but it appears John Tory is widely preferred to another member of the Ford dynasty,” Forum Research president Lorne Bozinoff said.

“And when we add a progressive councillor as a placeholder on the left, little changes. The centre holds,” he said.

The poll of 778 Toronto voters was conducted on Nov. 14. Support for Tory is strongest amongst older voters, aged 55 to 64, at 62%. He also performs well in North York, where his support sits at 61%.

Ford supporters are typically the least wealthy (30%), residents of Etobicoke, York and Scarborough (33%), and the least educated (38%) with a high school diploma or less.

Cressy’s support is strongest amongst the wealthy, making $80,000 to $100,000 a year, (13%), the most educated, with a post-graduate degree, (12%), and those who commute by bicycle (30%).

Ford has openly mused about taking another shot at the city’s top job in 2018, saying for months that he will either run against Tory for mayor or run for a seat in the provincial legislature. He has said he will make a decision closer to that date.

The poll was an interactive voice response telephone survey. Forum considers the results accurate +/-4%, 19 times out of 20.


http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/C.....83985.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( its only at 48 votes but be interesting to see where this poll goes )


AM640 Verified account 
‏@am640
Do you think making the Gardiner and DVP toll roads is a good idea?


08%Yes


73%No


19%Depends on how much


Vote

48 votes



23 hours left
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( one has to be left wondering if Tory is being set up ? by people at city hall , it seems very odd the left on council aren't or weren't the first ones to suggest this , why let tory go first and face all the risks from the public ? )


‘It’s time to build’: John Tory promotes road tolls for Gardiner, DVP


Endorsement of user fees marks an about-face for mayor who called them “highway robbery” during unsuccessful 2003 campaign.


Mayor John Tory explains his support for tolls. (Steve Russell/Toronto Star)


By Betsy PowellCity Hall Bureau
David RiderCity Hall Bureau Chief

Thu., Nov. 24, 2016


In the biggest speech of his Toronto mayoralty, John Tory has made a pitch for road tolls on the Don Valley Parkway and Gardiner Expressway to help solve Toronto’s financial woes.

Tolls on those roadways of just $2 would raise the city more than $200 million a year, Tory told a lunch crowd in downtown Toronto.

To achieve the equivalent amount from the property taxpayers would involve an increase between five and 10 per cent, and the mayor said he believes property taxes should pay for day-to-day services, not to fund large capital projects.

RELATED:

“For decades, we have been under-investing as a city in almost everything and those under investments are having an impact on our resident and on our city. We all see it and we all feel it everyday," Tory said in a speech called “Time to Build.”


The speech came in response to a report on revenue options by city manager Peter Wallace that was released Thursday morning.


On Thursday Mayor John Tory said the city can’t expand transit and improve the highways without a new source of revenue and a toll on drivers is the fairest way to do it.

On Thursday Mayor John Tory said the city can’t expand transit and improve the highways without a new source of revenue and a toll on drivers is the fairest way to do it. (Steve Russell / Toronto Star) | Order this photo


Honesty starts with acknowledging the things we need “are not free, they are not free,” Tory said, adding it is time for “decisive action” by city council and he is prepared to lead.

Tory said the city can’t expand transit and improve the highways without a new source of revenue and a toll on drivers is the fairest way to do it.

Budget problems will not be solved through modernization and efficiency alone, Tory said.

The city needs $33 billion to build specific projects over the next 20 years, including expanding the transit network.

“Traffic is a growing nightmare and the number one fix is to give people transit options so they can get out of their cars,” he said.

If we are going to “tame the traffic beast,” Toronto must build more new transit, Tory said. The federal government has provided $840 million in funding for state of good repair for the TTC, but the city must match those funds.

Other unfunded projects include $250 million construction for long-term care homes for elderly citizens to live, and affording housing "an economic issue as well as a social issue because we need people to work and live in our city.”

“These are big things to take on. These projects have big price tags. They are not free. But they will have a big, positive impact.

“The question remains, how do we pay for it?”

Tory noted that “tolls are paid in cities around the world, places many of us have visited.”

He pledged that, if tolls were imposed, the money raised would be spent on unfunded capital projects, starting with transit expansion, “so people have no doubt how it is being invested.”

The city is buzzing about the bold proposal from a man who, while running against David Miller for the mayoralty in 2003, called tolls “highway robbery” and seemed to reject them during his successful 2014 election campaign.

But city staff reports released Thursday include more than just toll proposals.


Tory said he will also support making the city’s voluntary destination marketing fee a mandatory hotel tax at all Toronto hotels. Airbnb and other online short-term rentals will also pay this tax to make sure we “level the playing field.”

A hotel tax can contribute at least $20 million to the city's operating budget.

Some of the revenue options require provincial legislative change. Others call for varying degrees of change to existing tax systems, such as refining the Municipal Land Transfer Tax and property tax rebates.

In his speech, Tory reiterated his longstanding pledge not to hike property taxes above the rate of inflation, which critics blame for the enormous budget shortfall requiring new revenue streams.

In his report, Wallace did not endorse a parking levy, a view Tory shared.

Tory also said he does not support the sale of Toronto Hydro.

RELATED:

Here’s how people in the GTA are reacting to the mayor’s proposal for tolls on Gardiner, DVP

Tory said he has made city hall more functional, and he is now turning his mind to how best to make the city more livable.

“I have a plan to make the most significant investment in transit and infrastructure in decades, to cut congestion and get this city moving,” he said.

Tory said he will ensure every single penny raise to build transit and fix city roads, and make a real difference on unacceptable traffic conditions and overcrowded transit.

“Simply put, I believe it is time to build.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/city_hall/2016/11/24/john-tory-speech-on-road-tolls-for-gardiner-expressway-don-valley-parkway.html
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( the poll seems to be indicating a strong NO for this idea )


AM640 ‏@am640 · 7h7 hours ago

Do you think making the Gardiner and DVP toll roads is a good idea


18%Yes


69%No


13%Depends on how much


Vote

158 votes


17 hours left
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( john tory makes his case for road tolls in Toronto , he claims its the fairest way to raise money for transit ? except the people paying the tolls wouldn't even be the people using the transit . so that makes little sense , why isn't the council looking for cost savings instead ? I have a hard time believing there isn't any savings to be found in a city that large . )


Road tolls the fairest way to raise money for transit


JOHN TORY

First posted: Thursday, November 24, 2016 08:07 PM EST | Updated: Thursday, November 24, 2016 08:30 PM EST

John Tory tolls
Toronto Mayor John Tory speaks in support of putting tolls on the Don Valley Pkwy. and the Gardiner Expwy. at the Toronto Board of Trade on Nov. 24, 2016. Dave Abel/Toronto Sun


TORONTO - For decades now, Toronto has been under-investing in almost everything.

We all see it. We all feel it.

It’s hard to get around; our roads are congested and our subways are packed.

That’s not OK.

I came into office promising to be honest with the people of Toronto, to get this city moving, grow our economy and make sure no one is left behind.

So I’ll be honest: If we are to achieve those goals we have to acknowledge that things we need are not free.

So how do we pay?

First, we need to demonstrate to the people of Toronto that we’re going to spend their money wisely.

I’m holding government to account, and making sure we spend your money wisely and improve services that people need.

I want the people of Toronto to see their government working hard for them, and making the right decisions.

So I’m moving ahead with contracting out garbage collection east of Yonge, and I’ll continue to demand efficient ways of doing things to save us millions of dollars each year.

But when it comes to our budget problems, efficiency is not enough.

The city needs billions to build new transit lines and repair roads if we’re going to tackle the congestion strangling our city.

But I don’t want to do this by making the city more expensive for hard working people.

That’s why I won’t raise people’s property taxes to pay for these investments.

I wont support a vehicle registration tax or a parking levy.

And I won’t sell Toronto Hydro, not without knowing the impact that could have on your energy bills.

There are no easy answers here. That’s the truth of this.

But I’ve looked at all the options, and I do believe there is a fair way to build transit and reduce congestion.

A road toll on the DVP and Gardiner Expwy. of just $2 would give us $200 million a year to build transit and repair roads.

That’s the equivalent of a 5% to 10% hike in property taxes.

Forty per cent of the people who drive on those roads don’t live in Toronto, meaning they don’t pay anything for the roads we maintain and operate.

Tolls help reduce travel times and ease congestion. They also encourage more people to take transit, getting them off the road.

And the money raised through tolls would be held in a separate account, so people know exactly how it is spent.

I’ll also be supporting straightforward tax reforms that will save the city money, without charging city residents a dime.

A hotel tax will raise $20 million a year from visitors to our city, and getting rid of the vacant property tax rebate will save us $22 million a year.

When I became mayor, I promised to be honest with the people of Toronto.

I promised to keep their property taxes low.

And I promised to make our city more liveable, by getting traffic moving and building more transit.

I have a plan to do all of these things, and I have a fair way to pay for it.

And I think the people of Toronto want me to get it done

http://www.torontosun.com/2016.....or-transit
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

think part of what stinks about this plan is the fact the Gardiner Expressway needs $millions of dollars in repairs itself , it seems bizarre to install tolls on this highway and give the money to public transit instead , when the highway itself needs massive and expensive repairs

if the toll fees went to repairing the Gardiner expressway itself some of the drivers might not see it as a cash grab and instead a necessary expense

the same could be said about the Don Valley parkway If the toll fees went to maintaining and repairing the DVP it would sit better with the people using it but giving the money to public transit that most of these drivers never use is not fair
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will bury him in the suburbs of Toronto;
I would imagine this has more to do with shaking down the Federal Government for funding then actually moving forward this concept.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
It will bury him in the suburbs of Toronto;
I would imagine this has more to do with shaking down the Federal Government for funding then actually moving forward this concept.



I don't know the city of Toronto is also pushing for photo radar in school and community safety zones , there seems to be a major push for new revenue thru tickets and tolls on automobiles , the war on the car is back , were suppose to be walking or riding a bicycle thru Toronto instead


does the federal government or provincial government have any extra money to give Toronto ? both are running deficits and debts
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
It will bury him in the suburbs of Toronto;
I would imagine this has more to do with shaking down the Federal Government for funding then actually moving forward this concept.



I don't know the city of Toronto is also pushing for photo radar in school and community safety zones , there seems to be a major push for new revenue thru tickets and tolls on automobiles , the war on the car is back , were suppose to be walking or riding a bicycle thru Toronto instead


does the federal government or provincial government have any extra money to give Toronto ? both are running deficits and debts


It didn't stop the Province from funding the majority of Metrolinx programs within the 416.
RCO





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cosmostein wrote:
RCO wrote:
cosmostein wrote:
It will bury him in the suburbs of Toronto;
I would imagine this has more to do with shaking down the Federal Government for funding then actually moving forward this concept.



I don't know the city of Toronto is also pushing for photo radar in school and community safety zones , there seems to be a major push for new revenue thru tickets and tolls on automobiles , the war on the car is back , were suppose to be walking or riding a bicycle thru Toronto instead


does the federal government or provincial government have any extra money to give Toronto ? both are running deficits and debts


It didn't stop the Province from funding the majority of Metrolinx programs within the 416.


had another though , is this a done deal ? can Tory bring in toll roads by himself ? does he have that power as mayor ?

or would it have to go to a vote at council ? would any of the suburban councillors actually vote for tolls on the DVP and Gardiner ? knowing they have to run for re-election , I'd imagine it be a tough sell
Bugs





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PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RCO wrote:
... After John Tory called the idea of road tolls "highway robbery," his supporters stood at the Spadina Ave. entrance to the Gardiner holding signs reading "Road Tolls = Highway Robbery" and "Honk if you hate tolls."

“What really worries me is the negative impact it will have on the downtown,” Tory said during the campaign. “If people just had that one other thing to worry about — paying $4.50, $2.25 each way — they may not bother to go downtown to do some shopping or go to a restaurant.”
https://www.thestar.com/news/city_hall/2016/11/23/torys-changing-position-on-road-tolls.html


The problem is -- many of the toll-payers live in Mississauga or Pickering, or places further away. Drivers who go downtown already get slaughtered, paying $300+ monthly for parking in the downtown. Most of them won't go downtown to a restaurant anyway.

So ... the non-citizens of Toronto will pay for the subways and roads. It's probably fair, they get most of the use out of them.
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John Tory to announce tolls on DVP and Gardiner

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